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  1. #1
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    2010 Nomad to 456c?

    Toying with the idea of going from a 2010 Nomad to a 456c. I live near Tahoe and ride summers there. My XL Alum Nomad seems big and a bit much sometimes with all the squish and travel. Have a hard time manualing, wheeling and tossing it around like I want. Had to buy it sight unseen on reviews alone, plus shop recommendations as no one within 3 hours had anything in stock to test. I know, big mistake, but I was excited to start. Since then, Ive realized huge jumps scare me, so I dont think I need 6+ inches of travel. Wondering now if I should go another way like the 456c and swap my components over, or if I'll get too beat up on Tahoe tech stuff and regret going to a hardtail like the 456c? Or should I just shut up and learn to fully ride what I have working on my skills?

    A little more about me. Age 47. I learned to love to challenge myself on climbs and wonder if a long travel hardtail might be better. I love to try and clean all the tech climbs I can, pedaling until I fall off or tip over, which I do often. To this end, Ive switched to platform pedals to be able to wait to escape until Im actually crashing, thus giving it a full credit try. Been mt. biking for just 3 years and still learning a lot on challenging tech. trails every time I ride. Down hill seems easier on the Nomad than up for sure and its been a confidence inspiring bike on most downs. Have to walk the extreme sections of Toads Wild Ride for instance, but doing a lot of other things on it on the way down? Opinions welcome. Keep what I have and learn to ride it better or try another type of frame?

  2. #2
    FASTER, DAMIT, FASTER
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    I have a Carbon Nomad and 456c. I regularly ride them both, but to be honest my 456c will never replace my Nomad. My 456c climbs well, I don't think you'll be disappointed there. I have a 160mm fork on mine, I image that if you went with a adjustable travel fork, or a 4" or 5" it would climb even better. The other thing that I can tell you is that you'll instantly notice not having that 6" of travel in the rear when things get a little gnarly. I feel much faster on my Nomad than on my 456c. Not in a bad way, it's just very different. To be fair I don't know if it's an "apples and apples" comparison. I do have a friend that went from a Turner 5-spot to a 456c and he seems very satisfied...and he's still pretty dang fast on the hard tail. Good luck!
    DON'T EXTINGUISH THE STOKE.

  3. #3
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    It sounds to me like you would be better served with a light weight 5" full suspension trail bike. Going to a hardtail would probably be pretty extreme for you coming from a 6" travel FS.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. I appreciate the advise. I think a 5" travel bike might be the answer I'm looking for. I got talked into the slacker head angle by a guy at the shop when I first bought. I ended up with an XL Nomad instead of a L Blur LT like I went in for originally.
    I'm 6'2" with a shorter torso and all legs (34" inseam) and might have been better served on a L rather than an XL as I'm on the fence from the Santa Cruz site for sizing. Looking back, 2010 was lame time to buy. I think all the shops around were not stocking bikes to try as they were all just trying to stay afloat during the depth of the recession... can't really blame them, I guess. I think I ended up with too big of a frame and too much travel to for my needs. I might point to a lighter 5" now instead. What is one of the best 5" travel frames for slow, technical, rocky, Sierra climbs? One that is easy to balance on and flick around at the last minute but still has acceptable downhill prowess? I know I might be asking for the holy grail, and everything is a compromise, but there are great bikes out there, but just hard to try them in advance sometimes.

  5. #5
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    I guess it depends on your budget. If you've got the money I think the Ibis Mojo or Santa Cruz Blur TRC would be perfect.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  6. #6
    Ow!
    Reputation: clydecrash's Avatar
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    Based on your last message, I recommend you consider a Blur LTc. It has turned into my do-it-all bike. Handles the rocky, rough stuff, but it still handles quickly on tight singletrack. I would even be willing to hit some of the less-intense DH stuff on it. I have it built up bigger than most, with a Marz 55 and a Manitou Evolver.

    It really sounds like your shop gave you poor advice, both in frame selection and sizing. I am 6'3". I also have a large Nomad1, even though my shop thought I should have an XL. I am glad I didn't listen to them. My Blur is an XL, which has worked out well, but I could have gone with a L also. Keep in mind that I usually buy the size smaller than what most people recommend. I think it is because I like a more responsive frame in the tight stuff.

    I have a steel 456 also. Bunches of fun to ride, but it is not a FS, which limits how I ride some trails, and how long I can ride (more wear and tear on the body). The 456c might be a nicer ride, but not that much nicer--it is still a HT.

    Is it possible to lighten up your Nomad? Some people have built their Nomads very light. I think this kind of defeats the purpose of a Nomad, but it may be a better alternative than buying a new frame or bike.

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