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  1. #1
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    Best place to live in Oregon?

    So, I'm about 90% sure I'll be moving to either Washington or Oregon this year and wanted to get input from those "in-the-know" about places I should focus my search.

    Obviously, proximity to great MTBing is a priority.

    Other things... I prefer more liberal/progressive areas and I tend to like small and medium size cities more than large cities, but I still like to have restaurants, cafes, decent community, etc. And I'm not rich, so low-med. cost of living is important as well.

    If any of you guys are planning to move to upstate/western New York, I can return the favor!

    Thanks!
    Greg

  2. #2
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    Dude, you've put us in a tough spot.

    Proximity to great MTBing is a priority... hmmm... That would include places like the Gorge or Bend or Oakridge. Of those three, only Oakridge offers great singletrack plus low cost of living (the other two are off the freakin' scale).

    But Oakridge's restaurants, cafes, "decent community" is just developing, we're talking early, early stages. That's why its cost of living is on the low end. But you'll never tire of the riding opportunities close by Oakridge.

    There may be other places in Oregon worth considering that I failed to mention. Personally I live near Eugene and I'm happy with my proximity to good riding (half hour to the Disciples of Dirt's ~18 miles of secret stash, 40 minutes to Oakridge, an hour to McKenzie River Trail, 3 hours to Bend). But I'm a homebody when I'm not riding. I'd live quietly in or near Oakridge, in the woods, if I could... and ride and ride and ride.

    --Sparty
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  3. #3
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    Thanks Sparticus. I'd not even really heard much anything about Oakridge, I'll definitely look into that a bit more.

    I'm usually more of a home-body myself as well. But I work at home and I need to get out to "mingle" at least once a day - and a cafe or a cool place to have lunch are where I often find myself.

    Also, being single (and 34), it's nice if there's a few single women around.

    I had been looking a bit at Bend already - it seems like a nice size city. Is it really that expensive to live there?

    Thanks!
    Greg

  4. #4
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    Bend is nuts expensive. It's an outdoor fanatic's dream, but wicked expensive. There are, of course, ups and downs as there are everywhere, but it's a cool location and has lots of things to do. My sis and family live there and I was disappointed at the price they had to pay to get a decent house in an OK neighborhood 4 years ago (Our house is just as nice, one bedroom smaller..., sits on 6 acres in a "semi-private assocation" near Cottage Grove and we paid less). The riding is better in Oakridge, but the living is better for someone who needs "people" and culture in Bend ("culture" used to mean middle class/upper middle class and downright rich white people).

    Good luck.

    Brock...
    Are the wheels roundish? Ride it.

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  5. #5
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    Where are you from? If you are from the East Coast, than ANYWHERE in OR will likely feel cheap. Yes, even Bend...

  6. #6
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregzilla
    Thanks Sparticus. I'd not even really heard much anything about Oakridge, I'll definitely look into that a bit more.

    I'm usually more of a home-body myself as well. But I work at home and I need to get out to "mingle" at least once a day - and a cafe or a cool place to have lunch are where I often find myself.

    Also, being single (and 34), it's nice if there's a few single women around.

    I had been looking a bit at Bend already - it seems like a nice size city. Is it really that expensive to live there?

    Thanks!
    Greg
    Bend has plenty of cafes and lunch spots -- with more opening by the day. Is it expensive? I know several broke-ass people living here so that means it can't be that expensive, right? With people declaring bankruptcy all over town you might be able to get a good deal on a slightly-used home. I wouldn't call Bend liberal/progressive either.

    I wouldn't want to be single and looking in Oakridge. That's all I'm saying about that.

  7. #7
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    JWind - I grew up in Rochester, NY (north-west NY state), I lived in both San Diego and Boulder for a number of years (SUPER expensive housing in both those places), but am now back in Rochester temporarily. Decent houses in decent neighborhoods here are easy to find starting at $150k, but the taxes are really high (4k-6k/yr).

    I'd prefer to rent for awhile anyway if I just move to a place - a year or two to get a feel for the area. 1 or 2br for $700-$1000 would be what I would look for - hopefully in a decent neighborhood.

    As for political/social climate, anywhere between "somewhat liberal/progressive" and "middle of the road" works for me.

    I've heard that Portland doesn't really have too much sprawl as anything outside the "city limits" has to be agricultural. Are all cities in Oregon like that? What are the "outskirts" of Bend like? Personally, I hate burbs, but I like small towns outside of larger cities.

    Bend seems nice from a weather standpoint too. I've heard it's sunnier than places nearer the coast.

    Thanks!
    Greg

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Bend has plenty of cafes and lunch spots -- with more opening by the day. Is it expensive? I know several broke-ass people living here so that means it can't be that expensive, right? With people declaring bankruptcy all over town you might be able to get a good deal on a slightly-used home. I wouldn't call Bend liberal/progressive either.

    I wouldn't want to be single and looking in Oakridge. That's all I'm saying about that.
    I second these statements, Bend is a great place to live & coming from someone who is used to big city life (I'm from Southern California, my wife from Oahu, HI) the cost of living is reasonable & the restaraunts / cafes & coffee shops are off the hook here! I work from home as well & get out during the day for coffee, lunch, etc.. & the choices are endless. Rent, compared to bigger cities, is actually on par or cheaper, as well as house prices, plus they are getting much cheaper, as everywhere else in the country. My inlaws (now that they have a 12 week old grandson) will be shopping for a house soon for a future move here from Oahu & have found that there are great deals to be had for well under $300k, brand new or re-sales. & yes, if you are single, there are plenty of fit, single females here

    Now the riding, well, it goes without saying ; )

  9. #9
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregzilla
    JWind - I grew up in Rochester, NY (north-west NY state), I lived in both San Diego and Boulder for a number of years (SUPER expensive housing in both those places), but am now back in Rochester temporarily. Decent houses in decent neighborhoods here are easy to find starting at $150k, but the taxes are really high (4k-6k/yr).

    I'd prefer to rent for awhile anyway if I just move to a place - a year or two to get a feel for the area. 1 or 2br for $700-$1000 would be what I would look for - hopefully in a decent neighborhood.

    As for political/social climate, anywhere between "somewhat liberal/progressive" and "middle of the road" works for me.

    I've heard that Portland doesn't really have too much sprawl as anything outside the "city limits" has to be agricultural. Are all cities in Oregon like that? What are the "outskirts" of Bend like? Personally, I hate burbs, but I like small towns outside of larger cities.

    Bend seems nice from a weather standpoint too. I've heard it's sunnier than places nearer the coast.

    Thanks!
    Greg
    It's a renter's market in Bend:
    http://www.bendbulletin.com/apps/pbc...44/0/FRONTPAGE

    Portland has an urban growth boundary that limits sprawl. Bend doesn't have that yet, so there's still spreading development, but the outskirts are pretty much agricultural, ranches and forest. The city is still small enough that there aren't "suburbs" per se, but rather neighborhoods.

    Bend feels like Ft. Collins without the university, or like Boulder with a political bias more to the right side of the scale. I think it's fairly conservative here but not so much as Colorado Springs. Over the last few years even more wealth has been moving to town so things are getting even fancier.

    The weather is fantastic.

  10. #10
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    If you want a smaller community with center-to-left politics, you're looking at Ashland, Eugene, Corvallis, Bellingham or Olympia. Ashland is outrageously expensive, the others are moderate but also have wet climates. You pick your poison, and you pay for nice weather. I suppose it's possible that rents are reasonable in Bend, but home prices sure aren't. Last I heard the median price was way above Portland's median ($300k currently) -- and average incomes are far, far lower. I'd move to Bend in a heartbeat if I could have the same standard of living as an IT worker there, but for me it's not even close, not even factoring the better MTB opportunities.

    Nat's right, the weather's awesome in Bend, and so are the recreational opportunities. Sunny most of the year, dry summers, white winters but not very cold. Great mountain biking, road riding, kayaking, hiking and cross country skiing venues are everywhere, often right out your front door. Bend might not be too liberal, but there are certainly liberal pockets, and it's a whole lot more liberal than most other towns east of the mountains. Great restaurants for a town of its size too. Not a bad place to be if you can make the financial aspect of it work for you.

    As for the west side of the mountains and the rain: Easterners often misunderstand the rainy climate here, and picture buckets of rain coming down all the time (because that's what rainstorms are like everywhere else). But we don't get that most of the time. Mostly it's just a light drizzle on and off for about 6 months. Most cities west of the Cascade Mountains (except Olympia) get around 40 inches of rain, about the same as Atlanta or New York City. It's a damp climate most of the year to be sure, but even then it's only half the rain that people get on the actual coast -- most of the cities I'm talking about are an hour or two inland on the "dry" side of the coastal mountains. Also, even on the west side summers are dry, warm and beautiful. Most years it only rains a couple of times from early July to early October. It's a mild climate in a sense that people from the midwest or the east can't even comprehend until they've experienced. As a native Minnesotan, I'm always amazed that I can go play outdoors nearly any day of the year and not die. Pretty nice.

    Growth Controls: Portland has indeed limited growth with its Urban Growth Boundary, and you know when you've crossed it even though there isn't a line painted on the ground. All of a sudden the developments end and the farms begin. We still have some sprawl but nowhere near as bad as other like-sized cities that I've traveled to. The growth controls are actually a state law, and all Oregon cities have been required to have UGBs since the late '70s. Bend is a lot more spread out than you'd expect (I suspect the planners there have consistently made the UGB larger than the legislature intended), but I think that's only in contrast to the rest of Oregon. Compared to resort communities anywhere else, it's reasonably well controlled.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 04-01-2008 at 01:13 PM.
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  11. #11
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    I would not recommend Eugene or anywhere around there. Strange town.

    I grew up in and around Albany. Great place.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I would not recommend Eugene or anywhere around there. Strange town.

    I think what you mean to say was "I would not recommend Eugene or anywhere around there. liberal town."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I would not recommend Eugene or anywhere around there. Strange town.

    I grew up in and around Albany. Great place.
    Believe me when I say and I believe this may be one of those times that others would allow me to speak on their behalf.....We are all happy to hear that Kona0179 would not want to live in Eugene. With that said, Eugene's a pretty cool place to live as strange as it may be. Where else could tree huggers and loggers live side by side?

    As rent goes in Eugene; 700 to 1000 will put you in a nice place.

    Caz
    I am a Mountain Biker therefore I am late

  14. #14
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    If you want liberal...Oregon is your place! I consider myself a liberal thinking person but sometimes the liberals around here get way out of hand, at least in Portland.

    But to get back to your question...If I could find a job in Hood River I'd move there in a heart beat, and I am looking.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan
    If you want liberal...Oregon is your place! I consider myself a liberal thinking person but sometimes the liberals around here get way out of hand, at least in Portland.

    But to get back to your question...If I could find a job in Hood River I'd move there in a heart beat, and I am looking.
    Hood River is perfect for you.Do not look for "partners" in Oakridge.Oakridge is for riding and getting tubes/beer/friends on the way to Waldo.Come to Oregon...it's nice.Oh,did I mention to avoid "dating" in the Oakridge area.
    Master of Laundry...Lord of Cleaning!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppa#1
    Hood River is perfect for you.Do not look for "partners" in Oakridge.Oakridge is for riding and getting tubes/beer/friends on the way to Waldo.Come to Oregon...it's nice.Oh,did I mention to avoid "dating" in the Oakridge area.
    From this point forward, I'm stayin' outta this conversation.

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    We get old because we quit riding.

  17. #17
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    From this point forward, I'm stayin' outta this conversation.

    --Sparty
    What'd you do? You got some feral kids running around Oaktown?

  18. #18
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    I made the move to Eugene, from Northern CA one year and a day ago (March 31, 2007). We spent a lot of time scouting where to live in the Northwest - which amounted to Washington and Oregon, and essentially focused on any of the following: Seattle (and surrounding area, Portland (and surrounding), Bend, Eugene (a latecomer to the list), and maybe one or two others.

    We had lived in the SF Bay area for several years, and got very used to the incredible restaurant selection there, great tech job community, and of course insane housing prices. The housing prices drove us to move out a bit past Sacramento, getting us fairly close to Tahoe, and far cheaper houses. We were there for about 7 years, and then couldn't stand the heat anymore, and the utter lack of culture and much other than strip malls. I knew I could work from home, so we really could live anywhere I could get a decent Internet connection, relatively close to an airport with direct flights into the Bay area, etc. And, mountain biking and outdoor activities were a priority, as were good food, liberalness, and good environment for our two kids to grow up.

    We had originally thought Bend was it. Everything we read and researched had us squarely set on it. But, then we went to visit for several days. Bend is high desert, and given that we wanted to move away from the heat, this was a buzz kill for us. It's not as bad as where we'd been living (where it was routinely 105 for days or weeks on end). The other thing that got us, is that Bend is an island - there is nothing else around for 2+ hour drive. We didn't feel like it quite had enough to offer to be "that isolated" (our impression of course). The mountain biking also seemed to be a bit of a let down to me. There are hundreds of miles of trails, but they are very buff and given that I salivate over rocks and technical terrain, it was just not really appealing. The proximity to Mt. Bachelor was awesome though, and the town in general seems great, there are good restaurants, and it's definitely an outdoor paradise type of place. Housing prices are very high, and to me, are overblown (I guess it's why they're one of the top 10 most overpriced housing markets in the US). There also seems to be a dichotomy of wealthy early retirees and ski-bums or similar. You see these guys who look like they probably cashed out of the tech industry driving around in their Range Rovers or Porsches, and then you see the guys who are scraping by on whatever they can so they can ski or similar. Having said that, I think it's at least a consideration, and somewhere to scout out, as it may be more amenable to you?

    Ok, sorry to be long, but continuing... By this point we'd ruled out Seattle and that area, even though I love Seattle. My wife's family was also going to move and they weren't really interested, it was a bit bigger city than we all wanted, and mtb there is not that great (unless you count driving across into Canada ;-) and it just wasn't going to happen.

    So, it was narrowed down to Portland and Eugene. I was originally opposed to Eugene. Being truthful here, I'd heard it was a "hippy town" and that was a turn off to me (no surprise my wife's parents liked it, as they're from Berkeley But, the size was good, and everything I researched led me to feel it was the best of our possible cities for mountain biking (and now that I'm here, I'd agree). I as focused on, and believed we were moving to Portland - even on the last day of our split trip between Eugene and Portland. But, oddly, I got home, reflected a bit, and switched and was now selecting Eugene. The rest of the family chose Eugene as well.

    Eugene is not perfect, nowhere is. But, it is working out very well for us so far. You have got reasonable housing prices, good proximity to some fairly excellent mountain biking (as good as you'll get living in a more major city). There is absolutely no nice way to say this, but I love riding in Oakridge, but I'd never even consider it as a place to live.

    Many folks will heartily disagree, but I find the restaurants in Eugene to be just ok. I'm just heavily biased by the fact that I've lived in/near a place like San Francisco. The both breadth and depth of restaurants there will shame basically all but New York city. And, I don't just mean high end stuff. Full spectrum. But, we've found some places we like, it's just not the plethora we're used to, and the diversity is lacking.

    But, the flip side is that the local and organic food scene, and farmer's markets, CSA's, etc. are phenomenal! I'm so psyched on this. I really enjoy cooking as well, so this aspect has been a real pleasure. People are really into quality, local foods, organic stuff, and similar (grass fed, etc, etc.).

    Also, the Eugene airport is just so great. It's small for sure (I think it's 4-5 gates but I can get direct flights to SF, LA, Seattle, and a few others, so pretty much covers my needs in terms of that, and of course you can connect to anywhere. But, the airport is awesome, cuz you just pull up, no traffic ever, park in long term parking that is literally across the street from the terminal, and it's just low key and easy. I can almost leave my house an hour before my flight and be fine!

    Finally, the people both here, and from what we've found, pretty much all through Oregon, are just awesome! So friendly! Coming from California, the friendliness has actually creeped us out at times - in CA people would think folks were weird or up to something, or whatever if they were as friendly as some. But now it's just such a pleasure. I happen to be typing this from a hotel room in Portland, and as an example, we were standing at a corner in the city this evening, looking for the streetcar stop. A random, nicely dressed guy just said, "need help finding something?" We said yes, and he dialed us in on the streetcar stop. People you meet at a park or cafe or hanging out somewhere or wherever will talk to you and have a conversation, etc.

    Now that I've been here a year, I'm still not 100% dialed in, but I can absolutely say that I don't ever expect to live in CA again, and that I believe Oregon is my home now. I wish you the best of luck in your move and choices, and enjoy!

  19. #19
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    So why not move to Creswell, Sparty can rent you his fine RV Chester and you can work in super liberal Eugene, taste the local brews, chase all those UofO coeds, and commute to Oakridge for it's awesome MTBing.
    Happy Trails
    Jolly

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jollybeggar
    So why not move to Creswell, Sparty can rent you his fine RV Chester and you can work in super liberal Eugene, taste the local brews, chase all those UofO coeds, and commute to Oakridge for it's awesome MTBing.
    "Rent" on Chester might surprise you...

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  21. #21
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    "Rent" on Chester might surprise you...

    --Sparty
    Is it a case of, "If you gotta ass..."

  22. #22
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    Hillsboro (Portland Area)?

    Nobody has mentioned the Portland area. I live south of Hillsboro, way out in the country for living "in" the Portland area. (Nearest pizza is 10 miles away.)

    I can ride almost year around in the coastal range, but the trails there are limited. During the summer, I can drive north to St. Helens (ride next to a volcano!), west to Mt. Hood, East to Bend, South to Corvallis, Eugene, Silver Falls, Oakridge, North Umpqua Trail ...

    The truth is there aren't a lot of bad places to live in Oregon. (And there are more single women in Portland than most other places in the state ;-))
    The Lee-Man

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  23. #23
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    ... and if we just ...

    Headangle hit it on the nose about California and Eugene. I also came to Portland from living in the Sacto area for six years. Oregonian's a great bunch as the whole. Even in Portland people are nice, helpful, and generally decent people. I met every neighbor on my block within the first month of moving in and have become friends with all of them. In NorCal, after six years, I only knew a few of the families. Most people didn't want anything to do with the neighbors.

    We chose Portland because of the job opportunities, culture, arts, and proximity to outdoor activities. I don't have a job where I can work remotely, the the big city is where we had to land.

    No shortage of liberalism in Portland. It's the first place that we have lived where almost everyone that I meet is a registered Democrat. Originally coming from Arizona (land of John McCain) it was a real shock at first not having to defend myself constantly.

    My recommendation would be to stick within the Willamette Valley as a single person looking to do some serious dating. With the exception of Hood River and Bend of course. The time I spent in Bend reminded me of NorCal. Everyone in big ass SUV's flying around like they had to be somewhere yesterday when they are only going down to the mall for some new fashion accessories. I think you might be disappointed if you are looking for an educated, middle class, worldly lady in other parts of the state. Like Leeman says, more ladies to choose from in Portland.

    Portland has great venues for live music also. Just about every band you can imangine comes through here.

    You can get around by bike easily in Portland, Eugene, and Corvallis. Something to also consider when gas is $3.50 a gallon.

    Good luck.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by poppa#1
    Hood River is perfect for you.Do not look for "partners" in Oakridge.Oakridge is for riding and getting tubes/beer/friends on the way to Waldo.Come to Oregon...it's nice.Oh,did I mention to avoid "dating" in the Oakridge area.
    Huh?
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  25. #25
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    Headangle - Whoa, a book! But awesome info! I'm big into organic food, farmer's markets and CSAs, so that sounds great.

    Cazloco - sounds like Eugene is affordable too - right in my price range for rents.

    It seems like Eugene, Portland and Bend are the three areas to focus on. I've heard Portland and Hood River can be a bit pricey for rent/housing. Also, I've always imagined Hood River to be like a CO ski-town... full of single guys that live for skiing (or wind/kite-surfing) and rich couples/families.

    Thanks a ton for all the great replies, this is SO helpful!
    Greg

  26. #26
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    Embrace taxation

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregzilla
    JWind - I grew up in Rochester, NY (north-west NY state), I lived in both San Diego and Boulder for a number of years (SUPER expensive housing in both those places), but am now back in Rochester temporarily. Decent houses in decent neighborhoods here are easy to find starting at $150k, but the taxes are really high (4k-6k/yr).

    I'd prefer to rent for awhile anyway if I just move to a place - a year or two to get a feel for the area. 1 or 2br for $700-$1000 would be what I would look for - hopefully in a decent neighborhood.

    As for political/social climate, anywhere between "somewhat liberal/progressive" and "middle of the road" works for me.

    I've heard that Portland doesn't really have too much sprawl as anything outside the "city limits" has to be agricultural. Are all cities in Oregon like that? What are the "outskirts" of Bend like? Personally, I hate burbs, but I like small towns outside of larger cities.

    Bend seems nice from a weather standpoint too. I've heard it's sunnier than places nearer the coast.

    Thanks!
    Greg
    I thought you were liberal? Taxes are good. They feed the poor and hurting in our society. Feed the beast and embrace taxes. They are good for your soul and add to quality of life.

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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    I thought you were liberal? Taxes are good. They feed the poor and hurting in our society. Feed the beast and embrace taxes. They are good for your soul and add to quality of life.

    Jaybo
    What took you so long to join the party?

  28. #28
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    Wonder why nobody mentioned Corvallis yet. Great small town, McDonald Forest with plenty of trails for after work rides is a 15-30 min bike ride from town (no driving to the trailhead!). Restaurants and Cafes are there, nothing super exclusive though. Other than that, Mary's Peak is close, Falls City (Freeride) is 30 min away and all the other riding either in the North (Mt Hood, St Helens) or South (Oakridge, Willamette Pass, Waldo, McKenzie River, Bend) is equally far away so within 2-3 hours the most you are in all the cool places. And if you want the possibilities that only a big city can offer, Portland is a 1 1/2 hrs drive away. Best compromise IMHO. Did I mentioned that the town has 5 bikeshops?

  29. #29
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    Agreed on the job aspects of Portland vs. Eugene. Eugene is a bit weak there. It seems a higher than usual number of folks work from home or sort of alternative jobs. If I couldn't work from home, we'd almost for sure be in Portland (I work in the software business, and Portland is actually quite good for this).

  30. #30
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    Don't come on this board much

    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Muesl
    What took you so long to join the party?
    The Oregon board is not very interesting overall. Same old crap same board.

    Jaybo

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    Quote Originally Posted by iRider
    Wonder why nobody mentioned Corvallis yet. Great small town, McDonald Forest with plenty of trails for after work rides is a 15-30 min bike ride from town (no driving to the trailhead!). Restaurants and Cafes are there, nothing super exclusive though. Other than that, Mary's Peak is close, Falls City (Freeride) is 30 min away and all the other riding either in the North (Mt Hood, St Helens) or South (Oakridge, Willamette Pass, Waldo, McKenzie River, Bend) is equally far away so within 2-3 hours the most you are in all the cool places. And if you want the possibilities that only a big city can offer, Portland is a 1 1/2 hrs drive away. Best compromise IMHO. Did I mentioned that the town has 5 bikeshops?
    There's a lack of jobs in Corvallis, unless you want to commute to Albany/Salem/Eugene, etc. Best combination of mtn and road riding in the state though, and both flat and hilly road riding readily available. I'd move back in a heartbeat if I didn't need to work.

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    I'd suggest either Corvallis area of Ashland area. Corvallis because Black Rock is nearby, which is mostly a freeride park. The Ashland area has plenty to offer with more being added all the time. But Ashland is quite expensive, supposedly the most expensive in the state, so I'd suggest Medford instead.

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    Corvallis looks like a nice little town (from the pics in Google Earth). I've heard that Ashland is very expensive. Are Ashland or Medford nice places to live single, college-educated, left-leaning guys like myself? ) I've heard mixed reports...

    I work from home so finding a job and commuting are non-issues for me.

    Greg

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    I would move south

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregzilla
    Corvallis looks like a nice little town (from the pics in Google Earth). I've heard that Ashland is very expensive. Are Ashland or Medford nice places to live single, college-educated, left-leaning guys like myself? ) I've heard mixed reports...

    I work from home so finding a job and commuting are non-issues for me.

    Greg
    I work in the Columbia River Gorge and think it is awesome because the weather is so much better than PDX and other points throughout the Williamette Valley. Plus, you can ride almost year round in the lower trails. Salem and Eugene are not particularly interesting and I think they are flat and pretty ugly. Ashland is awesome with much nicer weather! Oakridge is nice because you are in the mountains and for 4-6 months a year you can ride there. Great riding in the summer. Oh, and Ashland is populated by a lot of left winged neo hippies. I think PDX is vastly overrated in so many ways, but you may enjoy it.

    Jaybo
    Last edited by Jaybo; 04-04-2008 at 11:50 AM.

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    Medford, Ashland, Bend and even Eugene are just big towns. Portland is a small city and as such has a lot going for it, despite what some people on this board and elswhere might say. Pros and cons exist everywhere. Portland's cons might be limiting factors for those people, but IMHO the pros far outweigh them. Sure there is not a lot of great riding without getting in a car and driving at least an hour. But make that drive (OK, maybe more like 1.5-2hrs) and it can be every bit as good (or better) than some other places already mentioned. But it is also seasonal. Get used to that. The good stuff, the alpine riding, is limited by snow pack each year, but some of the low-lying fruit is better than what some folks have at all in other parts of the country. And you'll find that no matter what part of the state you end up.

    But again, if you are young, single and left-leaning, Portland should be an attractive alternative for you. It might not be San Francisco when it comes to some of the dining options, but then again, it ain't trying to be San Francisco. The "slow food" movement is alive and vivacious here and Portland is also home to one of the coolest grocery store chains anywhere in the country (shameless plug) along with plenty of Farmer's Markets and CSAs.

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    Both Ashland and Corvallis are college towns. Well that's not totally true, while Ashland has a university in it, it is also where all the wealthy Californians go to retire. Also after living in Ashland for three years I can say that it is the embodiment of liberal, I mean up to a few years ago it was perfectly legal to walk around town totally naked. It is also very nice and well kept but it is probably more geared to older adults who are retired or near retirement just because it is so small and the standard of living is pretty high. But the Rogue Valley, where Ashland and Medford are, is pretty nice. Plenty of good riding from spring to fall. If you consider Corvallis a small town though, then you'll think Ashland is a village at probably not even 13,000 people. Oregon isn't one for east coast size cities, the whole state is at about 3.5 million and most of them are between Eugene and Portland. Medford is the biggest city around though at about 55,000 to 60,000. Something to remember though is that nearly everything town from Eugene to Portland along I-5 would be surrounding by agriculture. While bend is also a nice town, it has that feeling of being cut off I think, just a little too much by itself I guess. Not suggesting actually moving there but Falls City has a very nice mountain bike park that I have yet to get tired of, so finding somewhere to live within reasonable driving distance might be worth thinking about.

  37. #37
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    Good info in this thread (and funny too). I'm in the Portland area, but thinking of moving to a smaller city if I can find work. I love the time I've spent in Corvallis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    The Oregon board is not very interesting overall. Same old crap same board.

    Jaybo
    Agreed. And some people have that holier than thou attitude.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sullie
    Both Ashland and Corvallis are college towns. Well that's not totally true, while Ashland has a university in it, it is also where all the wealthy Californians go to retire. Also after living in Ashland for three years I can say that it is the embodiment of liberal, I mean up to a few years ago it was perfectly legal to walk around town totally naked. It is also very nice and well kept but it is probably more geared to older adults who are retired or near retirement just because it is so small and the standard of living is pretty high. But the Rogue Valley, where Ashland and Medford are, is pretty nice. Plenty of good riding from spring to fall. If you consider Corvallis a small town though, then you'll think Ashland is a village at probably not even 13,000 people. Oregon isn't one for east coast size cities, the whole state is at about 3.5 million and most of them are between Eugene and Portland. Medford is the biggest city around though at about 55,000 to 60,000. Something to remember though is that nearly everything town from Eugene to Portland along I-5 would be surrounding by agriculture. While bend is also a nice town, it has that feeling of being cut off I think, just a little too much by itself I guess. Not suggesting actually moving there but Falls City has a very nice mountain bike park that I have yet to get tired of, so finding somewhere to live within reasonable driving distance might be worth thinking about.
    Eugene is a college town as well.
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    While bend is also a nice town, it has that feeling of being cut off I think, just a little too much by itself I guess. [/QUOTE]

    I guess you could look at it that way, or you could look at Bend like a high end Wal-Mart (& yes, unfortunately, we have one, & now a Trader Joes)) where you can get everything you need in one place, & within 30 minutes. Redmond airport is 25 minutes away & you can fly direct to LAX, PDX, SFA, Vegas, etc...., the MTB riding is off the hook from April / May thru November, December thru April you are limited, but still have some nice singletrack riding 20 minutes away (Horse Ridge, Cline Butte, Smith Rock), you have big city style restaurants, 5 Micro Brewerys within walking distance, every home improvement store is here, tons of shopping, skiing / snowboarding 25-30 minutes away, yada-yada-yada, & as far as population, we are well over 70,000. I could go on & on. If you REALLY needed to get away, take a nice 3 hr drive to Portland, Salem or Eugene through the passes, & Oakridge (wicked riding there) is 1 1/2 hours away. I love it here (can you tell), as I am one of the many Cali transplants (41 years), been here almost 4 years & will never move back

    Sheesh, all of the above mentioned places will be a nice change of scenery from big city life!

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    I still would not recommend central or eastern Oregon unless you like snow and 100 degree temps depending what time of the year it is...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I still would not recommend central or eastern Oregon unless you like snow and 100 degree temps depending what time of the year it is...
    I like both, which is why I recommended CO You have four posts on this thread, but none of them are recommendations? wassup? Or maybe you just like complaining about other places?

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    I like both.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I still would not recommend central or eastern Oregon unless you like snow and 100 degree temps depending what time of the year it is...
    That is one thing I enjoy about the Gorge. The variety of weather. The Valley has this Groundhog Day weather pattern: cloudy, rainy, and gloomy 6-8 months a year.

    Jaybo

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    People have different opinions about what it means to be a good town for riding. A major factor for me is convenience. If I lived in Portland, which I might in a few years, I would probably only ride one day a week, two sometimes. Three hours round trip in the car plus ride time plus prep/unloading is just not time that I have often. It seems that Eugene pretty much requires driving too, although much less. In Corvallis you can ride into the McDonald Forest (the Mac) from three spots in town and one spot 5 miles out a rode with a nice wide shoulder. You can also drive or ride about 15 miles and enter the Mac from a different spot or the bordering Dunn Forest. Its a huge network of fire roads with mostly unsanctioned trails that run all over the place. You can easily do a 15 mile loop with 2000+ ft of climbing. Once you learn a bunch of trails and roads, you can just make your own loops and link several up and do 25-30 miles without riding the same singletrack. Some of the sinlgetrack sections are short, but many are 2-3 miles or more. It gets real sloppy in the winter but there's always something rideable... besides the fire roads of course. Lots of people ride cross bikes out there in the winter. Also there are a ton a bike lanes/paths in corvallis which make it really really convenient to get around. And its sort of in the middle of western Oregon so all these other places people are talking about are within a two hour drive... ok three hours to some of them. As for the town itself, the restaurants suck and there isn't much of a nightlife other than the college bar scene. The Co-op/ farmers market scene is great. Lots of variety.
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  45. #45
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    This evening reminded me how much I love living in Bend. We went downtown for Art Hop and got to enjoy lots of local photography, paintings, sculpture and music while imbibing free good wine and food. In the hour or so we were there, we ran into over a dozen people we know and walked through Drake Park under a clear, starry sky. When I grew up in the suburbs of Denver, I got to appreciate none of this.

    In their few years of life, our kids have already been exposed to more good stuff than I had access to during my entire childhood. They've been mountain biking, skiing, rafting, ice skating, xc skiing, horseback riding, indoor rock climbing, camping, fishing, hiking, canoeing, and have gone to the theater and live outdoor concerts. All that in one small area!

    With luck maybe they can also see the pregnant man.

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    Quote Originally Posted by inkpad
    I like both, which is why I recommended CO You have four posts on this thread, but none of them are recommendations? wassup? Or maybe you just like complaining about other places?
    I suggest you read my first post. I said I liked Albany.
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    Bend is awesome!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    This evening reminded me how much I love living in Bend. We went downtown for Art Hop and got to enjoy lots of local photography, paintings, sculpture and music while imbibing free good wine and food. In the hour or so we were there, we ran into over a dozen people we know and walked through Drake Park under a clear, starry sky. When I grew up in the suburbs of Denver, I got to appreciate none of this.

    In their few years of life, our kids have already been exposed to more good stuff than I had access to during my entire childhood. They've been mountain biking, skiing, rafting, ice skating, xc skiing, horseback riding, indoor rock climbing, camping, fishing, hiking, canoeing, and have gone to the theater and live outdoor concerts. All that in one small area!

    With luck maybe they can also see the pregnant man.
    We vacation there every year. Love it! Pregnant guy (err, girl) is creepy.

    Jaybo

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    Ok already... enough about politics and the social situation in Oakridge. Greg asked a legitimate question about nice places to live in Oregon. I'm biased in that I live in Bend and think it is fantastic for cycling and the other outdoor things I like to do.... multisport activities (triathlon/duathlon), fish, golf, ski, etc. And, there are lots of other active outdoor enthusiasts, both single and married. It is a town of about 72k and still growing. It is not a great place to move to if you are looking for work unless you are in medicine or have an engineering background. Likewise, salaries here tend to lag behind other larger cities such as Seattle, San Francisco, LA, Vegas... but are comparable to Portland, which is about 3 hrs away by car. It is not a very diverse community culturally, but that is slowly changing. Politically, it is pretty much middle of the road in town, but gets much more conservative as you move out of the city limits and in the surrounding communities. The cost of living here is very similar to most of Oregon, except for the cost of a home. The median home price here is about $339,000. Rents are reasonable though with lots of 3 BR homes in the $900-1200 range. Home prices are trending down though as the housing bubble is bursting here as in everywhere else in the country. We are blessed with good weather, incredibly clean air and water, a great selection of restaurants and, I can be on a mountain bike trail within 10 minutes of my front door.

    Other Oregon communities that would likely offer what you are after: Corvallis, Eugene and Portland all have access to good biking and offer more cultural diversity, with the downside of more crime, pollution, traffic and "city ills". Ashland is another town that has very good outdoor access and is a pretty nice town too. Hood River is also a cool place with great access to water sports on the Columbia River Gorge.

    My advice.... do yourself a big favor before loading the truck. Come for an extended vacation and check this state out! It is incredibly diverse in terms of geography and weather. The west side of the Cascade mountains is very green and lush with easy access to the Oregon coast. About 80% of the state's population lives in the Willamette Valley from Portland in the north to Ashland near the Calif. border. The climate is temperate but wet and gray from October to May. The summers are incredible in the entire state. East of the Cascades is drier and high desert. Bend gets 13" of rain a year, yet Mt. Bachelor which is only 16 miles from the center of Bend, got 500 inches of snow this winter. Most of the state is very rural. And, regardless of political affiliation, most of the Oregon populace is very concerned about wildlife preservation, public land access (including the entire Oregon coastline is open to the public) and keeping our air and water clean. Oregon is a special place and Bend is my favorite place I've ever lived (grew up in Virginia, lived in Tucson, SLC, Boulder and Portland as well).

    Good luck Greg, where ever you land.
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    Portland has a 'climate' where people act really nice to each other. The funky urban fear that comes from down below Shasta hasn't totally ruined the vibe yet. Its good for commuting and road biking but I put lots of miles on the car when it came to finding singletrack. I'm not a trained skier. . .to ME it wasn't worth a couple hours driving to get up to Hood. As time went by I jumped on the first opportunity to move back to southern Oregon. If you're from California or other urbanized environs Ashland, or parts of Medford, can be really attractive. As usual, in america, you get what you pay for in the housing market. Being a retirement mecca makes employment in healthcare or something else that caters to greys a plus around Medford. Otherwise I wouldn't recommend relocating here unless you can work over the web. There are no jobs and the kids who wanna stay here will do ANYTHING for next to NOTHING to stay in this beautiful place, driving wages way down. LOTS of them live with/off parents until thier own kids are in high school. I hope yer gittin' the pitcher I'm a paintin fer ya. Lotsa artists here too! Once one heads north outa the Rogue valley, the weather becomes stereotypical Oregon. I left Portland many times in a drizzle and enjoyed days of sun in Ashland only to return to the misty gloom. You get used to it though after a year or so in Portland because its easy to make good friends.

    Politics ???. Gimme a break

    We're ALL paying taxes that fund a government whose military wantonly attacks whoever for whatever, and has for over a century. Theres more guns here than in China, yet nobody pulls a trigger to stop it. Once we agree on that, not much point in pullin' pubes over politics is there?

    Best to just enjoy the ride, wherever it takes you.

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    Good points all around.

    If I had my druthers I'd live in Baker City or LaGrande. Maybe a cabin up outta French Glen so I could get my Kaczynski written.

    But for what I gotta do and for who I am, I love Portland.

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    Wow, so much good info and advice here. Thanks for taking the time. From just the info in this thread, Bend is looking mighty nice. Telemarktumalo makes a VERY strong case for Bend. (as well as a few of the previous posts). But I want to get out there sometime this summer and try to stay at least a couple days in Bend, Portland and Eugene (and the surrounding areas) to try to see what they're all like.

    Thanks again!
    Greg

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    More than welcome

    We're ALL paying taxes that fund a government whose military wantonly attacks whoever for whatever, and has for over a century. Theres more guns here than in China, yet nobody pulls a trigger to stop it. Once we agree on that, not much point in pullin' pubes over politics is there?

    You are more than welcome to move to another country! You will love PDX if you are a USA hater like you! Sheesh! Where to start? Nah, forget it.

    Jaybo

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    We're ALL paying taxes that fund a government whose military wantonly attacks whoever for whatever, and has for over a century. Theres more guns here than in China, yet nobody pulls a trigger to stop it. Once we agree on that, not much point in pullin' pubes over politics is there?

    You are more than welcome to move to another country! You will love PDX if you are a USA hater like you! Sheesh! Where to start? Nah, forget it.

    Jaybo
    Oh yeah, I almost forgot: 911, the radical muslims that hate our freedoms are out to get us!

    Where to start? Well, first I reread all the relevant posts and , dang, I could not find one instance where anybody proclaimed to hate the United States of America, course won't take much chips to get cashed and we will be the United States of China. Don't know if then I'd like not being able to criticize my own government. Too bad the wire tapping of American citizens didn't work out, might already be in jail anyway.

    Not sure how all these bridges are gonna get fixed either. I'm sure market forces will handle that one

    That cabin out in French Glen is lookng better all the time.

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    As telemarktumalo said, and I mentioned in my original long post, you have got to come visit and see these places in person, prior to making a decision. As I mentioned, we were dead set on Bend, but once we visited changed our mind. And, even more surprising, I never expected to wind up in Eugene, yet here I am.

    This thread is great in that it supplies lots of info and great opinions, and I think has been pretty true at least from my experience, but again, seeing it in person, getting a feel for it in person is really critical. And, in the grand scheme of things, a trip to visit some places will be a very worthwhile expense of both money and time when making a cross country move (or really any move).

    Anyway, good luck, it's a pretty fun thing to do IMHO - move somewhere where you are really making the choice, instead of say a job making the choice for you. It also makes it a different decision when it's up to you (or mostly up to you). All our previous moves had some aspect that was taking us to a given city (job, housing, whatever), but this one was an open book, and it was actually far harder, and also far more interesting to figure out. I'm also thinking it has had the best result.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    We're ALL paying taxes that fund a government whose military wantonly attacks whoever for whatever, and has for over a century. Theres more guns here than in China, yet nobody pulls a trigger to stop it. Once we agree on that, not much point in pullin' pubes over politics is there?

    You are more than welcome to move to another country! You will love PDX if you are a USA hater like you! Sheesh! Where to start? Nah, forget it.

    Jaybo
    One of my all time favorite "deep" thoughts about patriotism.You should live in Houston.Really!I believe that there is a map to Texas in the good book so that you will find your way.Somebody said it...you believe it...that settles it.Praise somethin' and then shoot. Are you better off now than you were ten years ago?Do you have children in underfunded schools...forget it.BTW...I thought Hood River was the best choice.I hate the Phoenix Suns.I have realistic "feelings" with respect to our dear country.
    Master of Laundry...Lord of Cleaning!

  56. #56
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    Sheesh!

    We're ALL paying taxes that fund a government whose military wantonly attacks whoever for whatever, and has for over a century. Theres more guns here than in China, yet nobody pulls a trigger to stop it. Once we agree on that, not much point in pullin' pubes over politics is there?

    You are okay with that statement? Okay! This is one of the reasons I struggle to like Portland. We wantonly attack whoever for whatever? Huh? What kind of moron write such nonsense unless they are a PDXer? 'Nuf said.

    Jaybo

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    What a flipping moron!

    Quote Originally Posted by poppa#1
    One of my all time favorite "deep" thoughts about patriotism.You should live in Houston.Really!I believe that there is a map to Texas in the good book so that you will find your way.Somebody said it...you believe it...that settles it.Praise somethin' and then shoot. Are you better off now than you were ten years ago?Do you have children in underfunded schools...forget it.BTW...I thought Hood River was the best choice.I hate the Phoenix Suns.I have realistic "feelings" with respect to our dear country.
    I'm not sure how to respond? "I have realistic "feelings" with respect to our dear country. What the h*ll does that mean? Texas? Huh! Now head back to 39th and Hawthorne.....

    Jaybo

  58. #58
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    Jaybo. You seem to use the English language in a manner that I find difficult to understand. Whatever argument you are trying to make does not belong on a cycling forum. You should feel welcome to post as you see fit on the topic at hand.... which as you may remember is where is the best place to live in Oregon as it relates to cycling trail access, cost of living and access to the amenities and quality of life that Greg seeks. As I recall, he didn't ask about the US Government or US military, China or guns. There are plenty of political blogs and forums in cyberspace that welcome the points you seem to want to make. I look forward to seeing your future postings on here regarding the think that ties us here.... cycling.
    "Dang! You got shocks, pegs. Lucky!

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    Medford

    Is a great town. There isn't much riding right from your door if your on a mountain bike, but if you're willing to deal with throwing the bike on the car for all of 15-20 minutes, the riding is awesome year round (even in winter). Medford also places you closer to rides like the Applegate and the Grants Pass goodies. Ashland has great riding, but you'd be surprised how small it feels after a while. All the rides start with at least an hour climb, and if you shuttle, the drive up to the top takes a while, as the roads wind way around to get to the put in. There are some nice little bedroom communities between the two which are pretty nice like Talent and Phoenix.
    I like to start out slow and then back it off a notch.

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    Jeez, you people make Bend sound like Arizona in the summer. It's 100 degrees about three days in August.

    I love living here, but it is definitely an island in the middle of nowhere. There is more culture than there used to be, but a lot forty thousand dollar millionaires mingling with real millionaires in what was a hick/fleece town ten years ago. Mind you, I liked that hicktown better than what we have today. Still, it's a fantastic place to live.

    Eugene is grey way too much of the year for me.

    By the way, Central and Eastern Oregon are more conservative than Western Oregon. Not that people aren't liberal over here too, but not everyone is a democrat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    You are more than welcome to move to another country! You will love PDX if you are a USA hater like you! Sheesh!
    I'll keep this brief: Criticizing the government's actions isn't the sign of a USA hater. It's often a sign of a USA lover who is insulted at the travesties sometimes committed in the name of this great country. In any event, our Founders strongly encouraged such criticism -- and would have recommended that those who discourage it find a different country to live in.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 04-09-2008 at 12:18 AM.
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    Back to the topic of what places are liberal and what places are not, here are some stats on the percentage of voters registered Democrat in various places in OR and WA.

    Party registration is a crude measure of political sentiment, but it's an easily obtainable hard statistic that gives at least a ballpark idea of the political leanings of a place.

    • Bellingham (Whatcom County): 53%.
    • Seattle (King County): 65%.
    • Olympia (Thurston County): 55%.
    • Portland (Multnomah County): 72%.
    • Corvallis (Benton County): 58%.
    • Eugene (Lane County): 58%.
    • Medford/Ashland (Jackson County): 43%.
    • Bend/Redmond/Sisters (Deschutes County): 42%.
    • Pendleton (Umatilla County): 34%.
    • La Grande (Union County): 33%.
    • Wenatchee (Chelan County): 36%.
    • Spokane (Spokane County): 43%.


    Also note that these were county level stats IIRC, so they don't take into account liberal enclaves like central Bend vs. Deschutes County as a whole, or Eugene vs. Lane County as a whole, or two blocks surrounding Eastern Oregon University vs. Union County as a whole. Portland may not actually be any more liberal than, say, Ashland; but it might appear that way from the numbers because Portland makes up a solid majority of Multnomah County's population whereas Ashland is a pretty small fraction of Jackson County. Also, the Portland figure doesn't include most of Portland's suburbs, which lie in Washington, Clackamas and Clark Counties and are marginally more conservative.

    And I'd echo what telemarktumalo said: you'll find certain issues where party affiliation doesn't matter. Preserving both the quality of and access to our spectacular natural environment is a very high priority for everyone.

    By the way, I pulled the above numbers from http://www.bestplaces.net (a few months ago, so the numbers may have been updated since). I highly recommend this site to anyone looking for a community to live in, by the way. Besides voter registration, the site is easy to use and chock full of data on schools, weather, housing prices, incomes, educational attainment, transportation, air quality, etc for every community in the country. A lot of the data goes down to the small-town level and not just county. Obviously you won't find specific info on mountain biking or Thai restaurants, and the subjective comments are pretty sparse and need to be taken with a grain of salt, but there are a lot of hard numbers that are useful for comparison.
    Last edited by GlowBoy; 04-09-2008 at 12:25 AM.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACree
    There's a lack of jobs in Corvallis, unless you want to commute to Albany/Salem/Eugene, etc. Best combination of mtn and road riding in the state though, and both flat and hilly road riding readily available. I'd move back in a heartbeat if I didn't need to work.
    There's a lack of everything in Corvallis. You have to remember Corvallis is really small and anti-growth so although you can survive here without going out of town choices are limited, it's not uncommon for folks here to go to Eugene or Salem just to go shopping.

    Corvallis is more dominated by the University than most of the other towns, you gotta understand that the student body is about half of the people in town.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kona0197
    I still would not recommend central or eastern Oregon unless you like snow and 100 degree temps depending what time of the year it is...
    100 degree temps in Bend? Are you on crack (or meth)? My mom's place in Grants Pass is way hotter in the summer then Bend. Yeah, it gets hot but the solution is a trip up to the mountains which are 30 minutes away. I've pasted a table of the average high temperatures for Bend from 1971-2000. I compared Bend to Grants Pass and, in August, Bend has 8 degree lower high temps.

    Day Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    1 39 42 47 54 61 69 78 82 77 68 53 41
    2 39 42 47 54 61 69 78 82 77 67 53 41
    3 39 42 48 55 62 69 78 82 76 67 52 41
    4 39 42 48 55 62 70 78 82 76 67 51 41
    5 39 42 48 55 62 70 79 82 76 67 51 41
    6 39 42 48 55 62 70 79 82 75 66 50 40
    7 39 43 49 55 63 70 79 82 75 66 50 40
    8 39 43 49 56 63 71 80 82 75 65 49 40
    9 39 43 49 56 63 71 80 82 74 65 49 40
    10 39 43 49 56 63 71 80 82 74 65 48 40
    11 39 43 50 56 64 71 80 82 74 64 48 40
    12 39 43 50 57 64 72 80 82 73 64 47 40
    13 39 44 50 57 64 72 81 82 73 63 47 40
    14 39 44 50 57 65 72 81 81 73 63 46 40
    15 39 44 50 57 65 73 81 81 72 63 46 39
    16 40 44 51 57 65 73 81 81 72 62 46 39
    17 40 45 51 58 65 73 81 81 72 62 45 39
    18 40 45 51 58 65 73 82 81 72 61 45 39
    19 40 45 51 58 66 74 82 81 71 61 44 39
    20 40 45 52 58 66 74 82 80 71 60 44 39
    21 40 45 52 59 66 74 82 80 71 60 44 39
    22 40 46 52 59 66 75 82 80 70 59 43 39
    23 40 46 52 59 67 75 82 80 70 59 43 39
    24 40 46 52 59 67 75 82 79 70 58 43 39
    25 40 46 53 60 67 76 82 79 70 58 43 39
    26 41 46 53 60 67 76 82 79 69 57 42 39
    27 41 47 53 60 68 76 82 79 69 56 42 39
    28 41 47 53 60 68 76 82 78 69 56 42 39
    29 41 47 53 61 68 77 82 78 68 55 42 39
    30 41 - 54 61 68 77 82 78 68 55 41 39
    31 41 - 54 - 69 - 82 77 - 54 - 39
    Month 39.7 44.1 50.6 57.4 64.9 72.8 80.7 80.6 72.4 61.7 46.3 39.6

    The weather in Bend is more moderate overall than where I used to live in Colorado Springs, CO.
    2 wheels == True

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon
    There's a lack of everything in Corvallis. You have to remember Corvallis is really small and anti-growth so although you can survive here without going out of town choices are limited, it's not uncommon for folks here to go to Eugene or Salem just to go shopping.

    Corvallis is more dominated by the University than most of the other towns, you gotta understand that the student body is about half of the people in town.
    Most people in Corvallis go to Albany or Lebanon to shop.
    My Bike: '15 Trek FX 7.2
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  66. #66
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    Liberals always use that tired argument

    Quote Originally Posted by GlowBoy
    I'll keep this brief: Criticizing the government's actions isn't the sign of a USA hater. It's often a sign of a USA lover who is insulted at the travesties sometimes committed in the name of this great country. In any event, our Founders strongly encouraged such criticism -- and would have recommended that those who discourage it find a different country to live in.
    The guy above stated we have been imperialists for the last years. Oh, yaw, the brave 21-year-old boys climbing that hill at Normady where imperialist! We are the kindest super power the world have ever known.

    Jaybo

  67. #67
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    Uhhh....

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    We are the kindest super power the world have ever known.

    Jaybo
    Betcha the "guests" at Abu Ghraib might politely disagree with that one.

    Forget about plowshares. We need to turn swords into McLeods and Pulaskis!

  68. #68
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    I think what Jaybo is trying to say is that the best place to live in Oregon is not in Oregon at all. It is a mythical place where there are no taxes, it is 75 degrees and sunny 365 days a year and all the trails climb downhill.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snake Muesl
    I think what Jaybo is trying to say is that the best place to live in Oregon is not in Oregon at all. It is a mythical place where there are no taxes, it is 75 degrees and sunny 365 days a year and all the trails climb downhill.
    That's funny! Oh, the ever search for the mighty "pot of gold" destination to live. I think they call that, the "grass is greener" over on the other side of the hills up in the yonder where the red fern grows (or red oak grows).

    I was enjoying Portland today after work while heading to the local trail with bike in tow and dry, partly clouded skies conditions. On today's ride I was rained on, hailed on, sun, rain, hail, sun again. I got drenched, dirty and and dry all in a days ride while Jaybo was riding primed, dry trails after work, you bastard But I still had some fun and was happy to be on my mt bike riding.

    JG
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  70. #70
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    It's turning into a buyer's market in bend. House's aren't selling all that great and prices are continuing to drop. But it's also a renters market for sure to.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atown117
    It's turning into a buyer's market in bend. House's aren't selling all that great and prices are continuing to drop. But it's also a renters market for sure to.
    It's not turning into a buyers market...it is a buyers market in Bend. The gold rush is officially over. There's close to a year and a half worth of housing inventory and still growing. If you're thinking of moving to Bend, I'd rent and wait for the pricing to find some sort of bottom. Cheap, nice rentals are a plenty.

    With regards to the comments about Bend being hot as H*ll in the summer, I couldn't disagree more. It warms up in the afternoons but always gets back down into the 50-60's. 80's and and low 90's are more the norm in the hottest months. The cold is more the issue, it's April 19th and I just got done freezing my arse off sitting in the snow during my kids soccer game. It's definitely sunny here though. I personally love it. Love the winter sports and dig the warm summer months.

    It is a 2-3 hour drive to Eugene or Porkland, not sure when that became a barometer of the quality of a city. I think that's what makes Bend cool, you're surrounded by endless wilderness all worth exploring. Chicks are way fatter in Porkland by the way. Must be all the rain?

  72. #72
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    This is all great info!

    Quote Originally Posted by El Guapo
    Chicks are way fatter in Porkland by the way.
    Fat chicks make me
    Fit chicks make me

    Greg

  73. #73
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    Not much new to add, but a few observations...

    1. Bend was recently rated by Money Magazine as the most overvalued real estate market in the entire country, beating out Naples Florida for the #1 slot. Real estate and construction have been the mainstays of the economy for several years, fed by a seemingly endless influx of mostly Californians. It has been an absolute frenzy. That is in the process of melting down- the construction/real estate scene there is crashing. As has been pointed out, there is a huge amount of inventory, and prices continue to drop. Check out realtor.com for an idea of what is available. It is a buyers' and renters' market. Depending on what you are used in NY, I think you could find a very nice house for a nice price by this fall. Or just continue to rent- there are literally hundreds of homes bought by speculators when prices were skyrocketing that they now cannot sell and need to rent.

    2. Those who said Bend is hot are on crack. It can get warm in summer afternoons, but then cools down. And the higher elevations are never very hot.

    3. Someone complained that Bend trails are too buff. Some are, some aren't. You can still find some pretty challenging stuff. There are plenty of trails with lava rock baby heads if that is your bag...

    4. Bend is liberal compared to any other Oregon town east of the Cascades. But it is more centrist/Republican than most towns west of the Cascades.

    5. Corvallis is also nice, but I'm a small town guy. Could be a bit limiting for a big city person. It is mostly a college town, but also many white collar professionals- HP has a huge campus there, EPA has a large office, USFS PNW Research Station is there, etc..

    6. Being a small town guy and spoiled by close access to biking, I'd find Portland stifling- at least an hour drive to good biking and maybe farther. But it is a great city- good public transit, great restaurants, nice people etc.

    7. Jaybo- every time I visit MTBR I find posts with you *****ing about Oregon/Portland and its progressive nature. Why don't you quit *****ing and move to Texas? You'd fit right in and probably be happier.

  74. #74
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    Bend is WAY overrated. If you're into corporate sprawl and lots of strip malls, by all means, move to Bend.

    I came out there just about 2 years ago and drove around the entire state looking for the best location. My criteria was simple: world-class outdoor sports. Hood River is without a doubt the best place I've ever been/lived. Though you probably shouldn't move here…we're not trying to "Bend" Hood River.

  75. #75
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    Yeah, Hood River is a nice place. Great windsurfing and kiteboarding to go along with riding. It used to be not great for a single guy with so many "outdoor" guys and so few "outdoor" girls. That may have changed but I kinda doubt it. I stay in Bend for now.

    Quote Originally Posted by springfish
    Bend is WAY overrated. If you're into corporate sprawl and lots of strip malls, by all means, move to Bend.

    I came out there just about 2 years ago and drove around the entire state looking for the best location. My criteria was simple: world-class outdoor sports. Hood River is without a doubt the best place I've ever been/lived. Though you probably shouldn't move here…we're not trying to "Bend" Hood River.
    2 wheels == True

  76. #76
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    That is funny

    Quote Originally Posted by riverrat
    Not much new to add, but a few observations...

    1. Bend was recently rated by Money Magazine as the most overvalued real estate market in the entire country, beating out Naples Florida for the #1 slot. Real estate and construction have been the mainstays of the economy for several years, fed by a seemingly endless influx of mostly Californians. It has been an absolute frenzy. That is in the process of melting down- the construction/real estate scene there is crashing. As has been pointed out, there is a huge amount of inventory, and prices continue to drop. Check out realtor.com for an idea of what is available. It is a buyers' and renters' market. Depending on what you are used in NY, I think you could find a very nice house for a nice price by this fall. Or just continue to rent- there are literally hundreds of homes bought by speculators when prices were skyrocketing that they now cannot sell and need to rent.

    2. Those who said Bend is hot are on crack. It can get warm in summer afternoons, but then cools down. And the higher elevations are never very hot.

    3. Someone complained that Bend trails are too buff. Some are, some aren't. You can still find some pretty challenging stuff. There are plenty of trails with lava rock baby heads if that is your bag...

    4. Bend is liberal compared to any other Oregon town east of the Cascades. But it is more centrist/Republican than most towns west of the Cascades.

    5. Corvallis is also nice, but I'm a small town guy. Could be a bit limiting for a big city person. It is mostly a college town, but also many white collar professionals- HP has a huge campus there, EPA has a large office, USFS PNW Research Station is there, etc..

    6. Being a small town guy and spoiled by close access to biking, I'd find Portland stifling- at least an hour drive to good biking and maybe farther. But it is a great city- good public transit, great restaurants, nice people etc.

    7. Jaybo- every time I visit MTBR I find posts with you *****ing about Oregon/Portland and its progressive nature. Why don't you quit *****ing and move to Texas? You'd fit right in and probably be happier.
    Response to 7: I actually lived in Dalles, Texas. Nice place but too big for my liking and the lack of mountains is not good. Progressive? I love that word. So sanitized. I prefer crazy. I irritate a lot of people on here. Join the list I'm pi**ed about your put down of Portland. Why don't you move back to Kentucky?

  77. #77
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    Hi Jaybo,

    Yes, you can add me to the list of people you irritate- maybe you should take it as a sign that it goes beyond your parroting of Republican propaganda and into the realm of inability to read and reason critically.

    I wrote "...But it is a great city- good public transit, great restaurants, nice people etc."

    I guess I need to point out to you that this is hardly a put-down.

    Moreover, I offered a PERSONAL OPINION as to how I would find Portland. Anyone with an IQ in the triple digits would take this as it was clearly, explicitly and purposely offered - from the perspective of a "small town guy".

    Someone who is not a "small town guy" could put two and two together and perhaps conclude that their definition of ready access to biking might differ. But that is apparently beyond your abilities...

  78. #78
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    You really need to come out and visit Oregon. Based on all your comments you should be sure to visit Bend, Eugene and Portland. If you like smaller places, go see McMinnville or Corvallis.

    Also, Portland is a good sized city. You could live right in Portland or there are a lot of suburbs like Beaverton that are effectively part of PDX.

    Bend doesn't seem outrageously expensive if you lived in the Bay Area for 50 years like I did. It probably has the best concentration of restaurants/night life, smallness and outdoor recreation of any place, but it is isolated and dry.

    Eugene has enough good eating to keep us happy. That's not that easy since we lived in Palo Alto for 20+ years. Our 20 something kids think it is dead.

    PDX is great, but too much like the Bay Area. Lots of people, too long a drive to the trails.

    Our story is almost identical to Headangle's, except we arrived in 2004. I'm even a software guy like him. Unfortunately there is very little high tech in Eugene.

    One last thing. If you like wine, the Oregon wine country around Yamhill, Carlton, Newberg and Dundee is really a lot of fun. It's like Napa used to be 30 years ago. When you visit wineries you very often meet the owner and winemaker. We visit often and buy too much.

  79. #79
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    [QUOTE=springfish]Bend is WAY overrated. If you're into corporate sprawl and lots of strip malls, by all means, move to Bend.
    QUOTE]

    I totally agree, I hate corporate sprawl...those damn corporations! I really hate corporate jobs too. What exactly is corporate sprawl btw?

  80. #80
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    How many McDonalds exist in Bend?

    Keep raping the planet dumb ass.

  81. #81
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    Hey Springfish

    Quote Originally Posted by springfish
    How many McDonalds exist in Bend?

    Keep raping the planet dumb ass.
    You don't happen to be good friends with a guy named Jaybo, do you?

    --Sparty
    disciplesofdirt.org

    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by springfish
    How many McDonalds exist in Bend?

    I think we have 2 or 3, can I get ya something, a chill burger perhaps?

    Keep raping the planet dumb ass.
    Hmm, do you not drive, buy products made from the earth, drink bottled water, etc.?? Just sayin'

  83. #83
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    How old are you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus
    You don't happen to be good friends with a guy named Jaybo, do you?

    --Sparty
    Anyone who disagrees with you gets you angry? Are you the face of the DOD or is it just your assumed role?

    Jaybo

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebnelson
    Yeah, Hood River is a nice place. Great windsurfing and kiteboarding to go along with riding. It used to be not great for a single guy with so many "outdoor" guys and so few "outdoor" girls. That may have changed but I kinda doubt it. I stay in Bend for now.
    Just moved here, I am married, I have been noticing booty call options abounding left and right, unless your a too stoned or nerded out to notice.

  85. #85
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    Great, I'm glad it changed since the gorge early days. I love the gorge and interviewed there out of school in the 90s. I have friends that live there still that told me otherwise in the past. Why the insults?

    Quote Originally Posted by freebiker
    Just moved here, I am married, I have been noticing booty call options abounding left and right, unless your a too stoned or nerded out to notice.
    2 wheels == True

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by springfish
    How many McDonalds exist in Bend?

    Keep raping the planet dumb ass.

    Thanks for proving my point. How old are you 12? We can't all run to the hills and hide from "corporations". It's easy to make statements such as yours while typing on your Dad's computer in his basement.

    You do realize the power your computer is consuming likely comes from the hydro electric dams right. Salmon killer!

  87. #87
    meatier showers
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    Chill, man

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo
    Anyone who disagrees with you gets you angry? Are you the face of the DOD or is it just your assumed role?

    Jaybo
    Gosh Jaybo, you don't have to come out swinging. Springfish lives up in the same area as you, doesn't he? I was just asking Springfish if he knew you, that's all. Then you come out of your corner all hostile and personal. What's the matter, man?

    Based on your trolling history here on MTBR and your tiny little short fuse, may I suggest you print this out (including the part quoting YOUR own words) then walk over to a mirror, look yourself in the eye, and read YOUR first question out loud to YOURself.

    As for your question about the face of the Disciples of Dirt, I'm just one of many; I assume nothing. Except perhaps that most people who enjoy online communities like this one are good natured, positive and well meaning.

    I admit that sometimes you give me reason to question that last part.

    --Sparty
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    We get old because we quit riding.

  88. #88
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    Hey man, I'm a hypocrite like every other tree hugger. I do everything I can do limit my consumption, bike to work (nice to have the option), eat only organics, don't purchase ANYTHING from big box stores or fast food, etc. I try my best.

    My point being it's been MY experience that Bend is insanely over developed and very commercial. Add to that it's a very dry, hot (in the summer) area, which equates to lots of energy draw, air conditioning, etc., which is even more damaging.

    And actually the energy I use for my computer (and all my electronics) come for wind power. The only salmons I kill are the ones I catch with my fishing rod.

    I don't know Jaybo, sounds like a great guy though.

  89. #89
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    Hmmm...

    Quote Originally Posted by springfish
    ...

    I don't know Jaybo, sounds like a great guy though.
    I wonder if anybody's ever seen Springfish and Jaybo in the same room at the same time.

    --Sparty
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    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  90. #90
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    We can't occupy the same space at the same time. Bad things would happen!

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