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  1. #1
    dusty paw tracks
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    Winberry Divide loop

    I'm trying to figure out how to string together a loop w/ Tire Mountain / Win. Divide, etc. We want to do about 4-5 hours of riding.

    I'm looking at my map (treadmaps) and just getting confused. Looks like lots of opportunity to get lost of fire roads stringing things together.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Fairly easy to get lost. Use this map and a topo or Middle Fork District map.

    The shortest route is to park at the "1911 Trailhead" or "Aid Zero" and turn right at the 151-1802 junction to get to "Aid 2". It is about a 30 mile loop.
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  3. #3
    dusty paw tracks
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    Sweet thanks. Much better map than the treadmaps version I have.

    Can't wait to ride out there!

    From 1911 - what's the preferred direction for the loop? I see the map has arrows going both ways for the bigger CCP course. Clockwise would be my instinct but is that recommended. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Tree Hugger
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimTreeshadow
    Sweet thanks. Much better map than the treadmaps version I have.

    Can't wait to ride out there!

    From 1911 - what's the preferred direction for the loop? I see the map has arrows going both ways for the bigger CCP course. Clockwise would be my instinct but is that recommended. Thanks.

    Unless you enjoy bombing down long gravel roads, and walking up steep singletrack, go clockwise.
    I love mankind - it's people I can't stand. ~Charles M. Schulz

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sasquatch
    Unless you enjoy bombing down long gravel roads, and walking up steep singletrack, go clockwise.
    Yup. Follow the arrow direction except for the "red" section of 1802.
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  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Tricky trail junction

    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    Yup. Follow the arrow direction except for the "red" section of 1802.
    In addition to what Sas & Shiggy said, beware of the trail junction after you are on the Winberry Tie Trail. After crossing the road at the saddle, you will be on trail for a couple hundred yards when you encounter a junction. You want to take a hard right at this junction, continuing uphill for a while. After that, there is one place where you will come out to a road junction. Take the right fork ~50-100 yards and be looking very closely for the trail taking off to your left. It leaves the road at an angle opposite to your direction of travel, so it would be easy to miss.
    Enjoy!

  7. #7
    dusty paw tracks
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    Fantastic - thanks for the tips!

  8. #8
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    Boo, Treadmaps....

    Quote Originally Posted by slimTreeshadow
    I'm trying to figure out how to string together a loop w/ Tire Mountain / Win. Divide, etc. We want to do about 4-5 hours of riding.

    I'm looking at my map (treadmaps) and just getting confused. Looks like lots of opportunity to get lost of fire roads stringing things together.

    Thanks!
    ....at least the Oakridge one. It has trails, but not necessarily the best routing, or trails that get overgrown through lack of use 'cuz they're not good trails, or how to string together different rides to make an epic, or other info that you would get from locals. It was obviously NOT done by locals.

    A few friends and I were working on a map for our local riding area (Mckenzie, Oakridge, Cottage Grove), and it would have been WAAAAY better, and much more encompassing (insert sour grapes icon). What Treadmaps has over us is 1) it's already out, and 2) what it lacks in solid information it makes up for in exciting, sexy graphics that would definitely make a non-rider (i.e., a mom, non-riding SO) buy it as a gift for a rider.

    Until we get our map out -- if we ever do -- Treadmaps is definitely a lot better than nothing.

    I have the Ashland and Oakridge Treadmaps. Like I said, better than nothing, but.....

  9. #9
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albee
    ....at least the Oakridge one. It has trails, but not necessarily the best routing, or trails that get overgrown through lack of use 'cuz they're not good trails, or how to string together different rides to make an epic, or other info that you would get from locals. It was obviously NOT done by locals.

    A few friends and I were working on a map for our local riding area (Mckenzie, Oakridge, Cottage Grove), and it would have been WAAAAY better, and much more encompassing (insert sour grapes icon). What Treadmaps has over us is 1) it's already out, and 2) what it lacks in solid information it makes up for in exciting, sexy graphics that would definitely make a non-rider (i.e., a mom, non-riding SO) buy it as a gift for a rider.

    Until we get our map out -- if we ever do -- Treadmaps is definitely a lot better than nothing.

    I have the Ashland and Oakridge Treadmaps. Like I said, better than nothing, but.....
    What makes the Oakridge Treadmaps really confusing is the way they labeled the roads. The main through routes are not well identified, if at all, while every spur road is labeled. Makes the map cluttered and obscures the roads the want. Most of the spurs are not signed on the ground. The FS district map does the same thing so the topos are needed.
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  10. #10
    dusty paw tracks
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    ouch

    That hurt... 33 miles and ~5,000 feet climbing hurt my unfit self. Especially the long return on fire roads. But it was insanely delicious singletrack. Top quality stuff!

    This ride made us appreciate the CCPer's.

  11. #11
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    Good job! Don't forget to appreciate the folks that clear the trails..

    Quote Originally Posted by slimTreeshadow
    That hurt... 33 miles and ~5,000 feet climbing hurt my unfit self. Especially the long return on fire roads. But it was insanely delicious singletrack. Top quality stuff!

    This ride made us appreciate the CCPer's.
    Those trails are kept up mostly due to DOD efforts. Glad you enjoyed the ride.

  12. #12
    meatier showers
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    Clarification

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudflaps
    Those trails are kept up mostly due to DOD efforts. Glad you enjoyed the ride.
    For anyone unfamiliar with "DOD," these initials are the acronym for the Disciples of Dirt mountain bike club. The Cream Puff's own X-men, most (if not all) of whom are DOD members, are annually charged with the task of grooming the Cream Puff course.

    The combined membership of the Disciples of Dirt performs thousands of man/hours of trail work each year to open not just the trails included in the Cream Puff course, but dozens of local trails within a 75 mile radius of Eugene/Springfield. We recognize and embrace our obligation to 'give back' if we want to retain off-road cycling access to the trails we love. The Northwest Youth Corps and the Forest Service, as well as one or two local hiking groups, also contribute to trail maintenance efforts in the Southern Willamette Valley area's singletrack-rich zone.

    The efforts of these clubs & organizations amount to a great benefit for everybody who loves local singletrack in the backcountry.

    --Sparty
    Last edited by Sparticus; 06-12-2006 at 08:11 PM.
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  13. #13
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    Sparty's right, this time Of course there are others that do trail work out there. I guess that I was just highlighting that we have recently been doing a lot out there.

    The Northwest Youth Corps are organized to train young people the value of good hard work, and, as a bonus, some of them will establish an enduring relationship with the woods, and all that's there. The hiker groups were greatly instrumental in the original building of some of the trails we enjoy so much now, and were very big on maintenence for a long time. It seems that there is less activity on their part now (the aging phenomenon?), but that's fine. It's our turn, so let's do our part. Do the same in your area, it does wonders in gaining respect with the land managers when they know there is a group of dedicated volunteers that they can call on to get some work done. They also begin to call on your group when there are questions as to what is wanted when it comes to new trails. Additionally, they are more willing to listen to proposals from people who are proven partners in the arena of outdoor recreation.

  14. #14
    dusty paw tracks
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    Nice. And just look at the results of all that effort. Sweetness
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