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  1. #1
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    Best destination for a weekend in October?

    Talking with a couple buddies about converging in Oregon for a few days of riding.
    If we fly into Portland, what would be our best combination of great riding and not too terrible car ride. Would that be Bend?

    Thanks,
    Mike

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    "“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view." - Edward Abbey

  3. #3
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    BBFT is well worth it.Camping at Waldo in October is my favorite.
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    I love camping at Waldo in October.

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    that sounds righteous! Unfortunately we'll be there the weekend after. Would following those three rides give us a good picture of what Bend has to offer for riding?

    The Rides – Bend's Big Fat Tour

  6. #6
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    So many choices! Any of the high elevation rides near Bend would be good in October (weather permitting). I'm betting someone will add Oakridge too.

    Here's another person's take on that Cache Mountain ride:

    Mountain Bike Trail Guide
    Cache Mountain loop offers great views of Oregon's Cascade mountains
    By Mark Morical / The Bulletin
    Published: August 19. 2011 4:00AM PST

    more photos | order photo
    Suttle Lake can be seen below the burned forest from atop Cache Mountain.
    Mark Morical / The Bulletin
    Breaking down the trail: Cache Mountain
    DIRECTIONS

    From Sisters, head west on U.S. Highway 20 for about 13.5 miles. Turn left on the Suttle Lake access road. After one mile, turn left on Forest Road 2066. Park at the Scout Lake day-use area on the left. The singletrack trail heads south along the shoreline. Ride FR 2066 to skip the singletrack. Continue along Forest Road 2068, FR 800 and FR 900 to the top of Cache Mountain. To skip the singletrack descent, return down the forest roads.
    LENGTH
    The loop is about 13 miles
    RATING
    Aerobically strenuous and technically advanced
    TRAIL FEATURES
    A challenging climb up singletrack and forest roads through a burn area. Spectacular views of Cascade peaks await on top of Cache Mountain. The singletrack descent is extremely steep and technical and will not be cleared for another few weeks. Until then, the best way to descend is back down the forest roads.
    Editor's note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

    We live in a singletrack trail paradise, but sometimes it's best to just settle for a plain old dirt road.

    I found that out the hard way last week during a ride up and down Cache Mountain, about 15 miles northwest of Sisters.

    I had been meaning to try this ride for nearly two years, but kept putting it off mostly because my Adventure Maps resource lists the loop as aerobically strenuous and technically advanced.

    Add to that an uncleared trail and, well, it gets pretty ugly.

    The 13-mile Cache Mountain loop includes a tough climb up forest roads and a harrowing singletrack descent.

    The ride started out innocently enough from the trailhead at Scout Lake. The singletrack, blocked in places by fallen trees, climbed to Dark Lake. It was hard to follow the trail, as plants and shrubs grew over the narrow path.

    I was actually relieved to reach Forest Road 2068 and begin the unobstructed climb up Cache Mountain.

    The road climbed steadily through the forest, which eventually gave way to jaw-dropping vistas of nearby Mount Washington. Along the way, other peaks popped pleasantly into view.

    The 5,577-foot summit of Cache Mountain is a perfect location from which to glimpse some of Central Oregon's most prominent mountains: the Three Sisters to the south, Mount Washington to the southwest, Mount Jefferson and Three Fingered Jack to the north, Hayrick and Hoodoo buttes to the northwest, and Black Butte to the east.

    The Cache Mountain ride, which includes 2,380 feet of elevation gain, is all about the views and the location, not so much the trail.

    The trail sucks — literally and figuratively — or at least it did last week. What is not overrun with snowbush, prickly weeds or fallen trees is like quicksand beneath your tires.

    And even without all that, it is not exactly the most rideable trail, as the top of the singletrack descent is extremely steep.

    Consider this excerpt from a review of the Cache Mountain loop by REI - Outdoor Clothing and Gear, Expert Advice, Classes and Events for Fall Camping, Hiking, Cycling, Paddling & More for the Family “... the views from the top seem to confirm your good judgment in choosing this ride. However, the descent is so torturous that you may be tempted to blame the selection of this ride on your riding partner.”

    And this is how that same website rated the trail: “Aerobically difficult and technically absurd and treacherous.”

    That may be a bit of hyperbole, but it's not too far off the mark.

    Wildfires in 2002 and 2003 burned much of the forest on and around Cache Mountain, resulting in countless downed trees and many incredible mountain views. But those fires also made the area susceptible to blowdown.

    Maintenance on the trail by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance is scheduled to begin this Saturday, according to Kent Howes, a COTA board member. The organization is looking for more volunteers to help with the project (Central Oregon Trail Alliance), which Howes says will take two to three weeks to complete.

    “I've never seen an area with that much brush and leaves,” Howes said. “It's quite thick. It's not getting ridden as much because of that.”

    COTA is hoping to have the trail cleared in time for the Sisters Mountain Bike Festival, scheduled Sept. 24-25. The event includes a ride up and down Cache Mountain, as does the Big Fat Tour, a mountain biking event set for Oct. 14-16.

    With a cleared trail and fall conditions (less quicksand), the singletrack ride down the mountain will no doubt be more ridable and more fun.

    Until then, riders can enjoy the forest roads to the summit and the view from the top — and they have the wise option of riding forest roads back down to the trailhead at Scout Lake.

    The singletrack descent begins a few hundred feet below the summit, and it was barely discernible when I rode there last week. I walked the first portion of the route down the hill because it was just too steep.

    A few sections were ridable, but after that, I spent most of the time carrying my bike over downed trees and picking thorns from snowbush off my legs.

    “When (snowbush) starts growing, it just starts going gangbusters,” said Chris Sabo, trails supervisor for the Deschutes National Forest. “We're dealing with that on dozens of miles of trail right now.”

    When I finally reached Forest Road 2068, I had never been so excited to ride doubletrack. Rather than continue on the singletrack, I took a left and rode down the red-gravel road a few more miles back to Scout Lake.

    The ride lasted more than four hours, and I was happy to be done. But I learned a valuable lesson: Singletrack is not always the best option.

  7. #7
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    Waldo lake campground is closed in October. There are spur options near N waldo CG.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by phreadi View Post
    Waldo lake campground is closed in October. There are spur options near N waldo CG.
    Really? Which campgrounds? All of them? I am planning a four-day trip to Oakridge starting next Friday 9/30 and Waldo is one option we are considering. The other is up the Middle Fork to Timpanogas/Summit Lake.

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    There is always Charlton lake camp ground.

  10. #10
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    At least for the last several years Hoodoo's been closing all three waldo CG's october 1. But I've heard Hoodoo lost a lot of CG contracts, waldo may be one of them, so it's worth checking with the WNFS to see if that date is still true.

    I've not been to, but have heard, that there's good group/spur camping near N. waldo CG. You'd need to bring in water as I think they remove the well pump handles.

    you could just camp in Oakridge at Salmon Creek CG, although it also may close in october, not sure. Most of the CG's are now operated by private sector and don't stay open as long into the fall as when they were operated by the FS.

  11. #11
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    Correction: North Waldo CG is open through October 4, 2011:
    http://tinyurl.com/68h6amm

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the info.
    That gives us some options as our plans are not finalized.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by phreadi View Post
    Waldo lake campground is closed in October. There are spur options near N waldo CG.
    Funny...since when?Yesterday?
    Master of Laundry...Lord of Cleaning!

  14. #14
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    Cache is a great ride when the trail is clear though. Even then, it's not so much technical as a little sandy and rutted. Really scenic in the fall though, and IMO one of the better rides included in BBFT. If the OP is going after BBFT, they should be fine.

    Borneo will probably chime in any time now with how much Cache mtn sucks though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat View Post
    So many choices! Any of the high elevation rides near Bend would be good in October (weather permitting). I'm betting someone will add Oakridge too.

    Here's another person's take on that Cache Mountain ride:

    Mountain Bike Trail Guide
    Cache Mountain loop offers great views of Oregon's Cascade mountains
    By Mark Morical / The Bulletin
    Published: August 19. 2011 4:00AM PST

    more photos | order photo
    Suttle Lake can be seen below the burned forest from atop Cache Mountain.
    Mark Morical / The Bulletin
    Breaking down the trail: Cache Mountain
    DIRECTIONS

    From Sisters, head west on U.S. Highway 20 for about 13.5 miles. Turn left on the Suttle Lake access road. After one mile, turn left on Forest Road 2066. Park at the Scout Lake day-use area on the left. The singletrack trail heads south along the shoreline. Ride FR 2066 to skip the singletrack. Continue along Forest Road 2068, FR 800 and FR 900 to the top of Cache Mountain. To skip the singletrack descent, return down the forest roads.
    LENGTH
    The loop is about 13 miles
    RATING
    Aerobically strenuous and technically advanced
    TRAIL FEATURES
    A challenging climb up singletrack and forest roads through a burn area. Spectacular views of Cascade peaks await on top of Cache Mountain. The singletrack descent is extremely steep and technical and will not be cleared for another few weeks. Until then, the best way to descend is back down the forest roads.
    Editor's note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

    We live in a singletrack trail paradise, but sometimes it's best to just settle for a plain old dirt road.

    I found that out the hard way last week during a ride up and down Cache Mountain, about 15 miles northwest of Sisters.

    I had been meaning to try this ride for nearly two years, but kept putting it off mostly because my Adventure Maps resource lists the loop as aerobically strenuous and technically advanced.

    Add to that an uncleared trail and, well, it gets pretty ugly.

    The 13-mile Cache Mountain loop includes a tough climb up forest roads and a harrowing singletrack descent.

    The ride started out innocently enough from the trailhead at Scout Lake. The singletrack, blocked in places by fallen trees, climbed to Dark Lake. It was hard to follow the trail, as plants and shrubs grew over the narrow path.

    I was actually relieved to reach Forest Road 2068 and begin the unobstructed climb up Cache Mountain.

    The road climbed steadily through the forest, which eventually gave way to jaw-dropping vistas of nearby Mount Washington. Along the way, other peaks popped pleasantly into view.

    The 5,577-foot summit of Cache Mountain is a perfect location from which to glimpse some of Central Oregon's most prominent mountains: the Three Sisters to the south, Mount Washington to the southwest, Mount Jefferson and Three Fingered Jack to the north, Hayrick and Hoodoo buttes to the northwest, and Black Butte to the east.

    The Cache Mountain ride, which includes 2,380 feet of elevation gain, is all about the views and the location, not so much the trail.

    The trail sucks — literally and figuratively — or at least it did last week. What is not overrun with snowbush, prickly weeds or fallen trees is like quicksand beneath your tires.

    And even without all that, it is not exactly the most rideable trail, as the top of the singletrack descent is extremely steep.

    Consider this excerpt from a review of the Cache Mountain loop by REI - Outdoor Clothing and Gear, Expert Advice, Classes and Events for Fall Camping, Hiking, Cycling, Paddling & More for the Family “... the views from the top seem to confirm your good judgment in choosing this ride. However, the descent is so torturous that you may be tempted to blame the selection of this ride on your riding partner.”

    And this is how that same website rated the trail: “Aerobically difficult and technically absurd and treacherous.”

    That may be a bit of hyperbole, but it's not too far off the mark.

    Wildfires in 2002 and 2003 burned much of the forest on and around Cache Mountain, resulting in countless downed trees and many incredible mountain views. But those fires also made the area susceptible to blowdown.

    Maintenance on the trail by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance is scheduled to begin this Saturday, according to Kent Howes, a COTA board member. The organization is looking for more volunteers to help with the project (Central Oregon Trail Alliance), which Howes says will take two to three weeks to complete.

    “I've never seen an area with that much brush and leaves,” Howes said. “It's quite thick. It's not getting ridden as much because of that.”

    COTA is hoping to have the trail cleared in time for the Sisters Mountain Bike Festival, scheduled Sept. 24-25. The event includes a ride up and down Cache Mountain, as does the Big Fat Tour, a mountain biking event set for Oct. 14-16.

    With a cleared trail and fall conditions (less quicksand), the singletrack ride down the mountain will no doubt be more ridable and more fun.

    Until then, riders can enjoy the forest roads to the summit and the view from the top — and they have the wise option of riding forest roads back down to the trailhead at Scout Lake.

    The singletrack descent begins a few hundred feet below the summit, and it was barely discernible when I rode there last week. I walked the first portion of the route down the hill because it was just too steep.

    A few sections were ridable, but after that, I spent most of the time carrying my bike over downed trees and picking thorns from snowbush off my legs.

    “When (snowbush) starts growing, it just starts going gangbusters,” said Chris Sabo, trails supervisor for the Deschutes National Forest. “We're dealing with that on dozens of miles of trail right now.”

    When I finally reached Forest Road 2068, I had never been so excited to ride doubletrack. Rather than continue on the singletrack, I took a left and rode down the red-gravel road a few more miles back to Scout Lake.

    The ride lasted more than four hours, and I was happy to be done. But I learned a valuable lesson: Singletrack is not always the best option.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikemikemike View Post
    that sounds righteous! Unfortunately we'll be there the weekend after. Would following those three rides give us a good picture of what Bend has to offer for riding?

    The Rides – Bend's Big Fat Tour
    We are intentionally vague about our routes. That said, several people find that tracks left by over 100 mountain bikers make for good route-finding and the trail conditions are usually good (you will be pushing the weather envelope, though)

    Also, the fires around Cache Mt. may force the us to choose a different ride location for Sunday. Not sure yet.
    "“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view." - Edward Abbey

  16. #16
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    Cache Mtn is where Shadow Fire is. Might not want to ride there now.
    Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours & Shuttles
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikemikemike View Post
    ... Would that be Bend?
    Thanks,
    Mike
    Will you be around Oct. 21-23? If so, consider Barbie Camp. To give you an idea of the flavor of BC, here are some clips from previous years:

    Spring '06 BC
    Fall '06 BC
    Spring '07 BC -- Lou's Thread
    Spring '07 BC -- Friday
    Spring '07 BC -- Saturday
    Spring '07 BC -- Sunday
    Fall '07 BC
    Spring '08 BC
    Fall '08 BC
    Spring '09 BC

    Everyone is welcome at BC. Well, so long as they're 18+. BC happens in both spring & fall but the fall event is usually 2x as big as spring. Frankly it doesn't include killer riding (well, Trail 99 is killer, assuming it's not covered in snow yet), BC is more about socializing & fun, but it would make a great staging point for your own private rides and evening kickass fun around BC's legendary campfires.

    If you're interested, e-me at daveysprockett at gmail dot com and I'll give you directions. Here's an incentive: Ninkasi Brewing is one of BC's sponsors. There are usually 60-75 peeps at the fall event. It's just plain straight up fun... no puffing up & posturing, just pure fun with downhome peeps. And your fellow campers can point you in the direction of the best local trails.

    C'mon. You won't be disappointed.

    --sParty

    P.S. Yes, Barbie is always in attendance. Check the pictures in the linked treads above.
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    you wanted to be.

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  18. #18
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    oregon ride suggestions

    Here's my ride reports for Oakridge, McKenzie River Trail, and North Umpqua. There's some free maps you can print out and you can purchase the maps everyone uses for the area online here. If you have any questions..let me know

    Ride Report
    www.24hrBikeShop.com 10% of your purchase price is donated to the trail organization of your choice!

  19. #19
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    Thanks for all the beta.

    We are going to Bend, and stoked.

    Barbie camp sounds sweet! Maybe that's in the cards now too!

    What's the best place in Bend to rent a good quality full suspension bike?

  20. #20
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    If you wanna try an ellsworth or niner go to webcyclery, or pine mountain sports.

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