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  1. #1
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    riding Bend Singletrack from town?

    I live in the east. I am slightly spoiled as I can ride about 30 miles of trail within the city limits - trail heads are literally a few minute roll from my front door.

    Bigger stuff on weekends is bet a 30-90 drive depending on what I want to ride. Its amazing ad yes I'm spoiled.

    Contemplating some things......Bend is on the list. On a visit, I rode a big 5-6 hr loop starting @ Phils trail and connecting a bunch of other stuff about 6 yrs ago (lava trail....some other trail I can't remember). But we drove to the trail head from downtown area. Is it possible to bike to the trail head anywhere IN town? If so, does this mean that I'd need to live on the west side?

    How far of a bike commute is the west side from down town?

    Lastly - can you ride year round in Bend? I know the higher trails are snowed in. I mean no disrespect, but I found the stuff on Phils a bit mellow and didn't know if anything semi-technical (not stupid big drops, just looking for some rocks! - I'm from the east remember?) would be open in winter.

    Thanks!!!

  2. #2
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    West side to down town is about 30 seconds. Maybe a minute. Riding from town is not a problem. You can make it to Phils in about 10 minutes from most of downtown. From there you can link up any ride you want.
    rochesterbc.com Sick of the gym yet?

  3. #3
    newfydog
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    You can ride darn near year round, and a short drive will open all sorts of places to you. The west side of Bend is where bikers tend to live ...virtually every friend I have here lives on the west side. If you know your way around, you can ride from downtown to the trails without riding a single road.

    Most of the trails are pretty much cruisers, but that is just the nature of the terrain. The rocks we have, and there are plenty in some places, are not the fun, ledgey type one finds in canyonlands, nor the slippery "baby heads" which New Hampshire riders know so well, they are sharp nasty volcanic rocks which slam your cranks, stop you abruptly, and you don't want to crash on them. Some people really get into them, though.

  4. #4
    Nat
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    Bend is all of 7-8 miles across, so if you want to ride that distance from your house to the trail you could do it. Most "outdoor sports types" seem to live on the west side though. East side has more of the softball/lake fishing crowd.

    I used to ride all through the winter, so it's possible, but I've since given in to winter sports (and there are several from which to choose).

    As for rocks, I agree with newfydog that our rocks are stupid. Later in the summer the higher elevation trails open up and accesses high meadows and vistas, but it's mostly smooth singletrack with sporadic tech sections.

  5. #5
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfydog
    ... they are sharp nasty volcanic rocks which slam your cranks, stop you abruptly, and you don't want to crash on them. Some people really get into them, though.
    I once fell on C.O.D. (I could not unclip in time) and landed knee first on a pointy volcanic rock. As Wally once said to the Beav, "Ow, that smarts!"

    They sure can "stop you abruptly". Be sure to roll them with plenty of momentum.

  6. #6
    it means 'no problem'
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    Nice collection of rocks at Horse Ridge / Dry Canyon for winter technical riding, I've been riding there all winter. It's getting pretty dry out there now. Lava rock is sharp and sticky, go ride McKenzie River Trail for a taste of our rock. That's a drive, though.

    I have single track right across my driveway. I can literally ride over 100 miles of single track from my door step.

    Where in the East are you? I grew up in Philly and my parent's house was at the entrance of Fairmount Park, lots of good trail there I'm told. I moved away before getting into mtb-ing.
    "“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view." - Edward Abbey

  7. #7
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    I'm in Virginia - ride the blue ridge and the mtns of west VA often.

    We did a big day & rode MRT out and back when we were out there -super sweet trail! not really super rocky, but for sure super fun, amazing views, and beautiful falls never once got boring.

    100 mi of single-dingle out your doorstep is sweet!

  8. #8
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    I too am contemplating Bend. I have ridden there before and really liked the trails I rode. I do like some more tight, technical riding and did not ride much of it when I was there. Will I be able to find a good deal of technical twisty singletrack,and if so which trails are they, where, and how far from the west side?

    Thanks!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    East side has more of the softball/lake fishing crowd.
    Come on Nat....You're killin' me. Softball/lake fishing crowd? Try poop-scoopin', shot gun shootin' crowd. Rekin I best go clean my gun.

  10. #10
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    Stop dissin my neighbors! Scooping pop does not go on over on the East side - we like to leave it laying around with our garbage for all the neighbors to see, it is tre chic!

    From where I live it is 7.5 miles to Phil's Trailhead. But it is also the same time distance to the trails out east to ride in the winter. Short drive either way, but I am guessing with house prices now there is no need to hang out with me and and gun touting neighbors.

    Yes, Phil's trails is mainly buff singletrack, but there are trails with rocks and even wood features. They are not the main routes that visitors seem to ride, but by locals who branch out and take advantage of the multitude of miles found right outside of town. And we have new trails going in by more progressive riders (all volunteer locals). Ride Funner or ODP for a taste.

    But if you like the trails you have at home and don't think ours will make the cut, you might want to look in Colorado or Tahoe. We love our trails - cross country for days through beautiful country, sections of technical, different areas different months of the year. Works for many of us, but not for everyone. Good luck with your decision!!

    Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours & Shuttles
    Sponsored by Deschutes Brewery!! Come ride..

  11. #11
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    C.O.D. is about as rocky as its going to get on the lower end. You can ad the bit bellow the ledge if you start at the Tetherow sign off of century. Maybe 10 minute pedal from the westside, maybe a bit more. Actual Bend riding seems to be more 'spinny' than technical and steep. Its a good way to get super fit and put some serious miles on your legs, not to mention you don't have to ride the same trail twice in the same week if you don't want to!

  12. #12
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    nowhere i have ridden in oregon/washington has had rocky technical riding of the mid atlantic- so if you love to ride that style terrain you may want to stick it out in virginia- if you like riding more miles on more varied terrain- and purpose built mountain bike trails- then bend is a great place to live- and within driving distance of so many other epic spots- it was a shock when i moved from pennsylvania and found out that the technical riding that i grew up doing wasnt going on here- but i cant name one town in the appalachian area that boasts hundreds of mile of legitimate mountain bike trails- and the coolest part about relocating is- if you get to bend and its not your scene- your already out west- and the possiblility to move on to another riding community will be that much easier- plus you can always go home and ride the rocks on holidays-
    Holy Cow----Why remove obstacles--when they can be ridden....

  13. #13
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    The McKenzie River Trail is scenic but I had a better time riding in Oakridge, The Alpine trail, around tire mountain, and the connecter was a great loop. Went early in November and had to skip the top due to snow but still a solid 24 miles, good climbs and some technical spots.

    I'm from Mid-Atlantic and Oakridge reminded me of Mid Atlantic riding but on a bigger scale!!!

  14. #14
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    i'm actually contemplating moving to the area from southern utah. how have trails come along? how much of the year can you ride? is there a good variety of trail types?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    i'm actually contemplating moving to the area from southern utah. how have trails come along? how much of the year can you ride? is there a good variety of trail types?
    Since this post was started in 2010 we have added some new trails and expanded the network. The newer trails from Wanoga are a little more advanced with jumps and more rock features. To be honest I wouldn't say we have that much of a variety of trail types in the Bend area. Each of the trails has its own characteristics but they are generally tight twisty singletrack with nothing too technical except for a few optional lines here or there. There is a variety of trail types somewhat near by in Oakridge and the McKenzie River area. Not sure where in S. Utah you are at but we don't have the technical trails like there are in the St. George area or Moab.
    As for riding year around, it is possible, but limited. The majority of the trails in Bend are ridable from around April/May to October/November. In the other months we have a few winter riding area that can be ridden most of the winter except for some extreme rainy or snowy weeks here or there. They have just started grooming fatbike trails for winter riding up at the Wanoga Snopark this year if you have a fatbike.
    You should definitely plan a trip up here to check it out before you decide to make the move.
    Moving to Bend? Let me help.
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  16. #16
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    I will trade my house in bend for yours in S Utah!

    I would much prefer the rockier terrain.

    Jay should chime in on how he likes it since moving here.

  17. #17
    Nat
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    You might have to PM jayoutside and ask him how he likes the riding. He might not have time to mess around on mtbr any more since he's all famous and sh*t.

  18. #18
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    As another who relocated from West Virginia a year ago—yep, nothing as rocky in Oregon as in WV! :-) But even after riding that insanely rocky sh_t in the Appalachians for years, I thought it was crazy and abusive. I mean, I knew people that regularly rode stuff like this (and I'm NOT exaggerating):



    It was pure trials riding (and hike-a-biking). The "typical" Appalachian trail looks more like this:



    That's the Huckleberry Trail on West Virginia's Dolly Sods plateau. I've ridden it, and that stuff rattles your teeth out and destroys your joints (even on a FS bike!).

    So I'm LOVING the buff-smooth trails out here! :-D (Except for that razor-sharp lava rock stuff—STAY AWAY!!!!!)

    Scott

    PS - Just remember: you think Oakridge is cool? Moab even? Nuh-uh. REAL bikers ride the APPALACHIANS!!! <thumping on chest> :-)
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  19. #19
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    Sketch and Nat -you guys kill me.......

    yup -I started this thread. moved here 3.5 yrs ago. Before that I rode all over the mid-atlantic for 11 years. GWNF, Jefferson, Massanutten Ridge, Dolly Sods, North Fork, Big Schloss, Sherrando.......I can't possibly explain how much I miss rocks. Rocks are your friends.

    If you move out here, can you bring some with you?.....not joking. a bunch of us would likely pay shipping.

    Bend has been fun so far. I really like winters, and have almost had enough stellar fun this season to make up for the past 2 "winters".....if you could call them that.
    As you've seen/heard/read, there is a TON of trail pretty much in town. Its all essentially vanilla - not bad at all! just very vanilla. The new type of terrain built over the past year is new-school flow and jump type stuff. The soil here is very pumice laden, and can't support steep terrain.

    Its been a great jumping-off point being in the west though. Its typically sunny and nice, and some of the areas with much better riding aren't always sunny and nice. But if you hit them at the right times, they are pretty darn sweet!!!!

    Is it worth moving here? Ask yourself these questions:
    1. Do you love riding flow trails with berms all over, that are quite pedal-y? if so, this is probably your heaven.
    2. Do you like grunting up super steep rocky summits like the pics above from WV? and then blasting through boulder fields that make you pucker? Bend has literally NONE of that. And I've looked. Hard. And my technical skills have gotten quite rusty b/c of that.
    3. For diversity of riding - do you have the type of job (or in most people's case in bend, the sprinter van and trust fund) that allows you to take off to oakridge, Sandy ridge, Northern Cascades, Bellingham, Squamish, and Sun Valley most weekends.....or even weekdays? You'll need that if you really want a well rounded riding experience.
    4. Are you really into riding? or like other stuff too? The diversity of stuff around here is pretty good. You can ski, bike, hike, paddle, climb all in the same weekend (or day if you are the family with the trust fund). Sure the skiing isn't jackson hole, the riding is not squamish, etc.....but there's diversity of 'other' stuff that makes it cool here. Plus - the seasons here are much more different than out east. Feels like 2 completely different cities in winter and summer.

    And if you don't have a trust fund or a sprinter and Enve wheels - I think they are giving them out when you get your OR driver's license these days. sure seems like it anyway....



    3. Do you have the type of flexibility that allows you to go to oakridge and some other lesser known spots every weekend? And have

  20. #20
    Trail Cubist
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayoutside View Post
    3. For diversity of riding - do you have the type of job (or in most people's case in bend, the sprinter van and trust fund) that allows you to take off to oakridge, Sandy ridge, Northern Cascades, Bellingham, Squamish, and Sun Valley most weekends.....or even weekdays? You'll need that if you really want a well rounded riding experience.
    LOL—You nailed it. I've never seen so many people cruising around in Sprinter vans or (more "Oregon") old VW camper vans that have been bought for $30K, then had another $30K of mods put into them (lifted, 4WD, Daktari roof racks, extra gas cans, winches, the works).

    Bend is definitely the playground of the rich and...not so famous. :-) (Heck, so is Eugene for that matter—but we have more hippies and homeless folks!)

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  21. #21
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    I am just missing the sprinter van!

    Bend is an XC paradise. Fast flowy fun. Live near the Century/Mt. Washington/Skyliners roads on the West side and sure you can take dirt the entire ride.

  22. #22
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    yeah i need to come check it out. it would be nice to have some flow with some berms. our trails are technical and a lot of them really slow. they just aren't progressing with trail design out here. it would be nice to have more then xc trails though.

  23. #23
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    Oh—I almost forgot: in West Virginia, people ride stuff like this on SINGLESPEEDS. <rolling eyes>

    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  24. #24
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    Ha I know people who have ridden whole enchilada on a single speed..1 word..gross

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