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  1. #1
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    Tire pressure - Bend

    Hey Bend riders, how much pressure do you run? I am coming down from Canada and with all the rock etc. I run around 40 psi, but with the flow of Bend I'm thinking it should be less. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Nat
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    I think the "right" tire pressure depends on a lot of things, including tire size, body weight, how aggressively you ride, how much suspension travel you have, tubeless versus tubed tires, etc. so the best way to find out is to play with your pressures once you're here.

    On my bike with 2.1 inch tubed tires I run close to 40 psi, but on my bike with 2.3 inch tubeless tires I run more like 25 PSI.

    Have a great time in Bend!

  3. #3
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    I run around 25 psi (tubeless) 2.2" Geax AKA tires. I am 5'11" around 160# on 20# XC bikes. 40 psi and I would be bouncing all over the place.

  4. #4
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    Tubed I'm running 35-40 PSI. Will be dropping to 30 or less when I go tubeless.

  5. #5
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    I must be an exception. I run pretty high pressures. Both my Singlespeeds (29er and 26er) hardtails run beautifully at 35-40 PSI. I tend to run a higher pressure in the rear as opposed to the front. I run Schwalbe Rocket Ron's on both bikes. My new build 29er Carbon Hardtail will also have the Rocket Ron's. They run great around here. Plenty of grip. No doubt the sandy corners sometimes get twitchy, but overall the trade off of the higher pressures works well for me on climbs. And judging from my Strava times, it must be working well. The responses here also depend on your riding style and technique.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by willem3 View Post
    No doubt the sandy corners sometimes get twitchy, but overall the trade off of the higher pressures works well for me on climbs.
    yup

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    Run Specialized a 2.3 Ground Control on the front and a 2.2 Fast Trak on the back; using the Control casing. I have this setup on my A9C SS and SJ HT. Front PSI is set at 21-22 and the rear is at 23-24. I am 6' and 160# or so. I have tried higher pressures, but I was not happy with how the bikes behaved.

  8. #8
    Daniel the Dog
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    Eat a bit would you

    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    I run around 25 psi (tubeless) 2.2" Geax AKA tires. I am 5'11" around 160# on 20# XC bikes. 40 psi and I would be bouncing all over the place.

  9. #9
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    Schwalbe knobby nic 2.35 up front at 22 psi and wtb weirwolf 2.3 at 25 psi rear. Both set up tubeless.

  10. #10
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    A lot of the somewhat-techy stuff you'll encounter are rock gardens with small to medium size stones and roots. If you run much over 27psi, particularly in the front, you'll deflect off them and have difficulty holding your line and/or potentially have troubles.

    You can run your suspension soft to compensate, but the efficiency loss isn't worth it IMO.

    A typical tire setup is something in the 2.2-2.4 range run tubeless at ~24-27psi F and 26-30PSI rear (given ~ 165lb rider). Ikons, RR's, Slant6, plenty of options.
    Santa Cruz TBc
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  11. #11
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    I'm gonna try an keep my opinions simple, based off what I ride in different terrain, and around here, etc....

    I'm 190lbs, and try to save my rim's/tires, and can usually put the tires exactly where I want. Around here, I generally run 30psi front 35psi rear with lighter AM tires tubeless. A little higher than "needed" as I can't trust squirmy tires. Just got back from a real high speed ROCKY race, and even with full DH tires on my AM bike I ran 38psi rear 32psi front.

    I set my 125lb wifes tires up about 25-28psi front, 28-32psi rear, with 2.4 tires and strong rims tubeless, as she just mashes straight into things lol.
    Bend, Oregon

  12. #12
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    Thanks for all the responses everyone - very helpful! After reading the comments, I think I might be the only one in Bend that is riding tubes!! hahaha...

  13. #13
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by darcymullin View Post
    Thanks for all the responses everyone - very helpful! After reading the comments, I think I might be the only one in Bend that is riding tubes!! hahaha...
    Going tubeless in central Oregon gives dubious benefit, in my opinion. There are very few thorns around here and most of the trails are pretty smooth so the risk of puncture is pretty low. The drawback is that if you decide you want to switch to different tire, it's not a simple operation of popping out a tube, switching rubber, then reinflating the tube. You have to reapply Stan's, use a high-pressure air compressor, and hope you don't make a huge mess on the garage floor. Then you have to wait to make sure that the Stan's "takes." I converted over to tubeless years ago because everybody told me that I had to, so I did.

  14. #14
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    I agree with Nat. For Bend, tubeless........ ehhhhhhh....... Not a huge advantage, when you take in the hassle.

    If it were more rocky(snake bites), or more thorns, I would say tubeless 100%.
    Bend, Oregon

  15. #15
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    Running tires tubeless has big benefits, IMHO, especially if the tires are run a low pressure. Advantages include, for example: (1) pinch flats are eliminated; (2) decrease in rolling resistance due to lower pressure and elimination of friction between the tire and the tube; and (3) lower resistance means better traction.

    I haven't had to use an air compressor to mount tubeless ready tires for years. A standard floor pump does it for me every time. I also haven't experienced having to wait for the Stans to provide a sufficient seal. 1.5 - 2 scoops and spinning of the wheel seems to work fine. Actually, I find it is best to ride newly mounted tubeless tires immediately to get a perfect distribution of the Stans. Easy-peasy.

  16. #16
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    I run (carbon) UST rims and never had any problem with tubeless (using Stan's sealant) with standard tires (Geax AKA). Benefits SpryIP lists are great. The ride quality at low pressures is so good. Saving nearly a pound of rolling weight. It makes a 29er HT the preferred choice for central oregon trails.

  17. #17
    Nat
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    If you want to run really low pressure then tubeless is beneficial, but how low do you want to go? I ran 20psi in a 29x2.35" tubed tire (Panaracer Rampage) and never came anywhere close to pinching. Going tubeless might let me go down to 10-15 psi but I don't see why I would want to. Smooth riding technique and not ramming into stuff helps avoid pinching too.

    Rolling resistance from friction between tire and tube is one of those things that seem like urban legend to me. It must be negligible if not nonexistent.

    I have yet to seat a tubeless tire with only floor pump pressure. Maybe I need a tutorial because when I cycle the pump the air just leaks out of the tire.

    Weight savings is nice, especially on a 29" tire.

  18. #18
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    If you got under 25 psi for real rides and avoided pinched flats you are the man! I haven't managed that. I'm going tubeless to increase grip and drop some weight.

  19. #19
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreamRider View Post
    If you got under 25 psi for real rides and avoided pinched flats you are the man! I haven't managed that. I'm going tubeless to increase grip and drop some weight.
    Does Phil's network count as "real?" I kept dropping the pressure just to see how low I could go but after 20psi the tire just felt mushy and slow.

  20. #20
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    If you are cruising through GS without any pinch flats you are the man. I've tried with tubed and its doesn't work for me sub 30. And even that is pushing it. I weigh about 155 dripping wet.

  21. #21
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by StreamRider View Post
    If you are cruising through GS without any pinch flats you are the man. I've tried with tubed and its doesn't work for me sub 30. And even that is pushing it. I weigh about 155 dripping wet.
    The big question is, "How low would you want to go in your tubed tires if you could go as low as you want?" The premise is that ride quality and traction get better as you drop your pressure, but at some point you'll get diminishing returns so even if you could drop to 10psi, would it make things the riding experience that much better? I say no. After a certain point the tires will just feel mushy, draggy, and easy to roll over in corners.

  22. #22
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    I'm guessing 25.

  23. #23
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    My guess is that riding the beginning east sections of GS with tubed tires below 30 psi equals some likelihood of a pinch flat. I think that likelihood is increased a fair amount as the psi drops. I would not even try riding the rocky sections of GS with a tubed tire at 21f/23r, which is often what I have the tires of my SS set to. I do not go lower than that because the bike/tires start to behave funny with my riding style, and the same applies if I increase the psi. I increase the rear tire pressure on my geared HT to about 24 psi to compensate for the increased saddle time, translating to an elevated risk of rock strikes through the tire.

    Sorry that we have sabotaged this thread, which is now just a discussion related to tubeless vs. tubed.

    It is clear that MTBers have strong opinions about bike setup .

  24. #24
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    Not to get too far off topic, but obviously the greatest advantage of tubeless is weight. A light-weight 29" tube is ~225g, 1.5 scoops of Stans is ~50g. You're loosing about a pound of rotational mass at the extreme of the wheel's circumference, where again it matters wildly more than any other location on the bike. And that at a cost of, well, pretty much nothing.

    Those who can't mount tires tubeless are often trying to mount new tires, which are often absurdly difficult or impossible. Ride the for a week or two with a tube first.
    It's also much cleaner to get the tire to seat/pop in place with no Stans (Stans doesn't help there), then inject the Stans with the syringe tool. No mess...
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  25. #25
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    I find removing the valve core makes it quite easy to get even brand new tires to pop right on the rim. I then add the sealant through the valve, put the core back in and inflate to desired pressure and ride. Have not flatted since I switched to tubeless two years ago. I replace the sealant every few months.

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