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  1. #1101
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    The story about marmite ie vegemite... I've never tried it, curious if anyone else has tried this "superfood"?

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-marmite_2321022b.jpg


    Perhaps you first heard about Vegemite in the early 1980s from the Men at Work song, "Down Under."

    The Australian sandwich spread, described by the Telegraph as a sticky, gloopy, salty spread made from yeast extract, may be the flavor that embodies the entire continent, as 23 million jars are purchased in Australia every year.1

    Vegemite's first cousin, Marmite, is the British version of the controversial condiment. Both are considered an acquired taste, but it's the latter that's been scrutinized in scientific circles and found to contain some very impressive properties for the human body.

    In fact, several studies show it contains vital nutrients, including 40 percent of the reference daily intake (RDI) for vitamin B12, 50 percent for folic acid and 36 percent for niacin, helps to protect against antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as MRSA and boosts gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels to restore optimal brain balance.2

    Invented in the late 1800s, Marmite came first, followed by Vegemite, invented in the 1920s. In fact, Marmite was included in the ration packs English soldiers carried during World War I. The high level of different B vitamins is also attributed to its effectiveness as a mosquito repellent.

    The Daily Meal describes the dark, rich sauce as"full of umami and, at first blush, one of the most disgusting things most Americans have ever tried."3

    The British are serious about their Marmite. Owned by Unilever, the company's spoof Ministry of Marmite exists "to enrich the existence of all Marmite lovers, whether resident in the U.K. or overseas, through the comprehensive application of Marmite in every facet of their domestic, professional, cultural and social lives."4

    Brits and Aussies are wild about their respective yeast extracts like many Americans are about jam on their morning toast, but Marmite isn't sweet like jelly and marmalade; it's umami, the newest flavor among the basic tastes of sweet, sour, salty and bitter. Umami is the Japanese word for "delicious," which in English means "savory."

    Popular as a meat flavor for vegetarians, this yeast-based paste can be stored at room temperature and, although it might dry out, remains edible for years, according to the International Business Times (IBT).5 One must ask what's in it to give it such a remarkable calling card.

    Sweden Not a Fan: Marmite's Controversial Components

    The main ingredients in Marmite are yeast extract, vegetable extract and salt augmented with thiamin, folate, riboflavin, niacin, iron and vitamin B12. It's flavored with things like celery extract, although the exact ingredients and the amounts are a carefully guarded and undisclosed recipe.

    The Marmite website reports that a jar contains 100 grams (just over 3.5 ounces) with 34 grams of protein, 30 carbs, 1.2 grams of sugar and 10.8 grams of salt.6 In spite of its strong flavor, some consider Marmite to be a bona fide superfood. According to Daily Mail:

    "Both products are made via a complex method in which salt is added to a suspension of yeast and then heated, resulting in a rich paste loaded with free glutamic acids, also known as umami (it's the primary component of MSG).

    The exact recipe is a secret, but various vegetable extracts and vitamins are also added."7

    The glutamic acid in MSG, or monosodium glutamate, is an excitotoxin, which means it overexcites your cells to the point of damage or death. But the glutamic acid found in nutritional yeast binds to and is absorbed by other amino acids or proteins, while what is found in MSG is not. In essence, your body controls the glutamic levels.

    While Marmite isn't exactly banned in Sweden, the government requires retailers to obtain special permission from the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration to place it on their shelves. IBT explains it this way:

    "The paste is made by adding salt to the yeast by-product from breweries, heating the solution until the cell walls of the yeast are softened, then straining the solution to make it smooth.

    The result is naturally rich in vitamins, especially the Vitamin B complex, but additional vitamins and minerals are added to Marmite — and that is what the Danish government dislikes."8

    While in the U.S. Marmite barely shows up on the radar in terms of nutrition, it's been lab tested and declared better than peanut butter in terms of its ability as a brain booster. Recent studies have determined that the savory substance may increase your brain's neurotransmitters, the function involving messaging.

    Marmite May Boost Your Brain's GABA Levels

    Of course, it was a study based in the U.K., kicked off when researchers found that a single teaspoon of Marmite, taken daily by study participants, prompted a decrease in neural response to visual stimuli.

    Scientists at the University of York said that's an indicator of increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels.9 According to Medical News Today:

    "GABA is a neurotransmitter responsible for inhibiting the excitability of brain cells, helping to restore the optimal balance of neuronal activity required for healthy brain functioning. Put simply, GABA 'calms' the brain.

    Previous studies have associated low GABA levels with an increased risk of numerous neurological and mental health disorders, including anxiety, depression, autism and epilepsy. As a result, researchers have been investigating ways to boost GABA levels in the brain."10

    Study author Daniel Baker, Ph.D., used data from 26 adults, divided into two groups. One group was directed to eat a teaspoon of Marmite every day for a month, while the others ate the same amount of peanut butter.

    Thirty days later, the study subjects underwent electroencephalography to measure brain activity in response to visual stimuli in the form of flickering lights.

    The latter group had a 30 percent decrease in neural response to visual stimuli in comparison to the Marmite group but, even better, those responses were ongoing for another eight weeks.

    The result was similar to that resulting from an animal study in which there was a 300 percent decrease in neural response to visual stimuli. The study concluded:

    "This 'response gain' effect should provide a clear index of GABA availability in cortex, in that increasing GABA concentration should reduce the neural response evoked by visual stimuli to below normal levels."11

    Baker said the main reason for the significantly reduced responsiveness to visual stimuli in the participants was most likely the high concentration of vitamin B12 in the Marmite.

    Interestingly, while the scientists stressed that therapeutic recommendations couldn't yet be made, they touted the study as the "first example of how dietary interventions can alter cortical processes."12

    B Vitamins: 'Super' Compounds in Marmite

    According to the Journal of Clinical Investigation,13 niacin, or vitamin B3, one of the main ingredients in Marmite, helps protect your body against staphylococcus bacteria. The Telegraph reports that in tests, niacin:

    " … [P]roduces neutrophils, a white blood cell that fights bacteria — [and] increased our immune system's ability to kill different strains of the bugs by up to 1,000 times.

    This could mark a turning point in the battle against antibiotic-resistant superbugs, such as MRSA, the deadly strain that poses a threat in hospitals."14

    Folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 are essential for converting what could become a damaging molecule, called homocysteine, into the amino acid cysteine in a process called the methylation cycle.

    Without this suppression mechanism, studies show heart disease and Alzheimer's to be an increased risk, as homocysteine can lead to brain and blood vessel deterioration. According to the George Mateljan Foundation:

    "Homocysteine promotes atherosclerosis by directly damaging blood vessel walls and by interfering with the formation of collagen (the main protein in connective tissue).

    Elevations in homocysteine are found in approximately 20 [to] 40 percent of patients with heart disease, and it is estimated that daily consumption of 400 mcg of folate alone would reduce the number of heart attacks suffered by Americans each year by 10 percent."15

    Further, high levels of homocysteine not only are linked to blood vessel damage, but are often found in Alzheimer's patients, suggesting that many people all over the world may be suffering from a "Marmite" (or B vitamin) deficiency.

    Other brain and mental capacities positively influenced by vitamin B3, or niacin, found liberally in Marmite, include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. And B12 deficiency can trigger different types of psychoses and paranoia. Unfortunately, this deficiency is common.

    How an Early Scientist Discovered One of Marmite's Most Important Benefits

    In the 1930s, English scientist Lucy Wills discovered that the folic acid content in Marmite could successfully treat anemia. In studying whether a vitamin deficiency might contribute to what was at the time called pernicious anemia of pregnancy, one review noted her research on the effects of Marmite, a "cheap yeast extract," on monkeys:

    "One particular monkey did especially poorly, and for reasons which are not recorded — perhaps in desperation — she tried the cheap yeast extract, Marmite. It had a dramatic effect. Thus, after all the intensive examination of diets and exhaustive testing on rats, it was a chance intervention with a single animal that led to the breakthrough. Wills had taken the first step to the discovery of folic acid."16

    According to nutritionist Melanie Brown, who specializes in pre-conception and pregnancy nutrition, Marmite can help pregnant women through morning sickness, as well as help elderly individuals who have lost their sense of taste.

    High Salt Content Leads to Marmite Bans, but —

    Denmark, which hasn't sold Marmite since May 2011, isn't the only country to look unfavorably on the savory condiment that a large portion of the known world swears it can't live without. The powers-that-be in Ceredigion, Wales, banned Marmite in elementary schools in 2008.

    Oregon State University jumped on the bandwagon and began warning people not to take high "doses" of the stuff without medical supervision due to its high salt content. However, salt is not the ogre it's been made out to be. In fact, not enough salt in your diet isn't good for your heart. The more important question is whether or not your salt quotient is properly balanced with that of your potassium intake.





    Sauce:

    Can This Banned Condiment Boost Brain Function?
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  2. #1102
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    I've had it but it was a long time ago, in the '90s. I just remember it being really salty and tasting like bouillon, really concentrated.

    Interesting that there may be more to it than we've realized.
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  3. #1103
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    Veg Fests


    There are some great vegan festivals coming up this spring and summer. Check 'em all out here.


    Vegan Festivals
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  4. #1104
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    The story about marmite ie vegemite... I've never tried it, curious if anyone else has tried this "superfood"?

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    Ha! Oh man, I haven't tried Marmite, but have tasted Vegemite years ago. It was salty. Bouillon is a good comparison. I didn't hate it but didn't feel like adding it my diet either. I do get a little suspicious when I'm told about a new 'superfood'. There are a lot of them these days. And no guidelines on what makes one. Cool that it has benefits though! Maybe it's why those Brits are so good on the DH circuit!

  5. #1105
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    Happy Green Day

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    Eat your veggies

  6. #1106
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17862494_1912479818996460_2198157926823534302_n.jpg

    It might be impossible to always eat ethically, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    Carnivores rejoiced at the news, proudly sharing it like a stack of flyers that proved they had been right all along. It fit neatly into their set of nutritional morals.

    As specialty diets have gained increased mainstream acceptance, nutrition today has started to resemble organized religion rather than conventional dietary advice. There are endless options to follow, and everyone believes theirs to be right.

    When it comes to conflicting nutritional research, the literature is seemingly endless: from low-carb, high-fat diets like the meat-heavy paleo diet, which claims to help weight loss and increase heart health, to macrobiotic meal plans, veganism, lacto-vegetarianism and debating the merit of the calorie itself. Instead of sorting through this mass of information, we typically cobble pieces of information that confirm our pre-existing beliefs together like makeshift lifejackets. Forget nuance. This is a survival mechanism. Everyone has to believe something if they are to successfully navigate those technicolour grocery store shelves.

    Of course, being able to subscribe to any specialty diet is its own privilege. It’s easy to tell people to “eat local” while proudly swinging a $25 bag of chanterelles and microgreens home from the farmer’s market. It’s another to relay the message to yourself as you pass a Popeye’s location, the smell of crispy fried chicken bubbling in the deep fryer. It’s yet another to relay the message to the millions of Canadians making minimum wage, or those who do not have access to seasonal markets, never mind the free time necessary to nurture a budding interest in organic seedlings and seasonal mushrooms.

    And cravings and economics are only the beginning of the problem. Some of our most agreed upon, nutritionally wholesome foods are destroying natural environments and local economies in their wake.
    The sudden demand for quinoa – a superfood lauded by everyone and their grandmothers for its protein-packed properties – caused the price to surge to three times what it once was. A Guardian report revealed that the price increase meant Bolivian people who had long depended on the grain as a dietary staple are no longer able to afford the product that became a luxury export seemingly overnight.

    In a similar superfood disaster, Greek yogurt is contributing to acid whey production, a toxic substance with a pH balance comparable to acid rain. A 2013 Cornell University report found that for every 7,000 gallons of milk used to make Greek yogurt, up to 4,900 gallons of acid whey is produced. Whey that isn’t properly disposed strips oxygen supplies from streams and rivers, killing marine life and damaging habitats and ecosystems. Yet yogurt companies are ending up with so much of the byproduct that Modern Farmer found Greek yogurt giants like Chobani have started paying farmers to take it off their hands. The farmers have obliged, but they themselves don’t know what to do with it.

    A handful of heart-healthy almonds might be a go-to Greek yogurt topping, but the nuts are also contributing to drought problems in California. Eighty per cent of the world’s almond supply comes from the state experiencing its worst drought on record. A report published by The Watershed Agricultural Council found that a single almond takes 1.1 gallons of water to produce. Demand for heart-healthy almonds and their affiliated products has grown so strong that The New York Times found California almond farmers are drilling thousands of feet down into aquifers to pump out water, threatening critical infrastructure like bridges, roads and irrigation canals, and even potentially triggering earthquakes.

    Meanwhile, an Associated Press investigation found that shrimp sold at global supermarkets is often peeled by slave laborers in Thailand. Yet you shouldn’t be eating it anyway, because global consumption of heart healthy, omega-3 rich seafood is depleting seafood supplies at rates that they cannot be naturally replenished, wreaking havoc on the health of our oceans, the planet’s most significant source of oxygen.

    Even the innocent banana is corrupt. A New York Times report found that conventional bananas – the world’s most popular fruit – often employ child labour while underpaying workers and abusing human rights. Large banana producers like Dole and Chiquita also cut down rain forests, contributing to deforestation and turning former lush forests into uninhabitable deserts that displace millions of species from their natural habitats, according to a Pacific Lutheran University report.

    Knowing this, I recently made the switch from conventional bananas to fair trade organic bananas that support local agriculture in Ecuador and Peru. The ethically superior bananas wear a large, reassuring green sticker that says “Wholefoods Guarantee Fair Trade Certified” over top of their bright and unblemished yellow skin. But after thinking about the choice for longer than two minutes, it started to feel like the nutritional equivalent of sending a paper airplane to Syria. There is no amount of fair trade bananas one person can buy to undo the damage that has already been done.

    The problems are so vast and beyond the scope of our grocery carts — themselves too often plagued by convenience and price — that it can feel necessary to ignore most issues if you are to continue eating and ultimately existing in the world.

    The agroindustrial complex no doubt benefits from this nutritional confusion, swooping in to tell us that Coca Cola and Skittles aren’t that bad for you because they only have 130 calories. Yet as we continue to discover new information about food and its nutritional, environmental and moral impacts, deciding that there is only one correct dietary answer is a bit like resolving to read the same book for the rest of your life.

    When it comes to debating what to make for dinner, the list of nutritional, environmental and social contradictions we face is endless. Once you begin to understand the problems of our food system, it’s all too easy to buy into the ethos that everything is bad so you might as well ignore most of it.

    Yes, it is exhausting to navigate the ethical footwork of eating in 2017. But the more we know about our flawed dietary habits, the better we can work toward improving them. To do this we have to leave sentiments of moral superiority on the table and accept that food has nothing to do with being right. It’s about admitting that, at least in some way, we are all wrong and, despite that, trying to be better.



    It might be impossible to always eat ethically, but that doesn?t mean we shouldn?t try | National Post
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  7. #1107
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    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
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  8. #1108
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
    The headline was going to be "Nothing's perfect, even some foods that may be included in a vegan diet." But that didn't make for good click bait.
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
    I interpreted that as saying there's an excess of farmland, and that vegans can feed themselves with far far less land used for food production, so even more land becomes excess. *shrug* if carnivores thought that was bad mouthing vegans and happily spread the word about it, it would only make me think they're seriously lacking intelligence.

  10. #1110
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    I'm always perplexed when people characterize veganism as expensive. It seems to be a disingenuous excuse. I occasionally like to splurge on free range organic tofu that has been blessed by the tears of a monk under a full moon during the solstice, but generally speaking I'm fine with my various beans, whole real fruit etc
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    Rice and beans, totally vegan and can't think of anything cheaper

  12. #1112
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    It seems a lot studies on Vegan diets is done by the meat and dairy industry so they put their spin on it. The meat and diary industry is "Big" business and lobbies heavily and wins when it comes to influencing what people eat. I've heard the heads of the USDA are former meat and diary execs. It's big money and they will not lose their profits at the expense of a healthier society.

  13. #1113
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    'beans, beans the magical fruit
    the more you eat, the more you toot
    the more you toot, the better you feel
    that's why you eat them every meal!'
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  14. #1114
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    'beans, beans the magical fruit
    the more you eat, the more you toot
    the more you toot, the better you feel
    that's why you eat them every meal!'
    My wife makes me lots of lentil soup. One week I was eating it for several meals that day and was experiencing some tremendous gas so I wrote my own version.

    Lentil soup, lentil soup, good for the heart,
    The more you eat it the more you fart,
    The more you fart the better you fart,
    So eat lentil soup with every fart!

  15. #1115
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17992059_1912991148945327_2174766993202353795_n.jpg


    Ramps aka wild onions are still small. They should be ready for picking next weekend


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  16. #1116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    My wife makes me lots of lentil soup. One week I was eating it for several meals that day and was experiencing some tremendous gas so I wrote my own version.

    Lentil soup, lentil soup, good for the heart,
    The more you eat it the more you fart,
    The more you fart the better you fart,
    So eat lentil soup with every fart!
    As they say, don't quit your day job!
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  17. #1117
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    As they say, don't quit your day job!
    I won't

  18. #1118
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  19. #1119
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17903855_1450793158304771_7013810827726355522_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  20. #1120
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    Happy Hump day

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  21. #1121
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    Most quality dark chocolate uses soy lecithin. ( eg Lindt 70%)


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18118428_10212128535591451_5910188297849142390_n.jpg
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  22. #1122
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Most quality dark chocolate uses soy lecithin. ( eg Lindt 70%)


    Click image for larger version. 

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    True and good one!

    How about beaver anal glands.. why do they have to put that in food?

  23. #1123
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18058201_2268328506725089_8008042304978527437_n.jpg


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18058019_2268328510058422_6396188641076241263_n.jpg


    It keeps me regular
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