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  1. #1
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    High Cascades 100

    Aug 23

    Anyone going?

    Any idea what the temp will be like?

    Any tire recommendations?

    Any advice?

    Looks like fun.

  2. #2
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    Hot, Dusty, Loose, Dusty

    The HC100 should be a challenge. Great trails, but in August they will be very loose and dusty, unless something strange happens beforehand, like a snowstorm or week of rain. I'd use high-volume UST tires with big knobs and low pressure.

    By October, when the Big Fat Tour happens, the trails will be sweet... I'll wait for that.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply. Sounds like it will be dusty and difficult. Good times.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jameshetfield
    Thanks for the reply. Sounds like it will be dusty and difficult. Good times.
    He is not kidding about the possibility of snow/rain/thunder storms. It could be 35 degrees and mixed snow and rain. I have seen--and ridden in--that in August several times in the past 4-5 years.

    Be prepared.
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  5. #5
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    Thanks.

    Any idea on the average temps up there that time of year? I know, hot(or real cold).
    80-90-100?

    Thanks again

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jameshetfield
    Thanks.

    Any idea on the average temps up there that time of year? I know, hot(or real cold).
    80-90-100?

    Thanks again
    Generally "hot", >80, with "weather."
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  7. #7
    jms
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    Looking forward to it and for some advice

    I'm going, and looking forward to it. I'm thankful and I think Mike Ripley will put on a great event, and it takes some serious "stones" to put on a single loop, 100 mile race, with @ 80 miles of singletrack. There is NOTHING comparable here in CA. As much as it pains me to say this, California endurance races seriously suck compared to the OR races. I'm surprised there hasn't been a bigger "buzz" @ this event in CA and OR. I'll be driving @ 1000 miles round trip for this one, coming from San Luis Obispo, CA, and I'm doing what I can to entice the usual suspects @ the CA races to join me.
    As for the weather.....whatever. After the Cream Puff the last two years, it'll be what it will be.
    And here's a question for all the Bend locals - what 29er tire would be appropriate for "typical" conditions. I'm thinking WTB Prowler [front] / Nanoraptor [rear] at the moment, or Wierwolf / Raceking. Thoughts?

  8. #8
    Keep Singletrack Single
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    Quote Originally Posted by jms
    And here's a question for all the Bend locals - what 29er tire would be appropriate for "typical" conditions. I'm thinking WTB Prowler [front] / Nanoraptor [rear] at the moment, or Wierwolf / Raceking. Thoughts?
    I run a Panaracer Rampage 2.35 up front with 28-32 PSI and a Conti Race King 2.2 in the rear with 28-32 PSI. Runs really well around here! Especially in the DUST...
    Phil's Trail Steward for COTA
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  9. #9
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    compared to the CCP the HC is...?

  10. #10
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley Johnson
    compared to the CCP the HC is...?
    ...further east.
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  11. #11
    I should be out riding
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    Quote Originally Posted by jameshetfield
    Thanks for the reply. Sounds like it will be dusty and difficult. Good times.
    For comparison purposes, there was once an XC race (also promoted by Mike Ripley) put on in the same area, at the same time of year, called (appropriately) the Dustslinger. I still remember bonking and suffering though that one...

    Great trails and looks like a good loop, but it can be really hot and dusty out there in August.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy
    ...further east.
    And that's about the only true comparison. Completely different terrain, soil, layout.. everything.

  13. #13
    Daniel the Dog
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    I want to ride a KTM

    Are motorcycles legal? Otherwise, I'm out

    Jaybo

  14. #14
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    course review

    Here is my take on it.
    http://dirtsurfdavid.blogspot.com/

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon
    And that's about the only true comparison.
    ..and easier. right? no one tell me otherwise, else i might not show up.

  16. #16
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    Hc100

    Any results published yet? How about some good race-day recaps?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by scocke
    Any results published yet? How about some good race-day recaps?

    Results are here
    and this is my race recap...

  18. #18
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    Here is my report for High Cascades 100

    Pre-race concerns:
    1. Duration of race and specific training. My longest ride going in was 6 hours, but I did tons of intensity.
    2. Hydration. Bend tends to be dryer than Boise and I was warned by Chris Bondurant to drink tons.
    3. Descending Kwohl Butte. I had heard a lot about it and had no idea what to expect. I was very concerned about ripping a sidewall.
    4. Tire choice. Race director Mike Ripley suggested that I run 2.2's or bigger. I have never raced on them and decided to again listen to Chris and go with the Kendas that I used at Creampuff. I did use 2x the amount of Stan's.
    5. Chain lube. I brought lube and a small towel. I did not use either
    6. Food. Getting the food right was a big part of this. Gary Stott ate his was through Creampuff, I planned to do the same.
    7. Bike. Would the Cannondale Scalpel (soft tail) hold up?

    http://www.mudslingerevents.com/high-cascades-100/

    The race is well planned and put together. Think Creampuff with fewer aid stations. It would be very difficult to place aid in the outlying portions of the course. The race starts on a wide, fire road sort of trail, but it is very dusty. I mean very dusty. Wear a mask dusty. Also, you really can't see for the first 5-10 minutes because of the stuff being kicked up, you just have to hope for a good line. I made one mistake in trying to ride off the side of the trail and almost lost it. As the pack splits up you begin to get your first glimpses of Mt. Bachelor. It is impressive in the distance and also a little daughnting knowing that you have to ride around it. After a few miles of the dusty road bit you move on to single track. Very sweet singletrack that goes on for miles. I had a great time on that stretch. I mostly big ringed the trail and then kicked down to my middle ring for some of the small rises. Also, during this time I began eating (mostly Chomps) and drinking. I was very glad I brought my Camelback. I filled it with water and electrolyte mix. My goal was to finish 2 bottles and the whole CB by the time I got to aid #1 at 25 miles. I almost did it. I was well hydrated for this race, in fact, I stopped to pee at least 6 times throughout the day. I also had a goal of 3 hours to aid #1, I was surprised to do it in 2.5 hours. Just like Creampuff, the aid stations were great. They had gels, Perpetuem, HEED, Endurolytes and water. They also had other foods which I really didn't use. At each aid stop the crew would take my bike and lube the chain, I never heard a noise from my chain.
    The climb up Kwohl began after aid #1. I knew from the pre-race meeting that descending Kwhol behind people could be difficult. I made my first major effort here. The climb is about 2000 ft. and an easy one to get a rhythm on. I passed a lot of people. Over the top I was very careful to steer around the large jumbles of lava and go a little slower. Imagine the baby head section of Sweet Connie (in Boise), but with lots of dust, much steeper and much longer. That descent took about 30 minutes?? and I had no problems. I stayed steady and passed 1 or 2 people. It was technical, but in a different way. After Kwohl there was a long trail/road/dust section which included several hike a bikes, then on to the Swampy loops.
    At the start of Swampy there is an aid station which you will go by 2 times. This is the best supported station at the race. The first 1/2 of Swampy was, in a word, fun. You can flat out rip it. Mostly big ring single track with some rollers. I did go off course here due to the markings and added about a mile to the day (others added more than that). The last part of Swampy is a long climb of about 1500 ft. I did not expect the climb to be that long and actually ran out of gels at that point. As luck would have it, I found one on the ground and ate it right then. Dave Byers writes about a dark spot in every long race he does http://davebyers.blogspot.com/ . This was my dark spot. It also proved to be several other people's dark spot because when I got to the top the aid worker first asked me if I wanted to drop out or keep going. I thought it was a joke!! I want to keep going! Apparently most of the drop outs occurred here. At this point I downed a can of Coke and took some Endurolytes. I felt recharged and took off for my next loop of Swampy. This time I knew what to expect and ripped the singletrack. It was amazing. The only issue at all was that the trails were not closed to recreational riders and I had several close calls both going up hill and down hill. I was racing, I wasn't thinking.
    Coming out of Swampy was another long climb followed by some dusty trail and fire road. Some parts of the fire road were covered in deep dust (6"-8") and a few sections were actually hardpack. The fastest speeds of the race were on the hardpack. I probably went 25-30 mph for 2 miles. At 80 some miles in it was nice to go that fast. Finally, after what seemed like a really long time, I made it to the start/finish/aid station and the final 12 mile loop. Again, the aid work here was great and this was the first time I found out how I was doing. I was very suprised to find out that I was in 26th place. I thought I would have been in about 60th. That was invigorating. I found this next trail section, Funner, to be slightly more technical than the earlier stretches. It was tough to do at the end of the race, but I still really enjoyed it. Similar to Swampy the trail descends first and then finishes on a climb. On a good day, the climb would be 100% middle ring. I mostly small ringed it. My legs were a little tired. I had one person pass me toward the end of the climb and I did not have the desire to chase him down. Really, what is the difference between 26th or 27th. I finished in 11:45, my time on the Garmin was 11:22 (did not include stops).

    Post race:

    1. Good, hard, satisfying race. The fatigue I felt was very different than a long road race or even long local mountain bike rides. I think there is so much total body movement throughout the day that it just wears you out.
    2. Unexpected pains: Wrist, knees, low back, neck - I'm a wimp
    3. Food is good. Gary was right, eat your way through it.
    4. Creampuff comparison. Because I did not finish the Puff I cannot say. It is different. It is unrelenting. People who completed both said the same things. Matt Erlenbusch from Bend said, "Hard to compare the two races, but they are both harder than Ironman."
    5. Dust. The dust sucks. Learn to ride it, bring a mask, get through it because the singletrack is soooo good.
    6. The bike. My bike did very well. It was squeaky at the end and it was pretty anoying, but it rode very well all day. The Kendas were the best tire I could have imagined. I have not looked at them to see if they were cut.
    7. The berms are not berms. Bondo told me that the things that look like berms in the trails are actually dust piles. I am glad he told me, I rode in the middle of the trail.
    8. Only do this race if you know you can do it in under 14 hours. It gets dark fast. I would not want to be out on those trails in the dark.

  19. #19
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    Hc100

    Thanks for the race report, very well written. I hope to participate in this race next year, it would be my first 100 miler.

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