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  1. #1
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    Big Bird: A C456 Build

    Started a new thread with a title that let's everyone know what's actually in here.

    As you may know, this is my first build, it's a yellow C456, with SRAM 2x10. I had some chainring issues, but have finally ordered all my parts as of yesterday. I expect to finish the build sometime late next week, and am dreading the cable routing.

    Component Breakdown:

    Frame: Yellow C456 16"

    Fork: Sektor RL Solo Air 150mm

    Wheels: DT Swiss M1800

    Bars: Blue On-one

    Seatpost: Blue On-one

    Saddle: On-one

    Crank: SRAM x7 39T, 26T with x9/x0 rings

    Front and Rear Mech: x7 2x10

    Tires: Panaracer XC 2.1 rear, Nevegal 2.35 front tubed for now

    Pedals: Time Atac Alium


    What's Left:
    Have the SLX brakes on the way,
    switching the grips to black ODI Rogues,
    switching the stem to white FRS pro
    Blue Shifter Cables

    pics coming soon...

  2. #2
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    yep, my room is dirty. It's crammed with pretty much everything I own while I finish up my second BS degree, ha.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrodie View Post






    yep, my room is dirty. It's crammed with pretty much everything I own while I finish up my second BS degree, ha.
    Going to be a wild bike.

    What concerns you about the cable routing? It is pretty forward on the 456C.

    BTW, your seat post is backwards.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  4. #4
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    Woops and thanks for the heads up about the seat post, it has been switched.

    I really just don't feel like doing the cable routing TBH. However, I have been planning it out in my head. It seems with the L Rear brake, the routing would cross with one of the derailleurs.

    Isn't the convention, L= rear brake, front mech, R= front brake, rear mech...if that's the case, it seems like there will be some cable crossing. It looks like the reverse should be true for the derailleurs if they cross in front of the head tube? It seems that the rear derailleur should start on the left, cross over and use the left stops.

    Can anyone give me a routing breakdown? It would be much appreciated.

  5. #5
    All That is Man
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    You can route across the front however you like really. But yea, you're left/right and front/rear is correct. Looks like a cool bike, it will definitely get noticed on the trail Keep us updated.
    John

  6. #6
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    Looking good! No crazy cable crossovers under the top tube are needed. The rear brake (right hand in the US cable path is easy - that is the one with clips on the left. The FD cable goes in the middle lane and the RD in the right one.





    Edit: the cable stops are far apart enough so I think a different routing may work as well if not better.
    Last edited by StiHacka; 05-09-2012 at 08:25 PM.

  7. #7
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    ahhh crap....On-One Carbon 456 Complete Bike

    way cheaper than what I paid and it has better bits...sad face

  8. #8
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    quick update:

    put the new stem on, a white pro frs. It looks pretty good.
    Put the rotors on, alligator wavys, 180 in front, 160 in back.
    Front derailleur is on loosely, ready to be cabled and adjusted.

    Tomorrow, my last package comes, it has my slx m666 brakes, adapters, rim tape, chain rings.

    So hopefully tomorrow night I'll have everything done, a test ride up and down the street to make sure everything is adjusted and ready to go. I'll post a pic, and then thursday is the big day...first ride.

    What I have left:
    -cable routing
    -shifters
    -brake mounting
    -grips
    -derailleur adjustments (going to need videos for this)
    -tire and tube set up
    -pump up fork
    -ride like a psycho

    Let's hope I don't have a terrible crash and destroy my newly minted bike on the first ride.

  9. #9
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    Well, it's almost done. I ran into a couple of snags, the disc brake housing was way too long, so i trimmed that up this morning. Unfortunately, I didn't tighten the hose into the levers enough and when I went to squeeze the lever to center the brakes I lost some fluid. Looks like I'll be needing to go bleed the thing later this morning. The front brake could use a slight trim but, I think it's not too bad so I'll do that one at a later date.

    I broke my chain tool somehow, I guess it wasn't lining up correctly with the pin on the chain and so the little screw type thing snapped. So now I'm left with a tight link and need to press the pin back in to loosen it up.

    So once I get those two things done I'll adjust the derailleurs and it will be ready for a ride. I really don't want to remove the pads again, getting that split pin in is a PITA. What is the likelihood of getting oil on the pads if I don't remove them?

  10. #10
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    I bleed my brakes with the pads in. You just have to be real careful and use a nice, long lead of tubing on the bleed valve.

  11. #11
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    That's what I do, too. I think I read somewhere that you should be able to get a spare bolt for the XTs and replace the split pin with it.

    PS: we crave some more pictures!

  12. #12
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    I may get those XT pins and replace the split pins because they just annoy the hell out of me.

    Bad news, my bleed went terrible. I tried to use a kind of ghetto method and it didn't work, I also didn't realize that there was a bleed port on the master cylinder, not just a kind of "open bath" so I started taking things off and then realized, oh I guess I need a syringe or something. So basically, I ended up trying to bleed and the cylinder started leaking oil. I have no idea what's going on, I tried tightening up all the screws in the cylinder that I had messed with earlier, to see if maybe I just hadn't been careful and created a bad seal. I guess tomorrow I'll find out if it worked.

    I ended up just buying a bleed kit (the tubing, oil, funnel and plug) and found a video of how to bleed the new style shimano brakes. I got the package overnighted so I'll be ready to work on it tomorrow evening. Wish me luck, I hope I didn't mess up the cylinder somehow. It shouldn't be too difficult, provided there is no leaking at the lever again.

    Pictures will be coming shortly, maybe tonight if I get motivated.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrodie View Post
    I may get those XT pins and replace the split pins because they just annoy the hell out of me.

    Bad news, my bleed went terrible. I tried to use a kind of ghetto method and it didn't work, I also didn't realize that there was a bleed port on the master cylinder, not just a kind of "open bath" so I started taking things off and then realized, oh I guess I need a syringe or something. So basically, I ended up trying to bleed and the cylinder started leaking oil. I have no idea what's going on, I tried tightening up all the screws in the cylinder that I had messed with earlier, to see if maybe I just hadn't been careful and created a bad seal. I guess tomorrow I'll find out if it worked.

    I ended up just buying a bleed kit (the tubing, oil, funnel and plug) and found a video of how to bleed the new style shimano brakes. I got the package overnighted so I'll be ready to work on it tomorrow evening. Wish me luck, I hope I didn't mess up the cylinder somehow. It shouldn't be too difficult, provided there is no leaking at the lever again.

    Pictures will be coming shortly, maybe tonight if I get motivated.
    Good luck! I bought my front brake as a bunch of individual parts (lever, caliper, hose, mounting bracket) and I used the Shimano bleeding bottle kit and the gravity method to get them going. It is not that hard, you just need to take things slow and prevent air from entering the system at the lever when you bleed the caliper. The process is not messy unless you manage to drop the plastic bag that collects the bled oil...

  14. #14
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    It wasn't that the bleed process is terribly confusing or difficult, more that I just didn't have the right equipment. Can you still do a top down bleed on the new SLX brakes, do just have to remove those plates to reveal the cavity? Regardless, I'll probably just use the caliper first method like in the video, it seems more reliable. I'm starting to think that maybe the syringe in the bleed port on the cylinder just wasn't fitting correctly and the oil was bleeding out of the top or something, I can't think of a reason the cylinder would fill and begin to overflow the way it was.

  15. #15
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    oh, and I'll get some pictures in better light tomorrow hopefully.

  16. #16
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    Looking good!
    All I used was this bottle with hose: Amazon.com: Shimano Disc Brake Bleed Kit, 50ml: Sports & Outdoors
    I cannot help with the levers. Mine are dual control ST-M775s that have a good sized fluid reservoir so I did not need to screw in any funnel to bleed them.

  17. #17
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    I bought that same kit, but I also bought the funnel so I can bleed from the bottom up.

    Out of curiosity where your brakes like this Bleeding Shimano BR-M575 brakes - YouTube, where there is only a port to bleed from.

    Or like this Tech FAQ: How To Bleed A Shimano Disc Brake - YouTube, more like an open bath kind of thing. This what I wanted to do at first, just doesn't seem possible on the new brakes.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrodie View Post
    I bought that same kit, but I also bought the funnel so I can bleed from the bottom up.

    Out of curiosity where your brakes like this Bleeding Shimano BR-M575 brakes - YouTube, where there is only a port to bleed from.

    Or like this Tech FAQ: How To Bleed A Shimano Disc Brake - YouTube, more like an open bath kind of thing. This what I wanted to do at first, just doesn't seem possible on the new brakes.
    My brakes have a reservoir like the ones in the second open bath video.


  19. #19
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    Nice bike, but... That front brake hose would drive me bonkers. My as well shorten it now that you have to rebleed anywy, right?

  20. #20
    All That is Man
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    I would definitely shorten the left hose before getting into the bleeding project. That will slap around on the trail. Also, the right hose typically routes below the bar. That will also slap around while riding.
    John

  21. #21
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    well, I finally got the rear brake bled and it took so much effort. The hose constantly comes off the nipple if your not careful and it's impossible to get the fluid to go in at the caliper. Honestly, after you get the fluid to go in the caliper and then try to let it bleed back out at the caliper, there aren't many air bubbles at all. The front I may possible do this week, I'll need to find the olive and barb, if I'm careful I wont even need to do a bleed. If I have to do a rebleed on this front brake I'm going to go crazy...

    I'm having trouble with the sektor air, I pump it up to the recommended pressure and the thing jsut compresses way too much, I can never get the sag set around 25% ever. Also, once I pump to a certain level the meter will hardly move at all like I can't get any more air in. Are there any tricks to pumping up the fork or something? Maybe I have a bad pump?

    Oh and the idiot at the bike shop put it on over the bar, I guess he was in a rush, I switched it back.
    Last edited by kbrodie; 05-19-2012 at 03:02 PM.

  22. #22
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    And the official weight is...26.8 lb with pedals, WTH! Where is all that weight coming from? The huge front tire?

    Apparently, the on-oen x456 XT build is about 26.4 lb without pedals, so I guess the weight is about average. Maybe I'll get a 120mm fork and a smaller front tire if I ever think I want to race some XC.

    I ended up just pumping the fork way up and then dropping air slowly until I reached the sag I wanted, it ended up being like 130+ psi which is out of the recommended range. I hope my fork doesn't have any issues, it was brand new.

  23. #23
    help with the zip please
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    Quote Originally Posted by kbrodie View Post
    And the official weight is...26.8 lb with pedals, WTH! Where is all that weight coming from? The huge front tire?
    2 kg for your wheelset, 1900gm for your fork, claimed 700gms for the front tire plus tube. Forget about the scales, get out and enjoy it

  24. #24
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    First ride today, it was okay. I fell a ton because of the clipless pedals, maybe I should switch to platforms until my skills get up to par. I think a 120 or 130mm fork would suit the trails I ride more. I liked the frame and the size, definitely easier to go downhill. I haven't ridden a trail in 2 years and even then I was new, so maybe I just need to keep riding. This pic may be a little better...



    Yea, I'm definitely going to switch over to flat pedals, I'll use some cheapo trek pedals for now and then buy one of those welgo 5.10 deals on price point in a month or so. I just wish I could get some blue pedals...

    I figure that I'm not doing any XC racing/training so I might as well ride what I'm comfortable with and have fun/ get some exercise.
    Last edited by kbrodie; 05-21-2012 at 06:33 AM.

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