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  1. #1
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    Work boots for standing on cold concrete?

    I'm not sure where to post this but thought here is a good start.
    Does anyone have a favorite? I'm starting a new job and usually have sore feet.
    The temp should be as low a zero degrees at times.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    You should look into Redwings. If you're going to be on your feet all day spend the $$$

  3. #3
    Ride More, Whine Less
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    If you need a steel toe boot, look at Redwings or Carhartt boots. At 0, you don't really need that much insulation provided you have a nice pair of wool socks.

    If you don't need a steel toe, there are many good options for "snow boots" and ice fishing boots. These may have more insulation than you need, but might be more comfortable.

  4. #4
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    Honestly... ahh I give up

  5. #5
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    Keen are the most comfy, warmest boots i ever had but just like cycling shoes everyones different so YMMV.. It's a good idea to get 2 pairs so you can alternate between the pairs each day to let them fully dry out.
    Good idea to try em on and have some extra wiggle room, and room for thick socks. Trust me, too tight means cold feet no matter the boot. The extra sole helps to walk on snow and ice too.
    Never cotton socks, either wool of synthetic.
    Get some silk under wear, even silk socks to wear as a base layer for colder days.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  6. #6
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    Redwings.

  7. #7
    duh
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    If you need safety boots with steel toes and plates anrd you are working outside, stay away from steel and get composite toe and sole plates. The steel gets cold and stays cold for a long time even when you go inside.

  8. #8
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    The red wing store will have a variety of options for working on different surfaces. I tend to like slip on's . They have a greater volume of trapped air than a lace up boot and have always felt warmer to me.

  9. #9
    Climbs = necessary evil
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    Doc Martens have the most comfortable soles I've ever worn in 30+ years of wearing steel toe boots. Not sure if if they have insulated ones or not, but I can wear them all day long and I'm talking long hours (16-18 hrs/day). I've owned Red Wings and while they are well constructed, they were not as comfortable as the Docs.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by deke505 View Post
    If you need safety boots with steel toes and plates anrd you are working outside, stay away from steel and get composite toe and sole plates. The steel gets cold and stays cold for a long time even when you go inside.
    exactly why I recommended those Danners -
    Just forgot to point that out - thanks!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
    duh
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    You might also think about getting some gel insert too.

  12. #12
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    Hey! Thanks for the help. I'll look into all that. No need for steel / composit toes for this job. Great idea on having extra boots to dry out completely.
    Do redwings have a great return policy if they hurt after a day?

  13. #13
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    IMO, a judgement can't be made in a day (besides obvious discomfort - pinched toes etc) - sometimes it takes a bit to break in -
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
    duh
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    agree with highdell. Buy what you think is comfortable and wear around the house for a few days. Try and not to muck up the soles to much because if they are not comfortable after that you still would want to be able to return them.

  15. #15
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    I feel like it's like this: (just my experience) If it's comfy right out of the box, the materials fail with in months
    If it takes a week to break-in, those boots/shoes are the ones that have lasted - and are sooooper comfy.
    some never feel good.

    There are exceptions of course

    My USN issued flight deck boots were some of the comfiest boots I have owned (took like 2 weeks to break-in) - someone stole them a few years ago, and I cannot find the style made anymore - except used on ebay and they go for like 160
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  16. #16
    I see what you did there.
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    I am currently wearing a pair of Royer Moab with Dr. Scholls Massing gel insole and they're just about the most comfy boots I've ever worn - even from day 1. They're also "metal free" too.
    2002 Cannondale Jekyll 800
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  17. #17
    Climbs = necessary evil
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    I feel like it's like this: (just my experience) If it's comfy right out of the box, the materials fail with in months
    If it takes a week to break-in, those boots/shoes are the ones that have lasted - and are sooooper comfy.
    some never feel good.

    There are exceptions of course

    My USN issued flight deck boots were some of the comfiest boots I have owned (took like 2 weeks to break-in) - someone stole them a few years ago, and I cannot find the style made anymore - except used on ebay and they go for like 160
    I use to feel that way until I bought my Doc Martens. Those felt like sneakers on day one and I usually replaced them about 4 or 5 years.

  18. #18
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    Redback slip on boots are my preferred foot ware for work. Steel toe, medium height, super light weight. They offer a leather insole that is super comfy when it comforms to your foot. Mine typically last one year.
    One of the benefits to me is the lightweight. I find my feet and legs are far less fatigued at the end of the day when I use lightweight boots.


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  19. #19
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    Slip-ons - I have never liked the feel (except for a zip-up) what am I missin here? - only tried a couple boots - both sloppy feelin - I like being able to cinch-down certain areas of my foot/ankle
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  20. #20
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    Would I be nuts to buy some midpriced ( $250.00) winter hiking boots from REI? The return policy there is so hard to pass up. Just thinking of all options. I definitely want to try some of the work boots mentioned also. I guess I can bring them home and wear them in the house for a while.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huck Pitueee View Post
    Would I be nuts to buy some midpriced ( $250.00) winter hiking boots from REI? The return policy there is so hard to pass up. Just thinking of all options. I definitely want to try some of the work boots mentioned also. I guess I can bring them home and wear them in the house for a while.
    well, you're supporting REI - not that that's as bad as supporting walmart.

    Buying direct (if possible) would be preferred to me, despite a chain's return policy.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  22. #22
    gran jefe
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    make sure to buy them plenty big, so that there is room for socks, and some wiggle room. too-snug boots reduce the amount of circulation and compress the socks, reducing their insulation value.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    well, you're supporting REI - not that that's as bad as supporting walmart.

    Buying direct (if possible) would be preferred to me, despite a chain's return policy.
    Those Danners look nice and made in USA. The tread looks minimal for my snow shoveling duties. Shovel to get to truck. Shovel snow plow berm in driveway. Shovel to get into work.

  24. #24
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    Which ever boot you decide on, look into the moldable insoles. The ones that I use are from Redwing, cost about $50, but are awesome. You trim them to size then throw them in the oven until they're approximately 200 degrees, then you insert them into your boots while nice and warm, put your boots on and lace them, then just kind of squat for a couple minutes until they shape to your foot. They are not very cushy, but with proper support you won't need cushy. I spend 10-12 hours a day on my feet on concrete, walk about 11 miles a day in my work shoes, mine are plenty comfortable, even considering that I'm very picky when it comes to footwear.

  25. #25
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    I switched to danner steel toes this year. Much more comfortable and pretty good water resistance. Plus cheaper than redwing.

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