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  1. #1
    Nat
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    Do I smell like meat?

    I got nipped by a dog (again) today, this time on the DRT. I think that makes three or four times for me now.

    "I've never seen him do that before!" said the owner. Yeah, yeah, never heard that before. "It must be your gloves" was the justification.

    I propose a ban on glove-wearing in the national forests.

  2. #2
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    Yeah, last time I heard "Don't worry guys, he's really friendly", their dog proceeded to chase after me and gnaw into the back of my leg. They were mtb'ers too. Made no effort (and had no means) to restrain their dog - other than calling for him - although he was clearly more interested in making a meal out of my calf.

  3. #3
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    Sorry you got bit, ticks me off when I hear about this.

    I had a pitbull charge me while backpacking last summer, scared the crap out of me, but didn't get bit. Think god the owners came around the corner when they did. Needless to say, I was pretty pissed and gave them quite the earful.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan
    Sorry you got bit, ticks me off when I hear about this.

    I had a pitbull charge me while backpacking last summer, scared the crap out of me, but didn't get bit. Think god the owners came around the corner when they did. Needless to say, I was pretty pissed and gave them quite the earful.
    I've never gotten bit but holy cow if I did I'd be so pissed I don't know what I'd do. I love a well trained dog. Hate owners of dogs that aren't well trained; enough to bring a lawsuit.

    So maybe I do know what I'd do.

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  5. #5
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    You have a slight liver and onions odor.

    It'll pass with a good bath.

  6. #6
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    DRT is always filled with dogs...dogs are both good and bad on the trails. It all depends on the owner....I usually run into the SLOW old furball who is trying to keep up with its owner....Usually the owner has no clue....I try to pass the darned thing and it just moves into my path... last year I had an incident on the trail that runs along the Deschutes below RiverRim. This particular owner had what turns out to be five dogs. I thought only four. Did not see the fifth. ALL OFF THE LEASH! The fifth darted out of the bushes in front me. I thought about a bunny hop and instead had to ditch. Needless to say it all resulted in trail rash and a severely sprained thumb. She has the "balls" to yell at me after. I told her that MTBer's are allowed on that trail section and with five dogs to one human ratio it might be wise to use a leash on each dog.

    Hope the bite was not severe! And to DF's point...Go take a damn shower!
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  7. #7
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    Isn't there a leash law? I don't mind dogs being off leash in principle, but I rarely see a dog well behaved enough to justify it. Just remember the owner is at fault. I stopped kicking the dogs and moved up the food chain.

  8. #8
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    The perfect thread for this announcement:

    On Nov. 18th the Deschutes National Forest is holding an open house to discuss dogs in the forest. If you are a dog owner and are not happy with the on-leash rules or if you are not a dog owner and have something to share, this is the meeting to not miss! Here are some more details:

    We would like to invite you to be part of a wider audience of different recreation users to discuss and explore ways for achieving respectful recreation on the Deschutes National Forest.
    Please bring your ideas to an Open House we are hosting on Thursday, November 18th from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m.
    The Open House will be held at the Bend Metro Park and Recreation District Office at 799 SW Columbia Street.

    The intention is to have a respectful dialog, it is NOT the time or place for complaints.
    "“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view." - Edward Abbey

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    Bummer you got nippped. How are you with dogs in general? In my experience, thats really the root of the issue. There are certainly aggressive dogs out there, but more often than not it seems to be a combo of a skittish/wary dog and person who isn't comfortable around them.

    Also - I know a lot of bikers want to stop off leash dogs, but I think thats about as fair as all of the nonsense with bikes in forest park. Dogs need more exercise (meaning off leash time) not less.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorkild
    Bummer you got nippped. How are you with dogs in general? In my experience, thats really the root of the issue. There are certainly aggressive dogs out there, but more often than not it seems to be a combo of a skittish/wary dog and person who isn't comfortable around them.

    Also - I know a lot of bikers want to stop off leash dogs, but I think thats about as fair as all of the nonsense with bikes in forest park. Dogs need more exercise (meaning off leash time) not less.
    did you really just say the guy who got bit is really the root of the issue?? wtf.

    and, dogs in the forest are like bikes in forest park? wft^2.

    never heard of a bike biting someone as i just read about here. i'm sick of getting dog sheit on my downtube.

  11. #11
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by danlorek
    did you really just say the guy who got bit is really the root of the issue?? wtf.
    Ha! I caught that too. It was kind of a misguided thing to say, wasn't it? It's akin to saying, "She was asking for it, dressing up all hot like that."

    How am I around dogs? Apparently appetizing. Actually I'm indifferent. I don't love them, I don't hate them. To me they're just animals. I address them kind of how one would address a bird or a squirrel, not overtly sentimental, fearful, or antagonistic (although squirrels can be both cute and terrifying all at the same time).

    Besides, the dog owner said it was my gloves, not me, so I'm going to sue Pearl Izumi.

    Quote Originally Posted by danlorek
    and, dogs in the forest are like bikes in forest park? wft^2.
    I'm not following the Forest Park issues, so wtf^3.

    For the sake of accuracy, I got nipped, not full-on bitten or gnawed upon. I felt tooth pressure but not enough to break skin. When I told the dog "NO!" it shied away, and the owners showed genuine surprise and contrition, so I left it at that. My hope is that they will train the dog to quit getting excited over gloves, but somehow I think they'll probably just forget about it and go back to business as usual until they "never seen him do that before" to the next guy.

    ...and I probably do smell like liver and onions.

  12. #12
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by sans soucie
    The intention is to have a respectful dialog, it is NOT the time or place for complaints.
    Good luck with that.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorkild
    Bummer you got nippped. How are you with dogs in general? In my experience, thats really the root of the issue. There are certainly aggressive dogs out there, but more often than not it seems to be a combo of a skittish/wary dog and person who isn't comfortable around them.

    Also - I know a lot of bikers want to stop off leash dogs, but I think thats about as fair as all of the nonsense with bikes in forest park. Dogs need more exercise (meaning off leash time) not less.
    Incredible!!

    I do not have be comfortable around your dog. Having been bitten once, and chased numerous times, I can NOT be comfortable when I encounter you, of unknown control ability, and your dog, of unknown temperament and behavior.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by thorkild
    Bummer you got nippped. How are you with dogs in general? In my experience, thats really the root of the issue. There are certainly aggressive dogs out there, but more often than not it seems to be a combo of a skittish/wary dog and person who isn't comfortable around them.

    Also - I know a lot of bikers want to stop off leash dogs, but I think thats about as fair as all of the nonsense with bikes in forest park. Dogs need more exercise (meaning off leash time) not less.
    This the dumbest thing you've ever said.

    At least I hope it is.

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  15. #15
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    Now I know this occurred on the DRT, which is completely, 100% mixed use. Just an unfortunate, unlucky experience for Nat there. I'm hoping the dog was at least leashed.

    But dogs running free (read: unleashed) on a singletrack bike trail is highly inconsiderate on the owners' part. More often than not, when at great speed, I'll need to slow to a crawl or even stop, because the dog will not move aside.

  16. #16
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    Most dogs are *not* under control

    I love dogs. I've always owned a dog or 3. I have 2 big dogs now. (I don't take them riding, even when I could, since they are large and can have hip problems, though.)

    I have never been afraid around dogs, and yet I've been bitten (broken the skin) twice. Both times I did nothing to elicit the bite (except perhaps smell like liver and onions). Bottom line, you can never know if somebody else's dog is going to bite you or not, no matter what the owner thinks.

    I have friends that ride with their dogs responsibly, i.e in places and at times when nobody else is around.

    But when I'm riding, and I see a dog on the trail that is not under control, I consider it a trail obstacle. I either try to bounce off it with my foot or my front tire. It's not really that I try to hit them, but I make it clear to them that I'm going where they are, and they need to move or be moved.

    Have you ever seen a motocross racer turn a sharp corner. They sit down and put out their inside leg, mostly straight, just above the ground. That stiff-arm foot out to the side move has nudged more than one dog out of the way on MTB trails.

    Don't get me wrong, I do not attempt to hurt any dog. I love dogs. But dogs only understand they are in the way if you tell them. So I tell them. (If the owner brings them out on the trail when untrained, to share with us all, they must be asking for help training them.)

    I feel compelled to note that I usually do not have to nudge the dog. In 10 years of using this approach I think I've nudged a dog out of the way once or twice with my foot and once with my front tire. (I stopped, so I didn't run over the dog, but he definitely lost the "who owns this trail" battle to my front tire.) I also always try to stop and mention to the owner that the dog was quite lucky, and that other trail users may not be able to stop or maneuver as I have.

    Just my $.02 ...
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  17. #17
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    Alright, please give me the opportunity to clarify my response above since it definitely angered a bunch of people on here.

    First off, the OP asked whether there was some reason he might be getting bit. I'm not saying he is at "fault," but I was suggesting that his comfort around dogs might be a contributing factor to being nipped. I should have framed this more as a suggestion than blame. Sorry.

    Let me see if I can explain my reasoning in a way that relates to my own experience and others might understand. For anyone that knows me, I grew up in Alaska with over 60 sled dogs plus at least 300 sled dogs within a 5 mile radius of my house that we regularly ran into while mushing on the trails. I have also owned or lived with many other dog breeds. I was last bit by a dog when I was 10--the dog was a known biter and especially agressive towards kids, but I never saw him bite any other musher that was comfortable around a dog like that. My point is that because of my upbringing, I am extremely comfortable around dogs and probably haven't really worried about being bitten in close to 20 years despite being in some situations that would scare many other people.

    On the other hand, I never grew up around horses and to this day am quite uncomfortable around them. I just don't know how to behave and am always nervous about how the horse is going to react. For that reason, I am always the person most likely to be bucked, kicked, bitten, or brushed off on a tree anytime I attempt to ride or hang out around horses. Its not because the horses are somehow bad, its partly or even mostly my fault because they sense my discomfort around them. Yet every "horse person" is just fine around them and the horses behave remarkably well.

    So - my broader point is that a person's comfort level around animals is a big factor in how they get treated. Ask any vet and they'll tell you the same. Since the OP seemed to want to know why he was bitten (especially now that it has been 3 times) or possible ways to avoid it, I thought it might be worth pointing out that his behavior may have been a factor. I am sorry I didn't do it as tactfully as I could have.

    As to my second point, off leash dogs and mountain bikes in forest park, my point is really that I think its a bit hypocritical to be heavily anti-dog (based on the behavior of a small minority of dogs and dog owners) when the exact same type of anti-attitude (again based on a minority of bikers and trailbuilders) is a huge reason why we may never see good mountain bike access to forest park. Don't hikers seem to have the same fear response to a mountain biker coming speeding around a corner as some of you do to a barking dog. Unfortunately, dog owners, like mountain bikers, are often relgated to off the beaten path, out of town, and unpopular areas to get the opportunity to exercise their dogs off leash. All I am suggesting is that can't we all get a long better and not spend our time trying to get one or the other kicked off the trails.

    BTW--I am not attempting to absolve dog owners of any guilt in this.

    Again - sorry I made everyone mad above. I hope I have explained myself better now (whether you agree or disagree).
    Last edited by thorkild; 11-08-2010 at 03:33 PM.

  18. #18
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    Perhaps tolerance of aggressive behavior by dogs is the norm in a society where dogs contribute to transportation or other societal needs. But in a society where dogs are simply kept as pets, I'm not going to tolerate any misbehavior.

    I'm talking about misbehavior by either the dog or the dog owner. Usually the latter is the problem. I'm amazed by how many people think I should tolerate their k9's objectionable antics simply because THEY love the animal. Bullshite.

    This is the primary reason I don't own a dog. With dog ownership comes responsibility -- lots of it. Training Rover, picking up his dog$h!t, making sure he's not being a nuisance to others (like nipping them) -- it takes far more time & energy to do right than I'm willing to invest.

    But lots of folks who don't want to invest the necessary time & energy choose to own dogs anyway. They give responsible dog owners a bad rep.

    If you don't want to be responsible for your dog and everything he does, then don't get a dog in the first place, I say.

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  19. #19
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    Thanks Sparty...btw,you were quite gentle about it compared to what I was "thinking".
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  20. #20
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    sParty, as I read your post I just mentally replaced "dog" in your post with "kid" and I can totally see eye to eye with you on that.

    As for the actual rules on DRT; dogs are free-range Sept 16th to May 14th, or to put it another way the FS requires dogs on leash May 15th to Sept 15th.

    Interestingly kids are not required on leash, but on the DRT they are rarely seen without a SUS (Sport Utility Trailer) which basically acts as a rolling kennel anyways.

    Ever try to mtb with a dog on leash? I loved riding with Dozer when he was a pup. The trick is to train the dog as sParty mentioned and for the owner use his friggin' head and stay off the most popular trails using their own discretion. Yep, that ain't gonna work. Prepare for regulations.

  21. #21
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer
    I'm hoping the dog was at least leashed.
    Yeah right. Have you seen a leashed dog ever on the trails? Once in awhile I'll see a leash rolled up in the owner's hand, but as per usual this one was not leashed.

    I think the reason I've had three or four encounters now over a span of 9 years comes down to a matter of numbers:

    1. I'm out in the woods a lot. I've never recorded how many days per year I've actually been out but I must average 3-4 days per week.
    2. Half (literally) of Bend owns a dog. I read recently that around 50% of homeowners in Bend have a dog as a pet.
    3. Bend attracts outdoor lifestylers. Apparently to fit this pre-fab mold one needs to own at least one piece of clothing from Arc'teryx, Marmot, The North Face, Patagonia, or Mountain Hardwear. One must also enjoy bland food from 10 Barrel, have at least tried tele skiing, question the logic behind childhood vaccinations (great, polio's back, thanks), have worn a costume to some athletic event, enjoy enthusiastic and trite conversation centered around being outside, and to round out the image, have a dog.

    When you combine the above three factors you're sure to come across a lot of dogs out in the woods, increasing the chances of coming across those that are poorly-trained.

    I just got in from out. In between Skyliners TH and Tumalo Falls sure enough I came across an unleashed dog running ahead of its owner. Nothing to report this time other than the seeming fact that I see a dog nearly every time I'm out on the trails. I'll be out again tomorrow afternoon and on Friday and who wants to bet I'll see at least one dog per day?

  22. #22
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeenYour Crash
    sParty, as I read your post I just mentally replaced "dog" in your post with "kid" and I can totally see eye to eye with you on that.

    As for the actual rules on DRT; dogs are free-range Sept 16th to May 14th, or to put it another way the FS requires dogs on leash May 15th to Sept 15th.

    Interestingly kids are not required on leash, but on the DRT they are rarely seen without a SUS (Sport Utility Trailer) which basically acts as a rolling kennel anyways.

    Ever try to mtb with a dog on leash? I loved riding with Dozer when he was a pup. The trick is to train the dog as sParty mentioned and for the owner use his friggin' head and stay off the most popular trails using their own discretion. Yep, that ain't gonna work. Prepare for regulations.
    I have two kids and no pets (unless you count a couple of bettas -- bad trail pets) and I actually agree with you. I can't stand being around poorly-behaved kids. If you get to know several parents and their kids, you quickly see that little hellion kids come from hellion parents. If you want to understand a child's behavior, look to the parents. I'm guessing same goes for wild pets.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeenYour Crash
    sParty, as I read your post I just mentally replaced "dog" in your post with "kid" and I can totally see eye to eye with you on that.

    As for the actual rules on DRT; dogs are free-range Sept 16th to May 14th, or to put it another way the FS requires dogs on leash May 15th to Sept 15th.

    Interestingly kids are not required on leash, but on the DRT they are rarely seen without a SUS (Sport Utility Trailer) which basically acts as a rolling kennel anyways.

    Ever try to mtb with a dog on leash? I loved riding with Dozer when he was a pup. The trick is to train the dog as sParty mentioned and for the owner use his friggin' head and stay off the most popular trails using their own discretion. Yep, that ain't gonna work. Prepare for regulations.
    Be careful with the direction that you are headed.
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  24. #24
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    My two cents

    First off, sorry to read about being bitten and the same goes to others who've had the same experience.

    I'm a dog owner who takes his dog on most rides. She is one I've trained to ride behind my back tire, not crap on trail, stay on trail when moving, among other things. She isn't perfectly behaved, a bit exuberant with wanting to say hello. She could see another rider and run after them, but it is more of a hurding instinct to bring the pack together. no barking or aggression, just a dog running. But I understand that can be intimidating in itself.

    That being said, the dog I had before her was larger, dominant, and aggressive. He was a 115# German Shepard. I did not take him riding and he wouldn't be off-leash hiking or otherwise. As the owner, I didn't want deal with the consequences of his protective nature taking over and hurting another person or animal.

    All dogs have their own personality, just like people. I'm comfortable around most dog, not all and can make friends with most. I know how to read their body language, Cats on the otherhand...I've been bitten by many and frankly would rather not be around them. But, no one rides with their cat

    Most dogs need exercise, it improves their behavior and tempermant. Some breeds need more than others. But all owners need to know their dog's personality and plan otherwise. A 'fido has never done that before' response is unacceptable. Fido is the owner's responibility, end of story. If the dog won't run behind you, you have no way to attempt to counteract Fido's behavior out in from of you, unless yelling really halts him or you have a remote collar (I trained mine with one of those).

    The summary of all this is, don't blame the dog, blame the owner (especially me if mine gets out of line). If a loose dog is coming aggressively toward you, stop and get the bike between you and the dog. Use soothing tones and relaxed posture, it helps. And if attacked, whack it with your bike to get its attention and let it you are the boss.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by nh4cl
    If a loose dog is coming aggressively toward you, stop and get the bike between you and the dog. Use soothing tones and relaxed posture, it helps. And if attacked, whack it with your bike to get its attention and let it you are the boss.
    Any other tips on how to avoid getting bit?

    This is what I have done in the past (use the bike as a barricade and try to be relaxed). Seems to work somewhat but I have also dealt with dogs that would NOT back down until their owner called them off.

    I have also been nipped before and also been bit, piercing the skin.

    I notice that the mail carriers have pepper spray. Does anyone carry it for riding? Does it work well on dogs? Any other alternatives which are not lethal and will not cause permanent injury?

  26. #26
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    I notice that the mail carriers have pepper spray. Does anyone carry it for riding? Does it work well on dogs?
    I live in ranch country and people let their dogs run free. Some, if not most, of these dogs are large and some are willing to bite anything that comes by. I have dogs charge or chase me nearly every ride and I've been bitten a number of times, including twice on one ride.
    I like dogs as much as the next guy, but if people are going to let dogs who bite run around, you have to take precautions. Most dogs will just run up to you barking, which is unnerving at times, but most won't bite. Yelling "Hey" or "Go Home" usually slows them down. Not all the time though, that's why I carry Halt. It's what letter carriers use(my neighbor is the local postmaster) and it doesn't cause permanent injury to the dog.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ride_nw
    Any other tips on how to avoid getting bit?

    This is what I have done in the past (use the bike as a barricade and try to be relaxed). Seems to work somewhat but I have also dealt with dogs that would NOT back down until their owner called them off.

    I have also been nipped before and also been bit, piercing the skin.

    I notice that the mail carriers have pepper spray. Does anyone carry it for riding? Does it work well on dogs? Any other alternatives which are not lethal and will not cause permanent injury?
    I have been rushed by dogs many times when riding my road bike out in rural areas where people let their dogs roam their unfenced property. The most effective method I have found is to yell "NO" and "GET BACK" multiple times as loudly as I can. This always stops a dog in its tracks, and has worked for me every time. I'm not an expert on dog psychology, but I believe this behavior establishes that you are the boss. There is definitely something to what Thorkild says about dogs being able to sense a person's apprehension and fear -- to which some dogs react with aggression. Not that I am suggesting that it was Nat's fault that he got bitten, either.

    I love dogs (well behaved ones) and do believe that they need to be able to run free of a leash sometimes. But if a trail is typically busy and your dog has aggressive tendencies or does not listen to you, you should either leash your pup, or take it to a less peopled area to exercise.
    "It is not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it is because we do not dare that they are difficult."

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kook91
    Not that I am suggesting that it was Nat's fault that he got bitten, either.
    IT WAS THE GLOVES!!!

    When I told this dog "No!" it backed off. When I've been rushed before I typically hop off the bike, turn to face the dog and yell "NO!" The only times I've been nipped were when I didn't see it coming in time to react.

  29. #29
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    I got bit in Forest Park, right on Leif Erickson, by an unleashed dog. It started chasing me as I rode by, and bit my knee. Then I stopped and started yelling at it, which totally flipped it around, and it cowered behind its owners. Since then, I've either rode straight at aggressive dogs and scared the crap out of them, or yelled NONONONONONON!!!!!! as loud as possible. That really seems to work. I think because they suddenly realize that I'm a person, not an odd shaped deer. On top of that, it brings back memories of getting whacked by their owner when they misbehave. I've got zero tolerance with dogs, and have been known to kick. Sorry, but getting bit sucks.

  30. #30
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    I have experienced more dog issues on rural roads than on the trail. I often consider carrying pepper spray. I would like to mace the owner since its not really the dog's fault. The on-trail dog issues I have had most were with my friends dogs, usually chasing deer or getting in the way on the trail. People standing around yelling into the forest is well, stupid, and worse than barking. Come back Moron, Come, MORON MORON, Come back MORON! Moron sit.

  31. #31
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    good thing you don't smell like a$$, nat, or you'd be attacked by cats trying to clean you
    lets not make it a religion, it is recreation

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by vulture
    ... Come back Moron, Come, MORON MORON, Come back MORON! Moron sit.
    I LOL'd.

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  33. #33
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    [I just got in from out. In between Skyliners TH and Tumalo Falls sure enough I came across an unleashed dog running ahead of its owner. Nothing to report this time other than the seeming fact that I see a dog nearly every time I'm out on the trails. I'll be out again tomorrow afternoon and on Friday and who wants to bet I'll see at least one dog per day?[/QUOTE]




    Hey Nat, where you riding Friday? My dog is getting hungry.

  34. #34
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by seedy
    Hey Nat, where you riding Friday? My dog is getting hungry.
    If your dog is worth his or her salt he or she will find me. This can be a new activity, like geo-caching for dogs!

  35. #35
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by vulture
    I have experienced more dog issues on rural roads than on the trail. I often consider carrying pepper spray. I would like to mace the owner since its not really the dog's fault. The on-trail dog issues I have had most were with my friends dogs, usually chasing deer or getting in the way on the trail. People standing around yelling into the forest is well, stupid, and worse than barking. Come back Moron, Come, MORON MORON, Come back MORON! Moron sit.
    Do you guys remember PinsNeedles? I was riding with him and one other person several years ago and the third rider's dog came along. Every time we would stop, the third person's dog would pick up rocks in its mouth and chuck it at our bikes. PinsNeedles had just picked up his new Vulture and the dog connected with a softball sized rock. Ting! Ouch.

  36. #36
    ronbo613
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    I would like to mace the owner since its not really the dog's fault.
    Bingo. I fully blame dog owners for their misbehaving dogs.
    I don't like getting bit by free range dogs, but I really hate to pepper spray them. I have friends who have seeing eye dogs and know people who are not as fortunate as us to have two working arms and legs; their dogs are one of the best parts of their lives.
    Gotta look at both sides of the story...

  37. #37
    Daniel the Dog
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    Yep

    I was the bottom of Coyote Cliffs at Syncline when a large group of guys were at the bottom relaxing. One of the guys was bragging how he kicked at a Labrador walking with some hikers. I kick myself because I didn't say something to him. I rode by the dog and he was a big love. It really works both ways.....

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    I was the bottom of Coyote Cliffs at Syncline when a large group of guys were at the bottom relaxing. One of the guys was bragging how he kicked at a Labrador walking with some hikers. I kick myself because I didn't say something to him. I rode by the dog and he was a big love. It really works both ways.....
    Agreed!

  39. #39
    Out spokin'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    I was the bottom of Coyote Cliffs at Syncline when a large group of guys were at the bottom relaxing. One of the guys was bragging how he kicked at a Labrador walking with some hikers. I kick myself because I didn't say something to him. I rode by the dog and he was a big love. It really works both ways.....
    It's true... there are morons who own dogs and morons who don't.

    --sParty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    It's true... there are morons who own dogs and morons who don't.

    --sParty
    Agreed!
    Master of Laundry...Lord of Cleaning!

  41. #41
    Obviously Single
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    Logic?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    It's true... there are morons who own dogs and morons who don't.

    --sParty
    I took Logic classes in College, let me try to get this one ...

    Let me see: (D and M) or (not D and M)

    Does that just imply there are Morons?

    What did I win? (and am I disqualified for being one?)
    The Lee-Man

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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeMan
    I took Logic classes in College, let me try to get this one ...

    Let me see: (D and M) or (not D and M)

    Does that just imply there are Morons?

    What did I win? (and am I disqualified for being one?)
    You win a new puppy!
    Master of Laundry...Lord of Cleaning!

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Do you guys remember PinsNeedles? I was riding with him and one other person several years ago and the third rider's dog came along. Every time we would stop, the third person's dog would pick up rocks in its mouth and chuck it at our bikes. PinsNeedles had just picked up his new Vulture and the dog connected with a softball sized rock. Ting! Ouch.
    I think if I saw a dog throwing rocks at my bike I'd probably bite the owner just to make the circle of absurdity complete.

  44. #44
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by ride_nw
    I think if I saw a dog throwing rocks at my bike I'd probably bite the owner just to make the circle of absurdity complete.
    Ha ha!

  45. #45
    please, just ride
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    I have to say that I have seen many more misbehaving mountain bikers than misbehaving dogs. Not that I have ever been bitten by either.

  46. #46
    Take Chances
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    I love taking my dog mtb'ing on trails with me. I don't plan on stopping anytime soon. Here is my approach. He does not bite. Keeps up well. Minds well. Has been on many trails. Generally behaves well(like not lying in the trail when we are stopped). He has been in the way of other mtb'rs twice in the hundreds of times we have been out. I appoligized as they went by and made sure next time he was near me off the trail when other mtb's went by. Generally others have been cool.

    I feel terrible that someone would get bit. That should never happen.

    Dog behavior is really the responsability of the owners. If you have a dog be a good owner and be in control of your dog.

    As far as mtb'ing with my unleahsed dog. We are not going to stop anytime soon. Dog's rule!

  47. #47
    B42
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    I have friends who have seeing eye dogs and know people who are not as fortunate as us to have two working arms and legs; their dogs are one of the best parts of their lives.
    I've met a number of service animals and all of them are great (the owners are not bad either).

    I really hope they don't have seeing eye dogs for mtbrs. I'm picturing a cliff with the dog watching the mtbr falling off of it after a missed corner.

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