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  1. #1
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    Wife loves Bend, I love mountain biking - perfect, right? Right?

    First post!

    Visited Oregon recently and my wife and I loved the vibe in Bend and she is sold on making Bend our next move. Unfortunately, I didn't get the chance to do any riding out there and from what I have read Bend is a huge MTB destination with a lot of buff singletrack but little in the way of rocks, steeps and drops (
    my style of riding). Is this true?

    I am not trying to start any controversy - I want to know, as a non-hardcore XCer mountain biker, have you moved to Bend and found the MTB disappointing because of lack of variation?

  2. #2
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    I've lived here now for 4 years and Bend definitely has a lot of singletrack trails for different levels. Plenty of "groomers" for all levels and lots of all mountain type trails with tough climbs and jumps. With the lift served area opening at Mt. Bachelor, it's got the downhill element just getting going and no doubt expanding. Bend doesn't have as much of the really steep, big drop kind of trails but there are definitely some trails that would qualify as technical in terms of rock gardens, no doubt about that. The area, however, with Oak Ridge, Mt. Hood, McKenzie River has a ton of variety and definitely all of the steep, big drop stuff you can handle. I'd say, in general, Bend is an absolute mountain biking mecca for XC and all Mountain type riding but not as much the full on bombing free ride type stuff. The trail network is gigantic and growing every year, the biking community is as good as it gets and the town of Bend is super supportive of the biking culture.
    Are you really sure about that?

  3. #3
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    The MTB *scene* in Bend is wicked badass. The XC riding is plentiful. The DJ opportunities are many. Within the "Bend" trails there's not a lot of steep or tech (there are some...just not much). You'll get close proximity and quantity at the expense of wide variety and rowdy.

    Sadly, while the Oakridge trails get steep and fast...there's no true DH riding either. Plenty of speed, some tech, but zero FR or DH.

    However, Bend is close enough to decent DH/FR stuff that it can work, especially if mama is happy.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImaKlyde View Post
    The MTB *scene* in Bend is wicked badass. The XC riding is plentiful. The DJ opportunities are many. Within the "Bend" trails there's not a lot of steep or tech (there are some...just not much). You'll get close proximity and quantity at the expense of wide variety and rowdy.

    Sadly, while the Oakridge trails get steep and fast...there's no true DH riding either. Plenty of speed, some tech, but zero FR or DH.

    However, Bend is close enough to decent DH/FR stuff that it can work, especially if mama is happy.

    Brock...
    I'm not really DH or FR type rider, but have you ridden the lift served trails on Bachelor yet? Do they qualify as serious DH/FR?
    Are you really sure about that?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSLKauai View Post

    I'm not really DH or FR type rider, but have you ridden the lift served trails on Bachelor yet? Do they qualify as serious DH/FR?
    They don't yet...but I'm hopeful they will! It sounds like those involved have a good plan. Hope it comes to fruition.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

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    OK, thanks. So I won't "starve", good to know. Maybe I would need to learn some solid DJ skills then.

    Do you ride through winter? Here in VT no matter what you want or think, you're not riding year round. There?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImaKlyde View Post
    The MTB *scene* in Bend is wicked badass. The XC riding is plentiful. The DJ opportunities are many. Within the "Bend" trails there's not a lot of steep or tech (there are some...just not much). You'll get close proximity and quantity at the expense of wide variety and rowdy.

    Brock...
    No serious tech/FR? Why is that? Is that just not the culture? Strict on the trail building?

  8. #8
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    I know some DH/FR guys that like trails like Funner, Twinks, COD. It's probably not enough if that's all you want to ride (you'd probably get bored). It seems to be the way the newer trails are headed, though. Perhaps someone from COTA will chime in about what they're thinking as far as free ride areas over the long term?

    Technical AM or FR near Bend?

    EDIT - Lots of snow in the winter and blow-down. Check out the conditions thread:

    2014 - Bend Area Trail Conditions & Blow Down Thread

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    No serious tech/FR? Why is that? Is that just not the culture? Strict on the trail building?
    Much of the terrain just doesn't lend itself to tech/FR, since there are vast expanses of low-angle pitches. The newer trails out of Wanoga parking lot are geared more towards AM riding though. Tyler's Traverse is several miles of fast descent with rocks, jumps, berms, and drops the whole way down.

    Keep in mind that at this point there must be over 500 miles of singletrack you can ride to from town. The AM trails make up a small percentage of the total mileage but still there must be a few dozen miles of it. Just be prepared to do some pedaling.

    You could also do the "when in Rome" thing and learn to enjoy XC riding, because it's really good here.

  10. #10
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    My wife and I are in the same situation. We love it in Bend and I like to MTB so we're making efforts to move. We almost moved there a couple years ago but were concerned we'd be quitters--at the time we'd only lived in Portland for a few months and were unsure of another move so soon. Should've done it because now we make that long drive to Bend a couple times a month from April - October. I'm an XC rider/racer so it is perfect for me, and as Nat said the XC riding there really is good.

    I have to ask...do you have jobs line up in Bend? The labor market is tight and it could be difficult to find a well-paying job, depending on your profession. Luckily I'm in a job that will let me work remotely so my wife just needs to find something decent in Bend and we'll be on our way.

  11. #11
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    Grew up racing Motocross and DH, and love it here. With your fitness in check to put down 20-30 miles, and you are golden. The DH and tech here is just fine, as long as you are ready to gas-out redline on the not-steep downhills. Trying to hold a corner at high speed is tech in it's own.
    Bend, Oregon

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    Unfortunately, I didn't get the chance to do any riding out there and from what I have read Bend is a huge MTB destination with a lot of buff singletrack but little in the way of rocks, steeps and drops (my style of riding). Is this true?
    That is mostly true. My suggestion is to make a trip and scope out the trails to see if they will keep you pumped.

  13. #13
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    Definitely an XC paradise. Most of it (99%) is perfectly rideable on a 29er SS HT. Recent trail work has filled in or created by pass of the rock drops making it even more manageable on your run of the mill XC bike.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    Definitely an XC paradise. Most of it (99%) is perfectly rideable on a 29er SS HT. Recent trail work has filled in or created by pass of the rock drops making it even more manageable on your run of the mill XC bike.
    Unfortunately...

  15. #15
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    Slightly OT, but a good resource for those considering moving to Oregon or Bend is here..

    Oregon Forum - Relocation, Moving, General and Local City Discussions - City-Data Forum

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    Quote Originally Posted by sketchbook View Post
    Unfortunately...
    In your opinion. Bypasses are cool with me assuming the tech/rocks sections are not removed. I hit the rocks and drops often, but I do like the option to go around form time-to-time.

    Bend, as others have said, is XC heaven. But, I do think there is enough for AM folks too. Get over to the Wanoga area or go deeper beyond Phils and AM bikes have a huge advantage over XC machines, at least on the DH. Personally, I don't ride anything with a rear suspension in Bend or wheels smaller than 29. The dirt, IMO, is tailor made for 29er HTs, both geared and singlespeed. Those are the two bikes I have in Bend.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpryIP View Post
    In your opinion. Bypasses are cool with me assuming the tech/rocks sections are not removed. I hit the rocks and drops often, but I do like the option to go around form time-to-time.

    Bend, as others have said, is XC heaven. But, I do think there is enough for AM folks too. Get over to the Wanoga area or go deeper beyond Phils and AM bikes have a huge advantage over XC machines, at least on the DH. Personally, I don't ride anything with a rear suspension in Bend or wheels smaller than 29. The dirt, IMO, is tailor made for 29er HTs, both geared and singlespeed. Those are the two bikes I have in Bend.
    Why do you think it has anything to do with the type of bike you ride?

    I have a HT SS which i like to ride as well as a Full Susp. Do you see me tossing rocks and drops on your butter smooth singletrack so i can get my tech fix?

    As dryside metioned, tech sections have been destroyed AND go arounds were put in.

    Kind of a "let's make an non-approved trail that we want, and ruin everyone else's fun at the same time" moto?

    Keep the tiny fraction of bend techy sections as is please

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketchbook View Post
    Why do you think it has anything to do with the type of bike you ride?

    I have a HT SS which i like to ride as well as a Full Susp. Do you see me tossing rocks and drops on your butter smooth singletrack so i can get my tech fix?

    As dryside metioned, tech sections have been destroyed AND go arounds were put in.

    Kind of a "let's make an non-approved trail that we want, and ruin everyone else's fun at the same time" moto?

    Keep the tiny fraction of bend techy sections as is please
    You seem saddened. Taking a deep breath for you right now.

    Steinmeister, if you come to Bend, I gotta believe you will love riding the dirt regardless of the bike you ride.

  19. #19
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    Since I am solely an XC rider I am not upset with the go-arounds. There are still many technical sections on GS, COD, DS, Helipad, Farewell, South Fork, Flagline, Tiddly, Funner. I sure would like the trails worked on by the many volunteers than not. So I am not going to piss on them for a few areas where dirt is added or an optional go around is offered.

    I am more upset that Ben's is uphill only as it was my favorite flowing close in trail (which had a couple optional rock drop offs). The other one way trails make total sense.

    That said I feel very fortunate to live with these trails literally at my back door and the freedom to ride them when ever I want. Get out and ride!

  20. #20
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post

    I am more upset that Ben's is uphill only as it was my favorite flowing close in trail (which had a couple optional rock drop offs).
    Same here. It really is bass-ackwards to have Ben's uphill-only and Phil's downhill-only, especially since the bottom half of Phil's canyon is flat. Ben's is (was) the best descent in the lower triangle, with two rock drops, several berms and kicker jumps.

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    Nat +1 on the bass-ackwards on Phils downhill and Ben's uphill.

    COTA, nice try, but I think you made a mistake. Are you open to changing it after this season?
    Last edited by rushman3; 06-05-2014 at 08:50 AM.

  22. #22
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    Now that I have had a few times to run the one-way changes to Phil's/Ben's, I have to agree. I originally thought what was done makes sense, but the big thing I think was not considered, is the better soil on Ben's. It is MUCH harder, and would hold up better for descending. Phil's canyon is so sandy nothing holds up.
    Bend, Oregon

  23. #23
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    I'm really liking the one way trails. The parking lot is typically filled with cars but I rarely see anyone on the trails.

    I also thought COTA got Ben's backwards but after many loops I will concede that Ben's is the better outbound trail when intersections for creating alternate loops is taken into consideration.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreamRider View Post
    I'm really liking the one way trails. The parking lot is typically filled with cars but I rarely see anyone on the trails.
    Getting off topic from the OP's questions...but I agree. I've been to Phil's complex a few times this year and I really like having an uphill option that doesn't risk getting mowed down by someone descending too fast and not yielding. I witnessed too many close calls last year.

  25. #25
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    I lived in Vermont for 5 years before eventually ending up in Bend. You will find the majority of trails technically very easy, and surprisingly flat. Not necessarily less fun, but very different and takes a bit of a mental reset. There are often short technical sections but interspersed with long sections of buttery smooth trail. Nothing like the constant hammering that you can get on many VT trails. You will also be amazed at the amount of strava-esque lycra racing types.

    Phils network is the popular one - especially with beginners and the racing types, and is ridable almost year round. Trails get much better (IMO) and there is a significant amount of variety to be had a little further out, but then it is very much seasonal - maybe even more so than VT. The high trails are awesome but will be buried under a lot of snow for a long cascades winter. The desert trails offer a nice step up in technicality/vertical over Phils but will be too hot/sandy in summer time. Also, if you are into snowsports then the terrain and vast quantity of snow up high can have you forgetting about bikes for many months (it's a very long season). And the scope of the wilderness, and the huge tracks of public land without the ******** access issues of the east coast leads to a completely different experience.

    If you`re coming from VT then there`s a lot more than just the biking to sell the area, but it seems you`ve figured that out. The seasons are similar to VT (except for mud season), and you will never get an entire summer ruined by rain (or even more than 1 day) followed by a classic VT freeze-thaw ice-winter. You can often swap "seasons" by driving 30 miles in either direction. And make sure you have a healthy supply of sunglasses. Life is very easy here Then there`s the rest of Oregon to explore also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spottydog View Post
    Phils network is the popular one - especially with beginners and the racing types, and is ridable almost year round.
    On a typical year and if you are being polite and staying off the trails when they are muddy then Phil's is not ridable for months. Not a big deal as there are many other good winter riding options.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rushman3 View Post
    Nat +1 on the bass-ackwards on Phils downhill and Ben's uphill.

    COTA, nice try, but I think you made a mistake. Are you open to changing it after this season?

    Completely agree with it being backwards. I just thought I was the only one who felt that way....I have ridden in Bend for almost 10 years and never once considered riding UP Ben's. I did it after the one-way and couldn't understand the logic behind it. Glad to see I'm not the only dissenter

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    Quote Originally Posted by mophile View Post
    I have ridden in Bend for almost 10 years and never once considered riding UP Ben's.
    Seriously? Even though I enjoy Ben's headed downhill I still rode it outbound at least 1/3rd of the time just so I could descend Phil's canyon. That part of Phil's, while short, is better than anything on Ben's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by StreamRider View Post
    That part of Phil's, while short, is better than anything on Ben's.
    I recognize that everyone has different views. Certainly many people feel as you do. My post was simply that I was pleased to find I wasn't the only one who felt as I do

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    I agree with you and like the climb up Ben's all the way to Skyliner ... Given how much traffic there used to be on the lower part of Phil's going both ways, I think they made a good decision.
    Are you really sure about that?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mophile View Post
    Completely agree with it being backwards. I just thought I was the only one who felt that way.
    You're far from the only one who feels that way. I'm curious if anyone has asked Ben what he thinks about it? He's still around.

    Tangent: The Dirty Half is this Sunday and the course will take the runners DOWN Ben's. Everyone just be aware so you don't have to ride into a sea of people.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    First post!

    Visited Oregon recently and my wife and I loved the vibe in Bend and she is sold on making Bend our next move. Unfortunately, I didn't get the chance to do any riding out there and from what I have read Bend is a huge MTB destination with a lot of buff singletrack but little in the way of rocks, steeps and drops (
    my style of riding). Is this true?

    I am not trying to start any controversy - I want to know, as a non-hardcore XCer mountain biker, have you moved to Bend and found the MTB disappointing because of lack of variation?

    There is no happiness in the home until the wife is satisfied.

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    Being a transplant from VT myself, here might be some help.
    Burlington = portland,
    Hoodriver = waterburry
    bend = stowe

    Trails in bend are very much like the trails in the kingdom on darling hill. Batchlor will end up being like burke, + there is funner twinks.

    Now back to your bashing on phils complex.

  34. #34
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    Agreed; the soil on Ben's is more conducive to DH. COTA mentioned that the one-way project was executed on a trial basis and changes could be made if warranted. IMO (though I enjoy hitting the gas down the Canyon), I think Phil's Canyon would be better to climb and Ben's as the DH....there's ton of potential on Ben's for high speed charging!

    Quote Originally Posted by thuren View Post
    Now that I have had a few times to run the one-way changes to Phil's/Ben's, I have to agree. I originally thought what was done makes sense, but the big thing I think was not considered, is the better soil on Ben's. It is MUCH harder, and would hold up better for descending. Phil's canyon is so sandy nothing holds up.
    jjMarS

  35. #35
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    Very good place to live! Getting crowded and a bit of a cluster at times. However, riding is good. It is not as good as Oakridge but a much nicer town. It is very dusty in the summer so if you have a road bike get it out once the trails turn to a giant cat box down low. The upper trails are really where the good riding can be found but they are only open for about four months. It you like skiing, kayaking, and other sports it is perfect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elistan View Post
    Being a transplant from VT myself, here might be some help.
    Burlington = portland,
    Hoodriver = waterburry
    bend = stowe

    Trails in bend are very much like the trails in the kingdom on darling hill. Batchlor will end up being like burke, + there is funner twinks.

    Now back to your bashing on phils complex.
    I know it is heresy, but I don't like the Kingdom Trails outside of "Tap & Die". The rest are rather boring. Pretty and scenic but honestly not very challenging.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    I know it is heresy, but I don't like the Kingdom Trails outside of "Tap & Die". The rest are rather boring. Pretty and scenic but honestly not very challenging.
    Alright, "boring" is a bit strong but you know what I mean.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    Alright, "boring" is a bit strong but you know what I mean.
    t+d was the kittens pj's. KT was great because you could ride with everyone of all levels and have a great time. I loved upper jbar-jbar. I could ride that all day.

    But you have to admit with trails around the area like perry hill, and carse hill, KT is very much like how i would classify bend trails. Pretty easy, mellow and lots of them.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steinmeister View Post
    I know it is heresy, but I don't like the Kingdom Trails outside of "Tap & Die". The rest are rather boring. Pretty and scenic but honestly not very challenging.
    If you're looking for technically challenging trails like you have in the NE, you won't find them in Bend. You'll miss the rocks and it'll be a reason to head back to the east coast but you'll have to find a reason to love the trails in OR (and there are many). Just be glad your wife doesn't want to move to Portland. Other advantages...no mud season, no black fly season, it's not humid as f**k in the summer and yes, the dry heat actually makes a positive difference.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudge View Post
    it's not humid as f**k in the summer and yes, the dry heat actually makes a positive difference.
    That's hilarious to someone from the East Coast (NYC) where you feel like Swamp Thing half the summer.

    Portland *NEVER* feels humid to me, even at it's worst. It's all relative!
    - -benja- -

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    Quote Originally Posted by benja55 View Post
    That's hilarious to someone from the East Coast (NYC) where you feel like Swamp Thing half the summer.

    Portland *NEVER* feels humid to me, even at it's worst. It's all relative!
    I could have structured it better, but that's what I meant. OR is dry in the summer. Even when it's 100F you can walk into the shade and it matters, unlike the mid-atlantic when it feels like you're wearing a hot, wet blanket in the shade.

    I lived in Charleston, SC and near D.C. for most of my life. Portland is moderately humid for about two weeks in the summer but that's it. East coast is gnarly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudge View Post
    I could have structured it better, but that's what I meant. OR is dry in the summer. Even when it's 100F you can walk into the shade and it matters, unlike the mid-atlantic when it feels like you're wearing a hot, wet blanket in the shade.

    I lived in Charleston, SC and near D.C. for most of my life. Portland is moderately humid for about two weeks in the summer but that's it. East coast is gnarly.
    I agree. I lived in the oppressive humidity of DC for 7 years and Portland is comparably comfortable but will feel a bit sticky once in a while. Not very often and never as bad as the east coast. Bend is ridiculously dry. So dry it often tears up my lungs and gives me a bloody nose since I'm not used to it...but I'm overly sensitive from asthma and allergies.
    Last edited by economatic; 06-12-2014 at 01:10 PM.

  43. #43
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    Born and raised outside of Boston, and have lived all over the world. Oregon has the best summer weather of any place on this planet.

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    shhh... Portland is already a mess. Let's keep summer to ourselves.
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