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  1. #1
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    Work boots for standing on cold concrete?

    I'm not sure where to post this but thought here is a good start.
    Does anyone have a favorite? I'm starting a new job and usually have sore feet.
    The temp should be as low a zero degrees at times.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    You should look into Redwings. If you're going to be on your feet all day spend the $$$

  3. #3
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    If you need a steel toe boot, look at Redwings or Carhartt boots. At 0, you don't really need that much insulation provided you have a nice pair of wool socks.

    If you don't need a steel toe, there are many good options for "snow boots" and ice fishing boots. These may have more insulation than you need, but might be more comfortable.

  4. #4
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    Honestly... ahh I give up

  5. #5
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    Keen are the most comfy, warmest boots i ever had but just like cycling shoes everyones different so YMMV.. It's a good idea to get 2 pairs so you can alternate between the pairs each day to let them fully dry out.
    Good idea to try em on and have some extra wiggle room, and room for thick socks. Trust me, too tight means cold feet no matter the boot. The extra sole helps to walk on snow and ice too.
    Never cotton socks, either wool of synthetic.
    Get some silk under wear, even silk socks to wear as a base layer for colder days.
    Round and round we go

  6. #6
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    Redwings.

  7. #7
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    If you need safety boots with steel toes and plates anrd you are working outside, stay away from steel and get composite toe and sole plates. The steel gets cold and stays cold for a long time even when you go inside.

  8. #8
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    The red wing store will have a variety of options for working on different surfaces. I tend to like slip on's . They have a greater volume of trapped air than a lace up boot and have always felt warmer to me.

  9. #9
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    Doc Martens have the most comfortable soles I've ever worn in 30+ years of wearing steel toe boots. Not sure if if they have insulated ones or not, but I can wear them all day long and I'm talking long hours (16-18 hrs/day). I've owned Red Wings and while they are well constructed, they were not as comfortable as the Docs.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by deke505 View Post
    If you need safety boots with steel toes and plates anrd you are working outside, stay away from steel and get composite toe and sole plates. The steel gets cold and stays cold for a long time even when you go inside.
    exactly why I recommended those Danners -
    Just forgot to point that out - thanks!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    You might also think about getting some gel insert too.

  12. #12
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    Hey! Thanks for the help. I'll look into all that. No need for steel / composit toes for this job. Great idea on having extra boots to dry out completely.
    Do redwings have a great return policy if they hurt after a day?

  13. #13
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    IMO, a judgement can't be made in a day (besides obvious discomfort - pinched toes etc) - sometimes it takes a bit to break in -
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
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    agree with highdell. Buy what you think is comfortable and wear around the house for a few days. Try and not to muck up the soles to much because if they are not comfortable after that you still would want to be able to return them.

  15. #15
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    I feel like it's like this: (just my experience) If it's comfy right out of the box, the materials fail with in months
    If it takes a week to break-in, those boots/shoes are the ones that have lasted - and are sooooper comfy.
    some never feel good.

    There are exceptions of course

    My USN issued flight deck boots were some of the comfiest boots I have owned (took like 2 weeks to break-in) - someone stole them a few years ago, and I cannot find the style made anymore - except used on ebay and they go for like 160
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  16. #16
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    I am currently wearing a pair of Royer Moab with Dr. Scholls Massing gel insole and they're just about the most comfy boots I've ever worn - even from day 1. They're also "metal free" too.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    I feel like it's like this: (just my experience) If it's comfy right out of the box, the materials fail with in months
    If it takes a week to break-in, those boots/shoes are the ones that have lasted - and are sooooper comfy.
    some never feel good.

    There are exceptions of course

    My USN issued flight deck boots were some of the comfiest boots I have owned (took like 2 weeks to break-in) - someone stole them a few years ago, and I cannot find the style made anymore - except used on ebay and they go for like 160
    I use to feel that way until I bought my Doc Martens. Those felt like sneakers on day one and I usually replaced them about 4 or 5 years.

  18. #18
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    Redback slip on boots are my preferred foot ware for work. Steel toe, medium height, super light weight. They offer a leather insole that is super comfy when it comforms to your foot. Mine typically last one year.
    One of the benefits to me is the lightweight. I find my feet and legs are far less fatigued at the end of the day when I use lightweight boots.


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  19. #19
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    Slip-ons - I have never liked the feel (except for a zip-up) what am I missin here? - only tried a couple boots - both sloppy feelin - I like being able to cinch-down certain areas of my foot/ankle
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  20. #20
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    Would I be nuts to buy some midpriced ( $250.00) winter hiking boots from REI? The return policy there is so hard to pass up. Just thinking of all options. I definitely want to try some of the work boots mentioned also. I guess I can bring them home and wear them in the house for a while.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huck Pitueee View Post
    Would I be nuts to buy some midpriced ( $250.00) winter hiking boots from REI? The return policy there is so hard to pass up. Just thinking of all options. I definitely want to try some of the work boots mentioned also. I guess I can bring them home and wear them in the house for a while.
    well, you're supporting REI - not that that's as bad as supporting walmart.

    Buying direct (if possible) would be preferred to me, despite a chain's return policy.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  22. #22
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    make sure to buy them plenty big, so that there is room for socks, and some wiggle room. too-snug boots reduce the amount of circulation and compress the socks, reducing their insulation value.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll View Post
    well, you're supporting REI - not that that's as bad as supporting walmart.

    Buying direct (if possible) would be preferred to me, despite a chain's return policy.
    Those Danners look nice and made in USA. The tread looks minimal for my snow shoveling duties. Shovel to get to truck. Shovel snow plow berm in driveway. Shovel to get into work.

  24. #24
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    Which ever boot you decide on, look into the moldable insoles. The ones that I use are from Redwing, cost about $50, but are awesome. You trim them to size then throw them in the oven until they're approximately 200 degrees, then you insert them into your boots while nice and warm, put your boots on and lace them, then just kind of squat for a couple minutes until they shape to your foot. They are not very cushy, but with proper support you won't need cushy. I spend 10-12 hours a day on my feet on concrete, walk about 11 miles a day in my work shoes, mine are plenty comfortable, even considering that I'm very picky when it comes to footwear.
    Low and slack.

  25. #25
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    I switched to danner steel toes this year. Much more comfortable and pretty good water resistance. Plus cheaper than redwing.

  26. #26
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    Danners are nice.

    A little different option:

    Living in Texas, a lot of people where pull on boots (cowboy style). I was always resistant, but my father-in-law convinced me to try some Ariat work boots, as I'm outside much of the day, and my feet are constantly getting wet. I picked up some Ariat Drifters, and after the initial awkward break in, they're awesome. Super comfortable to walk around all day in, and roomy enough for wool socks.

    Slip on boots are weird. You have to buy them tight, where the heel slips up and down. After a day or so they stop, and they're fine. If you buy them so that they don't slip initially, apparently they'll rub and cause blisters.

    If I'm going to be walking several miles, I always wear my Keens, but normal day to day work, I'll wear the Ariats.


    edit: I should mention, that the boots I bought are not slick soled like most people think of cowboy boots. They have a slip resistant/oil resistant rubber sole...it looks a lot like a Doc Martin sole, actually.

  27. #27
    gran jefe
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    If you need water-resistance, SnoSeal is the bomb.

  28. #28
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    +1 on SnoSeal.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerfromco View Post
    Doc Martens have the most comfortable soles I've ever worn in 30+ years of wearing steel toe boots. Not sure if if they have insulated ones or not, but I can wear them all day long and I'm talking long hours (16-18 hrs/day). I've owned Red Wings and while they are well constructed, they were not as comfortable as the Docs.
    +2

    Doc Martins + good hiking socks = Happiness

    Red wings are nice but I had a couple fall a part on me and they wasn't near as comfortable for me as my Doc Martens. And I abuse the hell put of my Docs working 12-30hrs straights in all temps out in the oilfield...they even handle acid...yes, I've walked around in HCI.

    Anyhow, here is what I use...if you're going to spend time around water, pick up some wih longer shafts. These are water proof but can't handle much depth.

    Dr Martens IRONBRIDGE - CSA APPROVED TEAK INDUSTRIAL TRAILBLAZER - Doc Martens Boots and Shoes

  30. #30
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    I'm a big fan of my Redwing boots in cold weather (even though they are my year-round work boots). Get a pair that has the Thinsulate, and paired with Smartwool socks your feet won't get cold.

    I've got the 1201's, and while they're a little heavy for an every day boot, they are the best boots I've ever owned for everything I do around the house and farm. They do offer arch supports for their boots as well, too.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    I'm a big fan of my Redwing boots in cold weather (even though they are my year-round work boots). Get a pair that has the Thinsulate, and paired with Smartwool socks your feet won't get cold.

    I've got the 1201's, and while they're a little heavy for an every day boot, they are the best boots I've ever owned for everything I do around the house and farm. They do offer arch supports for their boots as well, too.
    Funny I'm in in the same situation as the O.P. Having moved from many years in a warm climate to a cold one. I find myself ready to go drop some coin on a good warm work boot. I'm glad I happened upon this thread before I did. There is a lot of good info. in here, ya gotta love this site. Especially since the O.C. forum has been added. I like what Squatch added in, it sounds like the ideal boot. Now all I need is to know where to buy them?
    Front Range, Colorado.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE, View Post
    Funny I'm in in the same situation as the O.P. Having moved from many years in a warm climate to a cold one. I find myself ready to go drop some coin on a good warm work boot. I'm glad I happened upon this thread before I did. There is a lot of good info. in here, ya gotta love this site. Especially since the O.C. forum has been added. I like what Squatch added in, it sounds like the ideal boot. Now all I need is to know where to buy them?
    I was surprised to find so many work boot wearers in off topic. So helpful.
    Go to their site and there is a store finder. I found one in my small town.

  33. #33
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    The OC - famous for Humour, Rep, and general badassery, now known for boots! - and puss
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huck Pitueee View Post
    I was surprised to find so many work boot wearers in off topic. So helpful.
    Go to their site and there is a store finder. I found one in my small town.
    Yep googled it and found a store very close to me. So when the shopping mood strikes I'm all over it.
    Front Range, Colorado.

  35. #35
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    Ironworker here.....all i wear is red wings.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  36. #36
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    Thanks, This helped me 2.
    Raising money, my friend broke his neck Mtbing, Please Share link. http://givealittle.co.nz/cause/elliottkeys/donations

  37. #37
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    Regardless of what you end up with...invest in good wool socks.

  38. #38
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    I agree with the socks and recommend you look no further than Darn Tough

    http://darntough.com/
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  39. #39
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    Merino wool socks from REI come in 3 different thicknesses and work great. The magic part is they don't get smelly like others. I can't even guess why.

  40. #40
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    For a non-safety toe slip on, I've had great luck with Blundstones w/ superfeet insoles. But I've always liked slip on's.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Redwings.
    This exactly, nothing compares.

  42. #42
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    I keep seeing all the Red Wing love, and the only pair I've ever owned never fit quite right. Maybe boots are like saddles. I do agree on the socks though. I was a boiler operator for years and the right socks made all the difference in the world. I hated when all my wool socks were in the laundry.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huck Pitueee View Post
    Great idea on having extra boots to dry out completely.
    A boot dryer is less expensive than a second set of good boots and will thoroughly dry your boots overnight. I have one of both of these dryers and they work great but the Peet dryer uses a bit more power and takes up more room.

    PEET Shoe Dryer - All PEET Dryers on sale now.

    DryGuy™ - Boot Dryers - Glove Dryer - Shoe Dryer - Boot Dryer Accessories

    I think one could probably make a decent boot dryer with incandescent 4 watt nightlights and you would then would have the added benefit of UV light destroying mold and mildew. The dry Guy Drystix use the same 8 watts btw.

  44. #44
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    Good point but I find extra or more heat isn't kind to leather
    Round and round we go

  45. #45
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    For snow country and shoveling the white stuff, Sorrel Caribou's were the gold standard in my day.

  46. #46
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    Best thing I've found is putting decent sole inserts in, go to a walking store or somewhere that has the machine you stand on & analyzes your feet. I didn't believe it till I tried it, now all my shoes & boots have inserts in them, so much more comfy at the end of the day.

  47. #47
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    The heat moldable redwing innersole sounds like a plan.

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