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  1. #1
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    Wolf tracked over the Cascade Crest

    Just wondering what the general feeling is for wolves amongst those who frequent the woods on bikes. While I'm no longer in Oregon I did spend a lot of time riding up in your parts. Admittedly I would be nervous about a wolf pack, however I do understand wolves were a part of the ecosystem for millennia. It would be amazing to see them out there, at a distance of course.
    A friend of mine fb'd this article written up today...
    Migrating wolf enters southwest Oregon | MailTribune.com

  2. #2
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    I for one welcome their return. I'm very excited at the prospects of hearing the distant howl of a wolf in the woods. I am not worried a wolf will attack me. Maybe my dog would be at risk, but its not like wolves enter camps hunting for food. They do their damnedest to avoid man.

    I'm excited to see a few predators return to the forest. It will also keep the deer and elk more wary. It will make it tougher for the hunters who have grown accustomed to lazy game, and a few ranchers may need to be compensated for predation of their livestock (who commonly enjoy highly subsuduzed use of public lands for grazing) but I think it will make the backcountry a better place.
    I love mankind - it's people I can't stand. ~Charles M. Schulz

  3. #3
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    Wolf

    I've been approached by curious wolves in Canada on many occasions. I've never felt threatened by them, but it is humbling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch View Post
    I for one welcome their return. I'm very excited at the prospects of hearing the distant howl of a wolf in the woods. I am not worried a wolf will attack me. Maybe my dog would be at risk, but its not like wolves enter camps hunting for food. They do their damnedest to avoid man.

    I'm excited to see a few predators return to the forest. It will also keep the deer and elk more wary. It will make it tougher for the hunters who have grown accustomed to lazy game, and a few ranchers may need to be compensated for predation of their livestock (who commonly enjoy highly subsuduzed use of public lands for grazing) but I think it will make the backcountry a better place.
    +1 I could not agree more. It will be great for the ecosystem. So right about the ranchers.
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  5. #5
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    Nothing to be nervous about. I agree with Sasquatch on all points. I just wish this endless cycle of welfare ranching would end.

  6. #6
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    Agree with Sas. I worry little to none about wild animals. We live in the woods and have bears, big cat sign regularly anyway. I've only seen one wolf in the wild (in MT) and it was doing it's damnedest to avoid us.

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    Frankly it makes me happy! I have spent lots of time in close proximity to wolves in AK, and have always relished the experience. It is a very positive thing and hope to see them fully restored. Small mom & pop farms aside I have zero, zilch, notta sympathy for ranchers that have absolutely decimated public land with their for profit live stock. Down with the cattle lobby!!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by big JC View Post
    Frankly it makes me happy! I have spent lots of time in close proximity to wolves in AK, and have always relished the experience. It is a very positive thing and hope to see them fully restored. Small mom & pop farms aside I have zero, zilch, notta sympathy for ranchers that have absolutely decimated public land with their for profit live stock. Down with the cattle lobby!!!
    Dude, why is your rep. square red?

    I'll give you some positive rep.! Nice post.


    edit: I gave you a thumbs up post, and you immediately turned green! Nice!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer View Post
    Dude, why is your rep. square red?

    I'll give you some positive rep.! Nice post.


    edit: I gave you a thumbs up post, and you immediately turned green! Nice!
    Not sure what the rep power is all about, but thanks mang!

  10. #10
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    Very much welcome the return of the wolves to OR. Piss on Obama for signing away their protected status.

  11. #11
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    Pretty exciting development. That wolf crossed a lot of Harney and Lake County desert to get there. Previously on this board I've discounted the possibility that a wolf would have crossed farm and desert to reach the northern OR Cascades, and obviously I was wrong. And where does he go from there? California? Coast range? Settle in the cascades?

    Although I've never had the privilege of an encounter, I grew up canoeing in country populated by thousands of wolves (Northern MN) and I'm not particularly afraid of them. There is no documented case of an adult human ever being killed by a wolf in North America (though, very surprisingly, someone was killed by coyotes in Nova Scotia just a couple years ago). Not that I don't keep a close eye on my kid in the woods, but for other reasons than wolves.

    I'm about 100 times more concerned about big kitties in the woods than I am about big doggies. And even that doesn't exactly keep me up at night. Actually, I will admit that the one wildlife issue that does sometimes genuinely keep me up at night when I'm in the backcountry is the possibility of a midnight bear visit.
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  12. #12
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    Can't wait to hear the howl, someday!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy View Post
    Pretty exciting development. That wolf crossed a lot of Harney and Lake County desert to get there. Previously on this board I've discounted the possibility that a wolf would have crossed farm and desert to reach the northern OR Cascades, and obviously I was wrong. And where does he go from there? California? Coast range? Settle in the cascades?

    Although I've never had the privilege of an encounter, I grew up canoeing in country populated by thousands of wolves (Northern MN) and I'm not particularly afraid of them. There is no documented case of an adult human ever being killed by a wolf in North America (though, very surprisingly, someone was killed by coyotes in Nova Scotia just a couple years ago). Not that I don't keep a close eye on my kid in the woods, but for other reasons than wolves.

    I'm about 100 times more concerned about big kitties in the woods than I am about big doggies. And even that doesn't exactly keep me up at night. Actually, I will admit that the one wildlife issue that does sometimes genuinely keep me up at night when I'm in the is the possibility of a midnight bear visit.
    That's not entirely true, just so you don't get trapped by the statement if you're having a conversation with one of those ranchers. There have been a few people killed by wolves in Alaska in the last decade, most notably a school teacher in the chignik bay area while running. But your point is still good. Wolf attacks are tremendously rare and should be way down the list of things to worry about in the woods.

    I've had the pleasure of growing up seeing a lot of wolves. The best experiences by far are having them pace a dog team along the trees while running up a river valley and having a couple dozen sled dogs get into a howling contest with a pack of wolves nearby while winter camping.

    I'm glad to see them speeding throughout the west. I'd love to see one down here. I also have no problem with allowing them to be hunted if the population gets to the point where it's sustainable.

  14. #14
    Nat
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    If a wolf and a mountain lion got into a fight, who would win?

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    Nat, I’m surprised you’re not, “peeing in your chamois” right now with the thought of additional canine conflicts in the outdoors. Here is what I have learned from a previous thread - “your past posts in these forums relating to dogs and your many bad encounters strongly suggest that you have a phobia and do not know how to handle yourself around dogs.”

    I will admit that seeing a wolf in the wild would be neat, but I’m not sure what the proper response would be if I encountered an aggressive wolf. Now I know that conflicts with wolves are rare and conflicts with domesticated dogs on trails are very common. I have committed the lessons below to memory and ran the scenario through my head multiple times in preparation for a conflict with an aggressive dog on the trail. I’m just wondering if I should be considering additional or different techniques for wolves. For Nat and my comfort, can someone confirm if these tips learned from past reading are still applicable and appropriate?

    Advise - One must remember, “It can be a thin line between acting confident and confrontational though……………the trick is being cool and in the middle.” Also, “Dogs read body language extremely well, and there isn't really a one body language for one situation.”

    Lesson learned - Remain firm and friendly but emotionless, oh and try to place an object (bike if handy) between you and the aggressive animal.

    Advice – “Every dog knows what a hand down with a treat looks like, and every dog can be manipulated with food.” If you go this route,

    Lesson learned – Cary dog treats with you in an easy to reach accessible location. If you encounter an aggressive dog, retrieve said dog treat and, “hold your hand flat and let the dog take the treat from your palm, don't hold it between your fingers.”

    Thank you in advance for your advice on this.

  16. #16
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    I appreciate the response. So far so good.
    I guess my point about a pack is that there inevitably will be encounters if that pack establishes itself and prospers.
    Those who were attacked in other regions of the world are sorta like mtbikers, i.e. out in the wild by themselves, i.e. that woman who was killed while out running in her "backyard." Mind y'all, I'm not advocating their collective extermination in any way, just expressing a little trepidation. Having grown up in NorCA and CenOR I never had to deal with the idea of riding with a pack. Granted there are plenty of mtn lions everywhere in the west, but they hunt on the down-low solo. A wolf pack works in tandem, etc.
    I'm looking forward to reading/hearing about whether this solitary male is ridin solo or has some gf's or bff's with him.
    These kind of developments are heartening - I just hope he/they survive!!!

  17. #17
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    On another note, if one looks up wolf research oregon on google.com, the primary hits come from the land-rapers. FTW.

  18. #18
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    Just an FYI there are no documented "wolf pack" attacks that I am aware of. All of the wolf biting incidents that I have ever read about is by a lone hungry/injured/ older wolf. Same is most often the case for cougars and to a lesser extend bears. The possibility that you would ever.... EVER even see a wolf is infinitesimally minute. Not to mention they are critical to the long term health of the forest that we all love and enjoy.

  19. #19
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    The Wikipedia page on wolf attacks is pretty good. Wolf attacks on humans - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    More common than many are led to believe, but definitely nothing to be concerned about. In this state, I'd spend my time worrying about crazy people, crashing, and then bears and cougars way down the list before I'd worry about wolves. I'd probably even pick a ride somewhere if there was a chance to see one. They really are amazing to watch.

  20. #20
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by DRTTherapy View Post
    Nat, I’m surprised you’re not, “peeing in your chamois” right now with the thought of additional canine conflicts in the outdoors. Here is what I have learned from a previous thread - “your past posts in these forums relating to dogs and your many bad encounters strongly suggest that you have a phobia and do not know how to handle yourself around dogs.”

    I will admit that seeing a wolf in the wild would be neat, but I’m not sure what the proper response would be if I encountered an aggressive wolf. Now I know that conflicts with wolves are rare and conflicts with domesticated dogs on trails are very common. I have committed the lessons below to memory and ran the scenario through my head multiple times in preparation for a conflict with an aggressive dog on the trail. I’m just wondering if I should be considering additional or different techniques for wolves. For Nat and my comfort, can someone confirm if these tips learned from past reading are still applicable and appropriate?

    Advise - One must remember, “It can be a thin line between acting confident and confrontational though……………the trick is being cool and in the middle.” Also, “Dogs read body language extremely well, and there isn't really a one body language for one situation.”

    Lesson learned - Remain firm and friendly but emotionless, oh and try to place an object (bike if handy) between you and the aggressive animal.

    Advice – “Every dog knows what a hand down with a treat looks like, and every dog can be manipulated with food.” If you go this route,

    Lesson learned – Cary dog treats with you in an easy to reach accessible location. If you encounter an aggressive dog, retrieve said dog treat and, “hold your hand flat and let the dog take the treat from your palm, don't hold it between your fingers.”

    Thank you in advance for your advice on this.
    You should carry rack of lamb for a wolf treat.

  21. #21
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    I checked out that site after having watched The Brotherhood of the Wolf. As you state, more common than many think. Some of them pretty ghastly, but comes with the territory. If you're out there you might just get it, whether it be a snake or mosquito bite, or a chompin by a bear, cougar, or wolf. More often though, those rocks are pretty mean, or otherwise those darned stationary trees, or cacti for that matter. Haha.

  22. #22
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    I stand corrected on fatal attacks. Guess I was parroting something I'd read years ago. According to the Wikipedia list there have been two fatal attacks by wolves in the past decade in North America. Prior to that, the most recent deaths from wild (non-pet) wolves had been in the 1920s.

    The Wikipedia list is rather long, but the vast majority of incidents have been in the former Soviet bloc, along with a number in places like Finland and India.'

    Still not worried. At least east of the Cascades, rattlesnakes are a bigger threat to humans.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy View Post
    I stand corrected on fatal attacks. Guess I was parroting something I'd read years ago. According to the Wikipedia list there have been two fatal attacks by wolves in the past decade in North America. Prior to that, the most recent deaths from wild (non-pet) wolves had been in the 1920s.

    The Wikipedia list is rather long, but the vast majority of incidents have been in the former Soviet bloc, along with a number in places like Finland and India.'

    Still not worried. At least east of the Cascades, rattlesnakes are a bigger threat to humans.
    You were only restating the something that we were all taught when we were younger. Shoot, I was raised in rural Alaska where they shoot wolves from low flying planes and was still taught that there were no fatal wolf attacks in North America. Unless you pay close attention to the newspapers up there, there's no reason you would have known different. There was apparently a pack on the military base outside Anchorage last year that killed several dogs in front of their owners and treed a few people before fish and game stepped in and killed a few. If you do a google search, the story is pretty interesting.

    Anyhow, they are definitely one of the coolest animals to see in the wild and the risks are sooooo low. Unless you are a rancher, you should be excited to get a chance to see one.

  24. #24
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    Right on! Let's start howlin! Some people will be spooked, others won't. To me the salient point is that these animals are "new" to S OR or Nor Cal. They will not be looked upon kindly by a contingent, and otherwise with admiration and respect and awe.

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