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  1. #1
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    Security / locks and such

    I'm looking to see what folks use to secure their bikes on their rigs. I have never had the need to before but recently I want to park my rig at COCC and maybe ride before or after school. Was wondering what locks and cables or chains offer the best defense. And if anyone in the Central Oregon area knows where to get them. Thanks

  2. #2
    Nat
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    My roof rack locks to the bike. Does yours not?

  3. #3
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    You need redundancy to make it not a quick process to take your bike. Mine was locked on the roof of my Xterra using the cable lock on the Yakima King Cobra. Bike was stolen in the middle of the afternoon in an open parking lock. Two quick cuts, the cable and the wheel strap and they were gone. Something using a big chain would be best. However, my solution is to bring it into my office on the days I ride after work.
    2011 Santa Cruz Blur LTc
    2005 KHS DJ200
    2005 Rocky Mountain ETSX-70 (stolen)

  4. #4
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by nh4cl View Post
    You need redundancy to make it not a quick process to take your bike. Mine was locked on the roof of my Xterra using the cable lock on the Yakima King Cobra. Bike was stolen in the middle of the afternoon in an open parking lock. Two quick cuts, the cable and the wheel strap and they were gone. Something using a big chain would be best. However, my solution is to bring it into my office on the days I ride after work.
    Someone clambered up onto your Xterra and grabbed your bike in the middle of the day??? That's balsy. Sorry to hear about that.

    My rack is one of those on which the jaws clamp onto the fork dropouts. Do you know if those are easily broken?

  5. #5
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    Yes, very balsy. Which brings me to my next piece of advise. Do not assume that your employer or school has adequate surveillence of thier parking lots.

    As for fork mount with locking mechanism, depends on whether the thief can overcome the friction on the drop outs with a vice grip and a screwdriver. Or if removing the rack is relatively easy. As I said, redundancy will help as a deterrent. But nothing is perfect if you leave the bike unattended long enough.
    2011 Santa Cruz Blur LTc
    2005 KHS DJ200
    2005 Rocky Mountain ETSX-70 (stolen)

  6. #6
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    I am paranoid. I never leave a bike unattended on a roof rack. If I'm going to get a beer or something after a ride, I either bring my bike and lock it up to a bike rack with a kryptonite lock and cable. Or I put it inside my car and lock it with a krypto and cable (yes, I lock my bike even when in the car -- I am paranoid and my bike cost a lot of money). Nothing is foolproof, but I just hope they move on to the next one.

  7. #7
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    I have a good old-fashioned roof rack that requires the front tire be off -- and in my car. And my roof rack locks to my roof. I use the roof rack lock, which makes it impossible to get the front fork out of the rack, all the time, but I also make sure I park where I can see my car when I stop some place. For extended times away from view, I add a nice cable with a sturdy lock, and make sure I loop it through the frame and through the back tire. I usually cover my seat to keep evil eyes from coveting it, and it does not use a quick release.

    So far, the bike has been safer than the contents of my car have been.

    Disclaimer: do not follow anyone else's advice, since you are the one that has to pay for your bike if it is stolen. And even if insurance covers it (not always the case), you'll never get _that_ bike back again.
    The Lee-Man

    A witty saying proves nothing. -- Voltaire

  8. #8
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    A couple of lessons I have learned either directly or from others.

    1. Don't leave anything visible inside the car if possible. The window in my truck was broken where I had left some clothing on the seat. Luckily, I always take my wallet and phone with me on the rides. Second car with stuff visible, same. Third car at the trail head had nothing visible inside the car and no broken windows.

    2. Like someone stated earlier, keeping the bike out of sight is the best thing you can do to keep it safe. I have a truck with a matching cap and very dark tint on those windows. I put the bike in with the wheel off and secure it along the side of the bed/cap. If I want to get really crazy, I put a black blanket over it and it cannot be seen from outside the truck. A hard bed cover is a good way to hide a bike in a truck also.

    3. Don't rely on just one lock, including fork locks. I know a guy that returned to his car after work and his fork was still there, attached to the rack on top of his car, but the rest of the bike was gone...

    4. Good locks and chains may help, but they all can be defeated in seconds with the right tools and knowledge.

    5. Don't advertise. I don't put any stickers on my truck that would indicate there may be something good to steal inside.
    Last edited by bubba13; 04-09-2013 at 06:47 PM.
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    Hmm. Thanks for the replies. I don't have a rack. I use motorcycle straps in the back of my pickup w/ 550 cord around the frame. I have never had a reason to lock it up before because I never left it. I guess I could take the front tire off and put the bike in my back seat. How good are kryptonite locks?

  10. #10
    Nat
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    I think that if you can stick your entire bike inside the vehicle then it's that much safer than locked to the outside. I figure that breaking into a car takes a higher level of commitment than breaking a lock on the outside, but I'm not a bike thief so I may be totally wrong. Out of sight/out of mind seems like a good principle, so maybe you can cover it up inside the truck?

  11. #11
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    I use a hitch rack a lot of the time, installed with a locking hitch pin, and then I lock the bike to the rack (unfortunately with a cable, because my U-lock doesn't reach).

    Most of the time I don't have the rack mounted on the hitch, and I'll just carry my bike in my car. In that case I lock the bike to the inside of the car. Since I have the seat folded down in that case, the U-bolt that the seatback locks onto when upright is perfect. If that's not available, you can usually run a cable down to one of the front seat tracks, or some cars have tie-downs in the cargo area that are big enough to run a cable through. Don't lock to a headrest because those are usually removable.

    If I were parked in a known high-crime area (such as a college campus!) and had my front wheel in the car, I'd lock that too! People will break into cars for far less.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  12. #12
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    Perhaps the best lock would be to electrically charge your bike.... 3 times greater than an electric fence!!

    In all seriousness, I never leave my bike on a rack (even locked) unless I can see it. My hitch rack locks (Tule) can easily be unlocked. Inside a car or truck is best.... and covered if possible.

    My last break in near Syncline a few years ago was for a 5 yr old sweatshirt ... NOTHING else was in the truck.. window was $350.... shoulda left the door open!

  13. #13
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    I would not leave them in the open... Thieves are like freaking magicians. They want it, they will get it. Out of site is the best defense.

    It is crazy what they can do in public, middle of the day! Power saw off catalytic converters and no one seems to notice. People are oblivious it seems.

    Saw one of those "What would you do" shows and they had someone stealing a bike in plain day with lots of people around. Most did NOTHING to stop or say anything. I think they even changed the thief to a girl and she actually got someone to HELP her. Was a while ago I saw it...

  14. #14
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    This is a couple years old, but relevant and worth a watch anytime you're considering bike securing methods.

    Bike Thief - Video - NYTimes.com

    tl;dw: visibility isn't a deterrent, so if you have to leave a secured bike unattended, just make sure yours is harder to steal than the bike next to it. :P Also shows how useless cable and chain locks can be.

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