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  1. #1
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    Which bike for general Oregon riding

    My X-Cal got stolen recently so I'm using this opportunity to upgrade to full-suspension. I live near Black Rock but also like to ride Alsea Falls and Peterson Ridge in Sisters. Hoping to get down to Oakridge this year finally as well. Options I'm looking at are a well specced 2015 Fuel EX 9 or slightly less well specced 2015 Devinci Troy, both Alu frames, both 27.5. Devinci does have the Dual Air Pike going for it but 150mm seems like overkill for everything except Black Rock. $400 difference but the Trek is ready to go tubeless and has a stealth dropper already so the difference is pretty close. Just looking for general input from folks who ride these areas more than I have.

  2. #2
    Trail Cubist
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    Well for what it's worth, I moved to Oregon from the east coast (Appalachian Mountains). And I'm pretty sure if I'd learned to ride in Oregon I probably would have bought a hardtail. I say that because most of the trails I've ridden out here are baby-butt smooth, and my FS seems almost ridiculous.

    I know there are some places that are rocky, but Peterson Ridge and Alsea Falls aren't those places! And even the Alpine Trail in Oakridge struck me as fairly smooth.

    In the Appalachians, you're riding endless loose rocks—rocks, rocks, and more rocks. So there a FS bike will literally keep your butt and joints from being hammered into powder.

    I'm not trying to tell you not to get a FS bike...just saying in my short experience in Oregon, there isn't much reason to have one. :-)

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

  3. #3
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    I dunno. I ride Blackrock with friends. There's everything there from DH bikes to slopestyle hardtails to all-mountain bikes. There's a guy who hammers laps on an XC 29er.

    I suggest you try out both bikes and get the one that you're the most excited about.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, Appalachia is SOOO gnarly, especially with all those hillbillies chasing you thru the rocks and all. Oregon is so lame and tame I would just get a scooter and send it. Maybe go hybrid like this, should be good for Black Rock and Larch...

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    Yeah, Appalachia is SOOO gnarly, especially with all those hillbillies chasing you thru the rocks and all. Oregon is so lame and tame I would just get a scooter and send it. Maybe go hybrid like this, should be good for Black Rock and Larch...

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    LOL, damn Gman086!

    In all fairness, there is some logic to what SWriverstone is saying. There really are a lot of smooth/flowy trails out here. That's not to say there isn't a good supply of tech in the PNW, but from someone with "short experience in Oregon," I could see why they'd say it's smooth out here. Either way, I'll take the PNW over the east coast any day...
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  6. #6
    Metalheadbikerider
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    Those are both really good trailbike options. It all depends on how "big" you might want to eventually go. Will you be looking to tackle bigger drops/jumps/etc? Or, will you be sticking only to typical XC singletrack/flow trails? If your answer is the latter, you are all set. If it is the former, test ride some all-mtn bikes with a bit more suspension. You don't really lose much these days on AM rigs when it comes to climbing, and the weight penalty is negligible as well. Go hit every local bike shop and test ride the hell out of everything. Ask them questions and take your time.
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  7. #7
    The Unaffiliated
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    It really depends on both where and how you like to ride. Most of my rides are long, smooth, slogging climbs followed by fast/steep/rough descents. I pretty much ride the most aggressive bike I can manage to ride up. If you are mostly riding XC loops or technical climbs you might want something lighter and more efficient.
    Personally, I would rather work a bit harder and ride a bigger bike.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWriverstone View Post
    .......I'm not trying to tell you not to get a FS bike...just saying in my short experience in Oregon, there isn't much reason to have one. :-)

    Scott
    Certainly a personal preference. Every so often I pull out the hardtail and go for a ride. Next time I'm back on the FS and it feels like a Cadillac. As I get closer and closer to 60, I'm liking the Cadillac so much more.
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  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the input. I went ahead with the Trek as I felt it was a better compromise between the areas I want to ride. Also it was a smoking deal at 40% off. Took it up Blackrock last night after work, didn't really lose any time going up compared to my hard tail, way faster coming down which was awesome. Not looking to go super big off anything, but it did give me the confidence to hit some of the smaller stuff that I never would before. Might have to actually try something besides the Bonzai trail.

  10. #10
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    Keep at it. I was at the same place three years ago. I'm not hitting Grannies yet but have Sicter Gnar dialed and am eyeing Sunday Stroll / Brake Check.

  11. #11
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    Scott, quityer*****in and head back to Appalachia. 😜
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  12. #12
    Trail Cubist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glide the Clyde View Post
    Scott, quityer*****in and head back to Appalachia. 😜
    LOL. Y'know, riding all those effing rocks was a pain (literally). They gave me some good technical skillz, but I don't miss those trails at all! :-)

    Scott
    29er wheels are dangerous. They may cause you to go faster which can result in serious bodily injury. —Jim311

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