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Thread: Inbred question

  1. #1
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    Inbred question

    Are there any differences in the geometry between a new Inbred 26er and an older Inbred?

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    Any geometry changes between an 06 and a new Inbred?

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    Was wondering the same for my 29ers - I think my Swapout is a earlier gen than my single speed. Doesn't help much for your 26er question but found this:
    » Month of 29ers: Brant Richards on the past and future of 29er design » Bike Magic

    Brant Richards designed the UK’s first 29er frame nearly a decade ago. In this column he talks through the development of the bigger wheelsize and the hurdles he’s faced along the way.

    We launched the On-One Inbred 29er about seven years ago now. And until they arrived, I don’t think I’d ever ridden one. I just slammed the geometry down, doing a bit of wiggling around to make things fit. I read a lot. Talked to a few people and had some ideas too.

    The first bikes were designed thus: Head angle, 72 degrees (where it would fit). This was two degrees steeper than the standard Inbred. Handling back then was all about “fast” and “singletrack” and “making bikes handle fast” was a desirable thing. So I did the sums, looked at the trail generated and found that increasing the head angle by 1.5degs made things work about the same for a given fork length. I increased it by another half a degree as I figured having a bigger wheel flopping about we’d be better off making it a bit quicker. The 16in frames had a 71deg head angle because otherwise the front tyre hit your toes.

    These numbers are how I quote numbers though – those are “sagged” dimensions when you’re sat on the bike with 30% sagged forks. It’s good in determining how a bike rides. “Static” dimensions with an extended fork are fine for comparing similar travel bikes, but the numbers make increasingly less sense as forks get longer

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