Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    21

    Portland, Phoenix, or Sacramento - Help Please!

    I'm leaning on you pretty hard here for some advice: I am relocating with family in June of this year from Connecticut to one of the subject cities (actually Scottsdale and not Phx) for employment. The choice is ours to make here and I am struggling. Employment / pedalling / hiking / city life / schools for the kids / climate / rock climbing, etc all play into the decision. I just spent 2 days in Portland sussing the city life and liked what I saw. Unfortunately, the weather was fantastic without a cloud in the sky, so I didn't get to experience the '100 days of rain'. Fantastic quantities of Thai food though. Love the neighborhoods of Hollywood, Alberta, Hawthorne districts etc as places to live. Did I mention the Thai food? I got a bit of the flavor of the crosstown traffic you experience when you live across the river but also like the public transit system.

    Folks I talked with around town indicated that the good single track is a bit of a haul out of town (except for some "local" spots) and can be a bit of a slog in winter. I don't want to give up the XC trails entirely for the city-single-speed.

    Please offer some feedback on the reality of living/working/playing in the Portland area with my family that includes a wife that will be a busy medical resident, an energetic 5 yr old that likes to hike, and a 1 yr old future cyclist. Feel free to comment on the other places if you have an opinion on those too! Our deadline for decision is Feb 22, so bring it on...

    Thx a bunch!

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,232
    I would pick Phoenix, Oregon over Portland. Prefer small towns.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
    MattSavage
    Reputation: mattsavage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,432
    Portland is a sweet town. If you live in any of those neighborhoods, you'll rarely have to do any driving (unless, god forbid, you want to go out to the suburbs). But, then again, since you're a breeder (have kids) you'll probably wind up doing a bit of driving around, school and whatnot, which means you'll become an excellent parallel parker. Don't move there if you're a habitual driver. Those close-in eastside neighborhoods are a commuters paradise. Get one of those Burley trailers for the kids and light it up like a UFO.

    Excellent mountain biking within an hour, any direction, of Portland. In town is mediocre at this point.

    It really doesn't rain that much in Portland, that's an old Californians tale. It's damp, but it's a dry dampness.

    Phoenix AZ, on the other hand is, how do I put it... a total sh*t hole? Perfect place to live if you like to drive your kids around, because there is no walking down the street to the grocery store, or the park. Just miles of urban sprawl. Developement, strip mall, developement, strip mall..... et cetera. I spent a couple years there going to college, awful experience. Good riding for a few months out of the year, but I'd rather put up with the poison oak in the Willamette Valley, than the scorpions, snakes, cacti, flash floods, rabid wild dogs, criminals... of Phoenix.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  4. #4
    MattSavage
    Reputation: mattsavage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    2,432
    I got a speeding ticket in Sacramento. Overnighter from Phoenix. I did it in just over 14 hours in a rented Kia. I didn't go to court, so I can't go back. So, I can't tell you much about it. The office was polite though.
    "I wrote a hit play! What have you ever done?!"

    Have Ashtray, Will Travel....

  5. #5
    Daniel the Dog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,550

    Go to Phoenix!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock Magnet
    I'm leaning on you pretty hard here for some advice: I am relocating with family in June of this year from Connecticut to one of the subject cities (actually Scottsdale and not Phx) for employment. The choice is ours to make here and I am struggling. Employment / pedalling / hiking / city life / schools for the kids / climate / rock climbing, etc all play into the decision. I just spent 2 days in Portland sussing the city life and liked what I saw. Unfortunately, the weather was fantastic without a cloud in the sky, so I didn't get to experience the '100 days of rain'. Fantastic quantities of Thai food though. Love the neighborhoods of Hollywood, Alberta, Hawthorne districts etc as places to live. Did I mention the Thai food? I got a bit of the flavor of the crosstown traffic you experience when you live across the river but also like the public transit system.

    Folks I talked with around town indicated that the good single track is a bit of a haul out of town (except for some "local" spots) and can be a bit of a slog in winter. I don't want to give up the XC trails entirely for the city-single-speed.

    Please offer some feedback on the reality of living/working/playing in the Portland area with my family that includes a wife that will be a busy medical resident, an energetic 5 yr old that likes to hike, and a 1 yr old future cyclist. Feel free to comment on the other places if you have an opinion on those too! Our deadline for decision is Feb 22, so bring it on...

    Thx a bunch!
    The winters here are horrible! Go south.

    Jaybo

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RockyRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    814
    This winter has been wet indeed but it's not always this way. There is great riding around here but yes you do have to drive a little to get to it. If you like to ride to work I think you'll like it here. Portland schools aren't the greatest so you might consider living across the river in Vancouver Wa. I have a lot of co-workers that did just that because apparently the Evergreen school district is much better. Portland has much better coffee and micro-brew than the others as well. I don't think I've had a Full Sail or Deschutes beer I didn't like...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    17
    The weather here IS as bad as people say. "old californians tale"???? What a bunch of SH!#%. It rained almost everysingle day in January and the entire first week of Feb. -and it's not even the rainy season yet.
    Much more important though is Oregons school systems. They suck and are in financial struggle constantly. Do some research on Portland public school systems.
    With a 5 and 1 year old you may be much better off in CA. -and in Sactown you'll be at the foot of the Sierra Nevadas !! good luck.

  8. #8
    Big Test Icycles
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,300
    The Portland Metro area is quite nice. If you plan to stay and put your kids into the public school system then plan to live in the burbs. Lake Oswego, West Linn/wilsonville, Sherwood Public systems are about your best bet in the area. Plenty of good Private schools as well. Portland as a city is very bike friendly and within an hour away you have plenty of great riding. As for the rain, yes be prepared to get wet, not quite Seattle style but wet none the less. Spring, Summer and Fall are great. There is so much outdoor activity in this town. When I first moved here I too had a small child. I bought a Burley (a great Oregon product) and rode the Portland Bridge Pedal, she rode the entire 26miles in the Burley. We've been here almost ten years and love it. Just get a nice North Face coat and your set.

  9. #9
    Nat
    Nat is offline
    Solo contendre
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    10,687
    Phoenix is a "total shethole" as someone else put it, but the riding there is phenomenal. I've lived in AZ (Phoenix and mostly Tucson) but moved away due to the hot, dirty desert living. Little kids, venomous creatures, high crime, and lots of traffic didn't seem to mix. Plus we considered that our kids' summer vacations would likely be spent indoors fatting up due to nighttime temps in the low 100's...it wasn't for us.

    I've never lived in Portland but every time I've visited it was gray and drizzly. That's not our cup of chai either.

    Maybe more importantly...which Residencies have accepted your wife? Do you plan on sticking around after she finishes? You might look into the State Medical Board requirements, malpractice climate, and demographics for whichever specialty she's entering.

  10. #10
    gave up SS in 1975
    Reputation: hiawatharider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    74

    Smile

    I have got to chime in on this one. It is more expensive to live down in Phoenix, though the overhead in Portland is going up quickly. The decent off road rides are a drive for both places. If you are tooling around town, Portland is a safer place to ride. I have relatives there and have heard that it is plain dangerous to ride in town-especially with a kid in a trailer. If you like inner city life-style then you would like the bike paths in Phoenix, though be careful what part of town you are in. Portland has it's share of problems too but Phoenix is bigger on them. For the weather side, you need to ask if you want cool rides or hot ones. T-shirt or long-sleeve, and if you ask me, it is easier to take off layers than when you are down to your nakedness and still can't get cool. Last summer they had a week of over 110! Yeah, there is rain, but you can still ride all year. For me the seasonal retirees that float in (snowbirds) are a real bother, and you really have to watch out for really crazy, bad drivers while on the streets. If the school here is OHSU, one of the best ones on the market from what I have heard for schools, then you could go anywhere from here after graduating. Then again you might just stay.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    21

    Update and Thanks

    I appreciate the feedback.

    More details: My wife has choice of any of the 3 Portland programs (OHSU, Prov St. V, and Prov Portland) and strongly prefers the last one. Others include UC Davis in Sacto and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale.

    The sentiment shared above re: Phx area seems right on. It seems a city with zero soul, infinite shopping, and gridlock, but beautiful mtns and destinations within reach. Some of my favorite all-time hikes are not too far from there (Mazatzal Peak Wilderness).

    No one seems to comment on Sacto (??). I know it isn't a mtn biking mecca being in the flats. I understand there are good trails in the foothills around Auburn.

    Are the Portland (east side) schools really that bad? I did see the recent headline article over funding issues. Not sure about housing availability (and possibly affordability) in the Hillside or Heights areas in the west but hear the schools are good. No offense to anybody, but L Oswego isn't my cup-o-tea and is a bit far from Prov Portland.

    I appreciate any more input and will be back with more questions if Portland is da' place!

  12. #12
    Big Test Icycles
    Reputation: Hangtime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,300
    As far as Lake O goes, yeah it's very mucky muck, hoity toity, ritzy but the schools are good. Prov Ptld is just off of I-84, which has it's own issues. Overall the freeway systems in PDX move quite well, compared to other large cities. Portlanders are either devoted to the West side or the East side. East side Portland has more of the inner city feel to it. West of the river is more of the burbs. I would steer you to not live in Multnomah County. Do your research and choose either Washington Co or Clackamas Co. Multnomah Co and Mayor Tom Potter are always trying to put new and improved taxes on people. IE: The I Tax, three years of taxes to improve schools, did not work. Potter wants a new cell phone tax for his city, Portland and Multnomah Co. He just got voted down on some other crazy tax idea. If you are very democratic this is the place to be. I would push you to look at Beaverton, a garden city with access to Portland. Very clean, decent schools. PM me if you have any more questions you dont want to put on the board.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    428
    To quote (or maybe paraphrase) Edward Abbey: "Phoenix is just a cancerous piece of LA that someone transplanted to the desert and added water to."

    I lived up the hill in Flagstaff for many years. There is great riding there and also in Sedona, but those are 1.5-2 hours away. I never rode in Phoenix at all. I've heard there is some decent riding there, and it might actually be tolerable for a few months in the winter. Temps regularly hit 115 in the summer, and people basically move from one air conditioned space to another and stay inside, kind of like winter in other areas.

    Tucson is an hour south, but not quite as hot because it is higher. Good riding there too, but still pretty warm most of the time.

    All in all Phoenix is a hellhole, IMO.

    I would take Portland any day of the week.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RockyRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    814
    Quote Originally Posted by jmac1911
    As far as Lake O goes, yeah it's very mucky muck, hoity toity, ritzy but the schools are good. Prov Ptld is just off of I-84, which has it's own issues. Overall the freeway systems in PDX move quite well, compared to other large cities. Portlanders are either devoted to the West side or the East side. East side Portland has more of the inner city feel to it. West of the river is more of the burbs. I would steer you to not live in Multnomah County. Do your research and choose either Washington Co or Clackamas Co. Multnomah Co and Mayor Tom Potter are always trying to put new and improved taxes on people. IE: The I Tax, three years of taxes to improve schools, did not work. Potter wants a new cell phone tax for his city, Portland and Multnomah Co. He just got voted down on some other crazy tax idea. If you are very democratic this is the place to be. I would push you to look at Beaverton, a garden city with access to Portland. Very clean, decent schools. PM me if you have any more questions you dont want to put on the board.
    Don't forget Vancouver (Wa). You couldn't pay me to live in Multnomah County but I still want to be able to bike to work so I live in Vancouver. Generally it's less expensive to live there and the Evergreen school district is arguably one of the better in the country, plus I can still ride into work.

  15. #15
    Cheezy Rider
    Reputation: Rufudufus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,684
    My daughter spent a week in intensive care at Providence Portland, the staff there is fantastic. I have a good friend who got her degree at UC Davis, she liked it a lot. If you're looking for a university town it's pretty nice...but very hot in the summer, though not in Phoenix' league. I'm not a fan of Phoenix, but some people love it.

  16. #16
    gave up SS in 1975
    Reputation: hiawatharider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    74

    Good job!

    Scottsdale is not as bad as Phoenix.

    UC Davis, hmmm, that choice would be a hard one. If there is a Davis campus in Sac I don't know of it. In Sac-o-tomatoes you can ride a fare share of bike trails and the weather is much more pleasant than Arid-zona. But you will still have to drive to the Sierra foothills for riding. There are epic trails to ride in a lot of places if you are willing to drive a few hours - kind of what we end up doin' here for more variety. Definitely hard to compare the two. The smog days in Sac are really gross and are found scattered all year around. (Have relatives there) Temps are too hot for me, many 100's, but not like Arizona. The population, traffic, and general getting around the town is oppressive. It can be frustrating here too, but it is not the regular I-5/I-80 traffic down there. Also, you definitely would find really rough parts in Sac that might make you a crime statistic. The city of Sac really sucks for in-town riding and I wouldn't do it cause of the traffic, again very dangerous cause of the large intersections. As you go north into the suburbs, and near the American river, there are nicer neighborhoods. Very pricey to live there though. The bike trails along the American river are nice, but boring to the more adventurous types.

    If your destination is UC Davis campus in Davis, I would have a tough time deciding which place I would like better. The town is very rider friendly, and even though Portland has gotten excellent ratings, we don't even come close to the Davis community. For epic mountain bike trips, again you would have to drive to the Sierra foothills, and or to the coastal range. I would take a road-trip and stay in our community (Portland) for at least a week and then go to Davis. If you can stay longer, do so, it'll be a coin toss. Then decide. I did and that's why I am up here.

  17. #17
    I got nothin'
    Reputation: hydrogeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    686

    Go with Portland....in my opinion

    I grew up in Arizona (Tucson) and can tell you that Phoenix is probably not the place for you if Portland intrigued you. During the summer you will spend a lot of time in the mall and the movie theatre to avoid the heat. And it does not cool down at night either because the concrete and asphalt releases the stored UV radiation at night. When I lived down there I did a lot of road riding. After a long ride, my throat and the roof of mouth would burn from the air pollution. Traffic is horrible, it is too hot to ride during the day in the summer, and the air is bad. I used to get up and ride at 4am and quit by 10am to avoid the heat.

    I spent the last six years in Davis (suburb of Sac). The UC Davis Hospital is in Sac near downtown. There are some really cool areas to live down there but the public schools are terrible. Davis has good schools but you might want to check the real estate costs (very expensive). The plus side is that you are within and hour to an hour and a half from the best MTBing on the West Coast. The Sierras has some of the most unbelievable riding. The down side is that during the summer the air pollution is horrible. I have been up in the foothills riding when the air is so dirty it looks like there is cloud cover. It ruins the views. All of the pollution from the SF Bay area, Sac, and the Central Valley gets blown up there by the Delta breezes. Sac can be hot in the summer. We used to go the SF on the weekends when it hit the 100's.

    I have only been in Portland for a year now and really love it. I am on the SW side near Hillsdale. I have kids also and think we can make a go of the schools here. What you run into on the NE side is that all families have their kids in Elem school but pull them for private school at High School age. They do this because the High Schools are the point where the tougher kids from the poor areas get mixed in with the wealthy kids. The exceptions seem to be Wilson and Lincoln High on the West Side. We also opted for the SW area because I work in Beaverton and I can ride to work easily. I also get a good hill workout on the way home. Summer in Portland is paradise compared to PHX or SAC. We don't even have A/C in our home and we were fine except for a couple of days.

    Also consider real estate costs, cost of living, the people that you will be working with, and opportunities for the kids. We landed in Portland because we felt that it offers the best of all worlds for us. Feel free to ask any more questions, I would be happy to give my opinion.

  18. #18
    gave up SS in 1975
    Reputation: hiawatharider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    74
    Touche! Been here since the 80's and haven't given it a moments thought of moving to Davis cause of the property prices, and that was back then. Didn't know of the UC hospital in Sac. Now if ya said Downieville...hmmm.

  19. #19
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,181

    Blatantly biased towards Portland ...

    ... since my wife and I made a conscious choice 8 years ago to ditch Seattle for somewhere more livable. Also have considered Sacramento, although the housing cost is much higher there and the heat would kill us. Sacramento is in the same boat with trail access, having to drive a ways to get to real singletrack.

    At least we do have Forest Park, with 27 miles of bikeable trails, right within the city limits. Plus a few more miles at Mt. Tabor and Powell Butte, though Powell isn't open year round. Forest Park also has 73 miles of hiking trails, with additional trails connecting all the way across the west hills. If you're willing to drive an hour or two there is an incredible array of options, and within that driving distance there are a number of decent riding spots that are open all year -- rain, mud, snow or shine.

    The schools are having their problems, but they're actually pretty good schools. It's fun to jump on the bashing bandwagon, but a lot of it is being done by people with an agenda. Portland is one of the very few urban school districts whose outcomes are better than their state average. I've never met an actual parent who has a kid in the school system who complained about the quality of their child's education. One of the reasons is parents can choose which school they send their kids to, and that's the third rail that the school district knows better than to touch. Also, we have very safe schools with very few incidents (thanks in part to a very involved Police Bureau detail), and unlike most urban districts we do not even have metal detectors in our schools. I have a young child at home, and we are selling our condo to move into a house in SE Portland. We would not be doing that if we did not believe in the quality and safety of the school system.

    The schools are having a(nother) funding crisis because 12 years ago we decided to cap our property taxes and shift most school funding responsibility to the state. Seemed like a good idea at the time, so that poor rural districts could have a decent education too. Problem is our state isn't up to the job. Its revenue model is the worst in the country, with a full 70% of the budget coming from personal income taxes, the most recession-sensitive revenue stream a state can have. When our heavy manufacturing and high-tech industries got clobbered by 9/11 and the tech slump, our economy got hit harder than any other state's, and thus so did the budget. This was made worse by our state constitution's unusual prohibition against having a rainy-day fund. Partisan bickering and (in my opinion) gubernatorial wussiness prevented the last legislature from even agreeing on what to do about it. Of course the (slim) upside is very low property taxes -- mine are typical, at less than 1% of my home's value per year. The latest crisis is hitting right now because 3 years ago we voted for a county income tax to close the gap (since the poor rural folks weren't interested in a statewide tax that would help schools statewide) -- and now that tax is expiring. The real solution is to find a more stable source of revenue for the state, but that's a third rail too. So in the next recession we'll probably repeat the crisis cycle again. I'm not sure what happens when history repeats itself a third time, because we've already been through tragedy and farce.

    As far as home prices go, yes they have risen rapidly. Just like everywhere else. Of the 9 largest Western cities we have the second lowest home prices (only SLC is lower), having recently been surpassed by Phoenix. Median price is $250k here. Not cheap, but compare to Seattle at $350k and San Diego at $600k. Still tough if you're a first time home buyer, but again that's true everywhere. Those who think this is a problem specific to Portland need to get out more.

    Rain? Yes, this January was sucky-wet. It was also the 2nd or 3rd rainiest on record, not exactly typical. Still, you do have to get used to rain. What a lot of people don't realize is although it rains a lot of the time, we don't actually get that much rain: 38 inches a year is less than Atlanta or New York. Much of the time it's just a light mist. I commute year-round in all weather (including yesterday's freak snow) and I don't get truly soaked very often. And in summer it doesn't rain at all. Our lawns are green in the winter and brown in the summer, the opposite of everywhere else.

    Sorry, guess I got long-winded. What can I say? I'm passionate about living in Portland.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mudflaps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,143
    Good summary Dan. I'm glad to see someone address the Oregon tax/cost issues in a fair fashion. I am in Eugene, and except for the job climate here (continually tenuous) it's a great place to live. I guess 28 years here states my preference pretty clearly. Oregon is a great place to live and an exceptional place to ride. We'll see you at BC Dan!

    Brandmaster T/Mudflaps

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    172
    I lived in Phoenix for 5 years and plan to never return. Why, because of what has already been mentioned on this thread. I highly recommend, although recognize you stated you are moving in June, that someone wanting to live in a desert should go and spend at least 2 weeks there in the middle of summer hell. Keep in mind that the electric companies, in the Phoenix metro area, raise their electric rates from the middle of May to the middle of October. Why? Because you could have over 100 degree days that entire time. The crime, pollution, traffic, snowbirds all make for not my idea of a great place to live. Phoenix is a golfers dream. I hate golf. Also, don't kid yourself about buying the non-sense of Scottsdale is not Phoenix. Scottsdale is the extended Phoenix metro area just as Boulder is to Denver.

    Sac town. I have only visited there. I did not like it myself but can't commit much on it as I have not lived there. It was very brown.

    Oregon. I like there person who said that the traffic moves very good in Portland. No offense, but are you on crack? As I sit in traffic, I often think that the Civil Engineers that designed some of the highway systems in Portland should have their licenses stripped, be arrested and thrown in jail. Okay, maybe that is a bit extreme, but those Civil Engineers have a lot to learn about moving traffic. Creating slow moving traffic does not get many people to use public transportation.

    Aside from the traffic issues, Portland is a unique city and to me seems to be very diverse. Given that, I spend as little amount of time in the city as possible. There are a lot of great places to explore outside of the Portland metro area with a lot of different things to do. Oh yeah, Oregon is very beautiful and GREEN on the western side of OR which is where I spend almost all my time. I do have many friends who spend a fair amount of time on the eastern side of OR and they love it. If you do move here, just accept that you will have to go about your business whether it is raining/misting or not. Get practical rain gear and do what you want. It is possible. Just plan on having to drive for quality MTB'ing.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    21

    ... and if we just ... Day of Reckoning

    I awoke this morning at 5:00 a.m. in a Dallas hotel room, out on business, no need for my alarm clock. (I am so terrifically tickled Dallas didn't make the list.) I Couldn't sleep....today is the day I find out where my wife and I will call home. I cannot thank each of you enough for your carefully crafted thoughts on the pros and cons of my diverse listing of cities. I can safely say that Portlanders (and even some sun-baked Arizonans) are quite passionate about your gem-of-a-city. While I am in zen mode over the outcome at this point (okay, I confess that I am still having a hell of a time getting my head wrapped around the possibility of ending up in the PHX suburbs...shivers) I am pretty convinced we are headed your way and am excited at the prospect.

    Later today, as I toil through a business restructuring meeting, my mind will be on a little city way up north along the Pacific, hoping for the chance to call all you folks my neighbors.

  23. #23
    Shamisen Appreciator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,881
    Quote Originally Posted by Rock Magnet
    I awoke this morning at 5:00 a.m. in a Dallas hotel room, out on business, no need for my alarm clock. (I am so terrifically tickled Dallas didn't make the list.) I Couldn't sleep....today is the day I find out where my wife and I will call home. I cannot thank each of you enough for your carefully crafted thoughts on the pros and cons of my diverse listing of cities. I can safely say that Portlanders (and even some sun-baked Arizonans) are quite passionate about your gem-of-a-city. While I am in zen mode over the outcome at this point (okay, I confess that I am still having a hell of a time getting my head wrapped around the possibility of ending up in the PHX suburbs...shivers) I am pretty convinced we are headed your way and am excited at the prospect.

    Later today, as I toil through a business restructuring meeting, my mind will be on a little city way up north along the Pacific, hoping for the chance to call all you folks my neighbors.
    Good luck with everything. My wife and I moved to Portland a little less than a year ago. I've got to say that it's one of the best places I've lived, but we're a little uncomfortable in the neighborhood in which we're living. I’d recommend not buying a place in the Foster-Powell hood anywhere near 82nd ave. As with any location, PDX has its share of pros and cons, but if you have the desire and time to be outside, it’s overwhelmingly pro.

    This winter has been amazing with all the snowfall on Mt.Hood. It's fantastic to live in an area where you never have to deal with snow, but be so close to a great mountain that offers so much. I’ve been getting turns in at least once a week since November. I’m almost at the point where I’ll be ready to put my snowboard away and start suffering on my bike.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Paco Finn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by smudge
    Good luck with everything. My wife and I moved to Portland a little less than a year ago. I've got to say that it's one of the best places I've lived, but we're a little uncomfortable in the neighborhood in which we're living. Iíd recommend not buying a place in the Foster-Powell hood anywhere near 82nd ave. As with any location, PDX has its share of pros and cons, but if you have the desire and time to be outside, itís overwhelmingly pro.

    This winter has been amazing with all the snowfall on Mt.Hood. It's fantastic to live in an area where you never have to deal with snow, but be so close to a great mountain that offers so much. Iíve been getting turns in at least once a week since November. Iím almost at the point where Iíll be ready to put my snowboard away and start suffering on my bike.

    Yep, I found it hard to believe ....closing the ski resorts because of a lack of interest in the spring not because of lack of snow! Never heard of in Michigan. Nice being able to go sking, go biking, and go play on the water all in the same day! (triathalon)

    Nate
    Paco the "Flyin' Finn"

  25. #25
    Shamisen Appreciator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,881
    Quote Originally Posted by Paco Finn
    Yep, I found it hard to believe ....closing the ski resorts because of a lack of interest in the spring not because of lack of snow! Never heard of in Michigan. Nice being able to go sking, go biking, and go play on the water all in the same day! (triathalon)

    Nate
    For the record (just in case a Mt. Hood Meadows manager reads the board ) I'm going to be on my snowboard until I can't possibly stand to go another day. If that means I can slide until the trails dry, perfect. Why on earth Meadows would close up shop in the middle of April after the season they've had is beyond me. I hope people are interested enough next month that Meadows will have a reason to petition for an extended permit.

    Sorry to be OT.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •