Results 1 to 50 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,091

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    I'm planning a trip to Oregon in July and will hopefully be able to hit the trails in Oakridge, Bend, Grants Pass, Medford, and Ashland. I'm super paranoid about cougars and bears! Has anyone personally run into either of these animals on the trails or is it pretty rare? I've heard its best to avoid riding in early morning/dusk when they are most active (well, for cougars - not so sure about bears). Please shed some light on this topic to help ease my paranoia!

  2. #2
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    Quote Originally Posted by getagrip View Post
    I'm planning a trip to Oregon in July and will hopefully be able to hit the trails in Oakridge, Bend, Grants Pass, Medford, and Ashland. I'm super paranoid about cougars and bears! Has anyone personally run into either of these animals on the trails or is it pretty rare? I've heard its best to avoid riding in early morning/dusk when they are most active (well, for cougars - not so sure about bears). Please shed some light on this topic to help ease my paranoia!
    Not an issue. Unlikely you will see any.

    I have seen 2-3 cougars in 30 years. A few bears a year. Don't bother them and they do not bother you.

    Need to careful of Indian attacks, though.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GhostRing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    267
    Dot or Feather?
    Time wounds all heels...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: yourideit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    275
    i've only seen a couple of cougar in my life.
    don't sleep with snickers bars in your tent and the black bears won't be a problem. probably won't see either anyway.

    i'm way more afraid of mosquitoes and poison oak.
    "if you can't be good, be good at it."

  5. #5
    Marin rider
    Reputation: IPADrinker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    80
    I surprised a bear cub near Oakridge in OR a few years ago when barreling down a singletrack. I guess it didn't hear of smell me until I was about 20 yards away. It took off in a hurry. Then after a second's delay, my willy meter went sky high once I started wondering where Moma bear was located. Fortunately for me, she didn't come into the scene and I road from the area with emphasis.

    If one is worried about those critters, one can always wear a bell and/or make noise as they ride. Supposedly, they don't want to deal with us if they know we're there and not their usual pray.

    I've also read that if confronted by a bear, don't look them in the eye directly and slowly, calmly back away while standing upright. Don't run, don't turn your back, don't look them in the eyes. The idea is to respectfully back down.

    If one is confronted by a cougar, do look them directly in the eyes, keep standing, make noise; yell, throw rock and sticks, beat big branches on the ground and do not run or turn your back. Stand your ground. The idea here is to show that you could be a threat to them.

  6. #6
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Why are you afraid of black bears? I've run across mothers with cubs, in the Columbia Gorge, and they just run away frightened.

    Now a grizzly on the other hand (which are not in Oregon).....

    I'd love to see a mountain lion someday.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    308
    Beware of deranged therapists and don't worry about lions and tigers and bears.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    Quote Originally Posted by pedalitup View Post
    Beware of deranged therapists and don't worry about lions and tigers and bears...
    ..Oh MY!
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    HA! I thought the title said "paranoid about BEERS and cougars" which is dangerous in PDX anyway. Drink to many beers and you may wake up with a cougar. Scary stuff dude!!!

  10. #10
    Dude, got any schwag?
    Reputation: TheSchwagman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    829
    If you see bear scat along the trails, keep your head on a swivel.

    In case you don't know how to ID bear scat, it's likely to have bells in it. ;o)
    Billy

    Speed is sweet, it's like an avenue to
    ... Shredtopia!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    302
    Never seen a bear, but know lots and lots of folks who seem to see them all the time. They apparently really are more afraid of you than you are of them.

    Heck, in all my 13 years of Oregon mountain biking my wildlife sightings include one coyote and four deer. When I lived in California, I'd see more than that on every ride. I think our animals are more stealth or something. I see far more animals when I am out road riding or on the gravel roads.

  12. #12
    Dude, got any schwag?
    Reputation: TheSchwagman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    829
    And remember, you don't have to outrun the bear or the cougar. As long as you're faster than someone in your group.
    Billy

    Speed is sweet, it's like an avenue to
    ... Shredtopia!

  13. #13
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    HA! I thought the title said "paranoid about BEERS and cougars" which is dangerous in PDX anyway. Drink to many beers and you may wake up with a cougar. Scary stuff dude!!!


    Hmmm... what's wrong with that? Isn't the definition a fine, older woman on the prowl? I believe an ugly older woman on the prowl is called something (many things, actually) different from "cougar".

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: thuren's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    789
    Didn't I read somewhere there has never been a cougar attack on a person in Oregon?

    My brother got chased by a Cougar in SoCal, RIDING HIS MOTORCYCLE off road. It was obviously sick or something, but still. He said it was about 20' behind him before he saw it out of the corner of his eye and realized what was going on.

    I think they have enough REAL food here they don't bother with us.
    Bend, Oregon

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,491
    I typically see one bear each summer, it's usually the bear's hind end as it's running away. My wife and I did see two bears last year while backpacking for two weeks in Yosemite NP.

    I have seen plenty of fox while BC skiing and marmot while backpacking. We did get a chance to see (what we think) were wolves high (around 9000') in the Wallowa Mts several years ago while BC skiing. I've never seen a cougar though.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    700
    Dogs help Oregon couple fend off cougar attack | Local & Regional News | Eugene News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KVAL CBS 13

    Wesley said that he pointed his flashlight into the eyes of the cougar and temporarily blinded it.

    One dog was on either side of the cat barking and growling, distracting the cat and protecting Wesley.

    "As I waited for Lisa, I just couldn't believe this was happening," he said. "The cougar was about 10 to 15 feet away from me."

    As soon as Wesley felt the weapon shoved into his hand, he gave Lisa the flashlight and the cougar seemed to sense the danger.

    Wesley fired once and the cat bolted away. He fired once more into the general area.

    Corona suffered puncture wounds to his neck and claw wounds to the body, but escaped serious injury.

    "If Gigi hadn't bitten the cat like she did, Corona would have been hurt badly," said Wesley.

    He was told by Leonard Erickson of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife it "was definitely an attack because the cougar had ample time and opportunity to get out of the area where we were camping, but it did not," Wesley said.

    The Wynns said it deepened their appreciation for their dogs.

    "They worked as a team and kept the cougar away from us," said Wesley. "They are hero dogs to me."

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer View Post
    Hmmm... what's wrong with that? Isn't the definition a fine, older woman on the prowl? I believe an ugly older woman on the prowl is called something (many things, actually) different from "cougar".
    You have got a point there. I guess it all boils down to your perception of "older woman". My field studies have shown there to be a direct correlation between beers drank & age of corresponding cougar.

    On a serious note, as guy who has a spent LOT of time outdoors exploring, I have never seen a cougar. It will be a great day indeed when I do. Was privileged to see two badgers last year while riding angels staircase which was awesome. I have seen many black bears while riding/camping in Oregon though. I've seen them on Hood, & Tillamook, but regularly see them camping down at Smith Creek. Typically they don't make it down to Smith Creek until Sept. Did see a rather large pile of Bear scat last sunday by the creek while riding Falls Creek ....think it was quite old though. Been in close proximity to many a wild animal including Grizzly...never skeered just humbled, acutely alive, and excited.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    735

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    Our warm, early spring here in Oregon seems to have the bears out and about in the Eugene to Oakridge area. They run away though, after providing some great entertainment with the huge surprise that crosses their face and mine!

    Only saw a cougar (4-legged type) once in the woods just inland from the ocean south of Astoria a few years ago. That one (pretty large) slowly loped away from me after we saw each other at about 30 yards. It seemed to be going somewhere, and we just crossed paths. The other cougars are plentiful in my area.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,091
    Thanks for the responses. Hopefully won't run into any!

  20. #20
    jp4
    jp4 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jp4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    60

    Re: Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    No worries around here. I've run into little black bears quite often up near Hood River where I live, but usually only on dirt bikes where you come up on them fast. Literally came within inches of running over one once. I think they are more afraid of bike/hiker noise than engine/chain saw/truck noise, which I speculate they are used to from all the logging activity.
    I've only encountered one cougar, and it was trotting away from me as I approached.
    The biggest animal hazard around here are frightened deer and chaotic flocks of indecisive wild turkeys running across the road in front of you
    I was nearly trampled by a heard of deer during an mtb race down in Bend last year.
    I've met a few people attacked by sharks in Oregon, but never bears or cats.

  21. #21
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  22. #22
    newfydog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    276
    A cougar growled, snarled and came towards a woman on the mrazak a few years ago. It didn't eat her. A cougar snarled at Ben while building Bens's trail.

    don't come here, too dangerous!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    Best use for dogs on the trails: cougar bait.
    More likely coyote bait though.

  24. #24
    highly visible
    Reputation: GlowBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,185
    I've been in the Northwest well over 20 years and have never seen a cougar. Cougars are pretty scary, but attacks are so exceedingly rare I don't worry about it much, and neither should you. At least with a cougar you won't likely know she's there until she's in the process of clamping down on your neck.

    I've run into a number of bears on the trail, but none has ever been hostile. I wouldn't exactly call bear encounters common, though they do happen once in a while. If you are biking on a trail in the daytime there's really nothing to worry about. The advice above on what to do is correct, and you are not likely to need it.

    Personally I'm more worried about bears at night, when I'm backpacking or bikepacking in bear country, than during the day. Even then I realize intellectually they are little threat to me, but I don't always sleep that well.
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  25. #25
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Whatever you do, don't voluntarily share your barbecue with a bear, should you chance to happen upon one!


    Bear mauls man: Animal was 'goaded' into attack - CSMonitor.com

  26. #26
    Marin rider
    Reputation: IPADrinker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    80
    Since it's brought up.... there are multiple daily sightings of the two legged variety of cougars down here near San Fran. They can bite but they may also pay for meals, drinks and sometimes clothing (less bikes). If one wants to deter them on their approach, refer to them as "mam" or stare at a young woman in the vicinity.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    115
    Skunks. Now that maybe a problem. And those little golden mantle chipmunks are always playing chicken with me.

  28. #28
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,307

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!

    Quote Originally Posted by CmbtDvr185 View Post
    Skunks. Now that maybe a problem. And those little golden mantle chipmunks are always playing chicken with me.
    In the spring you need to watch out for the rough skin newts. Poisonous and they do not get out of your way!

    BTW I just spent the weekend in Squamish BC, where they have bear-proof garbage cans everywhere including downtown. Never saw a bear.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,282
    I got charged by a 300+ lb. black bear down near Crater Lake but he was after the food in the cooler I had in hand and not me. I knew this and I know bear behavior so I stood my ground. He stopped before impact and wheeled away but then decided he wanted one more crack at me and came nose to nose. DO NOT show fear in these instances! I put my hands over my head to make me look bigger and yelled at the top of my lungs - he tucked tail and ran back into the woods. Now if you're talking sow with cubs... then all bets are off and you'd better be faster than your buddy!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN

    PS - Don't try my trick with a grizzly; you'll become an appetizer.
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  30. #30
    Nat
    Nat is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    11,456
    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    I got charged by a 300+ lb. black bear down near Crater Lake but he was after the food in the cooler I had in hand and not me. I knew this and I know bear behavior so I stood my ground. He stopped before impact and wheeled away but then decided he wanted one more crack at me and came nose to nose. DO NOT show fear in these instances! I put my hands over my head to make me look bigger and yelled at the top of my lungs - he tucked tail and ran back into the woods. Now if you're talking sow with cubs... then all bets are off and you'd better be faster than your buddy!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN

    PS - Don't try my trick with a grizzly; you'll become an appetizer.
    Okay, that is bad-ass!

  31. #31
    Get to dah choppah
    Reputation: icsloppl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    144
    That's becasue he was smarter than the average bear.

    Bears and Cougars in Oregon - Paranoia!-yogi_bear-5312.jpg
    Santa Cruz TBc
    Pivot 429c

  32. #32
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Heck, I've thrown small stones and pebbles at a bear, foraging right in the middle of a hiking trail, and wouldn't budge. I tried shouting at him to scare him off, to no avail. Throwing small pebbles at him worked. He scampered quickly away.

    They're really big babies at heart.

    (Until one eats you!)

  33. #33
    Daniel the Dog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,736
    I worry more about crazy drug users with big trucks and guns.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    151
    Used to be a tree that was a big scratch post for some cougars where I ride but it's gone now. Was up at Whistler this weekend couple bear right under the lifts Mother with three little cubs. Amazing how they don't bother to interact with the bikers.

  35. #35
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Hey Nat, I know this is waaaay off topic, but can you elaborate on this post? It sounds intriguing!

  36. #36
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,712
    Sorry to resurrect this thread, but here is some sage advice on what to do (or not?) if you encounter a bear.

    Freakin' hilarious!!!!!!!

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ilzEmTii_vw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

  37. #37
    I got nothin'
    Reputation: hydrogeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    738
    This is the only Cougar issue that I can recal in recent history. This was up in Levanworth WA. Leavenworth trail closed after cougar encounter | OregonLive.com

    The only thing that scared me one time was being charged by a Buck. Did the bear trick by screaming loudly and waving my hands in the air and it eventually figured out I wasn't something of a threat or to hump. First time I have ever been charged by a deer.
    I ride at ludicrous speed

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by Gman086 View Post
    I got charged by a 300+ lb. black bear down near Crater Lake but he was after the food in the cooler I had in hand and not me. I knew this and I know bear behavior so I stood my ground. He stopped before impact and wheeled away but then decided he wanted one more crack at me and came nose to nose. DO NOT show fear in these instances! I put my hands over my head to make me look bigger and yelled at the top of my lungs - he tucked tail and ran back into the woods. Now if you're talking sow with cubs... then all bets are off and you'd better be faster than your buddy!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN

    PS - Don't try my trick with a grizzly; you'll become an appetizer.
    I hope there was a laundromat nearby.

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    225
    Chukar hunting over in the rim country in SE Oregon, my buddies have had a few cougar stalk them (with bad results for the cougar). The number of cougar in Oregon is sky high due to the legislation banning the use of dogs to hunt them (stupid legislation, by the way). Since they are stalking predators, the likelihood of one attacking a mountain biker is small as their opportunity to keep up with a biker while stalking is pretty poor. A surprised cat is more likely to run away. The one caveat is an injured or sick cat.

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,282
    Quote Originally Posted by GauchoGreg View Post
    I hope there was a laundromat nearby.
    Definitely got my adrenaline going! Buddy decided to run but he actually fell when turning to run the opposite way. Was kind of comical seeing him try to run backwards then forwards and land on his ass. Gave me a sense of relief knowing that he was down and not me but I knew the bear was after the cooler - black bears don't attack people for fun. Here's another little known fact - bears can run up to 40mph for short distances. There is NO outrunning one even on a bike or horseback. That's why I didn't even bother. I spotted it in a grove of cedars making direct eye contact. Like the vid says - that's usually bad news as he came out of that cedar grove like a Saturn V! This wasn't my first dance and probably not my last.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN

    PS - Pepper spray is the absolute best thing to ward off bears because they have among the most sensitive sense of smell in the animal kingdom. You just have to be able to stand your ground and wait to use it. Guns are among the worse because the person's aim goes to you know where when being charged, not to mention large bears can take a lot of lead before being slowed unless you're a really good shot with a high caliber gun.
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,491
    Quote Originally Posted by GauchoGreg View Post
    Chukar hunting over in the rim country in SE Oregon, my buddies have had a few cougar stalk them (with bad results for the cougar). The number of cougar in Oregon is sky high due to the legislation banning the use of dogs to hunt them (stupid legislation, by the way). Since they are stalking predators, the likelihood of one attacking a mountain biker is small as their opportunity to keep up with a biker while stalking is pretty poor. A surprised cat is more likely to run away. The one caveat is an injured or sick cat.
    From what I've read (Oregonian) the numbers of cougar in Oregon is higher than it has been in the past, but the number of sightings is significantly less.

    I'm unable to argue this point, just repeating what I have read.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    From what I've read (Oregonian) the numbers of cougar in Oregon is higher than it has been in the past, but the number of sightings is significantly less.

    I'm unable to argue this point, just repeating what I have read.
    I hunt chukar, and while I have not personally seen any while hunting, my group has gone from not seeing any cougar for about 10 years on the hill from the mid-1990s to now having seen several in the past few years. And chukar hunters in general, have been seeing more big cats. The big cats are taking their toll on the deer population in many places, too.

    By the way, I'm personally repulsed by the idea of going out and hunting cougar, but the no-dog law is beyond stupid. With dogs, hunters were able to track the cats and determine if the cat was a good one to kill. They would know if the cat has a litter of cubs, and not kill the mom. But now, shooting long distance, orphaned cubs are much more likely. It was a case where do-gooder types acting on their sensibilities promoted an emotional law, rather than good legislation. They still allow hunting cougar, they did not reduce harvest levels, they just do not allow hunting them in the way that is really most logical. It says something that the wildlife biologists opposed the new law.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,491
    The one thing I do not get is the idea that we need to illuminate or control the numbers of a predator based on the notion that it is harming the deer and elk populations that we want to hunt. Plus add the exaggerated safety threat that is much to do about nothing.

    I have to say, one of my favorite cats is Tommy the Cat...

    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    225
    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    The one thing I do not get is the idea that we need to illuminate or control the numbers of a predator based on the notion that it is harming the deer and elk populations that we want to hunt. Plus add the exaggerated safety threat that is much to do about nothing.

    I have to say, one of my favorite cats is Tommy the Cat...

    Well, with modern livestock, civilization in areas where big cats originally lived (with their pets and kids), you would have very large cyclical fluctuations of the big predators without predator/game management. Those fluctuations bring disease, injuries, desperate animals, etc. Boom-bust cycles with the predators and the forage animals. Under those conditions, we would see much more conflict with the big cats. Just because we have banned the use of dogs for hunting, it does not mean that the wildlife biologists have backed off on management of the big cats, including harvesting them. All it means is that instead of hunters paying to do it, now the ODF&W has to spend money doing it.

    Lots of things are not my cup-o-tea, including hunting big cats, but I'm not going to try to ban them all just for sense of feeling better about things. Just like mountain biking, people need to think about what makes sense before legislating against it.

  45. #45
    Daniel the Dog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,736
    You get hurt of killed by an animal and count yourself among the rarest of cats. As my dad used to say, "Don't look for a zebra look for a horse." In other words the cat is the zebra and hitting your head on a rock is a horse. Far more likely.

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    1,249
    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    The one thing I do not get is the idea that we need to illuminate or control the numbers of a predator based on the notion that it is harming the deer and elk populations that we want to hunt. Plus add the exaggerated safety threat that is much to do about nothing.


    Agreed. Propaganda & politics make people come up with some dumb poop.
    Last edited by WHALENARD; 07-19-2013 at 12:02 AM.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,282
    Agreed!
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    16
    A few months ago, saw a beautiful cinnamon colored adult about the size of a riding lawnmower while grinding along the road back up to the top of the Jedi Trail by Galice. About 30 yards in front of me, she just crashed down through the underbrush onto the road. She stopped, I stopped, we looked at each other, and she bolted off the road down the embankment. I started back up, and crashing down onto the road came a cub about the size of a black lab. I stopped, but cub was oblivious to me and just followed mom over the other side. That's when I got scared, then confused. What about the common wisdom that moms go hogwild to protect the kids? I still waited a looong time before I continued up the road.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gman086's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,282
    They go hogwild when you get in between the cubs and her. Then it be GoPRO time!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,091
    Well, had my bear encounter. Read about it here:

    My 2 to 10 week mountain biking vacation and relocation - Page 2

Similar Threads

  1. Cougars at Draper trails in Oklahoma?
    By Ozzy43 in forum Great Plains - OK, KS, NE, SD, ND
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 20 Hours Ago, 08:10 AM
  2. Watch out for Cougars
    By SHIVER ME TIMBERS in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-15-2012, 04:58 AM
  3. Cougars on Devil's Gulch
    By rbwen in forum Washington
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-29-2012, 07:11 PM
  4. Trunk track paranoia
    By Will Goes Boing in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-11-2011, 11:47 PM
  5. Images of 8 Cougars at Moses Coulee
    By ward in forum Washington
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-03-2011, 02:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •