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  1. #1
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    Attention Kosmo!

    I figured you'd see that sooner or later Hey, I just got off a group road ride tonight with the Mt. View crew and apparently my etiquette regarding the paceline is somewhat lacking. Of course I don't have much, if any, experience with a paceline so I figured I'd give you and anyone else with some tips, a shout. Any links I can go to to read up on how to ride in a paceline? One of the errors I apparently made was when taking the lead, I'd punch it and end up dropping the entire group Anyway, suggestions are appreciated.
    New Obama Creed: Change you can believe in TO Change what you believe in

  2. #2
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    Don't listen to Wes, he can only hang with flypaper! I thought you did great. Yea you pulled hard but if it was that bad the group would just let you go until you blew-up and then would spit you out the back. It was the hills, the draft does not get any bigger. I thought that the group should have talked about this at Rowena Crest and then made sure everyone was there for teh decent and just let the 5 main riders do the pulls but keep the group together. We have to be careful on these rides to encourage some of these riders and let them experience the fun of group riding that they would not normally see. People get dropped but we should have at least tried to keep everyone together on the decent at teh beginning. The only one that we should always try to drop is Wes!

    Time for you to come on the Sat. morning rides 8:00am - great group of guys and will let you know what to do - excellent experience gained.
    Paco the "Flyin' Finn"

  3. #3
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    Check this link out Nate

    Tell me what you think of this info Nate. Good pointers? Anything to add or subtract?
    paceline basics
    New Obama Creed: Change you can believe in TO Change what you believe in

  4. #4
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    Looks good to me.

    Nate
    Paco the "Flyin' Finn"

  5. #5
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    Random Paceline Thoughts

    Here are some random, bonk-induced thoughts, all of which assume a group of mixed abilities that is trying to stay together:

    1. When you take over pulling at the front, don't accelerate at all. Once the previous puller re-attachs to the back, you can accelerate a bit if you think the group can take it, espcially if the previous puller stayed out front too long and lost 3 mph or more. This should be easy. Often, the new person up front thinks they might be slowing everybody down (we're actually happy for a slight break every now and then) and will unwittingly accelerate. If anybody behind sees this causing others trouble in hanging, a simple, shouted "easier!" will get the puller's attention.

    2. When starting to pull, never accelerate up shorter hills. You will crack the group. It's better IF YOU ARE TRYING TO STAY TOGETHER to save the accelerations for after you crest the rise.

    3. Try to avoid using your brakes in the paceline, instead drifting out to the left to catch a bit of wind resistance. The paradox is that where we live, this could slow you too much. It also increases the chance of mishap, in case the rider behind you has inadvertently overlapped wheels with you. So I, and everybody else I know, tends to use the brakes smoothly. The key here is to make sure and use the back brake. The guy behind can see this out of his periphal vision, and will know you are slowing (even though he should NOT be looking directly at your rear wheel.

    4. Don't stand up in the paceline unless you know how to stand UP, without throwing your bike backwards due to lunging your body forward. A quick "standing" comment helps too.

    5. On big climbs, forget the paceline. You'll never keep the group together, anyway, and you could actually demolish weaker riders by encouraging them to overextend themselves. Instead, make it clear that one or more of the first riders will always come back down the hill and ride the rest of it with the last person in the group. If you don't do this, they will inevitably start thinking they are holding everybody up, or that nobody is going to wait for them.

    6. Don't fight people who say they are cooked, and would prefer to lollygag back on their own, PROVIDED THEY SAY THIS TWICE. Always assume that the first time, they are just looking for encouragement to stick with the group, and that nobody minds waiting.

    7. When peeling off the front of the paceline, I've read that you should first flare your fingers out twice off the drops as a signal to the second man in the paceline. Sounds reasonable, but I know of nobody that actually does this. Instead, the glance over the shoulder for traffic seems to let everyone know that you are rolling off the front.

    8. Don't follow too close. There really isn't much difference in efficiency between leaving a 4 inch gap or a 14 inch gap, especially at speeds over 15 mph.

    See you on a 8 AM Saturday hammerfest one of these times. In a slightly sick way, I've found them to be an absolute blast.

    Tom
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Kos; all I'm really interested in doing is having fun with the rest of those who are interested in fun as well.
    New Obama Creed: Change you can believe in TO Change what you believe in

  7. #7
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    Another couple of tips that I've learned riding with these groups (fast, but sociable), as a guy who is often not one of the strongest:

    There's no(t much) shame in sucking wheel. It's better to stay at the back, and give riders that are coming back from their pulls a gap to pull into ahead of you, than to try and stay in the rotation and let gaps form every time there's a roller or acceleration. They won't hate you for it unless you use the rest to crush them later!

    If you're marginal at staying with the pace, but working into the rotation, make sure a fast guy isn't behind you. You'll get crushed everytime you finish your pull and get to the back just as the line is accelerating. Ideally you should be one or two places behind the fast guy, and have another slow guy behind you so you'll get a bit of a rest after your pull.

    Try to time your effort at the front to take advantage of your strengths. I'm OK in rollers, so that's the best time for me to take a good pull. Longer uphill grinds kill me, so I'll take shorter much shorter turns then.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by slackdaddy
    Another couple of tips that I've learned riding with these groups (fast, but sociable), as a guy who is often not one of the strongest:

    There's no(t much) shame in sucking wheel. It's better to stay at the back, and give riders that are coming back from their pulls a gap to pull into ahead of you, than to try and stay in the rotation and let gaps form every time there's a roller or acceleration. They won't hate you for it unless you use the rest to crush them later!

    If you're marginal at staying with the pace, but working into the rotation, make sure a fast guy isn't behind you. You'll get crushed everytime you finish your pull and get to the back just as the line is accelerating. Ideally you should be one or two places behind the fast guy, and have another slow guy behind you so you'll get a bit of a rest after your pull.

    Try to time your effort at the front to take advantage of your strengths. I'm OK in rollers, so that's the best time for me to take a good pull. Longer uphill grinds kill me, so I'll take shorter much shorter turns then.
    Excellent additions, all of which I agree with totally. There are few things worse in a group than a weaker rider insisting on pulling too much early in the ride, then slowing the entire group down for the last third of the ride. That's just no fun for anybody.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

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