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  1. #1
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    Moving to Oregon, but where?

    Like the title says, I'm moving to Oregon with my as soon as my better half finishes her Masters in Social Work. We've settle on Oregon due to a variety of circumstance which range from cost of living to proxity to family but frankly, you folks remind us very much of our current current Community here in Maine -- very much in a good way

    We're in a unique position, which allows us to be somewhat broad when looking at places to live. My better 1/2 will shortly begin working very closely with here placement adviser in finding a Job. She does need to do is give her adviser communities to focus on.

    Much like most all MTBR's, cycling is a priority in life. Some other interests are, skiing, food, our dog and other general outdoor activities.

    we'd like to stay away from Portland, not b/c we don't like, but we'd rather get more rural than urban at this point. Contrary to what many think, Maine isn't all moose, fisherman and lobsters. Portland (maine) is about 75K right now, and 250K with the surrounding area. It's a great town, but we'd like to stay away from communities much bigger. The idea of a single family home and some land is pretty appealing to us right now... At the same time, we're realistic about finding jobs in small towns.

    With that being said, we're aware and have been to many of the usual suspects mentioned what seems like daily. i.e. Eugene, Bend and Hood River all of which are considerations. Recently some other communties have been suggested. Astoria is one, which located on the coast agian would be nice, but i'm concerned about MTB'ing and skiing access. Ashland was also mentioned, but from the realestate prices, it would seem it's already been Californicated.

    Are there any other communties worth looking into. I appreciate your input.

  2. #2
    AW_
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    I dig Astoria. It's a funky little town. Once upon a time I considered moving there. Seems like there are a lot of nice old houses with character. I really like the coast. But it's a loooooong way from any skiing that I know of. And I never hear much about mountain biking out there aside from "norm's trails" which ain't much from what I understand. But it seems like there is a lot of wooded land.... some elevation... and not many people... which can be a good combination. Maybe there is more stuff out there but it just isn't well known. Or if you like building trails perhaps there are some good places to do so in the area.

    Sorry I don't have any recommendations other than some quick feedback on that area. Tough choices ahead, but man, what an awesome predicament to be in. Have fun with your research and good luck!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by AW_
    But it seems like there is a lot of wooded land.... some elevation... and not many people... which can be a good combination.
    I'm realizing this... It's funny, on the East Coast, the coast is crowded, expensive and well, crowded. I guess I95 is alot closer to the coast than I5 is in OR

    Quote Originally Posted by AW_
    Tough choices ahead, but man, what an awesome predicament to be in.
    Ya, really can't complain. THough i have to confess, while OR is top the list right now, we are considering WA as well, more specifically; Olympia and Bellingham.

  4. #4
    AW_
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    Bellingham
    If I could handle small town living, I would be there already. Bellingham and surrounding area is absolutely phenomenal. So close to the North Shore and Woodlot, it's not even funny. Whistler and back would be possible as a day trip. There is good riding in town too. And a lot of people who ride, both road and mtb scene appears to be pretty big up there from what I have seen. Crap. You almost have me reconsidering. North Cascades.... San Juans... BC.... awesome. Forget Oregon!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    I'm realizing this... It's funny, on the East Coast, the coast is crowded, expensive and well, crowded. I guess I95 is alot closer to the coast than I5 is in OR



    Ya, really can't complain. THough i have to confess, while OR is top the list right now, we are considering WA as well, more specifically; Olympia and Bellingham.
    I will second Bellingham and Olympia as well for great mtb and outdoor possibilities in WA. Also don't forget Wenatchee, WA with Devil's Gulch and Mission Ridge out your backdoor!

    JG
    Ride On!

  6. #6
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    If you are into skiing and mountain biking, Bend would be my first choice in Oregon. I second what the others have written about Washington, plus if you are close to Seattle metro area, your choice of jobs goes up quite a bit. You could still get to Mt. Bachelor and other such skiing places as well as Whistler. Good luck with all related to relocation and let us know how it goes. -GT2005

  7. #7
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    Ashland real estate is expensive (though getting cheaper by the month), but Ashland is a small town in the area. Depending on how close you really need to be to work (and depending on your jobs, your work may be more likely to be in Medford anyway) or various activities, Medford and its outlying areas are very affordable. The distances really are not great between areas. I live in Ashland but work in Medford and it takes me less than 20 minutes to get to work. The area does have good mountain bike options, local skiing with Mt. Ashland. Mt. Shasta an easy day trip and Mt. Bachelor an easy weekend trip. Other outdoor stuff very close includes many lakes, extensive hiking, river rafting. As for food, since Ashland is a tourist town, there are many really great restaurants.

  8. #8
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    I'll second/third Astoria coolness. There isn't much badass riding easily accesible there though (in my limited information).

    My favorite place in OR is where I choose to live (Cottage Grove). We are about a half hour south of Eugina. The riding is close and snowboarding isn't too far. Cost of living is excellent, schools are pretty decent, it still feels pretty small-ish (9K proper but serves an area of about 28K) and it's not Eugina. On the downside: there's a WalMart about to go super. On the upside: it has some funky local spots to get your shopping and eating done. There are still a few of us rednecks (not self-proclaimed, a fellow DOD'er calls me that...) in charge, but there's a small but vocal (and mostly welcome) yang to my yin. Keeps things colorful and balanced during breakfast conversations.

    Please don't move here though...please.

    Brock...

    PS: Just kidding about not moving here...kinda...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

    Disciples Of Dirt, come ride with us.

  9. #9
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    wenatchee area blows the pants off of bellingham

  10. #10
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    My wife and I are planning to Oregon early summer. After looking into housing and jobs in Portland, Eugene, Roseburg, and Medford we have decided Eugene is the place for us. The proximity to great biking, lakes, and winter activities is perfect in Eugene. Add the valley weather in the summer months and its an easy decision for us. The coast is too economically depressed and WAY to wet in the summer for us.

    We both grew up in Coos Bay so we know the pro's and con's of coastal living. We also lived in Seattle for 7 years so we know what Washington has to offer. IMO Oregon is a MUCH better environment than Washington. If you like getting taxed for every social improvement known to man move to Washington.

    Thats my .02 on why we choose Eugene as our destination for our move back to Oregon. I hope you get a chance to visit many area's and are flexible enough with jobs to land in the spot you desire.

    Good Luck on your move.

    -Jason

  11. #11
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    I'm a big-city guy myself, but if I were moving to the Northwest and wanted to be in a smaller city or small town I would consider: Medford, Grants Pass, Roseburg, Eugene, Corvallis, Albany, McMinnville, Astoria, Bingen/White Salmon (across from Hood River), The Dalles, Redmond, Sisters, Bend, Prineville, Klamath Falls, Lakeview, LaGrande, Baker City, Walla Walla, Ellensburg, Wenatchee, Olympia and Bellingham. All of these towns are nice places to be, and have good recreational access.

    Part of the reason you don't see so much crowding on the coast, by the way (except for the summer RV traffic jams), is that the coast is a lot rainier than places inland. Even in the "rainy" Willamette Valley and Puget Sound, most towns get about 40" of rain. That's similar to many eastern cities, though the precip is spread out much differently over the course of the year. But many coastal towns get double that, or more. The plus side is that winter temps are often a few degrees warmer on the coast, and summers are of course cooler.

    If you're willing to put up with somewhat bigger cities (still a fraction of Portland's size) then Spokane and Boise are worth considering. Both have much bigger job bases than the other cities and still have excellent recreation access as cities go.

    By the way, I highly recommend bestplaces.net. It has detailed information on communities of all sizes, including every one on the list above. Take their housing price values with a grain of salt, though -- sometimes they're recent and sometimes they're outdated, and sometimes they make no sense at all. For example, Portland's median house price is listed there as $387k, when the actual median price (as reported in yesterday's paper) is $276k. We briefly went over $300k last summer, but never have we gotten anywhere near $387k.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 01-18-2008 at 03:35 PM.
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  12. #12
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    For those still interested in my in my personal life (as i'm sure it's much better than US weekly), there have been further development on the relocation front. Due to acadamia reasons not worth explaining, Mrs jwind (and I of course :P) have be within a 2hr radius from Seattle. It's somewhat of a bummer, but hey whatever, it's one step closer to knowing where where we're going to be! And realistically, being a photographer by trade, it''l be alot easier to find work in that area -- that's for certain. Riding on the other hand, well, we'll see where we end up Thanks for all the advice. It's been helpful. Time to maek my way over to the WA board I guess
    Last edited by Jwind; 01-18-2008 at 03:56 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    For those still interested in my in my personal life (as i'm sure it's much better than US weekly), there have been further development on the relocation front. Due to acadamia reasons not worth explaining, Mrs jwind (and I of course :P) have be within a 2hr radius from Seattle. It's somewhat of a bummer, but hey whatever, it's one step closer to knowing where where we're going to be! And realistically, being a photographer by trade, it''l be alot easier to find work in that area -- that's for certain. Riding on the other hand, well, we'll see where we end up Thanks for all the advice. It's been helpful.
    Then it's Oympia for backdoor access to Capitol forest ("the Cap") and Olympic Pennisula/coast to the west or Ranier and surrounding mts to the east or Bellingham with close access to the north cascades and BC while still being within an hour or so from Seattle. That's a tough call, since I've heard Olympia is a nice town to live in, but being close to BC riding with Bellingham would be pretty sweet! Flip a coin?

    JG
    Ride On!

  14. #14
    Daniel the Dog
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    What do you do?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    Like the title says, I'm moving to Oregon with my as soon as my better half finishes her Masters in Social Work. We've settle on Oregon due to a variety of circumstance which range from cost of living to proxity to family but frankly, you folks remind us very much of our current current Community here in Maine -- very much in a good way

    We're in a unique position, which allows us to be somewhat broad when looking at places to live. My better 1/2 will shortly begin working very closely with here placement adviser in finding a Job. She does need to do is give her adviser communities to focus on.

    Much like most all MTBR's, cycling is a priority in life. Some other interests are, skiing, food, our dog and other general outdoor activities.

    we'd like to stay away from Portland, not b/c we don't like, but we'd rather get more rural than urban at this point. Contrary to what many think, Maine isn't all moose, fisherman and lobsters. Portland (maine) is about 75K right now, and 250K with the surrounding area. It's a great town, but we'd like to stay away from communities much bigger. The idea of a single family home and some land is pretty appealing to us right now... At the same time, we're realistic about finding jobs in small towns.

    With that being said, we're aware and have been to many of the usual suspects mentioned what seems like daily. i.e. Eugene, Bend and Hood River all of which are considerations. Recently some other communties have been suggested. Astoria is one, which located on the coast agian would be nice, but i'm concerned about MTB'ing and skiing access. Ashland was also mentioned, but from the realestate prices, it would seem it's already been Californicated.

    Are there any other communties worth looking into. I appreciate your input.
    In the social work field, if you have some experience, you can typically find jobs in rural communities because social services folks don't want to live there. Bend and Hood River are totally Californicated Eugene is a pretty decent town with some rabid riders down there called the Disciples of Dirt. I would move to Southern Utah if I was moving cross country because the riding is so awesome and the riding season is so long. By the way, I am not sure why you would want to move from Maine. Great place!

    Jaybo

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jwind
    For those still interested in my in my personal life (as i'm sure it's much better than US weekly), there have been further development on the relocation front. Due to acadamia reasons not worth explaining, Mrs jwind (and I of course :P) have be within a 2hr radius from Seattle. It's somewhat of a bummer, but hey whatever, it's one step closer to knowing where where we're going to be! And realistically, being a photographer by trade, it''l be alot easier to find work in that area -- that's for certain. Riding on the other hand, well, we'll see where we end up Thanks for all the advice. It's been helpful. Time to maek my way over to the WA board I guess
    Two hour radius? That could be anywhere from 10 to 100 miles depending on the time of day! A few years ago I drove from the U District to Renton on a Saturday morning in about 25 mins. That afternoon it took me 1hr45mins to drive back. No sporting events or such where even happening that day, just "normal" traffic.
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  16. #16
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    Shiggy's right. Seattle traffic is brutal (something I know well, as a Seattle refugee). Are you actually planning on driving to Seattle on a daily basis? If one of you needs to be in Seattle daily, you're better off living closer to town and driving to your recreation. You'll fight traffic doing that too, but it won't be quite as bad. Gas is only going to go up from $3, you know.

    If you really just need to be <2hr from Seattle but don't need to go there daily, then I'd recommend Olympia or Bellingham for bigger towns. For smaller towns, Mt. Vernon, Burlington and Anacortes are all nice too.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

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