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  1. #1751
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    He got a little close to my back wheel and got a mouth full of mud. Dogs with Passion-imageuploadedbytapatalk1353778555.473139.jpg
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  2. #1752
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    He got a little close to my back wheel and got a mouth full of mud. Click image for larger version. 

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    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  3. #1753
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    Tailgating with my buddy, Thanksgiving morning.

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  4. #1754
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    Quote Originally Posted by EMFC View Post
    Pippa was a trooper today, we did 10 miles and she didn't complain one bit.


    love this pic. The dog is really cut but it also almost looks like a painting.

  5. #1755
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    went out for a hike and took my little one along!



    The torture ends now.

  6. #1756
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    Here's my buddy Dogs with Passion-imageuploadedbytapatalk1354170649.912986.jpg
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  7. #1757
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    ^ what's he drinking?
    "A full rigid SS or fixie is 99% rider, 1% bike, and 100% more fun" Monogod

  8. #1758
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    I want a dog SOOO badly.

    But I am such a responsible owner, I am denying myself. I know I am not in a position to give it the kind of home it needs. There are lots of dangers to a dog around here I can't do anything about, and I don't work from home. I also don't have enough extra money in case something bad happens and I need to take care of it.

    What to do?! I am letting fate decide when it is right. If a dog falls in my lap, I am not going to say no. Dogs ownership sometimes happens that way Either way, it is going to puppy school! I need a pal to come on the trails with me too


    How did you guys who take your dogs on the trails with you get them trained? The dogs I grew up with were brats who basically laughed at you when you tried to get them to come when called. Strict leash laws mean I would have to make sure they stay with me and would drop what they are doing to come right away if I call.

  9. #1759
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    I don't have MTBing pics, but they runs with the best of them. Here's some backpacking pics though.






  10. #1760
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    How did you guys who take your dogs on the trails with you get them trained? The dogs I grew up with were brats who basically laughed at you when you tried to get them to come when called. Strict leash laws mean I would have to make sure they stay with me and would drop what they are doing to come right away if I call.

    I believe the most important thing is to spend as much time with them early on as possible, like the first couple months if you can. They learn best with constant easy correction, like a dog pack would provide. Leaving them home for 8-10 hours a day (can't do thet with a puppy though) leaves them to their own devices and they don't know if it's right or wrong. Plus you won't build that Alpha status very easily if you're not around.

    Both of my labs are very, very well behaved, and except for the yellow with has a stubborn streak at times, don't ever cause me grief. And I take them everywhere.

  11. #1761
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoban View Post
    I believe the most important thing is to spend as much time with them early on as possible, like the first couple months if you can. They learn best with constant easy correction, like a dog pack would provide. Leaving them home for 8-10 hours a day (can't do thet with a puppy though) leaves them to their own devices and they don't know if it's right or wrong. Plus you won't build that Alpha status very easily if you're not around.

    Both of my labs are very, very well behaved, and except for the yellow with has a stubborn streak at times, don't ever cause me grief. And I take them everywhere.
    Your first sentence is very true. The more time you spend with a young dog, the easier their training will be. You also have to make it so the dog has fun with you. If you are more important than other things going on around them, then they will be easy to call back. Lots of small treats makes a dog eager to please also.

    I taught my older dog to sit whenever another dog came by while I was walking her. She learned this quickly and also helped to teach it to the dog that was acquired a year later. It's much easier to teach a 2nd dog when you have a very well trained 1st dog.

    I don't buy into the "alpha dog theory" and there are dog trainers that will back me up on this.

    When I started riding with my first dog, I went out with only her. We rode at her pace, and the ride was only about her having fun. Don't ever ride with others that are more concerned about their heat rate than they are about your dog.

    I have taught my dogs to keep an eye on me. If they get out of sight, I'll go off the trail and hide. They always stop and come find me, but that's because I'm fun to be with, and I have beef jerky in my pocket.

    Above all, find a dog that wants to listen to you. Some breeds are much better about this than others, but there is always the exception. And seriously consider a rescue. There are way too many unwanted, good intelligent dogs in the pounds and rescues.

  12. #1762
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    Good day, started cold but an hour later we were warmed up by sunrise.
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  13. #1763
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    Here's Apollo - tireless and fleet of foot.
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  14. #1764
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    Lets go again....
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  15. #1765
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    I can finally play this game :)

    Feyd-Rautha is my Young Apprentice to trail running. Next spring, he gets to come with on my rides.

    This is right after our first trail run (The Impetuous Feyd-Rautha)


    Yeah, he likes snow just a little bit (The Abominable Feyd-Rautha)



    ***Anyone know of a collar GPS that can be used to clock speed? He's a fast little bugger and I'm curious***
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  16. #1766
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  17. #1767
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormwalker View Post
    Totally in his/her environment!
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  18. #1768
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    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    Yeah, Dixie would split at the first small fury (or feathered) woodland creature she saw.
    Just looked through this entire thread again and I am tearing up.

    Almost two months now since we said "goodbye" to our beloved Dixie girl, my forum namesake and best friend, due to a very aggressive cancer.

    I still miss the hell out of my girl, but I am glad she's not hurting anymore. And she felt good up until the end. She was running around like a crazy dog in the back yard 45 minutes before my wife (a veterinarian) and I had to "send her along" in her favorite sunspot. She crashed so fast. But that was Dixie. She did everything fast.





    We still have our hound Duke, and he didn't do well as an only dog, so three weeks after Dixie passed we added another family member, Lady (a 6 month old 60 lb. at the time dutch shepherd mix), to the crew. She's 7 months old now and almost 70 lbs. She's a big ol baby. Doesn't make the pain of losing Dixie hurt any less, but she sure is fun to laugh at.



    Duke on the trail saying "Come on fat man, hurry it up."


    Duke and Lady running in the back yard.



    Duke is 7 now, and I am working him up to being a good trail dog. We've done runs, and some short rides, and he's great.

  19. #1769
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    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    Just looked through this entire thread again and I am tearing up.

    Almost two months now since we said "goodbye" to our beloved Dixie girl, my forum namesake and best friend, due to a very aggressive cancer.

    I still miss the hell out of my girl, but I am glad she's not hurting anymore. And she felt good up until the end. She was running around like a crazy dog in the back yard 45 minutes before my wife (a veterinarian) and I had to "send her along" in her favorite sunspot. She crashed so fast. But that was Dixie. She did everything fast.
    Sounds like hemangiosarcoma (cancer of the lining of the blood vessels). Typically you find out they have it when a massive, vasculated tumor ruptures and they go into shock from internal bleeding. They call it the "silent killer" since until the very end, there are no symptoms.
    It's been ~2.5 years since it got Virgil. *sniff*
    If there's one thing to be thankful for, it's that quality of life was 100% until the end... no drawn out misery.
    Ugh... your post brought back memories. I still miss him.


    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    We still have our hound Duke, and he didn't do well as an only dog, so three weeks after Dixie passed we added another family member, Lady (a 6 month old 60 lb. at the time dutch shepherd mix), to the crew. She's 7 months old now and almost 70 lbs. She's a big ol baby. Doesn't make the pain of losing Dixie hurt any less, but she sure is fun to laugh at.

    Duke is 7 now, and I am working him up to being a good trail dog. We've done runs, and some short rides, and he's great.
    We got another pretty quickly... as soon as we found the right one. Rocco's a great dog, but I still miss V.
    Rocco likes to ride my Dummy to Home Depot or wherever.


    He's too big for the wide loader now, so I just got a sidecar for him.
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  20. #1770
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    Quote Originally Posted by pointerDixie214 View Post
    Just looked through this entire thread again and I am tearing up.

    Almost two months now since we said "goodbye" to our beloved Dixie girl, my forum namesake and best friend, due to a very aggressive cancer.

    I still miss the hell out of my girl, but I am glad she's not hurting anymore. And she felt good up until the end. She was running around like a crazy dog in the back yard 45 minutes before my wife (a veterinarian) and I had to "send her along" in her favorite sunspot. She crashed so fast. But that was Dixie. She did everything fast.
    My sympathies, I also lost a dog to cancer , a 7 year old female Shepard so my wife and I can relate the your sorrow.

  21. #1771
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    Lost my first search dog in 2005 to bone cancer at age 5. Amputation wasn't an option since it had spread undetected for so long, that by the time she showed a limp it was too late. Great dog, Lexi, miss her big time.
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  22. #1772
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    Quote Originally Posted by meltingfeather View Post
    Sounds like hemangiosarcoma (cancer of the lining of the blood vessels). Typically you find out they have it when a massive, vasculated tumor ruptures and they go into shock from internal bleeding. They call it the "silent killer" since until the very end, there are no symptoms.
    It's been ~2.5 years since it got Virgil. *sniff*
    If there's one thing to be thankful for, it's that quality of life was 100% until the end... no drawn out misery.
    Ugh... your post brought back memories. I still miss him.

    Sorry for your loss too. Dixie had a very aggressive form of adenocarcinoma that actually presented itself as bone cancer (not common, as adenocarcinoma usually presents itself in a gland first). We removed the bone tumor surgically and did ultrasound to search for other tumors. She had one tumor in her lungs. So we tried a mild form of chemo. Three weeks later she had over 3 dozen tumors in her chest, so we stopped chemo and went to pain management, which she did extremely well on (acted like her old self). 2 weeks after that she was gone.

    It was so fast. But like I said, she attacked life with a zest I have never seen before, and she did everything fast.

    Your Virgil is/was a very good looking buddy too.

    The only thing I will add, is to anyone going through a terminal illness with a dog, or to anyone who has lost one, the book 'The Legacy of Beezer and Boomer" really helped my wife and I a lot. It provides a very comforting perspective on the whole death "process". Still sucks, but this made it suck a little less.

  23. #1773
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    Training

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikemaya View Post
    How did you guys who take your dogs on the trails with you get them trained?


    The first step is to establish dominance over your dog, so he will respect you as the pack leader and listen to you. (It's just not going to work until you've done this.)

    Here's a search: bing.com/search?q=establish+dominance+dog

    Establishing dominance can be done by gently rolling the dog over onto his back, straddling him without putting any weight on him but holding him in place, and gently but firmly holding his head and turning it so he looks you in the eyes. He will instinctively turn away, and you have to calmly repeat this, gently but firmly turning his head and holding it until he will relax and look you in the eyes without moving. (No matter how many times you have to do this, stay calm. Dogs are less likely to respect people who can't stay cool.) Once you've done this, your relationship will have changed. You are the boss.

    Once you've done that, and provided that the dog will obey the command to sit, put the dog on a four-foot leash with one end around your wrist and slowly ride along a sidewalk. When you come to an intersection, tell the dog to sit. When it's clear to go, say the dog's name so he will look at you, and let him see you looking both ways, and after he's seen this, cross the street.

    Unless we're at an intersection, I prefer to let my dog set the pace. If she wants to run, I let her, but I never force her to speed up.

    My Australian Cattle Dog has trotted and run beside me three times a day for seven years now. She and I have done well over 10,000 miles together. Because she listens to me and trusts me, I can ride anywhere with her off-leash, and she stays right beside me. Whenever I stop, she stops automatically.

    Last edited by Roadsters; 01-03-2013 at 05:05 PM.

  24. #1774
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    New trail dog

    My dog Archer is a rescue dog as well..he was found in Brooklyn NY on the corner of Grant & Archer (hence the name) He was saved by a small group in NJ the day before he was to be destroyed. Our family took him FAR away from the city life and gave him what every dog needs, A home and a family to love him. He runs on the trails with me like crazy. We can do 6+ miles and he is not even panting.
    He is a pit mix.
    "foot to pedal, wheel to dirt, there is no substitute for the act of riding "

  25. #1775
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. 68 Hundred View Post
    ***Anyone know of a collar GPS that can be used to clock speed? He's a fast little bugger and I'm curious***
    Just duct-tape any bike or running GPS to his collar, and hit start/stop at the beginning and end of the ride. It would also be interesting to see how much more mileage he does than you.

  26. #1776
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    [QUOTE=meltingfeather;10032795]Sounds like hemangiosarcoma (cancer of the lining of the blood vessels). Typically you find out they have it when a massive, vasculated tumor ruptures and they go into shock from internal bleeding. They call it the "silent killer" since until the very end, there are no symptoms.
    It's been ~2.5 years since it got Virgil. *sniff*
    If there's one thing to be thankful for, it's that quality of life was 100% until the end... no drawn out misery.
    Ugh... your post brought back memories. I still miss him.



    meltingfeather, what breed of dog was Virgil? That is an incredible picture of him. Very stoic.
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  27. #1777
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    Sorry for being late, but MERRY CHRISTMAS!


  28. #1778
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    My german shepard, he loves biking as much as i do
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  29. #1779
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony.Montana View Post
    My german shepard, he loves biking as much as i do
    Beautiful bike and dog!
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  30. #1780
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    What a wimp Charlie, part terrier, short haired pointer.
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  31. #1781
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevinboyer View Post
    meltingfeather, what breed of dog was Virgil? That is an incredible picture of him. Very stoic.
    He was a mutt... but probably had aussie in him.
    highly intelligent dood.
    thanks.
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  32. #1782
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters View Post

    The first step is to establish dominance over your dog, so he will respect you as the pack leader and listen to you. (It's just not going to work until you've done this.)

    Establishing dominance can be done by gently rolling the dog over onto his back, straddling him without putting any weight on him but holding him in place, and gently but firmly holding his head and turning it so he looks you in the eyes. He will instinctively turn away, and you have to calmly repeat this, gently but firmly turning his head and holding it until he will relax and look you in the eyes without moving. (No matter how many times you have to do this, stay calm. Dogs are less likely to respect people who can't stay cool.) Once you've done this, your relationship will have changed. You are the boss.
    To anyone reading this interested in training your dog, PLEASE don't do this to your dog. Ever. It is completely WRONG. Yes your relationship with your dog will have changed because you have put the dog in a position of fearing for its life. The "Alpha Roll" is a very old and very outdated method and you are literally instilling the fear of death into your dog and is completely unnecessary. If you insist on establishing dominance, there are far better, faster and safer ways to train a dog without making them fear you.

    I own two very high-energy dogs that are trained with both verbal commands and hand signals. I have never had to resort to using fear tactics to train my dogs. They will run with me off leash just fine, keep pace and are excellent trail dogs.
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  33. #1783
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    We're not going to agree. The guy who taught me that used to train dogs for Navy SEALs. I stand by what I said. Argue with someone else.

  34. #1784
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters View Post
    We're not going to agree. The guy who taught me that used to train dogs for Navy SEALs. I stand by what I said. Argue with someone else.
    We don't have to agree, and I'm not going to argue with you. My post is intended to hopefully prevent anyone else from treating their dog in a similar fashion.
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  35. #1785
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    Any dog that gets the "the fear of death" by being rolled onto his back and gently held there has serious issues, possibly caused by being mistreated, that go beyond the scope of this thread.

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    ^my brother as well trains dogs professionally... that method is appropriate. You can do plenty of less controlling methods, but some dogs only work that a way.


    I own a blue heller, who is incredibly obedient. And was head strong when a puppy, so much so that the alpha discipline was the only way I could go with him. My brother agreed.

    Love this.thread!

    Sent from my HTC HD2 using Tapatalk 2

  37. #1787
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters View Post
    Any dog that gets the "the fear of death" by being rolled onto his back and gently held there has serious issues, possibly caused by being mistreated, that go beyond the scope of this thread.
    100% proof positive right here that you have absolutely no idea what you are doing. At least make an effort to educate yourself without just following blindly.

    Alpha roll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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  38. #1788
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    Quote Originally Posted by OO7 View Post
    We don't have to agree, and I'm not going to argue with you. My post is intended to hopefully prevent anyone else from treating their dog in a similar fashion.
    I agree with you on that one, but I'm not going to jump in and argue on such a topic on an internet MTB forum, and I think you know better as well... Bottom line is each dog is different, there are lots of ways to trains them and we can't always all agree either...

    In any case, back to our regular programming...

    Just a quick after work walk with the dogs in the backyard trails:
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    just read this and thought it was a good news

    Firefighters use new oxygen mask to save dog | Life With Dogs
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  40. #1790
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    Post New Years Day ride
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  41. #1791
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    This 40Lb black and tan rocket of fur and fangs has covered a lot of trail.
    She's a 4.5 year old Aussie/Germ Shep mix.
    I got her when she was 8 months old.
    She's and amazing trail dog-yields to oncoming riders, knows what "off trail" means, and will pace off of the back wheel until I tell her to "pin it!", at which point she goes all out.
    We average about 30 miles a week together.
    She's the fastest dog I have ever seen over extended distance.
    20 mile trail rides are no problem in cool weather.
    She's been all over Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, Idaho, California, and Oregon.
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  42. #1792
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    ^^dog indeed looks crazy fast!!


    My year old blue heeler/Australian shepard loves the long runs. Can't out run him, and is agile as all get out. Clears a chain fence without touching, and loves frisbees
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  43. #1793
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    Them's the Minarets in the background! How are the trails around Mammoth? I'm a winter regular up there, but now that I finally have a bike that can hang in rough terrain, I'm thinking of heading up this summer. Dog friendly, too, I presume?


  44. #1794
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    Me and one of my labs hitting the downhill trails with me.


  45. #1795
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    Quote Originally Posted by deke505 View Post
    just read this and thought it was a good news

    Firefighters use new oxygen mask to save dog | Life With Dogs
    I saw that. The chief's rigs carry an animal resuscitation kit where I work. I'll go back in for a dog if I can.

  46. #1796
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Clydesdale View Post
    She's and amazing trail dog-yields to oncoming riders, knows what "off trail" means, and will pace off of the back wheel until I tell her to "pin it!", at which point she goes all out.
    Any tips on how you trained her...?

  47. #1797
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    Again I browse over this thread and admire all the beautiful trail dogs and am thankful for their owners who include them in their lives.

    Norman, she does look fast, have you ever clocked her top speed? I rode with a pure "cattle" dog a few years ago and at one point I was hauling ass down the 401 trail in Crested Butte doing anywhere between 20-25mph and she's just cruising on my back wheel, could not believe it and boy could this girl put in the miles. Attached a photo of her below.

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Clydesdale View Post
    This 40Lb black and tan rocket of fur and fangs has covered a lot of trail.
    She's a 4.5 year old Aussie/Germ Shep mix.
    I got her when she was 8 months old.
    She's and amazing trail dog-yields to oncoming riders, knows what "off trail" means, and will pace off of the back wheel until I tell her to "pin it!", at which point she goes all out.
    We average about 30 miles a week together.
    She's the fastest dog I have ever seen over extended distance.
    20 mile trail rides are no problem in cool weather.
    She's been all over Colorado, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, Idaho, California, and Oregon.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dogs with Passion-dsc_2678.jpg  

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  48. #1798
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    ^ love these dog pics wish there was a 'like' button

  49. #1799
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    SVCKURT:
    Picture was taken after the bike park had closed for the season. When there's no trail traffic, I hit the trails with the dog till the snow falls.
    The Natl Forest outside of the bike park is dog friendly. Dogs are allowed leashed on the bike park hiking only trails and dogs are allowed on the gondola.
    Mammoth trails are great. Lots of vertical drop + 2wheel drifts through kitty litter soil. Once the lifts open, I'm on the DH bike till the season closes.

    RipRoar:
    I got lucky with this dog. Easiest dog to train I have had. Key factor in her becoming a great trail dog was just the investment of time. There are lots of things specific to certain lessons I wanted to teach, but repetition and time were the main things.
    Interestingly enough, she was the "problem" dog that no one wanted at the dog rescue. She'd been returned after adoption a few times. Her tail was docked before I got her and she had a bad eye injury and several broken teeth on the same side as the injured eye prior to her ending up with me. There's some history there for sure.

    LYNX:
    No idea on her top speed. Never clocked her. Her flat out speed is impressive, but the speed she can maintain for distance is unreal. Sometimes she chooses to lead the rides and stays ahead of the bike, sometimes she goes flat out for a bit and then pulls over to let riders pass. She'll stay back if I tell her to follow me. When the weather is cool and she's had a few months of solid riding, she's out in front much of the time. Canine athlete for sure. She gets bored on walks and hikes. The bike seems to provide a pace and variety that works for her.

  50. #1800
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    Trolling.... start your own thread if it bothers you. My dog never leads, and in this part of the country - We have more acres then people.


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