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  1. #1
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    The bike doesn't matter

    That's what I realized after I fell over the bars and down a rooty hill today and hurt myself. If I had gotten seriously injured I wouldn't have cared the least bit that my bicycle got damaged from the fall. And that's how it should be. As long as you are in good health you should be grateful for that and treat your bicycle as what it is - namely an item. What's important is not your bicycle and how pristine it looks. It is you and your health.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Innota View Post
    ... What's important is not your bicycle and how pristine it looks. It is you and your health.
    Tru dat, 100%

    TR

  3. #3
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    I have a friend who always insists that skin heals, equipment is expensive! Unfortunately, mine heals a little slower these days.

  4. #4
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    The bike does matter. The more disrepair it's in and the more unreliable it is, the more likely you are to be injured by an unexpected crash.

    But with that said, the rider matters more. Both with having the skills to avoid certain types of crashes but also the mental fortitude to make decisions that prevent injuries.

  5. #5
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    the bike matters a little bit IMHO. If you don't have trust and confidence in your bike you are going to fail. How many of you want to go down hill moutain biking on a wallyworld bike?
    '14 Specialized Hard Rock Sport Disc 29
    '14 Trek Skye (Wife)
    '12 Specialized Crux Skittles
    '13 Specialized Allez Compact

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by guamjim View Post
    I have a friend who always insists that skin heals, equipment is expensive! Unfortunately, mine heals a little slower these days.
    ^^^^+1

  7. #7
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    RE: The bike doesn't matter

    I wouldn't be as healthy if it wasn't for my bike
    Sent from my HTC6990LVW using Board Express

  8. #8
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by smoothie7 View Post
    the bike matters a little bit IMHO. If you don't have trust and confidence in your bike you are going to fail. How many of you want to go down hill moutain biking on a wallyworld bike?
    +1 - (and more than a little bit even)

    I've been on rides baffled as to how poorly others maintain their bikes. No chain lube, loose crank arms, busted up pedals, sketchy brakes... One guy who is a very skilled rigid SS rider had a rear wheel that had completely lost tension and wobbled like a weeble.

    I try and stay in front of those peeps and avoid the carnage

  9. #9
    Trail Prospector
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    Body parts are $$$$, and by comparison bikes are cheap.
    Never cease to be amazed by the # of people who'll ride with known issues.
    Rain rides are brutal, wreak havoc on bikes, and at times cannot be avoided.
    Witnessed last weekend's SM100 to realize that often the more I see - the less I know,
    yet believe in the old adages that; a painter's house always needs paint,
    the minister's daughter is truly a wild child, and the mechanics g/f's bike usually has needs.
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  10. #10
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    I dunno... I'm more worried about my bike than my self when I crash. I can afford band aides and ibuprofen but not derailleurs or wheels.
    ​mountain biking is fun.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin_W View Post
    yet believe in the old adages that; a painter's house always needs paint,
    Painter's houses need paint because they are hammered by the time they get off work. It's funny how professionals can be lax in their own field. Fat doctors are a good example.

  12. #12
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    I have medical insurance, I don't have bike insurance.

  13. #13
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    Without my bike, I am nothing. Without me, my bike is nothing.

  14. #14
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    Are you kidding me? It's all bout the BIKE and only the BIKE. 100%. Why do they call it
    MOUNTAIN BIKING? If you're so concerned about getting hurt then don't ride stay home and play golf in that fake man-made environment. Or better yet become a cry baby, sierra clubber and cry complain about the MOUNTAINBIKERS and their MOUNTAINBIKES. Getting an owei is the lease of my worries when I'm on my MOUNTAINBIKE. Yes I have my share of scars. But I got them having the most fun you can have on a MOUNTAINBIKE. 100% FUN NO HOLDING BACK
    thank you
    remeber MOUNTAINBIKE

  15. #15
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    For me my bike is a means to an end, a tool. It enables me to get healthy, enjoy the outdoors , have a blast doing it and meet great people and assh*les alike! Lol So I maintain my tool and in turn it helps me make my life better. If I break a part then I replace it with the best I can afford. If I can't do it right away then until I can I do something else. It's all about balance
    Chances are .. You're full of !$@&?

  16. #16
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    Smile

    I sit here reading all of these posts and see a little of me in every one of them. I have been forced by age to change my ways.

    I can't believe the number of silly little health issues that crop up while pushing the limits with TMB (To Many Birthdays) that you never even contemplated were possible when younger. The old saying "If it doesn't hurt it probably doesn't work" has some truth.

    Past a certain age (different for everyone) its probably wise to take a more structured managed risk approach to strenuous, dangerous physical activities or plan on ending your career early.

    For me the idea of managed risk came from the cockpit of aircraft. Mistakes there can be damned unforgiving.

    The bike matters: Get on the best bike you can and maintain that bike to a high degree of mechanical shape. Make sure the bike is maintained.

    Good bike fit matters: A good bike fit gives you use of the full range of motion you have.

    Technique matters: Have some kind of formal training plan for gaining skills and follow it. You will have much more fun and not waste precious time.

    Fitness Matters: Good fitness helps in so many ways to avoid injury and enjoy the sport. The more fit you are the less you hurt even without injury. Have some kind of a formal plan.

    Nutrition Matters: You cannot perform to your potential metally or physically if the body is not fueled correctly:

    Sleep and Recovery times Matter: Sleep deprivationand and lack of recovery time between rides are no doubt big contributors to injury in this sport.

    Be willing to modify your plans as you find misunderstandings in you knowledge base.

    Managed risk is meant to greatly reduce inherent risks. The plan is not meant to be rigid. You work your plan and your plan works magic. When you get on trail you can become metally intense and one with the bike and the trail while you open it up. Everything in you plan works its magic all without thought to make your riding superb.

    One way or another you always pay for your education. I haven't got enough birthdays left to re-enroll in the school of hard knocks. Been there done that.

    So how am I doing at the managed risk game:

    My bike is in top mechanical condition, plush and fits me to a very high degree. Grade A

    I have taken a formal approach to gaining skills and work on that often. Grade A-

    My marks are not as good on the rest. My nutrition and sleep habits need improvement and that directly affects physical fitness. Grade C

    I just have one area of my plan that seems to fail me. I am still susceptible to the "Hey guys watch this" crap and every now and then fall off the wagon. Grade F.

    Damned, just about what school grades looked like years ago.

  17. #17
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    Heheh, sounds familiar.

    As I watched my 14 year old daughter roll away from me in that seemingly effortless way that some people seem to have about them when they turn it up a few notches I thought "good for her!" and just kept plodding along. I blow up too easily now and have to pace it better and only sprint when I'm dialed and ready.

  18. #18
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    Of course the bike matters, if it didn't we would all
    be walking.

  19. #19
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    Thats why when we crash we jump up to see if we damaged "the bike". C'mon, you know its true.

  20. #20
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    See rule #4.
    Don't buy all the lies that they feed ya.

  21. #21
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    If I had the option of bail and maybe break the bike, or try to ride it out and possibly spend weeks in the hospital, I'm bailing. it's personal values. I personally value my health and ability more than my bike. I can always buy another bike, but no matter what faith you have in medicine, you cannot buy a new spinal cord. I'm terrified of paralysis and will always ditch the bike first.

    not ride until you can pay for repairs/replacements, or never ride again.
    your choice.

  22. #22
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    The older I get, the more its about me. It amazes me at the chances some take. As I get on the down side of 40, it just takes longer to recover. Spent 12 weeks out of work with a broke leg, motorcycle gone bad. Could have been just as easily been on a bicycle. That's a long time without a pay check. The amount of doctors' bills could have filled my garage with s-works bikes. I love to push it hard, now I just weigh the risks more and always keep my options open.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Innota View Post
    That's what I realized after I fell over the bars and down a rooty hill today and hurt myself. If I had gotten seriously injured I wouldn't have cared the least bit that my bicycle got damaged from the fall. And that's how it should be. As long as you are in good health you should be grateful for that and treat your bicycle as what it is - namely an item. What's important is not your bicycle and how pristine it looks. It is you and your health.
    My good health is due to my bike so I take extra good care of her, my "other woman". She's pretty, and she purrs down the trail.
    ...and proud member of the anti-sock puppet desolation

  24. #24
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    One's post-crash concern for the bike's condition increases as the distance back to the trailhead increases.
    For all you math heads, I was going to use the term 'directly proportional', but when I googled that term, I was quickly lost.
    Would my points have been linear and passed through the point of origin?
    Would my ratios be the same for all sets of values?
    But first, there is the variable of the body's ability to ride the bike back to the trailhead.
    Can anyone make this into an equation?

    Seriously, though, health and safety trump risk always.

  25. #25
    Oh, the huge-meh-nity
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawg View Post
    My good health is due to my bike so I take extra good care of her, my "other woman". She's pretty, and she purrs down the trail.
    I love this--I've told more than a few people, I barely take care of my bikes--compared to how well they take care of me...

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