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Thread: Electrocuted

  1. #1
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    Electrocuted

    I am a contractor and work with electric a lot. I figured I should mention it before everyone jumps to the conclusion that I have no idea what I was doing.
    Anyway, I work with electric a lot and I have had small shocks from 120v many times accidentally touching wires. No big deal.
    Yesterday I was connecting some wires over a walk-in cooler, (metal cooler). I was going to cut one wire at a time and connect them like I have done hundreds of times. I was under the assumption the power was off but I was cutting only one wire at a time anyway to be safe as always.
    When I cut the wire I was grounded to the cooler and .
    I got hit with 240v from a 60 amp and I could not let go of the cutter. As I was being electrocuted for a good 10 seconds unable to break the link. I got the idea to roll off the cooler using my weight to break the connection as I began to realize I may actually die. This luckily worked but my face touched the cooler and then landed on a glass jar, cutting me as well.
    I now have cuts along my face and my nose and forehead are burned. I look like crap.
    I can say that it was the worst feeling I have ever felt. It was awful.
    I now have real high CK levels from muscle breakdown and have to me monitored and given fluids. This sucks.

  2. #2
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    Holy cow that's a scary story, glad you survived.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    Holy cow that's a scary story, glad you survived.
    Thanks

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    I did commercial electrical work for a few months. brutally hard work in the summer heat! I was only shocked once, very mild. I thought a stray wire had stabbed me, but it turned out that a bundle of wires I have wrangling had some live ones in it! however, it happened when I was halfway into a drop ceiling on top of a 10-12 foot ladder. the fall would have been much worse than the shock.

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    Wow... Glad your (relatively) ok. That's some scary stuff. I know what you mean about 120v. I've been hit with it so many times it hardly phases me anymore. Not to say it isn't dangerous... Don't get me wrong. That said 220 scares the heck out of me, as I've only in the last year or so needed to mess with it, installing an outlet for a ev charger in the garage. Anyway, I'm curious what you mean about being "safe" cutting one wire at a time. You don't mean you can actually handle live wires that way do you? My understanding of AC, especially 220, is that you will get shocked by hot or neutral (obvious not ground).

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    You sound like a darwin award finalist, but glad you're OK.

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    Shocking!

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    Did you gain any special freeze/electrical powers?

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    I've never been hit by 220 AC mains (thankfully), but I have been hit with some high voltage, low impedance before like that... DC though. I used to build a lot of amplifiers and at one point I got a little too comfortable.

    When I was finished I used to tune them with the chassis open and clip stuff in until it was just how I wanted. Last time I did this I made the mistake of holding onto the guitar (which is grounded via the strngs) with my left hand while clipping in an alligator to a live a amp... around 350VDC where I touched. It burned right though the insulation on the alligator clip and burned a hole in the end of my finger.

    Luckily the whole thing sent me into a massive body spasm and my body tightened like I've never felt before. This tossed me from the amp and shot the guitar away. The bad part is the shock went right across my heart, left hand to right hand, the worst you can have.

    All I can say is it felt like getting kicked by a horse, but I never have been, so I can't be sure, but it hurt like hell and knocked the wind out of me. My chest and arms hurt for a while afterward, most likely from muscle spasm. Did some self-assessment and decided I was OK, didn't go to the hospital. All subsided soon after except the burn in my finger.

    I've also been hit by AC before, 120 and such, and I'll say DC is nothing like it. I'm lucky I didn't bite my tongue, go into shock or spasm so I couldn't let go. Electric energy is no joke.

    Glad you made it BigJunk... be careful out there!
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    Glad your ok, but I did LMAO reading the responses

  11. #11
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    Yikes, that is scary. Glad you are ok. Makes mountain biking seem really safe.

    l'oiseau, gotta ask, was the guitar damaged when it was "shot away"? I managed to be shocked many times by guitar and mic being grounded opposite or whatever causes that. Once saw a bandmate have a spark jump to his lip when he approached the mic. But these are minor compared to you and BJ1's experiences.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

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    Guitar was not damaged, thankfully! It landed flat on the back of the body on a rug. I did damage one of my acoustic guitars by dropping a bongo drum on it... but that was purely unplugged damage

    I'm not sure about guitar and mic shocks, I've heard of them, but never experienced that. I think they are either AC mains (120) or maybe line level (which is low voltage DC). Not fun, but nothing like touching the DC power supply of a tube amp (please, don't try).
    Life is too short to ride a bike you don't love.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumper33 View Post
    Wow... Glad your (relatively) ok. That's some scary stuff. I know what you mean about 120v. I've been hit with it so many times it hardly phases me anymore. Not to say it isn't dangerous... Don't get me wrong. That said 220 scares the heck out of me, as I've only in the last year or so needed to mess with it, installing an outlet for a ev charger in the garage. Anyway, I'm curious what you mean about being "safe" cutting one wire at a time. You don't mean you can actually handle live wires that way do you? My understanding of AC, especially 220, is that you will get shocked by hot or neutral (obvious not ground).

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    The black on a 110-120v and the black and red on a 220-240v carry power but are harmless until they are grounded or have somewhere for the power to flow. Touching only one positive line at a time (assuming you are not grounded to a cooler) would do nothing.
    Touching a positive wire along with a neutral (white) or ground (green) or other grounding location at the same time allows the current to travel through your body.

  14. #14
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    I have big time respect for electricity no matter what form, hence i don't mess with it. I will change a light bulb though..

    bigjunk may you fully recover and take precautions in the future.
    "ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK"

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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Did you gain any special freeze/electrical powers?
    Sadly, no.

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    Glad you survived. It only takes milliamps in the right body area to cause injury or death. (circuit breaker design engineer here)

    Always always always confirm wires are not energized with at least 2 voltage sticks or meters and never work on live equipment!
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    Glad you had the awareness of what was happening and relatively ok.
    I've been shocked by both 120/220VAC but just quick zaps, nothing like that.
    Guess that's what "they" say though, the lower voltages are more dangerous because you don't get thrown back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjunk1 View Post
    Yesterday I was connecting some wires over a walk-in cooler, (metal cooler). I was going to cut one wire at a time and connect them like I have done hundreds of times. I was under the assumption the power was off but I was cutting only one wire at a time anyway to be safe as always.
    With working with electricity never assume anything.

    1] Never assume the electricity is off.

    2] Never assume you know what you are doing unless you are a certified electrician.

    With that little scolding. I'm glad you survived.
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Dude, I'm in Illinois. The only place anyone would come from that would say this area is hilly is Kansas.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstateSC-rider View Post
    Glad you had the awareness of what was happening and relatively ok.
    I've been shocked by both 120/220VAC but just quick zaps, nothing like that.
    Guess that's what "they" say though, the lower voltages are more dangerous because you don't get thrown back.
    Compared to the main lines outside 220v is not much. The amps are much more important than volts when it comes to being electrocuted. 60 amps at 237v (actual) was a mother.
    Being paralized in intensive pain unable to move or even think was beyond words.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    With working with electricity never assume anything.

    1] Never assume the electricity is off.

    2] Never assume you know what you are doing unless you are a certified electrician.

    With that little scolding. I'm glad you survived.
    Good advise. I will certainly have greater respect for electric now.

  21. #21
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    They make little pocket VO meters ya know.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjunk1 View Post
    Compared to the main lines outside 220v is not much. The amps are much more important than volts when it comes to being electrocuted. 60 amps at 237v (actual) was a mother.
    Being paralized in intensive pain unable to move or even think was beyond words.
    You didn't get 60 amps, I assure you that. 1 amp will kill you deader than dead. Any 220 line in the house has the potential to kill you. It's just the matter of the actual path the current takes and how much resistance you have.

    You should always use a meter to check live stuff.

    Working on live stuff is part of electronics sometimes, and sometimes it is high voltage. If you don't like it, don't do it. I knew my risks, there is no issue putting your hand in a live, high voltage circuit, it's just I made a mistake with my idle hand - it should have been in my pocket, so there was no chance I would have grounded myself across my heart. Same goes for your situation, you should also be very wary of what your limbs may be touching, but working on a non-live circuit is a much better course. Check and double check next time.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjunk1 View Post
    I am a contractor and work with electric a lot. I figured I should mention it before everyone jumps to the conclusion that I have no idea what I was doing.
    Anyway, I work with electric a lot and I have had small shocks from 120v many times accidentally touching wires. No big deal.
    Yesterday I was connecting some wires over a walk-in cooler, (metal cooler). I was going to cut one wire at a time and connect them like I have done hundreds of times. I was under the assumption the power was off but I was cutting only one wire at a time anyway to be safe as always.
    When I cut the wire I was grounded to the cooler and .
    I got hit with 240v from a 60 amp and I could not let go of the cutter. As I was being electrocuted for a good 10 seconds unable to break the link. I got the idea to roll off the cooler using my weight to break the connection as I began to realize I may actually die. This luckily worked but my face touched the cooler and then landed on a glass jar, cutting me as well.
    I now have cuts along my face and my nose and forehead are burned. I look like crap.
    I can say that it was the worst feeling I have ever felt. It was awful.
    I now have real high CK levels from muscle breakdown and have to me monitored and given fluids. This sucks.
    You assumed. Ha! Lock out Tag Out!!

    I was hit with 480vac 3phase years ago working on a commercial RTU. My multimeter went flying, I was knocked back and stumbled about 20 feet. Luckily I was not close to the edge of the roof. I then was shaking uncontrollably as I sat down on the roof and contemplated life. I was hella more careful after that.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    You didn't get 60 amps, I assure you that.
    Yeah, 60a is a lot. Put you in the next life no problem.

    We use 230vac in the UK. My younger brother is an idiot and has nearly killed himself several times. He got me once too.

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    I've been hit by 120 a few times. Not bad at all really. At my first job. I was cleaning up an attic space for the Electric Company I worked for. Bumped into an exposed 220 line which caused it to hit a nearby piece of metal. It made a loud bang and I fell back on the floor because of the surprise. A bunch of coworkers rushed up to see what happened. Thankfully I didn't make contact with the exposed wire.

    One of my previous cars was a 99 Trans Am. I was hearing a thud coming from the front while turning so when I got home I opened up the engine bay. The battery was sitting at a weird angle. So I pulled it out and noticed that the piece that holds it in was broke. So I set the battery back in the car. Planning to go get a new mount. I noticed that I accidentally placed the battery on the cables and reached in with my left hand to move them. I was wearing a watch which contacted the positive terminal and another part of the car. My hand locked into a fist and I got stuck. Had to back away from the car to free myself. The watch was really hot, so I took it off really fast. The amazing thing is that the watch still works. Yes, it is a Timex. I still have a scar on my wrist after 8 years.

    I am glad you're still with us Bigjunk1.

  26. #26
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    About 30 years ago in electrical code class my instructor told me that as little as 8.6 volts was enough to stop a heart if it had as much as 100 milliamps associated with it. I also remember him saying that you have a better chance of surviving if you where hit with 200 milliamps because the higher amperage would cause the heart to clamp and tighten where as the smaller 100 milliamps would cause ventricular fibrillation where the heart walls would twitch out of sync causing death.
    He used to say 48 volts can be just as deadly as 480 volts.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

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    Lesson learned (more than once, I'm a slow learner): When courting danger, it only takes a moment's lapse of care and a bit of poor luck for something bad to happen. Your luck didn't completely run out - you kept your head and survived. Good for you, you're alive and wiser. Thanks for sharing.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  28. #28
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    All of my shocking experiences involve stuck welding and wet gloves. It ranges from pleasantly tingly to "MOTHER-BIZAPPER!"

  29. #29
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    120 ac can definitely kill you. I work with guys (idiots) who are in their mid 50's on 3 heart medications and think it perfectly harmless to get zapped by 120 because they're to lazy to kill the power. All the while having zero concept of how their heart pumps.

    I work for a property investment firm. We have an 11 story building in downtown Portland with a backup generator that's powered by one of those huge Cat D9 engines. It's really cool. I'm not sure what exactly happened but the guy who services it managed to fry himself down to his carbon structure. It was super gnarly.

    I never handle live power. I check everything with my meter every time. Even if I move from one task to the the next on the same circuit I check. You never what drunk bastard wired it up. This gets plenty of name calling from the aforementioned morons that don't know why their heart pumps. Even passing 120 through your body presumably with just a slight tickle can damage your heart & you'd be none the wiser.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  30. #30
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    Been hit by 277V on the primary side of a lamp ballast. Sort of the same thing, we always worked on them hot and never had an issue. One wire at a time, standing on an insulated platform using an insulated cutter. I must have grounded to the light housing or something. Got a pretty good jolt, but it lasted just a millisecond.

    Glad you're here to tell about it.
    Let's kick ass!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post

    I never handle live power.
    Unfortunately when troubleshooting equipment power must almost always be applied to locate the issue.
    But if I were cutting into wires as the OP was I would definitely turn the disconnect off and lock-out-tag-out if the disconnect were out of my immediate sight and double,triple check with my meter that power is truly off.
    I have worked on some RTUs that had two power supplies. One normal supply and one coming from a generator circuit for emergency power ( Usually for the heat and the blower only).
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    He used to say 48 volts can be just as deadly as 480 volts.
    This has been one of the issues holding back 48V vehicles for years. 12V is damn impossible to hurt yourself with (theoretically possible but practical impossible). 48 VDC opens that up to the realm of possibility.

    Of course the impedance matters. I've purposely shocked myself with 5-10k volts from automotive spark plug coils to see if they work, but the impedance is so high you can't even generate a milliamp of current. It ranges from a tickle to a hard snap or sting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    Unfortunately when troubleshooting equipment power must almost always be applied to locate the issue.
    But if I were cutting into wires as the OP was I would definitely turn the disconnect off and lock-out-tag-out if the disconnect were out of my immediate sight and double,triple check with my meter that power is truly off.
    I have worked on some RTUs that had two power supplies. One normal supply and one coming from a generator circuit for emergency power ( Usually for the heat and the blower only).
    Trouble shoot yes. Work on no.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Trouble shoot yes. Work on no.
    Zackly
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  35. #35
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    You guys need one of these:
    Extech 40130 Non-contact AC Voltage Detector https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0039F1NS6..._pxdtzbGXXB6JK

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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post

    I've purposely shocked myself with 5-10k volts from automotive spark plug coils
    This is how I was introduced to electricity. My old man was working on the Galaxy 500. I must have been about 9 or 10. I wanted to help. So he hands me the coil or spark plug wire and says hold this. He gets into the car and turns the key and I scream like a 9 year old girl. He gets out of the car laughing his ass off and says, "I guess that works".
    I have respected electricity ever since and even pursued it as part of my career.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    This is how I was introduced to electricity. My old man was working on the Galaxy 500. I must have been about 9 or 10. I wanted to help. So he hands me the coil or spark plug wire and says hold this. He gets into the car and turns the key and I scream like a 9 year old girl. He gets out of the car laughing his ass off and says, "I guess that works".
    I have respected electricity ever since and even pursued it as part of my career.
    LOL
    Funny I learned about electricity in a similar manner. I was about the same age, 6 or 7. My older brother had a mini bike as did several of his friends. A mini bike back then consisted of a steel frame with a 5 HP lawnmower motor to propell it. My brothers friends thought it was funny to have a kid hold the spark plug wire as they pulled the rip cord. A nice jolt of electricity rolled through my body. After my initiation I witnessed them do it to several other kids over the next couple of years.
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Dude, I'm in Illinois. The only place anyone would come from that would say this area is hilly is Kansas.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjunk1 View Post
    Compared to the main lines outside 220v is not much. The amps are much more important than volts when it comes to being electrocuted. 60 amps at 237v (actual) was a mother.
    Being paralized in intensive pain unable to move or even think was beyond words.
    I'm happy to report you weren't electrocuted. To be pedantic, you were shocked, with the potential for a very bad outcome that you luckily/wisely avoided.

    I'd agree with some others, it was not likely anywhere near 60 amps going through you--think of it this way, had you been a very low resistance 'short', you would have blown the breaker, as well as leaving a rather nasty mess for someone else to clean up.

    DJ's post is good advice, but #2 is wrong--it should read 'especially if you are a certified electrician'.

  39. #39
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    Was the walk-in cooler you were working on All-mountain, or more "Trail"? 29er, 27.5 or old-school 26er?

    Did it have a dropper?
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Yeah, why not?

  40. #40
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    At this point in life, I pay the experts for things I used to handle myself. If it involves electricity, water, a ladder taller than 8 feet, or getting up onto the roof, I pay them to take the risk.

    Mountain biking is all the risk I'm willing to take on.

  41. #41
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    Most countries in Europe use 240 volts. Growing up there as a kid, I have been electrocuted many times due to some mistakes. However, I was never electrocuted more than 1 second. I can't imagine what 10 seconds feel like.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    About 30 years ago in electrical code class my instructor told me that as little as 8.6 volts was enough to stop a heart if it had as much as 100 milliamps associated with it. I also remember him saying that you have a better chance of surviving if you where hit with 200 milliamps because the higher amperage would cause the heart to clamp and tighten where as the smaller 100 milliamps would cause ventricular fibrillation where the heart walls would twitch out of sync causing death.
    He used to say 48 volts can be just as deadly as 480 volts.
    agreed, and your last post too.

    what i find interesting about this thread is would think that if op was grounding a live circuit, or 2 in the case of 220, than it would blow him off, burn him, or the likes. but hold him onto the power?
    Round and round we go

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AshevilleMTB View Post
    Most countries in Europe use 240 volts. Growing up there as a kid, I have been electrocuted many times due to some mistakes. However, I was never electrocuted more than 1 second. I can't imagine what 10 seconds feel like.
    You can only be electrocuted once. You can't post up after it happens ... Fixed
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    agreed, and your last post too.

    what i find interesting about this thread is would think that if op was grounding a live circuit, or 2 in the case of 220, than it would blow him off, burn him, or the likes. but hold him onto the power?
    I have been shocked a bunch. Not bragg'n. Mostly lower voltages 24-120vac.
    I cant remember a time I was compelled to hang on. At least I do not recall. I do remember being hit by 24vac and it surprised the hell out of me. I had to learn to respect the low voltage all over again.
    I have talked to a few guys who said they could not let go or at least not very easily.. Not sure what voltage.
    Im sure your body/skin moisture make contributes to current as well as how pure your contact with the ground. Im sure in the right conditions low voltage can keep ya hanging on.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by ancient rascal View Post
    You can only be electrocuted once. You can't post up after it happens ... Fixed
    You are correct Sir!. Thanks for fixing this.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    You are correct Sir!. Thanks for fixing this.
    At least this thread has a happier start/ending than I expected when I saw it. Was thinking it was gonna be a buddy of the OP who died. We chopped down a tree in the mountains when I was younger and noticed wire in the branches we had to remove while we were gathering up things. We had knocked out the power to a bunch of homes. PG+E got there later and said we had a 50/50 chance of dying. The live lines were not in the tree but could have easily been there.
    Suicide by single speed. Work in progress.

  47. #47
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    That shock didn't turn you in to Littlejunk did it?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by CUP-TON View Post
    I have been shocked a bunch. Not bragg'n. Mostly lower voltages 24-120vac.
    I cant remember a time I was compelled to hang on. At least I do not recall. I do remember being hit by 24vac and it surprised the hell out of me. I had to learn to respect the low voltage all over again.
    I have talked to a few guys who said they could not let go or at least not very easily.. Not sure what voltage.
    Im sure your body/skin moisture make contributes to current as well as how pure your contact with the ground. Im sure in the right conditions low voltage can keep ya hanging on.
    Yeah, I've been shocked a bunch also. It's not only the voltage, the amperage too.

    Didn't make sense that the electric would pull you to it, especially since I've always had the opposite reaction. But apparently it not the power that holds you, but if strong enough it can make your muscles contract
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_shock
    Round and round we go

  49. #49
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    That's nothing I got shocked multiple times today by 20,000 V. Darn static electricity every time I get out of the car.

    The only reason we don't die from 120V or 12V is our skin is a good insulator. If you had open wounds that touched the wires you'd get the full current since your blood is a good conductor.

    I got 120V a few times. Replacing a light switch and forgot to turn off the breaker. That one went through the heart from one side to another, I was wired for a while.

    I used to replace fluorescent ballasts at my friend's stores. I'd turn off the breakers but once I got shocked anyways because it was wired badly. After that I didn't even bother to turn off the power and assumed all wires were live and wore rubber gloves and only touched the rubber part of the tool handle and was very careful about cutting the wires. This was on a step ladder...

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladmo View Post
    At this point in life, I pay the experts for things I used to handle myself. If it involves electricity, water, a ladder taller than 8 feet, or getting up onto the roof, I pay them to take the risk.

    Mountain biking is all the risk I'm willing to take on.
    That's about where I am too.

    Experience IS the best teacher,,, Someone Else's experience !!
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  51. #51
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    I used to do some kitchen work hooking into 120 / 240 at times and our dispensers were all 24v. Other times it was a commercial dishwasher for restaurants or cafeterias etc...

    One time, a co-worker was drilling into a 3/4 copper water line under a pot and pan sink to tie in a saddle valve and 1/4 in supply. This was obviously a low point in the line and even with the water valves off, water would drip or stream out.
    Sure enough, the water shot out to the drill motor and knocked him clear across the room.

    Thank goodness we were younger and could take that excitement. I'm not sure just seeing that happen to someone else wouldn't cause me some chest pain now days.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  52. #52
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    Looking at all these posts I realize that the coming of electric bikes should thin the MTB herd a little...
    It's all Here. Now.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    Looking at all these posts I realize that the coming of electric bikes should thin the MTB herd a little...
    No doubt.
    Working on a 385 watt motor could send lightning from your teeth fillings !!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Electrocuted-636047431389559686-478811059_shocoked%5B1%5D.png  

    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  54. #54
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    Same for me...

    Even when experts are paid, sometimes it gets real interesting.

    I've done IT work for more than 30 years. We kept having weird problems with a couple of servers and a tape backup device. Intermittently they'd lockup or reboot...

    Contract electrician comes in and starts checking various things at the receptacles and finally comes around to the main power panel for the entire floor. He gently poked each wire (a couple of inches away from the termination point) with a large screwdriver. Got all the way around to the panel ground. When he poked that a huge green spark went all the way around the perimeter of the panel.

    The electrician looked like he was going to puke and said that would of killed anyone it came in contact with...
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  55. #55
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    What kind of juice do tasers put out?

    https://twitter.com/AwardsDarwin/sta...34868822708228

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    It has been a couple days since I was ''shocked'' and I am now very soar. My shoulder and leg are the worst but my entire body is soar like a hard workout on every muscle. My shoulder is soar like I have never felt. The black that was on my face and nose fell off and now is red flesh.
    I was told that I actually smelled of burnt flesh and the cutters I was holding were hot. A guy picked them up after I ran outside and burned his hand on them as well. I am home now and drinking a lot of water rather than an IV.
    Glad to be home.

  57. #57
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    Glad you're gonna be okay

    Scary stuff
    Round and round we go

  58. #58
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    Holy hell, glad you survived to tell the tale. Of everywhere I've ever worked, I worked in a large scrap yard up north when I was younger, and anytime there was electrical work being done there were a few rules. One, two man integrity verifying the breaker is actually off. Two, the panel would then be physically locked, and three there was a bright red lockout tag placed on the physical lock.

  59. #59
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    I don't trust myself around something I can't see so I do not deal with electrical other than small stuff like replacing a switch or outlet. Always turn off the power first.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    I don't trust myself around something I can't see so I do not deal with electrical other than small stuff like replacing a switch or outlet. Always turn off the power first.
    But you do jump out of perfectly good airplanes thousands of feet above the ground! How is the healing going? Not sure if I would rather have experienced BJ1's shock or you're landing; deciding the shock probably caused a lot less damage.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  61. #61
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    40 years on the road in the music biz I have seen some nasty instances of shocks, some tragic. Also a fair few quite humorous ones. Once I arrived at the big annual Rock in Rio festival and was being shown around by the promoter prior to the show. We passed by the power cage/room under the grandstand, and I asked about the stability of the supply. The promoter assured me it was all state of the art and professionally maintained, and no sooner were the words out of his mouth than there was a huge flash and bang, and the venue electrician was thrown out of the cage to land smoking and quivering on his back at our feet. At the time it was a little disconcerting, but he turned out to be OK, and we had a bit of a giggle about it later...
    It's all Here. Now.

  62. #62
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    disconcerting? Pun intended?
    Let's kick ass!

  63. #63
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    ^^LOL, well played

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockerc View Post
    40 years on the road in the music biz I have seen some nasty instances of shocks, some tragic. Also a fair few quite humorous ones. Once I arrived at the big annual Rock in Rio festival and was being shown around by the promoter prior to the show. We passed by the power cage/room under the grandstand, and I asked about the stability of the supply. The promoter assured me it was all state of the art and professionally maintained, and no sooner were the words out of his mouth than there was a huge flash and bang, and the venue electrician was thrown out of the cage to land smoking and quivering on his back at our feet. At the time it was a little disconcerting, but he turned out to be OK, and we had a bit of a giggle about it later...
    I hear a lot of cases where someone got a quick, sometimes powerful jolt. I can assure you that being '' part of '' the current for a sustained period is quite different (completely different). You don't really know, and there are no words dark or scary enough to describe the feeling of being truly electrocuted. Every time I think back at it I feel almost sick to my stomach with fear as it was that traumatic for me. I think it will take all I can muster to work on wires again and it is sometimes a daily job for me.
    I am going to get some rubber gloves, all new rubber coated tools and check and double, triple check that the power is off and my tools are undamaged from now on. My cutters had the rubber worn and chipped off the handle and if the handle was still coated in rubber properly I would not have even been shocked. Being zapped so many times with 110v over the years with it being no big deal was my downfall as I did not have the respect and fear that I should have had.
    It only takes one quick unexpected mistake to kill yourself and I was very lucky this time.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    What kind of juice do tasers put out?

    https://twitter.com/AwardsDarwin/sta...34868822708228
    I almost got stung with 50,000 but they had a bad shot and one of the 'darts' bounced off my wallet. Then I tried the NEW Police version (x-26 maybe) that was more compact and it served a 'pulse' type of zap, probably 50 k volts on that one too.

    It's an experience.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigjunk1 View Post
    It has been a couple days since I was ''shocked'' and I am now very soar. My shoulder and leg are the worst but my entire body is soar like a hard workout on every muscle. My shoulder is soar like I have never felt. The black that was on my face and nose fell off and now is red flesh.
    I was told that I actually smelled of burnt flesh and the cutters I was holding were hot. A guy picked them up after I ran outside and burned his hand on them as well. I am home now and drinking a lot of water rather than an IV.
    Glad to be home.
    You may need some cardio follow up by a specialist.... don't take any chances. Make sure your heart is thumping along normally and not odd stuff.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  67. #67
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    'We' do Lock Out Tag Out at work, electrical, steam lines, boilers generators, chillers etc....

    I try not walk within 10 feet of those Lock Out tags placed on equipment !!
    lol
    My personal safety zone.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  68. #68
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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    You may need some cardio follow up by a specialist.... don't take any chances. Make sure your heart is thumping along normally and not odd stuff.
    ^^This! Especially after being cooked like he did!


    BTW Bigjunk, can we call you Smokey from now on?

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    You may need some cardio follow up by a specialist.... don't take any chances. Make sure your heart is thumping along normally and not odd stuff.
    A tell tale sign would be if lightbulbs are lighting up as he walks by. Maybe get a checkup if that's occurring.
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Dude, I'm in Illinois. The only place anyone would come from that would say this area is hilly is Kansas.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by bachman1961 View Post
    I almost got stung with 50,000 but they had a bad shot and one of the 'darts' bounced off my wallet. Then I tried the NEW Police version (x-26 maybe) that was more compact and it served a 'pulse' type of zap, probably 50 k volts on that one too.

    It's an experience.
    There's a story behind this…
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  72. #72
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    NEVER, ever ever assume the power is off.

    ALWAYS CHECK WITH A METER.
    I do HVAC work, and I am always working on live 230, 120 and 24 circuits. Has to be live.

    I was testing an intermittent blower shutting off yesterday, and had to lay on the floor. I had my meter clipped to the 120 leg, and was holding my other lead waiting for the blower to shut off. Just for fun, I was poking around, and accidentally touched my arm with the meter. I was surprised to hear my meter give me the audible "high voltage warning" beep. I apparently, even laying on the ground with no actual skin contact - was making continuity to ground. Had I touched a 120 leg, it would have been a nice complete circuit.

    Thankfully, I don't do 440 commerical stuff. Arcing and that crap is especially dangerous.

    My worst shock was not bad - but it was while I was teaching HVAC. I was demonstrating capacitors, and using a Turbo2000 capacitor. I showed the students how to discharge a cap to prevent shock. Well, apparently this sucker had a residual charge in it after I had discharged it, and it nailed me. My arm was numb for about 20 minutes.

    Electricity, water (nautical), and air (aviation) - three things that are incredibly unforgiving, and equally as deadly.
    "Go soothingly in the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon"

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by DethWshBkr View Post
    NEVER, ever ever assume the power is off.

    ALWAYS CHECK WITH A METER.
    I do HVAC work, and I am always working on live 230, 120 and 24 circuits. Has to be live.

    I was testing an intermittent blower shutting off yesterday, and had to lay on the floor. I had my meter clipped to the 120 leg, and was holding my other lead waiting for the blower to shut off. Just for fun, I was poking around, and accidentally touched my arm with the meter. I was surprised to hear my meter give me the audible "high voltage warning" beep. I apparently, even laying on the ground with no actual skin contact - was making continuity to ground. Had I touched a 120 leg, it would have been a nice complete circuit.

    Thankfully, I don't do 440 commerical stuff. Arcing and that crap is especially dangerous.

    My worst shock was not bad - but it was while I was teaching HVAC. I was demonstrating capacitors, and using a Turbo2000 capacitor. I showed the students how to discharge a cap to prevent shock. Well, apparently this sucker had a residual charge in it after I had discharged it, and it nailed me. My arm was numb for about 20 minutes.

    Electricity, water (nautical), and air (aviation) - three things that are incredibly unforgiving, and equally as deadly.
    I work commercial HVAC and work mostly with 277/480 Roof Top Units. And like you said, power almost always has to be on while troubleshooting. In 30 year I can only remember being hit with the full 480vac once and it made me contemplate life. I am sure I was in shock and was shaking uncontrollably after being blown back and stumbling for probably 20 feet. I don't remember any burns, but it was a long long time ago.
    My Lockout rule is, If I can't see the disconnect from where I am working it gets locked out.
    I have been bitten by a few capacitors too but now I automatically discharge them before I handle them.
    Sweet baby Jesus on fire, I'ma need a damn lawyer and a miracle to pull my ass out of this.

  74. #74
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    Scary ^

    My one and only real scary moment with electricity. Way back in my late teens I was on a construction job in Denver. We were working on the landscaping of an already established house. There was some main power lines [the kind that are connected to huge metal double posts that serve others] that ran through the edge of the back yard. A lightening storm and downpour hit suddenly. Cracks of thunder and lightening were ongoing. I was standing in grass with 4-6" of water and one bolt must have hit those lines or close to it because electricity went through me. My hair stood up and goosebumps with a burning smell. I ran out of there and abandoned the job. My boss understood and to this day I'm still not sure if I was actually struck. I'm pretty sure I had some electricity go through me.
    Quote Originally Posted by NDD View Post
    Dude, I'm in Illinois. The only place anyone would come from that would say this area is hilly is Kansas.

  75. #75
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    Electricians used to be regarded as stuntmen in the early days of electrical distribution.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTJUNKIE View Post
    Scary ^

    My one and only real scary moment with electricity. Way back in my late teens I was on a construction job in Denver. We were working on the landscaping of an already established house. There was some main power lines [the kind that are connected to huge metal double posts that serve others] that ran through the edge of the back yard. A lightening storm and downpour hit suddenly. Cracks of thunder and lightening were ongoing. I was standing in grass with 4-6" of water and one bolt must have hit those lines or close to it because electricity went through me. My hair stood up and goosebumps with a burning smell. I ran out of there and abandoned the job. My boss understood and to this day I'm still not sure if I was actually struck. I'm pretty sure I had some electricity go through me.
    Lightning is a powerful and bizarre phenomenon DJ. I remember watching a storm from the stage at an outdoor shed in Florida before the doors were opened, and a lightning bolt hit the steel railing embedded in the concrete out on the uncovered lawn seating area. It blew the thing straight up into the air about 20 feet and left a hole in the concrete beneath. Made a big old bang too! I've been on outdoor scaffolding stages that got hit too, and at the Monsters of Rock in '87 in Maine, our monitor engineer got blown off his console when a bolt hit the stage. he was fine, just tingling for a while. Storms and outdoor stages are a scary combo.
    It's all Here. Now.

  77. #77
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    Last year a guy on the tunnel project I was working on was sandblasting 500 m in a big pipe. I guess the ground wasn't connected properly but he got a massive static shock when he went to touch the steel. His finger was screwed u p and he had a few days off work. I wonder how many volts that one was if you get 20,000 just from rubbing the carpet.

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