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  1. #1
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    Black Canyon Trail, Arizona

    I've been riding the Black Canyon Trail, AZ, for the past three years, but always as an out and back from Black Canyon City. I had worked up to 40 miles and felt ready to try 50 miles. Whiplash lives a mile or so from the Black Canyon City trailhead, so we left my car at his house and shuttled north to Highway 69 near Mayer. This was an ideal setup because it allowed him to leave me early on and to not have to worry about when I finished. This time of year the first 8.5 miles was not very pretty, but it was a mix of fairly easy single track and dirt road, which allowed me to warm up gradually. From then on I found the trail nearly perfect and just my style. It was overcast for most of the ride, which made it very comfortable for riding, but poor for photos. Fortunately, the night before I had loaded a track on my GPS, because it was difficult finding the trail around one deep section of a river. And I often lost the trail when I came off a dirt road.

    At about 37 miles I reached the intersection near the Black Canyon City trailhead much sooner than expected. There was plenty of time and I felt up to 50 miles, so I headed south instead of finishing the ride. The trail gets much tougher and the surface much more rugged, often of jagged volcanic rock. Anticipating I might ride 50 miles solo, the previous day I bought a new rear tire filled with Stans. As I rounded a corner at a decent speed near 40 miles I blew the rear tire sidewall. I had Park Emergency Tire Boots but the cut was huge and the fresh Stans was such a mess there was no way the boot would stick anyway. I played around with the mess for quite a while and then just gave up and walked about 6 - 7 miles back to my car. I was ticked off for awhile. But one of the deathbed resolutions I made last month was to concentrate on the positives and to not worry about things for which I have no control. So I had a great 40 mile ride! The photos are in the order taken and many more are on my SmugMug site.



    Northen end of trail.



    Last time I saw Whiplash.



    Singletrack begins.

































    Needed GPS to get around this.



    River bottom.











  2. #2
    Slowest Rider
    Reputation: BigLarry's Avatar
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    Wow! So beautiful in that area.

    Your Garmin Connect climb data is corrupted because you enabled "Elevation Corrections", which uses location to define altitude. With your barometric altimeter, you have much more accuracy already and you should disable that option. Garmin Connect should do that by default but not always. You can go back and fix it now. See the difference it makes.

    Your other ride "Picketpost to Kelvin" is good with this option properly disabled.
    It's not slow, it's doing more MTB time.

  3. #3
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    No

    Quote Originally Posted by BigLarry View Post
    Your Garmin Connect climb data is corrupted because you enabled "Elevation Corrections", which uses location to define altitude.
    No I didn't. I know enough not to. Garmin says 3,087 ft. and Topofusion says 3,179 ft. This might have to do with the ongoing upgrading of GC. It did it to my ride today too. I can not change it.

  4. #4
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    Nice pics and great attitude re: cut tire.

    TR

  5. #5
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    Fantastic shots of the trail...looks amazing!! Thanks for sharing! Sorry about the tire cut, was it a side wall protected tire?

  6. #6
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    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to Wherewolf again.

    Damn it.

  7. #7
    Ahhh the pain....
    Reputation: Raybum's Avatar
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    WW and anyone else that worries about cut sidewalls. I put together a bunch of info on fixing tires trailside to avoid long walks and possibly dangerous situations. Anyone doing long rides in remote areas really needs to practice these things. Sliced sidewalls are really common here in AZ and most people will get several per year if they ride the more rubly and rugged trails.
    Fixing a Flat Trailside

    Also, turns out that Park Boots work REALLY well even with fresh stans. You have to wipe off the stans the best you can near the cut. We were 15 miles from the car one time, and a friend cut his sidewall from the rim to the tread. It was 3pm and the sun was setting fast (it was December). We used 2 park boots and were able to get him rolling again.
    Your limits are both physical and mental. Suffering will help you find and overcome both.
    http://onegear-ray.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
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    Thanks!

    Thanks, however I have something called familial tremors and sewing or any type of micro-manipulation is out of the question. I can barley get the cap back on the tube valve. It seems not breaking the bead is essential. How about putting the boot on the outside, sealing with super glue, and letting the Stans seep into the tear? Rocks N Blogs says to inflate with a hand pump. I thought you needed CO2 to pump up a flat tubless tire?

  9. #9
    govt kontrakt projkt mgr
    Reputation: ArmySlowRdr's Avatar
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    I just know my UST system just a hand pump will do.



    Quote Originally Posted by Wherewolf View Post
    ...... Rocks N Blogs says to inflate with a hand pump. I thought you needed CO2 to pump up a flat tubless tire?

  10. #10
    Ahhh the pain....
    Reputation: Raybum's Avatar
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    Generally speaking, a UST (or UST Ready) tire will air up and seat the beads on a UST rim w a hand pump. On a Stans rim, you need a bigger blast of air, either from an air compressor or C02 to get the beads to seat. The key to sewing is to not break the bead so no C02 is necessary.
    If you have some issues that make it tough to fix small mechanical stuff, I'd be REALLY hesitant to venture too far from civilization. I'd always be sure to carry a flashlight and be aware of bail out routes.
    Sliced tire, busted chains, derailleur hangers, brake pads, etc all can be fixed trail side but require fine motor skills.
    Regarding putting the patch on the outside; I don't think the adhesive would be enough. Superglue tends to be brittle and won't hold for long.
    I did a trailside repair last year in the AZT 300 where I sewed the cut, then used rubber cement to bond down a patch on the outside of the tire, then stitched the patch down. I used a little superglue just for good measure but it eventually cracked. The patch however held till the tire wore out.
    Your limits are both physical and mental. Suffering will help you find and overcome both.
    http://onegear-ray.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    Ahhh the pain....
    Reputation: Raybum's Avatar
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    btw, I do all my own maintenance and always give the bike a "once-over" before each ride; especially long rides. Even with all that mechanical preventative maintenance, I've still busted chains, spokes, worn out pads, sliced tires, lost cleat bolts, lost chainring bolts, etc. I firmly believe that anyone doing backcountry rides should practice fixing these kind of things because you'll either get yourself in trouble or heavily rely on riding partners to bail you out.
    Your limits are both physical and mental. Suffering will help you find and overcome both.
    http://onegear-ray.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Team Livemedium
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    OP, didn't you have a spare tube on hand? I heard you can add a dollar bill or something similar inside the tear then use a spare tube? Sounds like all the responses here are trying to get it airtight and sealed again. Nice 40 miler indeed.
    Keep trying to do the awesomest thing you've ever done.

  13. #13
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    You, sir got it right in the Attitude Department. Plus you take good pics and post about some great trails.
    Thanks for all of that.
    Re-Cycled Person who rides a mountain bicycle.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    Also, turns out that Park Boots work REALLY well even with fresh stans. You have to wipe off the stans the best you can near the cut.
    I finally got to use my first Park Boot today. I got a cut sidewall out there all by myself and I did exactly as above. I took my sweat moistened banada and wiped they area clear of stans, installed a partially inflated tube, and then stuck the boot between the tire and tube. The inflated tube held the boot in place. I then seated the tire and inflated. It was very easy and effective. The boot held in the same exact place throughout the ride.
    fat old man ... fueled by Mexican pastries....

  15. #15
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    I road tripped down to watch the Phoenix Supercross in January and had the time of my life as we took mtb's along and got in 2 rides outside Albuquerque and 40 miles of the Black Canyon TR. Spent quite a bit of time figuring out how to cross that river and finding the trail again

    Over two days with a brand new rear tire I got 3 slashes that a tube would bubble out of if I didn't have 2) tire boots and a honey stinger waffle wrapper

  16. #16
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    One of the riders on the Ouachita Challenge last weekend used a zip tie as the final step to help hold a sidewall tear in place. Apparently, it held.

  17. #17
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    WW, have you decided to use a different tire with stronger sidewall, or stay with your current set up? Sounds like the tear happened on the section with sharp volcanic rock, so perhaps tears just happen out there?

  18. #18
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    Ground Control Grid

    Quote Originally Posted by June Bug View Post
    WW, have you decided to use a different tire with stronger sidewall, or stay with your current set up? Sounds like the tear happened on the section with sharp volcanic rock, so perhaps tears just happen out there?
    My LBS suggested a "grid" model which is supposed to have a stronger sidewall. So they put on the Specialized Ground Control Grid. It might help a bit. But if you hit a sharp volcanic rock at the right angle I'm not sure many tires would hold up.

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