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  1. #1601
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    Friday funnies

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #1602
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    9 NEW MEDICAL REASONS TO NEVER EAT MEAT

    While there are no new medical articles demonstrating the health benefits of adding bacon and burgers to your diet, there are many studies that reinforce that idea that eating nothing but fruit, vegetables, grains, and legumes is optimal for your health. In fact, new data consistently reminds us of the benefits of a vegan diet, which makes it fairly safe to conclude that avoiding meat is one of the most important health decisions a person can make. Although most of these studies are observational—meaning they could not feasibly randomize people to eat or skip meat and follow them for decades—together they illustrate that whether meat comes from cows raised on grass or corn, and whether you know the farmer or not, meat is an inflammatory food with an inherent chemical structure that promotes cancer growth. Unlike the new data showing that the more servings of fruit and vegetables you eat, the more likely you will avoid chronic diseases and delay death, eating meat has the opposite result, leading to disease and early death. If you were ever wavering about your commitment to make it a bean burger rather than a beef burger, reviewing these nine new medical observations should keep you on track for a long and healthy life.

    1. Type 2 diabetes
    In a long-term study from Finland that followed more than 2,000 men over the course of 19 years, replacing even one percent of calories from animal proteins with plant proteins lowered the risk of developing diabetes by 18 percent.

    2. Liver disease
    A growing health concern is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In an analysis of more than 3,000 subjects in the Netherlands, increased dietary proteins from animal sources (meat) were associated with a greater risk (reaching 50 percent higher) of developing NAFLD.

    3. Asthma
    A study that focused on the relationship between processed red meat consumption and asthma symptoms found that eating cured red meat more than four times a week increased the odds of having worsened asthma by 76 percent.

    4. Colon cancer
    The health community was stunned (although some of us weren’t) when, in October 2015, the World Health Organization announced its results of a comprehensive analysis demonstrating that processed red meats such as bacon and hot dogs cause colorectal cancer. In a more recent analysis, 400 studies were examined and found that the risk of colorectal cancer increased by 12 percent for each 100 grams of red and processed meats eaten daily. The study also found that whole grains and vegetables decreased the risk.

    5. Depression
    In an analysis of 21 studies examining diet and depression, eating red and processed meats increased the risk of depression by more than 25 percent, while fruit and vegetables had the opposite effect by 20 percent.

    6. Stomach cancer
    Researchers combined 42 studies relating diet to stomach cancer and found that a higher intake of red meat increased the risk of stomach cancer by 70 percent, while processed red meat increased the risk by 80 percent compared to those who shunned meats.

    7. Head and neck cancer
    A Netherlands study of more than 120,000 subjects (who were followed for more than 20 years) says that the consumption of processed red meat is associated with developing cancers of the head and neck. The risk was increased as much as 50 percent compared to the low- or non-meat eaters studied.

    8. Gestational diabetes
    Developing diabetes during pregnancy (known as “gestational diabetes”) can complicate pregnancies and have an impact on the health of the offspring. However, recent analysis suggests that high red-meat consumption increased the risk of gestational diabetes by more than 200 percent. Once again, processed red meat also increased the risk by approximately double compared to people who eat fewer amounts of meat.

    9. Degenerative arthritis
    For the first time, diets high in saturated fats like butter, egg yolks, meats, and even palm oil have been linked to increased risks of destruction of joint cartilage commonly known as degenerative joint disease or DJD. The inflammatory nature of meat was identified in the study. Saturated fatty acids in meat deposit on the cartilage in joints, weakening them and making them more prone to damage.



    sauce https://vegnews.com/2017/4/9-new-med...never-eat-meat

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    F*ck Cancer

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  3. #1603
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    Why E. coli keeps getting into our lettuce


    Consumers have grown to love convenience salads, from tubs of pre-washed baby spinach to bags of chopped romaine.

    There’s only one problem with these modern-day conveniences: They’re regularly implicated in foodborne illness outbreaks.

    The latest, a nationwide flare-up of E. coli infections, has sickened 84 people in 19 states and hospitalized 42. Most of the victims grew ill after eating chopped romaine lettuce from a farm near Yuma, Ariz.

    Such outbreaks are rare overall but more common in certain types of foods. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that leafy greens cause roughly a fifth of all foodborne illnesses.

    And food safety experts say convenience greens — those handy bags of pre-chopped and pre-washed salads — carry an extra risk because they come in contact with more people and machinery before they arrive on your plate.

    Recent industry efforts and federal rules have attempted to reduce outbreaks. But the risks will never completely disappear, experts say.

    “We’re always going to have these cases, unfortunately, because consumers have gotten used to this product,” said Bill Marler, a prominent food safety lawyer who represents several patients sickened by the lettuce. “The product has risks, in my opinion.”

    Federal regulators haven’t yet uncovered the source of this latest outbreak linked to lettuce. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are urging consumers to throw out romaine that could be from Yuma, where most lettuce is grown during the winter season.

    Most of the 84 people grew ill after eating at restaurants that use bagged, pre-chopped lettuce in their salads. This strain of E. coli, known as 0157: H7, produces a toxin that can disrupt liver function. The majority of victims are women, a reflection of the fact that women generally eat more salads.

    Government regulators have long known that greens and lettuces pose a particular food safety risk. According to one CDC analysis, leafy vegetables were responsible for 22 percent of foodborne illnesses between 1998 and 2008, the latest period for which detailed attribution data is available.

    A more recent analysis of outbreak data from 2013 concluded that “vegetable row crops” — lettuces plus broccoli, asparagus, celery and some other vegetables — account for 42 percent of E. coli infections. In the past four months, E. coli infections linked to leafy greens in Canada and the United States have caused 151 illnesses and two deaths.

    “Leafy greens continue to be a problem, and we’ve looked at leafy greens and fresh produce with concern,” said Robert Tauxe, the director of the CDC division that responds to foodborne illness outbreaks. “Back 15 to 20 years ago, there was a huge concern in food safety around foods of animal origin. ... But beginning about 10 years ago, the produce side has become more and more prominent.”

    Contamination can occur on the farm when birds make frequent flights overhead or low-lying fields flood with contaminated water. E. coli can also be spread by farmworkers who don’t wash their hands or via farm equipment that has manure on it.

    Once the greens are picked, they move to a packaging plant, where they’re exposed to more workers and more equipment. Product from multiple farms is often bagged in the same facility, which further increases the odds of cross-contamination.

    While packers frequently rinse lettuce with a chlorine wash to kill pathogens, studies have shown those sprays are only partly effective. The same is true of washing fruits and vegetables at home, Tauxe said, because pathogens “cling” to the surface of produce and can even enter the inside of a leaf or fruit after they've been cut open.

    There's no “kill step” that destroys pathogens for foods eaten raw, as there is for a well-done burger or a glass of pasteurized milk.

    “This is why it’s so important that the people who grow food do everything they can to minimize contamination,” said Sandra Eskin, who heads the food safety project at the Pew Charitable Trusts. “Lettuce grows in the dirt. It’s eaten raw. There’s no opportunity to cook it to kill bacteria.”

    By all accounts, farmers and regulators have made progress toward making lettuce and leafy greens safer. Since 2006, when E. coli from fresh spinach sickened nearly 200 people and hospitalized 100, the produce industry has launched several initiatives to tighten farm safety rules for leafy greens and lettuces.

    In 2011, Congress passed the Food Safety Modernization Act, which included new standards for irrigation water quality, worker hygiene and equipment sanitation, and went into effect for large farms in January. Smaller farms will have to comply with the rules by early 2020.

    But despite these efforts, the number of outbreaks and infections linked to leafy greens has largely remained flat over the past 10 years, with 11 outbreaks and 242 illnesses per year on average, according to CDC.

    Eskin and Tauxe say they believe the new rules will help — but they will not eliminate the risk completely.

    “Produce is not grown in sterile environments,” Eskin added. “Anybody who knows anything about food safety understands that.”
    sauce: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.29e7cb8ccc07
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #1604
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    Another good reason to grow your own. There's something about organic vegetable gardening that just feels right. Wonderful therapy too.
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  5. #1605
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    The 5 Keys To A Rock-Solid Vegetarian Diet

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    Tell someone that you're on or thinking about going on a vegetarian diet, and you may receive responses along the following lines:

    "Humans have been eating meat for tens of thousands of years; We're designed to eat it"
    "How will you ever get all the nutrients you need?"
    "I guess that means you can't lift weights anymore; you won't have enough strength."
    Contrary to popular belief, a vegetarian diet can help you improve your health, shed unwanted body fat, and build muscle. You just need to make sure you lay out a meat-free approach that helps you reach your goals instead of working against them. Here are some of the key building blocks of a solid vegetarian-diet foundation.

    1. Finding Your "Why"
    Whether for environmental, political, dietary, ethical, or personal reasons, be clear from the onset why you want to follow a vegetarian diet. This way of eating may require a little more thought, planning, time, and money than you're used to. Being clear on your reason can help you stay motivated when you're thinking it's about time for a bacon cheeseburger.

    2. Figuring Out Your Version Of Vegetarianism
    Choosing to follow a vegetarian diet entails more than removing meat from your plate. What about milk? What about eggs? Will you still eat fish?

    Vegetarianism is a catchall category that can be broken down into more specific diets:

    Lacto-vegetarian: Includes all dairy products, but omit eggs
    Ovo-vegetarian: Includes eggs, but omit dairy
    Lacto-ovo: Includes both dairy and eggs
    Pescatarian: Includes dairy, eggs, and fish
    Veganism: Abstains from all animal meat and products, including eggs, dairy, and honey, as well as potentially abstaining from all products made from animals, such as gelatin
    Keep in mind the local availability and price of the key foods in each diet, and understand how to combine them to meet your minimum daily nutritional requirements.

    3. Learning How To Combine Proteins
    To maintain your health, you need the nine essential amino acids (EAAs) not produced by your body. A protein that contains all nine EAAs is considered a complete protein; conversely, a protein source that is missing one or more of these EAAs is an incomplete protein.

    Without these nine essential amino acids, your body can't take full advantage of the protein you consume. You can get all nine from animal-based protein sources and from a handful of plant-based sources, such as soy and quinoa. But most plant-based protein sources are incomplete, so you have to learn how to combine these sources to get all nine EAAs.

    4. Supplementing Your Diet Wisely
    As a rule, people following a vegetarian diet don't get all the iron, vitamin B-12, and zinc they would if they consumed animal proteins. Depending on whether you include dairy, you may also need additional calcium.

    These essential nutrients play an integral role in growth and development, metabolism, neurological function, and energy production. Supplemental sources can help you meet your minimum daily nutritional needs. You may also want to add beta-alanine and creatine to your diet to get the most benefit from your exercise routine.

    5. Being Conscious Of Calories
    The foundation of a well-rounded vegetarian diet includes high-fiber, nutrient-dense foods. But some plant-based food sources, such as beans and meat substitutes, pack in a surprisingly large amount of carbs and extra calories. The challenge of some vegetarian diets is to get all the complete protein you need without overshooting the mark on daily calories.

    But fear not: There are plenty of vegetarian food options that can get you the fiber and protein you need without all the extra calories—and that still give you the feeling of fullness that helps you stick with any diet.

    And the next time someone at the gym asks you why you have so much energy, you can just give them a nod and a wink and tell them it's all about what you eat.

    https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #1606
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    a friend of mine is trying to convince me to eat healthy, he will eat meat at times but perfers the vegan diet.... he is trying to tell me that i should be concerned about the amount of meat i eat.... I mainly eat meat, very seldom eat any form of veggies except for hot peppers and sweet corn. I would be perfectally happy just eating a steak or 2 for dinner and some hot peppers with maybe an ear of sweet corn. I ride my mountain bike for my job as an uber bike messenger and also just joined IMBA and Cambir in the chicago area and am planning on checking out some trails in the area as well. not sure if i could ever eat a primay diet of plant based foods, however he made something with black beans, corn and brown rice that was good. Also am one not to believe in having a regular physician or regular medical examinations.... if you feel ok why stir up trouble. however some of the vegan recipes do look interesting and may be worth an occasional try.

  7. #1607
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    Welcome, Brian.

    Probably the best suggestion to give you would be to have your blood tested during a physical. If that comes back with no issues, carry on!

    You don't mention your age, but when still in my 40s I was bullet proof and could wolf down steaks with poppers (jalapenos stuffed with cheese). Eventually it all caught up and damn near killed me. Now pushing 64 with a much more balanced diet, act like a kid on the bike for hours. It all comes down to choices, and some diet choices not only gunk up your engine, it makes your joints swell and hurt before you move. Where's the fun in that?

    Ohhh, I'm not "vegan" as I still enjoy milk, eggs, fish and chicken...with veggies and fruits

  8. #1608
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    i am 45, have not been to a doctor for a physical in at least 15 years, my thought is if you feel ok there is no reason to go look for trouble. I am on the bike for at least anywhere from 5 miles to 30 miles a day 5 days a week since i do uber eats delivery by bike. thinking about trying his food occasionally but i love my 3/4 raw daily red meat like steak and burgers

  9. #1609
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianR60077 View Post
    i am 45, have not been to a doctor for a physical in at least 15 years, my thought is if you feel ok there is no reason to go look for trouble. I am on the bike for at least anywhere from 5 miles to 30 miles a day 5 days a week since i do uber eats delivery by bike. thinking about trying his food occasionally but i love my 3/4 raw daily red meat like steak and burgers
    There is a little bit of a logical flaw in this line of thinking. Many conditions can be caught early with simple, routine checks, which prevent them from becoming a real problem. I'm 32 with a healthy weight and last year I was diagnosed with essential hypertension. Basically, high blood pressure with absolutely no known cause. It's just there. I felt fine for 30 years, but left untreated, I absolutely put myself at risk for stroke, heart problems, or kidney issues. One little pill a day, and I'm good.

    As an anecdotal side note, I keep track of my BP at home and it tends to be a few points lower if I eat primarily veg. Not so much to go off medication, but it does have an affect.

    Don't think of it as all or nothing. Start slow. Try for one meatless meal a day, or meatless Monday, or whatever works for you. A big source of 'failure' is when people assume it's all or nothing, and they drastically change their diet, feel crappy, fall back to their old way, and then feel guilty for failing.
    The cake is a lie.

  10. #1610
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubikeman View Post
    There is a little bit of a logical flaw in this line of thinking. Many conditions can be caught early with simple, routine checks, which prevent them from becoming a real problem
    ^ A thousand times this.

  11. #1611
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    typically i do not trust any medical doctor, i trust my mechanic that works on my car, harley and bike without a doubt but a doctor.... umm no. my friend is all about being health concious since he turned 31... i still believe i am totally bullet proof and nothing to worry about and being adopted have no clue to my actual parents health history but enjoy being outside doing the bike delivery for work, right now sitting by the lake on the beach waiting for the next delivery

  12. #1612
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    Well, if a head in the sand approach works well for you, then that's all that matters I guess. However prostate cancer is just one example where your approach will go from curable to terminal because it wasn't caught early enough with a simple office visit and blood test.

    To each their own.........

  13. #1613
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    prostate cancer doesnt happen until much later in life like most anything else

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    Wow.... just wow

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    the biggest problem i have with doctors is you have to pay something generally in the form of a co pay to listen to them telling you dont drink 7 to 10 cups of coffee a day, dont drink a 6 pack or more a day of soda, sleep more than 4 to 5 hours a night, drink water, dont go out and drink every day, make sure you eat more fruits and vegetables, dont eat of red meat or fried food.... like there is any proof that they know what they are saying.

  16. #1616
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    ....... ah, my bad.

    1) Registered today
    2) 1st post is in a vegan/vegetarian health based thread and it's that you only eat meat
    3) ....

    I could go on, but it's clear to me now that I fell for your trolling. Congrats! Job well done! You da man!

  17. #1617
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    i will sometimes eat his type of food, but i know someone who lived to be 80 eating only meat never ate any fruits or vegetables, never drank any water either coffee, coke, and alcohol and soda, smoked 2 cartons of cigarettes a week, no exercise and worked the highest stress job there is a police officer. he didnt die from health issues he died in a car crash. so these doctors tell you what they want and really cannot prove they know what they are talking about plus get kick backs from drug companies

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    I do love the smoothies my friend makes, they are the best breakfast ever, usually he uses like 3 bananas, blue berries, strawberries, depending on the store sometimes we get raspberries and black berries too. I like fruit but typically stay away from vegetables in favor of red meat. but fruit smoothies are the bomb....

  19. #1619
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    Happy Hump Day!

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  20. #1620
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    Works that slow, huh?

    If you're lucky, you'll make it to "much later in life" one of these days.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  21. #1621
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    The fish knew this all along.

    A cohort study conducted by researchers at nonprofit medical research organization Cochrane found that consuming fish oil supplements has no positive benefits on cardiovascular health.


    Fish oil supplements for a healthy heart 'nonsense'


    Cochrane researchers looked at trials in over 100,000 people and found little proof that it prevented heart disease.

    They say the chance of getting any meaningful benefit from taking omega-3 is one in 1,000.

    Eating oily fish, however, can still be recommended as part of a healthy diet.

    The review mainly looked at supplements rather than omega-3 from eating fish. Experts still believe the latter is good for the heart as well as general health.

    The NHS says people should try to eat two portions of fish per week, one of which should be oily fish, such as salmon, fresh tuna or mackerel, to get enough "good" fats.

    Omega-3
    Omega-3 is a family of fats that includes:

    ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) - which the body can't make for itself but is found in vegetable oils, nuts and seeds
    EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) - which the body can make from ALA but are also present in oily fish and fish oils, including cod liver oil
    Some brands of milk, yoghurt, bread and spreads have extra omega-3 (usually ALA) added to them.

    But when it comes to fish oil supplements, Cochrane lead author, Dr Lee Hooper, from the University of East Anglia, said: "We can be confident in the findings of this review which go against the popular belief that long-chain omega-3 supplements protect the heart.

    "This large systematic review included information from many thousands of people over long periods.

    "Despite all this information, we don't see protective effects.

    "The review provides good evidence that taking long-chain omega-3 [fish oil, EPA or DHA] supplements does not benefit heart health or reduce our risk of stroke or death from any cause.

    "The most trustworthy studies consistently showed little or no effect of long-chain omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health."


    Some fish contain small amounts of chemicals that may be harmful if eaten in large amounts.

    Shark, marlin and swordfish may contain small amounts of mercury and should be avoided by women who are pregnant or planning a baby and by all children under 16.

    Other groups should eat no more than one portion of these fish each week.

    Prof Tom Sanders, a nutrition expert at King's College London and honorary director of Heart UK, said: "Current dietary guidelines to prevent cardiovascular disease encourage fish consumption, rather than taking supplements.

    "This study provides no evidence to suggest that this dietary advice should change."

    Buy vegetables
    Prof Tim Chico, a cardiologist from Sheffield University, said: "There was a period where people who had suffered a heart attack were prescribed these on the NHS. This stopped some years ago.

    "Such supplements come with a significant cost, so my advice to anyone buying them in the hope that they reduce the risk of heart disease, I'd advise them to spend their money on vegetables instead."

    Dr Carrie Ruxton, from the Health and Food Supplements Information Service, said early studies of omega-3 fats had found a protective benefit for the heart, but it wasn't always easy to pick up the modest effects of dietary change, particularly in older people on medication.

    "For those who won't eat mackerel, salmon or herring, a daily fish oil supplement is a useful way of meeting recommendations," she said.

    "Omega-3s are also used by the body to maintain the health of the eyes, immune function and brain so it's not all about the heart."
    sauce https://www.bbc.com/news/health-44845879
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  22. #1622
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37858272_2006285689422603_8231610508491358208_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  23. #1623
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    i am still considering trying my friends vegan diet.... however i have never been concerned about physical health and figure there is nothing to worry about being only 45 and invincable and bullet proof. have not had a physical in 15 years and in no rush too either

  24. #1624
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37787928_1803021966457506_481250286652882944_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  25. #1625
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37978062_10215041903214962_5371046746145161216_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  26. #1626
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion

    Here is my pre ride smoothie.

    Oatmeal 1/4 cup
    Walnuts 1/8 cup
    Strawberries 1/4 cup or one large or two small
    Frozen pineapple 1/4cup
    Banana 1
    Soy milk 1 cup
    Pitted Dates 3 or 2 depending size

    Blend 40 second in the bullet.

    Enjoy




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #1627
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
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    No almond butter?
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  28. #1628
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    No almond butter?
    I checked: A serving of almond butter is equal to approximately 2 tablespoons. If you eat this amount of almond butter, you'll get approximately 7 grams of protein. It's slightly less than the 8 grams in a 2-tablespoon serving of peanut butter.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  29. #1629
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    Thanks for your efforts!

    For some unsubstantiated reason, I have thought almond butter would have been higher in protein than peanut butter.

    Personally, I like almond butter better. I will warm a jar of almond butter (short nuke) to soften, add sea salt, honey and some dried berries like cranberries, acai, or goji and enjoy.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  30. #1630
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    I’d been feeling poorly, so I went to a natural physician a year ago on a recommendation. Turns out my liver wasn’t functioning due to heavy toxins from construction materials and parasites, probably from third world countries I’ve lived in. I just got done with nearly a year long liver cleanse, and feel great. Mostly beef bile salt cleanse.

    That said, I eat a heavy diet of meat. Mostly wild game I’ve killed and processed myself. I don’t think there is a healthier food you can put in you’re body than elk meat. Look up it’s nutrition facts, it astoundingly healthy.

    I think most of the problem with meat is in nitrates and fats. Fatty meats like bacon and burgers, and processed meats will put you in the grave. Lean meats are legit.

    We’ve also started a small organic garden for our kids. Hopefully we can do more of that in the future. I’d love one day to get off of processed foods altogether.

    I don’t think I could ever intentionally be vegan or vegetarian. Elk roast and sweet potatoes are all you need.

  32. #1632
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    14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat!

    1. Spinach

    Spinach is a dull verdant green which is stacked with press, and only 3 measures of it contain 18 mg of spinach.

    2. Broccoli

    Broccoli is another astounding wellspring of iron and in addition other fundamental supplements, for example, vitamin K, magnesium, vitamin C and invigorates the assimilation of iron.

    3. Lentils

    Only some lentils contains more iron than a 8-ounce steak, alongside protein, potassium and dietary fiber.

    4. Kale

    Kale has a high substance of iron, with only 3 measures of it containing 3.6 mg of iron. It can productively treat iron deficiency and weakness.

    5. Bok Choy

    Bok Choy is a heavenly Chinese cabbage which is stacked with iron and vitamin A.
    6. Heated Potato

    Only 1 extensive potato contains 3 times more iron than 3-ounces of chicken, and additionally, it can be arranged scrumptiously.

    7. Sesame Seeds

    Trust it or not, a solitary tablespoon of sesame seeds contains 1.3 mg of iron which can without much of a stretch be added to your day by day abstain from food.

    8. Cashews

    Cashews are stacked with protein and have a high substance of iron, with 1 container containing 2 grams of iron.

    9. Soybeans

    Only a solitary measure of cooked soybeans contains 8-9 mg of iron, and over that, they are an extraordinary wellspring of protein also.

    10. Chickpeas

    1 single measure of chicken peas contains 4.7 mg of iron, which is the greater part of the every day prescribed dose for a grown-up male.

    More: :
    ◾dark Chocolate
    ◾Tofu
    ◾Swiss Chard
    ◾Kidney Beans

    sauce 14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat! – Mr Healthy Advisor
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  33. #1633
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    Wow 0 calories, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, 0 sugar, 0 sodium... wonder if these assorted cupcakes are vegan too?

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    https://draxe.com/elk-meat/

    I hate to troll, but some vegans continuously lump all meat into one category. All meat is not hot dog quality. I'm all for personal food choices without giving any grief about it, but I think we need to be honest about healthy meat options that do exist.
    Last edited by deerkiller; 08-12-2018 at 09:48 PM. Reason: spelling

  35. #1635
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    If you're vegan and like football, the Tennessee Titans are the team to root for this season.

    Vegan meals all the rage for Titans, with 15 players converted

    Something about the word "vegan" scares many athletes away. Doubts about protein, taste and fulfillment immediately arise. Some never can get past that point.

    Then there's the 15-and-growing number of Tennessee Titans players who set aside those doubts and jumped on a plant-based meal plan, which is a phrase that is a little easier to swallow. Still, it's a bit of a surprise to catch 250-pound NFL players scavenging through large black bags for extra vegan lunch meals after practice.

    Yes, beware of the meal thiefs.

    What started as a couple's personal undertaking has become a full-fledged Titans plant-based meal movement that is entering Year 2 of the program. It began when Titans linebacker Derrick Morgan decided to try a plant-based diet nearly a year-and-a-half ago, enlisting the help of his wife, Charity, to join him and re-educate herself to cook vegan. Morgan's teammates saw, smelled and tasted the food that his wife made during the 2017 season. One-by-one, players asked to join the vegan meal plan, and they were sold.

    "When they realized that their production didn't go down, their stats didn't go down, they didn't die on the field, they were like 'sign me up' because the food already looks and smells good," said Charity, who has been a Le Cordon Bleu-educated professional chef for 15 years. "Last year was a test run for a lot of the guys to realize you can be plant-based and successful."

    It all starts in the Morgan home, where Charity often begins at 6 or 7 a.m. making lunches from scratch for the guys. This year, it takes an average of four hours to make all the food she needs for those on the meal plan. It took much longer in 2017 before she added two assistants.

    During training camp, the players get two meals plus a snack every day. Some players request another meal so they can eat it for dinner when they get home.

    Converting skeptics

    On this particular morning, it's "chik'n taco" day. The order calls for 16 meals, three tacos per meal along with a container of rice, a container of beans and a side of guacamole.

    Primary ingredients consist of five pounds of soy curls (used as meat substitute), five pounds of uncooked sofrito rice, five pounds of Puerto Rican beans, 15 avocados to make homemade guacamole, and a variety of seasoning, spices and sauces. The soy curls, rice and beans make 10 pounds each when cooked and rehydrated

    Lunch is ready at 11:30 a.m., but the team's lunch time was moved back to 1 p.m. Charity and her assistant for the day, Jessica, must decide whether to prep the tacos ready-made with toppings and fillings inside and risk letting the tacos get soggy. They decide against it, leaving the tortillas wrapped in foil and allowing the players to prep the tacos themselves. Presentation is important, but quality and taste of the food is even more essential.

    The food is put into separate containers with the players' numbers written on top, placed in a black bag and delivered to the Titans facility. Right after practice ends, the Titans' vegan crew digs in.

    "In the beginning, I didn't number because I thought everybody knew who was on chef Charity Morgan's meal plan," Morgan said. "But no, we have to number. I'll call them toddlers. They don't grab just one bowl of rice, one bowl of beans and one set of tacos."

    Pro Bowl defensive tackle Jurrell Casey has a wide smile when you ask about his plant-based lifestyle. He was originally one of the biggest skeptics, questioning how it would affect his strength, then he saw how it changed him as a player.

    Casey and several other Titans raved about how it helps speed up recovery, decreases inflammation and increases their energy.

    The Titans' vegan group grew from one to 11 members, mostly starters, by the end of last season. They lost a handful of players to free agency and injuries. But the current crew of 15 represents a diverse mix from linemen to receivers to specialists.

    Some players from the original plant-based crew kept their eating pattern even while away from the team in the offseason.

    "I didn't really change much to it," said Casey, who admits he still eats fish from time to time. "It's been good. I still love it. I feel great. It helps me keep my weight down, too, because it can get too high in offseason as I eat a little bit more."

    Casey got down to his ideal weight of 285-290 pounds by the start of training camp. He's still a handful for nearly every guard or center that tries to block him, shown by his six sacks, prowess against the run and a third consecutive Pro Bowl in 2017.

    'It's my heart, soul and culture in the food'
    Sauces are Charity's specialties. Every day the guys get a different sauce, all homemade, including sour cream, pesto, chimichurri and chipotle sauces.

    "It's my heart, soul and culture in the food," Charity said. "I make sure it's layered with flavors."

    She regularly sprinkles hemp seeds on dishes. She uses pink Himalayan salt and maple syrup/brown sugar instead of refined salt and sugar. She also makes recovery smoothies with 20 grams of protein. She prefers a holistic cooking style, so there are very few processed items, like soy or corn, used.

    The first step was getting players to trust that going plant-based wouldn't hurt their football livelihood. Many players saw the evidence of that in Year 1.

    "Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part," said Derrick, whose diet is 100 percent plant-based and who led the Titans in sacks last season. "I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself."

    Charity added: "A lot of stereotypes are being debunked with the Titans."

    Linebacker Wesley Woodyard, the Titans' leading tackler in 2017, often talks about how he used to feel sluggish after heavy-meat meals, but he hasn't had that experience once since switching to a plant-based diet.

    The lifestyle change has helped many on the team grow closer, and they hold each other accountable.

    Last season, seitan burgers and jackfruit cheesesteaks were locker-room favorites. They were often the Friday "reward" meals.

    This year, Charity started a group text with the vegan crew, often asking if there are any preferences for meals. They rarely respond, trusting her to surprise them with a new cooked meal.

    Meals are often based on traditional meat dishes, with a meat or dairy substitute swapped in. Charity has a garden in her backyard where she grows many of the vegetables that go into her food, such as okra, curled kale, lilac bell peppers and collard greens.

    "There's no such thing as a go-to meal in my kitchen. Since April 9, we haven't repeated one meal," she said. "My favorite meal is the meal I haven't made. I don't want it to be boring. I want to create every day."

    Many elite athletes such as Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, tennis star Serena Williams and Germany's strongest man Patrik Baboumian have embraced a vegan lifestyle, but the Titans are at the forefront with their large plant-based movement. And it's flourishing heading into Year 2.
    Sauce NFL - Preseason Week 1 live - schedule, key players, fantasy impact, injuries and more
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  36. #1636
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    sorry, double post, i deleted it.

    see my link above.

  37. #1637
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    I buy blueberries year round but nothing beats the taste of fresh wild blueberries. We picked up 2 baskets of wild blueberries on our recent trip to Timmins, Ontario. Blueberries grow wild in northern Ontario, and we often stop along the way on the rides to pick and eat a handful.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38411777_1598954563566879_2216340662473719808_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38656440_2182066048704501_8785248762361544704_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38600747_2182075965370176_7604651665320312832_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38647458_2183145675263205_3852404300927991808_n.jpg

    And yes bears love blueberries too.... we saw alot of bear poop

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38448968_1603016543160681_6995167699751927808_n.jpg
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  38. #1638
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    Out of curiosity, how much did you pay for each basket?
    Around here (Portugal), and also in France going by my cousins word, we only found them in small packages, between 100g and 200g.

  39. #1639
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianR60077 View Post
    prostate cancer doesnt happen until much later in life like most anything else
    really an ignorant statement. just sayin. And if you have medical insurance and don't use it you are really foolish.

  40. #1640
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    Out of curiosity, how much did you pay for each basket?
    Around here (Portugal), and also in France going by my cousins word, we only found them in small packages, between 100g and 200g.
    We paid $30 cdn per basket. I'll try to find out how large the baskets are... I can only go by the pic. As soon as we got them home we freeze them.
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  41. #1641
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    https://draxe.com/elk-meat/

    I hate to troll, but some vegans continuously lump all meat into one category. Al meat is not hot dog quality. I all for personal food choices without giving any grief about it, but I think we need to be honest about healthy meat options that do exist.
    If you aren't going to post in the Single Speed forum with links and commentary about the virtues of gears, or in the Fat Bike forum about the benefits of skinny tires, then you don't need to do the same here.

    That said, please feel free to start your own thread about healthy meats, and hunting/farming practices. I am sure that there are many MTBR folks that are interested in exactly that. People that will find the knowledge beneficial to their lives that would not look within this (or any vegan/vegetarian) thread for information regarding the consumption of animals. I'm not saying that your input is wrong, but it would be better served in a location that warrants it.

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    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.

  44. #1644
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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    really an ignorant statement. just sayin. And if you have medical insurance and don't use it you are really foolish.
    That depends on the person. I believe the current "treatments" for prostate cancer are one or more of: surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. I reject all those as being too debilitating, so what is the point of having the test? That being said, I'm going for my first physical exam in 40 years. It won't make any difference to me, but my gf is making me go.

  45. #1645
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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.
    Probably not anymore than an alcoholic that is trying to quit craving a drink. I've been on a plant based diet now for 7 years after being a meat and potatoes kind of guy for 48 years. I am also a recovering alcoholic/pot head/addict with almost 25 years of sobriety.
    it will just take time and clean living to get over the cravings. I don't miss any of that stuff now and haven't for many years.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  46. #1646
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    Probably not anymore than an alcoholic that is trying to quit craving a drink. I've been on a plant based diet now for 7 years after being a meat and potatoes kind of guy for 48 years. I am also a recovering alcoholic/pot head with almost 25 years of sobriety.
    it will just take time and clean living to get over the cravings. I don't miss either now and haven't for many years.
    Thanks for your reply!

  47. #1647
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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.
    Read up on vegetarians and protein and iron sources and how much you need, Cyclelicious has posted some articles/links above.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

  48. #1648
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    If you aren't going to post in the Single Speed forum with links and commentary about the virtues of gears, or in the Fat Bike forum about the benefits of skinny tires, then you don't need to do the same here.

    That said, please feel free to start your own thread about healthy meats, and hunting/farming practices. I am sure that there are many MTBR folks that are interested in exactly that. People that will find the knowledge beneficial to their lives that would not look within this (or any vegan/vegetarian) thread for information regarding the consumption of animals. I'm not saying that your input is wrong, but it would be better served in a location that warrants it.
    Well, I understand your frustrations with my post, but misinformation is misinformation. For instance, in the above post about vegan foods that contain more iron than meat, the measurements and types of meats are ambiguous and misleading. The units or portions of vegan foods have been referred to as a "measure" or some other undefined or unpopular term, and there is no chart of comparison to popular meat choices of equal quantity.

    An 8 oz elk steak has approximately 7.467 miligrams of iron. Other meats probably have less. But lets be honest, instead of using arbitrary quantities.

    Veganism has probably done great things for a lot of people. I clicked on this thread to learn more about it.

    I'm certainly becoming more of an organic food type person, especially the older i get. If i can learn something here, i'm all ears. Currently, i strive to be gluten and dairy free whenever i can without offending the cook, and i'd like to move on to cutting out processed or "cured" meats as well.

    However, information must be factual, to the best of our abilities. If i find something here to be misleading, or intentionally unclear, i don't feel remorse in pointing that out.

    Meat may not be for you, and veganism may not be for you.

    But truth is for everyone.

  49. #1649
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    Well, I understand your frustrations with my post, but misinformation is misinformation. For instance, in the above post about vegan foods that contain more iron than meat, the measurements and types of meats are ambiguous and misleading. The units or portions of vegan foods have been referred to as a "measure" or some other undefined or unpopular term, and there is no chart of comparison to popular meat choices of equal quantity.

    An 8 oz elk steak has approximately 7.467 miligrams of iron. Other meats probably have less. But lets be honest, instead of using arbitrary quantities.

    Veganism has probably done great things for a lot of people. I clicked on this thread to learn more about it.

    I'm certainly becoming more of an organic food type person, especially the older i get. If i can learn something here, i'm all ears. Currently, i strive to be gluten and dairy free whenever i can without offending the cook, and i'd like to move on to cutting out processed or "cured" meats as well.

    However, information must be factual, to the best of our abilities. If i find something here to be misleading, or intentionally unclear, i don't feel remorse in pointing that out.

    Meat may not be for you, and veganism may not be for you.

    But truth is for everyone.
    Here is what you don't grasp. This is a vegan thread aimed at vegans. Vegans don't care about the comparison to meat because meat is not a food option for them. Remember, the thread is titled Vegetarian and Vegan Passion.

    It doesn't matter if the measurements are not 100% accurate because the science is still sound. Yes, spinach does have a lot of iron in it, and that is all that really matters. An adult male only needs 8 mg of iron a day. Cyclelicious brings a lot to this thread, but this is not the end all, be all for vegan and vegetarian info. This place should be a jumping off point to do your own research about what is right for you and your dietary choices.

    I commend you for wanting to eat better. You evidently have a love for elk, and that is your choice for your region. Here in Maine, it would be deer or moose if I was a meat eater, but I am not. Going organic is great, especially if you are supporting your local farmers, and being dairy free will provide you with more energy and less chemical dependencies (dairy creates similar euphoria to some drugs). I have yet to fully break free from the dairy grasp, but I try (I love pizza though).

    Best of luck in your own search for better health.

  50. #1650
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    Does anyone follow Pamela Popper ? She has some good video shorts and lectures on YouTube. It is scientific based, not just opinions.
    I have been 'low' grain, meat and dairy for a few years now. It has worked well for me.
    But, Doctor Popper has made a solid argument for a plant based lifestyle. I may be ready to cross over to the dark side.

  51. #1651
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhead View Post
    Does anyone follow Pamela Popper ? She has some good video shorts and lectures on YouTube. It is scientific based, not just opinions.
    I have been 'low' grain, meat and dairy for a few years now. It has worked well for me.
    But, Doctor Popper has made a solid argument for a plant based lifestyle. I may be ready to cross over to the dark side.
    I haven't heard about Doctor Popper. Please post up a video I'm curious to learn more
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  52. #1652
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat!


    sauce 14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat! – Mr Healthy Advisor
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Vegans don't care about the comparison to meat because meat is not a food option for them. .
    The vegan comparison to meat is my whole complaint with veganism. I have respect for veganism, until they start with their phony stats about meat.

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    that said, what are you guys using for non dairy creamer for your coffee?

    I'm looking for something good, right now i'm using almond mild and stevia, which is ok, but not great.

    Everything i've tried is kind of, well, blah.

  54. #1654
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I haven't heard about Doctor Popper. Please post up a video I'm curious to learn more
    https:youtu.be/QDZsg3hv77I
    This video is her commenting on several popular topics. I think she mentions her involvement with Forks Over Knives at the 3:00 mark.

  55. #1655
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    that said, what are you guys using for non dairy creamer for your coffee?

    I'm looking for something good, right now i'm using almond mild and stevia, which is ok, but not great.

    Everything i've tried is kind of, well, blah.
    I drink it black. If the coffee is good it doesn't need anything in it..
    Change begins by doing something different.

  56. #1656
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38403405_2068504076557006_3088711707850178560_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #1657
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-39208391_2126916170889940_2420954223010119680_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  58. #1658
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    Report Finds Traces of a Controversial Herbicide in Cheerios and Quaker Oats

    An environmental research and advocacy group has found traces of a controversial herbicide in Cheerios, Quaker Oats and other breakfast foods that it says could increase cancer risk for children.

    The report comes amid longstanding debate about the safety of the chemical glyphosate, which federal regulators maintain is not likely to cause cancer.

    In its report, released Wednesday, the Environmental Working Group said that it tested 45 samples of breakfast foods made from oats grown in fields sprayed with herbicides. Then, using a strict standard the group developed, it found elevated levels of glyphosate in 31 of them.

    “There are levels above what we could consider safe in very popular breakfast foods,” said Alexis Temkin, the group’s toxicologist who helped with the analysis in the report.
    The findings by the group, which has opposed the use of pesticides that may end up in food, were reported widely. But the question of whether glyphosate is safe is not so simple.

    In fact, it is central to a raging international debate about the chemical that has spawned thousands of lawsuits, allegations of faulty research supporting and opposing the chemical and a vigorous defense of the herbicide from Monsanto, the company that helped develop it 40 years ago and helped turn it into the most popular weedkiller in the world.

    Scott Partridge, a vice president at Monsanto, said in an interview on Wednesday that hundreds of studies had validated the safety of glyphosate and that it doesn’t cause cancer. He called the Environmental Working Group an activist group.

    “They have an agenda,” he said. “They are fear mongering. They distort science.”

    Central to critiques of the glyphosate, which prevents plants from photosynthesizing, is a 2015 decision by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer to declare glyphosate a probable carcinogen.

    That spurred a federal case in the United States over such claims and prompted California to declare it a chemical that is known to cause cancer.

    Last week, a California jury found that Monsanto had failed to warn a school groundskeeper of the cancer risks posed by its weedkiller, Roundup, of which glyphosate is an active ingredient. The man’s lawyers said he developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after using the weedkiller as part of his job as a pest control manager for a California county school system.

    Monsanto was ordered to pay $289 million in damages. The company says it is facing more than 5,200 similar lawsuits.

    Some research points to other potential health effects of glyphosate. In a study published last year in Scientific Reports, a journal from the publishers of Nature, rats that consumed very low doses of glyphosate each day showed early signs of fatty liver disease within three months, which worsened over time.

    But many regulators and researchers say glyphosate is safe.

    The classification by the International Agency for Research on Cancer has been disputed by United States and European regulators. And a recent major study, published by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, “observed no associations between glyphosate use and overall cancer risk.”

    In December 2017, the federal Environmental Protection Agency issued a draft human health risk assessment that said glyphosate was most likely not carcinogenic to humans.

    The E.P.A. is currently reviewing public comments on that assessment as part of a standard review, and will decide on whether or not the agency needs any “mitigation measures” by 2019, a spokesman said Wednesday.

    The United States Food and Drug Administration, which regulates domestic and imported food to make sure it does not exceed levels set by the E.P.A., said that based on 2016 samples, it had not found any violations of E.P.A. standards with glyphosate. More recent samples are still under review, an agency spokeswoman said.

    The F.D.A. said Wednesday that it would consider the Environmental Working Group’s findings.

    Both Quaker Oats and General Mills, which makes Cheerios, said that their products were safe and met federal standards.

    “While our products comply with all safety and regulatory requirements, we are happy to be part of the discussion and are interested in collaborating with industry peers, regulators and other interested parties on glyphosate,” a Quaker spokesman said Wednesday.

    A General Mills spokeswoman said, “Our products are safe and without question they meet regulatory safety levels.”

    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/h...imes&smtyp=cur
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  59. #1659
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    Apparently only the squirrels understand

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-39403736_2395206880497409_574223370694950912_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  60. #1660
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    Good vid explaining the role of fat


    F*ck Cancer

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    Eating pasta could save your life

    Eating pasta could help you live longer, a new study suggests.

    Following low-carb diets, such as Atkins, increases the risk of dying young, experts found.

    Scientists say people who eat a “moderate” amount of carbs can expect to live four years longer. They suggest an optimum level of 50 to 55 percent of calories from carbohydrates, which are typically found in potatoes, pasta and bread.

    Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data on 432,179 people. They found people who ate fewer carbs had a 20 percent higher risk of premature death.

    And those who ate more than the recommended amount had a 23 percent higher risk. The findings are published in The Lancet Public Health journal.

    Low-carb diets tend to result in a lower intake of healthy fruit, vegetables and grains — and more meat. This can lead to a loss of nutrients, harmful inflammation and biological aging.
    The Atkins diet has proved popular with fad dieters because it can lead to rapid weight loss. It says meals should include full-fat dairy, eggs and meat, such as chicken, beef and bacon.

    But those who replaced carbs with protein and fat from animal sources fared worst in the study.

    While low-carb diets have long been touted as being great for weight loss, Harley Street nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert told The Sun that plans like Atkins have helped “fuel the myth” that carbs make you fat.

    “The view that all carbohydrates should be cut from someone’s diet is quite simply wrong,” she said.

    But the truth is that not all carbs are created equal.

    Refined foods like white pasta, bread and pastries lack much of the fiber and other nutrients common to wholesome carbohydrates and provide quick-release energy that can leave us feeling deflated quickly.

    Cutting all carbs out can leave you feeling tired and moody.

    And that’s because our brains rely on the glucose found in carbohydrates as fuel.

    Carbs also affect how much serotonin — the happy hormone — we produce.

    So cut out all carbs and you could find yourself circling the drain.

    “Just because carbs are not essential for survival, that doesn’t mean they aren’t beneficial,” said Rhiannon. “Many carb-containing foods are healthy and nutritious, such as fruit and vegetables.”

    “These foods have all sorts of beneficial compounds and provide a variety of health benefits. Although it is possible to survive on a zero-carb diet, it is definitely a bad idea and not an optimal choice because you’re missing out on foods that science has shown to be beneficial.”

    The scientists who have just published this latest study say people who insist on a low-carb diet should opt for veggies and nuts instead.

    Study leader Dr. Sara Seidelmann said: “Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight loss strategy.”

    “However, our data suggests that animal-based low-carb diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall lifespan and should be discouraged.”

    “Instead, if one chooses to follow a low-carb diet, then exchanging carbs for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy aging in the long term.”


    sauce https://nypost.com/2018/08/17/cuttin...o-dying-young/
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  62. #1662
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    WOODY HARRELSON IS PRODUCING VEGAN DOCU-SERIES WICKED HEALTHY WORLD

    The new series will feature chef brothers Chad and Derek Sarno along with other innovators working to make a sustainable food system worldwide.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegnewswoodyharrelsonsarno.jpg

    New vegan docu-series Wicked Healthy World is currently being executively produced by vegan actor Woody Harrelson. The series will feature vegan chefs (and brothers) Chad and Derek Sarno, who will highlight individuals around the world—such as indoor mushroom farmers in South Korea and rooftop farmers in Tel Aviv—that are working to build a sustainable food system.

    “My brother and I are excited to meet other innovators who share our passion and who have developed solutions to bring about change,” Chad said about the new project. Harrelson penned the forward for the brothers’ first plant-based book The Wicked Healthy Cookbook, published in May. “Chad and Derek are doing some incredible work,” Harrelson wrote. “They are at the forefront of a plant-based movement that’s been building for decades and is now becoming a tsunami.”

    Derek currently works as the Executive Chef and Director of Plant Based Innovation at United Kingdom-based supermarket chain Tesco, and launched the Wicked Healthy line of plant-based grab-and-go meals—of which, the chain sold 2.5 million units within 20 weeks. The brothers are also part of the team behind Good Catch Foods, an upcoming vegan seafood brand that secured $8.7 million in investment capital last month.

    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/8/woody-har...-healthy-world
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  63. #1663
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    Does just reducing one’s intake of meat, dairy, and eggs significantly reduce mortality?



    Some people are semi-vegetarian or vegan a.k.a. flexitarian and you find this video helpful
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  64. #1664
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    How Do Commercials Make Food Look Amazing?

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  65. #1665
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-40158316_10214948371615669_64238962557845504_n.jpg
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  66. #1666
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    Happy Hump Day!

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  67. #1667
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    Melon murderer at large!

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  68. #1668
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    "Smelly tofu"... I didn't try it : (I played it safe and had a tomato and avocado salad instead)

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  69. #1669
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-40402754_1023657744472498_4458497149298016256_n.jpg

    Mmmm? Cherries, pistachios, walnuts, almonds, sunflower seeds
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  70. #1670
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    Cherries, sunflower seeds, peanuts, almonds, pretzels, walnuts

  71. #1671
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Bone View Post
    Cherries, sunflower seeds, peanuts, almonds, pretzels, walnuts
    Nice combo!
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  72. #1672
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    5 Vegan Foods Your Brain Will Thank You For

    Are you in need of a boost? Most of the time, when we try to eat better or more healthily, we do so for the sake of our physique—but what about our brain? This vital organ needs consideration and attention as well. So I whipped up this here feature on how to be kind to this essential part of our bodies. Read on to nourish your mind, and then eat with a purpose thanks to these healthy brainpower-boosting foods.

    1. Chia Seeds:
    These little buddies are versatile, nutrient-rich, and packed full of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to improved concentration and memory function. Sprinkle these tiny delights on just about anything, or try out this simple three-ingredient peanut butter and chocolate chia seed pudding

    2. Blueberries
    Ahhh, yes, we can’t forget about blueberries. They’re full of special antioxidants, which help slow down memory loss while improving learning and general cognitive function. Mix them into your oatmeal, blend them into a smoothie, or pop these bad boys right into your mouth for a quick and healthy snack.

    3. Avocados
    What can I say about my favorite fruit and superfood other than “thank you for your deliciousness”? Eating avocados improves blood supply to the brain, and their healthy fat helps lower your risk of heart problems, which are also linked to cognitive function, aka “your brain.” One of my favorite snacks of all time is avocado toast—check out this quick and simple recipe for making the perfect slice (or three).

    4. Sunflower Seeds
    Need another reason to eat this yummy snack? I got you. These seeds contain an excellent source of vitamin E, and they’re said to help prevent brain function decline, making them your memories’ best friend.

    5. Celery
    This light but nutrient-dense veggie is packed full of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Celery is also reportedly rich in a certain plant compound that may reduce inflammation in the brain, which can be a primary cause of brain degeneration over time. So tear off a stalk and munch away.

    So what have we learned here, folks? Giving your brain a boost with vegan foods is pretty easy. Food is meant to provide us with energy and nutrients, so opt out of eating stuff that’s unhealthy and unnecessary, such as meat and dairy foods. Not only are animal-derived foods bad news for animals and the environment, they can also contribute to preventable illnesses in humans!

    With school, work, and everything else going on in your life, it’s important to nourish your mind. Help your brain out by eating vegan foods and you’ll boost your learning ability, protect your memories, and improve your overall brain function.


    Sauce https://www.peta2.com/vegan-life/veg...20food::::link
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  73. #1673
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    Animal activist schools tucker carlson about veganism on fox news

    Animal activist Gene Baur—author and founder of farmed animal rescue organization Farm Sanctuary—appeared on a recent episode of Fox News’ “Tucker Takes On …” entitled “Tucker vs. Veganism.”

    During the episode, host Tucker Carlson debated the merits of veganism with Baur in his usual, critical tone. Carlson revealed that he enjoys burrata, but does not urge others to eat the cheese variety, and asked Baur why he advocates veganism to others. “Well, I’m actually not telling other people what they must and must not eat,” Baur responded. “I just want people to think more about their food choices and recognize the consequences of those, and also to recognize that not eating animals is actually an option we have.”

    Baur explained that while humans have been socialized to think eating meat is crucial for protein intake, many individuals thrive on a plant-based diet. “I don’t think it’s a crazy idea,” Carlson said. “I love animals and I don’t like the way factory farms treat animals, so I’m kind of sympathetic to what you’re saying.” Baur further explained the cruelty inherent in the dairy and veal industries, responded poignantly to Carlson’s questions about the dog-meat trade in China, and prompted a discussion about meat company Tyson. “I hope other conservatives would pause and think about it,” Carlson said. “I think a lot of them would agree. They have been trained in some ways to defend Tyson; we shouldn’t defend Tyson.”

    Carlson admitted that while he was skeptical of Baur prior to speaking with him about veganism, the activist had helped him understand the moral reasoning behind abstaining from animal products. “I have to say, I started this segment thinking ‘this guy is probably crazy,’” Carlson concluded. “But I think you’re actually reasonable and thoughtful, and I don’t agree with everything you’ve said, but I appreciate you coming on tonight.”
    sauce https://vegnews.com/2018/9/animal-ac...sm-on-fox-news

    Full interview: Tucker Carlson | Fox News
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  74. #1674
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    Chaos breaks out over cheap corn at No Frills Grocery Store in Toronto





    Sauce: https://www.blogto.com/eat_drink/201...rills-toronto/
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  75. #1675
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    Somehow it is comforting to know people are just as crazy on your side of the border as down here.

    "We're not alone" lol

  76. #1676
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    You shouldn't feel alone, on this side of the pond, couple weeks back a chain of supermarket made a 50% discount on the milk's price, people were stealing 6-packs of 1L pack from each other's hands, even in the presence of the police .

  77. #1677
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41155369_1910931142333872_756665798948290560_n.jpg


    “The purpose of cow’s milk is to turn a 65-pound calf into a 700-pound cow as rapidly as possible. Cow’s milk IS baby calf growth fluid. No matter what you do to it, that is what the stuff is.
    Everything in that white liquid – the hormones, the lipids, the proteins, the sodium, the growth factors like IGF-I – are all there to start that calf growing into a great big cow, or else they would not be there.
    Whether you pour it on your cereal as a liquid, churn it into butter, curdle it into yogurt, ferment it into cheese, or add sugar and freeze it to make ice cream… It’s baby calf growth fluid!
    Its purpose is to increase weight and promote growth in tissues throughout the mammalian body. It’s great stuff if you are a baby calf, but if you are a human trying to create a lean, healthy body, it will NOT “do a body good.” -Dr. Michael Klaper
    sauce https://www.facebook.com/wthfilm/pho...000539/?type=3
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  78. #1678
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41345321_2458700230835080_9073010810984333312_n.jpg
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  79. #1679
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    On my way back from my Sunday morning run, I smelled something cooking! The neighbours were making tomato sauce in the garage the old fashion way! Very cool that 3 generations were involved in the production. Next time I run, I'll carry a bowl of pasta with me



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41348484_2212701148974324_4122371148992217088_n.jpg

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  80. #1680
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    ^We used to do that, two grand parent, ten uncles/unties/parents, and at the time, four children, myself included, it was fun .

  81. #1681
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    A longish read but good review of metabolism and weight control. Bottom line - it's all about calories in vs calories out, and calories out is dominated by your basal metabolic rate.

    What I learned about weight loss from spending a day inside a metabolic chamber
    One of science’s best tools for understanding obesity is debunking myths about metabolism.


    When scientists offer mice or rats a spread of junk food, they consistently find that only some overeat and puff out into little rodent blimps, while others maintain a normal body size.

    A similar thing happens in people. In the US, and around the world, we are now overwhelmed with highly palatable, cheap calories. This has helped obesity rates soar on average. But not everyone overeats and becomes overweight, and not everyone who becomes overweight or obese develops illnesses like diabetes or heart disease. This individual variation — why we have different responses to extra calories and weight — is one of the greatest mysteries of modern medicine.

    The best place to find answers is an 11-by-11.5-foot room in suburban Washington, DC. This summer, I spent a day there, one of fewer than 100 patients who will do so this year.

    The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center’s airtight “metabolic chamber” is furnished only with an exercise bike, a toilet, and a bed. For 23 hours in June, I was sealed in the chamber, while nurses monitored me constantly through a plexiglass window and video camera in the ceiling.

    Like a prisoner in solitary confinement, I ate meals delivered through a small, air-locked opening in the wall. Since researchers were measuring every calorie I used, any leftover scrap had to be sent back through the wall and recorded. A heart monitor and three accelerometers on my wrist, waist, and ankle tracked my every heartbeat and movement.

    There are only about 30 metabolic chambers in the world, and the NIH is home to three. These highly sensitive, multimillion-dollar scientific instruments are considered the gold standard for measuring metabolism. They’ve furthered our understanding of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes — diseases that are now among the greatest threats to health worldwide — by letting researchers carefully track how individual bodies respond to the calories they’re offered.

    My participation, as a normal weight “control” subject in an obesity phenotyping study, would be used toward this lofty goal.

    But I wasn’t interested in joining the study just for the sake of science; I had selfish motivations too. As kids, my two brothers and many of my friends seemed to be able to binge on junk food without gaining weight. Today, my husband can gulp down mountains of pasta and remain skinny. I, on the other hand, have always noticed the scale creeps up quickly when I’m not careful about my diet. And I’ve harbored a suspicion that a “slow metabolism” might help explain my lifelong struggle to control my weight.

    Being a self-imposed NIH prisoner was an exciting and rare opportunity — to see one of the most important scientific tools in obesity research up close and to finally get some answers on this long-simmering question about my body.

    But my day in the chamber revealed the depths of my misunderstanding about my metabolism. And that the obsession with metabolism speed is distracting, destructive, and based on a myth about obesity and weight management.

    Metabolism, explained
    If you’ve surveyed the covers of women’s magazines, watched Dr. Oz’s TV show, or strolled down the supplement aisle at the grocery store, you might think your metabolism is a single thing that can be calibrated with “metabolism boosters” like chili peppers or coffee, or by following special diets.

    In reality, metabolism is the thousands of chemical reactions that turn the energy we eat and drink into fuel in every cell of the body. These reactions change in response to our environments and behaviors, and in ways we have little control over. (Eating certain foods and exercising a little more generally shifts our metabolic rate only marginally.)

    There are three main ways the body uses calories. There’s the energy needed to keep our hearts, brains, and every cell of our body working, known as the basal metabolism. There’s the energy used to break down food, known as the thermic effect of food. And there’s the energy burned off during physical activity — like walking around, fidgeting, or exercising.

    The basal metabolic rate accounts for the largest amount of the total calories a person burns each day (65 to 80 percent for most adults). Physical activity, on the other hand, accounts for a much smaller portion — 10 to 30 percent for most people — despite what many people believe. And digesting food accounts for about 10 percent.

    There are several predictors of how fast or slow a person’s metabolic rate will be. These include the amount of lean muscle and fat tissue in the body, age, and genetics. Women tend to burn fewer calories than men. Having a higher metabolic rate means your body uses food for fuel (instead of storing it as fat) more quickly. But you can still gain weight if you consume more calories than your body needs. Counterintuitively, heavier people generally have higher metabolic rates than skinny folks to meet the fuel demands of their larger bodies.

    These processes, essential to any living organism, are complex, and scientists had been working to unravel them for centuries before the obesity crisis hit.

    In the early 1600s, Santorio Sanctorius, an Italian doctor and “founding father of metabolic balance studies,” ran one of the first controlled experiments of human metabolism. He invented the “static weighing chair,” a device that allowed him to weigh himself before and after meals, sleep, toilet breaks, even sex. He noticed fluctuations in his bodyweight, and concluded these could be explained by “insensible perspiration.”

    One hundred years after that, French chemist Antoine Lavoisier used a device called an “ice calorimeter” to gauge the energy burn from animals —like guinea pigs — in cages by watching how quickly ice or snow around the cages melted. This research suggested that the heat and gases respired by animals, including humans, related to the energy they burn.

    The “metabolic chamber” I entered evolved from Sanctorius and Lavoisier’s work. Over the years, researchers probing the mysteries of the metabolism figured out that the amount of oxygen we take in, and carbon dioxide we let off, changes depending on how quickly we’re using calories and the type of calories we’re using. Measuring these gases in airtight environments can determine a person’s metabolic rate.

    The debunking machine
    The metabolic chamber — also known as a whole-room calorimeter — is the most precise tool available to track this gas exchange minute by minute.

    NIH’s three chambers opened in 2007 to focus on the growing obesity epidemic. Eighteen researchers now use the rooms to run about 400 studies every year. And they are part of a broader “metabolic unit” dedicated to understanding the weight problems, obesity, and diabetes that currently affect up to a third of the people on earth.

    Studying thousands of subjects in the metabolic unit — the chambers plus NIH hospital wings for patients with diabetes and obesity — has helped researchers show how adaptable the metabolism is, and how it works with our appetite, body composition, and physical activity levels to adjust the calories we’re burning at any moment.

    For example, by giving people a medication that causes them to lose (through their urine) an extra 360 calories per day, they’ve shown that we unknowingly compensate for those calories lost by eating more.

    They’ve found that exposing people to cold temperatures while they sleep causes them to accumulate more brown fat — fat tissue whose main function is heat production — and burn more calories. (These results reversed completely when the study participants slept in warmer temperatures again, revealing how dynamic metabolism is.)

    In a remarkable study of Biggest Loser reality TV show participants with obesity, researchers showed that crash dieting can permanently slow a person’s metabolic rate, leading them to hang on to the calories they were eating for longer, though this isn’t true for everybody who loses weight.

    The big theme in many of these studies: Our metabolism silently shifts under new conditions and environments in ways we’re not usually aware of.

    When it comes to diets, the researchers have also debunked the notion that bodies burn more body fat while on a high-fat and low-carb ketogenic diet, compared to a higher-carb diet, despite all the hype.

    “We could have found out that if we cut carbs, we’d lose way more fat because energy expenditure would go up and fat oxidation would go up,” said Kevin Hall, an obesity researcher at NIH and an author on many of these studies. “But the body is really good at adapting to the fuels coming in.” Another related takeaway: There appears to be no silver bullet diet for fat loss, at least not yet.

    Many basic metabolism mysteries remain. It’s not fully known why two people with the same size and body composition have different metabolic rates. They also don’t know why people can have different metabolic responses to weight gain (where some people with obesity develop insulin resistance and diabetes, for example, and others don’t). They don’t know why certain ethnic groups — African Americans, South Asians — have a higher risk of developing metabolic disorders like diabetes, and why people with diabetes have a higher cardiovascular disease risk.

    RELATED

    Most of us misunderstand metabolism. Here are 9 facts to clear that up.
    They haven’t even figured out how the brain knows what the body weighs and, therefore, the mechanism that controls our metabolic rate.

    “If I knew how the brain is aware of how much the body weighs, and how to regulate how many calories it burned off, I could change that setting and help an overweight person burn more calories through an increase in metabolic rate,” NIH metabolism and brown fat researcher Aaron Cypess told me over the phone before my stay.

    Cypess is using the chambers to work toward that, and figure out whether there might be a drug that can do what very cold temperatures do: help people burn more calories. These and other studies in the chamber are a gold mine for data on the metabolism’s mysteries — data that could eventually help uncover cures for obesity and diabetes.

    The meaning of metabolism
    For my part in the research, I’d undergo a battery of physical tests — from blood draws to an EKG — and spend a day and night in the chamber. In addition to watching how much I moved and what I ate, the scientists would get a reading on precisely how many calories I burned and what type (carbohydrates, fat, or protein), every minute of the 23 hours I called the chamber home. I’d also have my metabolic rate checked using two other methods (the “metabolic cart” and “doubly labeled water”; more on these later).

    In return, I’d get more granular data about how my body works than I ever could’ve hoped for. And that made me anxious.

    At age 34 and 5-foot-9, my weight hovers in the 150s, and my BMI is normal. But even as a child, I was chubby and seemed to enjoy sugary and fatty foods more than other members of my family. During my late teens and 20s, I struggled to manage my weight and was at times overweight — a situation that worsened at the end of high school. I moved to Italy and indulged in all the pizza, ice cream, carpaccio, and mozzarella my little town in Abruzzo had to offer. Like a research mouse, I puffed out and returned to Canada the following year depressed about my body. It took several years to really start the process of slimming down.

    I’d long believed these fat years somehow wreaked havoc on my body. Specifically, I thought they slowed down my metabolic rate, and that that made me prone to weight gain. But I was about to learn this idea I’d held on to for so long was wrong.

    How the metabolic chamber actually measures metabolism
    Halfway through my morning in the metabolic chamber, I had eaten and rested at prescribed intervals, and hit the exercise bike for 30 minutes. I also meticulously recorded all my activities in a log — when I was standing and reading, lying down, on the bike — so that the researchers could compare how they tracked against my calorie burn.

    Just before lunch arrived, Kong Chen, a metabolism investigator at NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, turned up on the other side of my plexiglass window to say hello.

    “How are you doing in there?” he asked.

    I was surprisingly comfortable in the little room, I told him, and asked if he could walk me through precisely how the chamber does the work of measuring the metabolism.

    Chen, who has a PhD in biomedical engineering, explained that the room I was standing in was almost airtight, with a fixed volume of oxygen and CO2. Through an array of metal pipes spread across the ceiling, researchers captured and measured the oxygen I consumed and the CO2 I produced at every minute.

    The reason these gasses matter for metabolism is simple, Chen said. We get fuel in the form of calories — from carbohydrates, fat, and protein. But to unlock those calories, the body needs oxygen. When we breathe in, oxygen interacts with the food we’ve consumed, breaking down (or oxidizing) chemical bonds where the calories are stored and releasing them for use by our cells. The product of the process is CO2.

    When air is sucked out of the chamber through the pipes, two things happen: First, gas analyzers measure everything the person inside respired, Chen said. Then the gas analyzers send the values for oxygen consumption and CO2 production to a computer, where researchers like Chen plug them into equations to calculate calories burned and what type of fuel was oxidized.

    The amount of CO2 we’re releasing, and the proportions of CO2 to O2, changes depending on how many calories we’re using and whether those calories came from carbs, fat, or protein.

    The reason these minute-to-minute measurements are so important is that they allow the chamber to detect subtle shifts of energy expenditure — as little as a 1.5 to 2 percent change over 24 hours — in a way no other tool can. “If you have an intervention — a drug or diet — that changes a person’s physiology by a small percentage, we can measure that,” Chen said proudly.

    The next best metabolism measuring method, called doubly labeled water, involves drinking a sample of water that contains (or is “labeled with”) forms of the elements deuterium and oxygen-18. Since they’re not normally found in the body, researchers can determine a person’s metabolic rate by tracking how quickly they’re expelled through urine sampling. But doubly labeled water can only detect a 5 percent change in metabolic rate over seven to 10 days, which is less than half as precise as the metabolic chamber.

    These tiny changes in calorie burn might sound insignificant, but over time, they add up. “Ultimately,” Chen said, “it only takes maybe a 100 calorie-per-day difference between food intake and energy expenditure over a few years to gain 10 pounds.” So an extra cookie a day can mean the difference between fitting in your jeans or not.

    I asked Chen whether he’d ever used the chamber himself. He told me he was his own first subject, part of an early validation study. What did he learn, and did it change his behavior?

    “I found myself to be fairly normal in terms of metabolic rate, which is good and bad I suppose,” he said. “Good because I’m metabolically normal. But it also means that I’m probably just as at risk to anyone else to gaining weight if I’m not watching it. So I’m not one of those people that can eat all they want and not gain weight.”

    After Chen’s visit, the rest of my day in isolation whirred by with several more rest periods, exercise bursts, and meals. I went to bed that night thinking about Chen’s results and wondering what the chamber would reveal about me.

    “You’re perfectly normal”
    The next morning, I woke up groggy from six hours of light sleep. I was eager to open the heavy steel door and get into fresh air.

    But the experiment wasn’t over. A “metabolic cart” — which looked like a computer on rollers connected to a tube and a plastic hood — arrived to measure my resting energy expenditure, or metabolic rate when I’m awake but not physically active, and before eating anything. So I lay in a hospital bed as a technician fitted the clear domed hood over my head while the machine captured the CO2 I respired.

    On my way out of the hospital, I said goodbye to Chen and thanked the nurses who had cared for me. They reminded me to collect urine samples every day for a week so they’d get a final measure of my metabolism, using the doubly labeled water method. I’d also continue wearing the three accelerometers. Together, this data would give the researchers a sense of my average daily calorie burn as a “free-living subject,” outside the hospital.

    A few weeks later, I called Kevin Hall to go over my results. What most surprised me: There was a pretty wide gap between how healthy I was and how unhealthy I expected I’d be.

    “[The results] suggest you’re perfectly normal,” Hall said.

    My metabolic rate was what he’d have predicted for someone my age, height, sex, and weight. In other words, I didn’t have a “slow metabolism.” I had burned the equivalent of 2,330 calories per day in the chamber, including during sleep, and most of those calories (more than 1,400) were from my resting energy expenditure. My biomarkers — my heart rate, cholesterol levels, blood pressure — were all excellent, suggesting no heightened disease risk leftover from my overweight years.

    There were other revealing takeaways. Staying awake cost my body only a few more calories than sleeping, which didn’t surprise Hall. “We know the sleeping metabolic rate is about 5 percent less than resting metabolic rate when you’re awake,” he explained.

    What’s more, the 405 calories I burned during 90 minutes on the exercise bike was both less than is advertised in spinning classes and just 17 percent of the total calories I had used, validating once again that workouts typically account for a relatively minor part of total energy expenditure.

    Even during sleep, my body was busy. “This goes into the question of, ‘Does your brain’s energy expenditure go up when you’re doing a hard math problem compared to when you’re zoning out watching TV?’ And everyone who has measured that has said ‘no’ — it’s a fixed amount, and your brain is not inactive at any point in time,” Hall said.

    As for the “calories in” part: I consumed about 1,850 calories (including 18 percent protein, 36 percent fat, and 46 percent carbs) of the 2,250 calories provided to me. That means I was in an energy deficit, and if I continued eating that much, I’d lose weight.

    I also found out that I’m bad at estimating my calorie consumption. During my chamber stay, I told a nutritionist what I’d eaten the day before and filled in a survey of my food consumption over the past year. Based on that, she’d calculated I was eating only 1,500 to 2,000 calories per day. I thought I was being incredibly thorough and generous in my accounting, but if this was really all I ate, I’d be thinner than I am.

    The results of these food surveys made me wonder how many of us blame some aspect of our biology for weight gain when we’re really just underestimating our calorie intake, forgetting all the little extras we eat and drink that can add up to pounds over the years. It seems I had too.

    I asked Hall if there were any other potential explanations for why I felt I gained weight so easily. He told me NIH does other studies that could answer that. If he had tracked my metabolism before I had lost weight earlier in life, he’d be able to detect any slowdown in response to slimming. Or if I participated in an “overfeeding study” — where I was deliberately fed more calories than my body required — he might detect no change in my metabolic rate. There are some people whose metabolic rate speeds up when they overeat, using the extra calories as fuel instead of storing them as fat, and it’s possible I’m not one of them.

    But we didn’t have that data, and according to what he could see, I was in perfect health.

    The metabolism myth
    I hung up the phone and reflected on the chamber experience — and my quest to better understand my body.

    Spending time at NIH reminded me that our epidemic of weight problems, in addition to damaging our physical health, has left in its wake an epidemic of psychological scars — even in those who, like me, manage to lose weight.

    I was genuinely surprised, and somewhat relieved, when nurses and doctors kept referring to my biomarkers as “excellent” and to me as “very fit.” Even though I know my bodyweight is in a healthy range, I still feel like a chubby kid.

    And you don’t need a history of weight problems to experience these feelings of inadequacy. Celebrities and big businesses — like Goop and Dr. Oz and many of the supplement, wellness, and exercise companies out there — have minted billions off stoking our anxieties about our physical shortcomings. If we only tried a new exercise, bought a new gizmo, or ate a certain way, they suggest, we’d be slimmer, glowier, healthier.

    Yet the truth of the metabolic chamber is that there’s a lot of variation in how people respond to diets and exercises, and so far, no single approach has worked to help everybody. That’s why so much of the one-size-fits-all weight loss advice we’re steeped in is so frustrating and futile for so many.

    The chamber has also shown that while some people have a “slow metabolism” relative to others their size and age, this isn’t a major cause of obesity. And despite the focus on “metabolism boosting” for weight loss, there’s nothing money can buy that will speed your metabolism up in way that will lead to substantial slimming.

    When I look back at what helped me lose weight, there was never a magic bullet — a special diet, exercise regimen, or supplement — that worked. Through plodding trial and error, I discovered habits and routines I could stick with to help me eat less and move more.

    I don’t keep junk food in the house, I avoid eating out a lot, I prioritize sleep, and I try to fill my plates with fruits and vegetables. As for exercise, I build it into my daily life — walking or biking to work, or during lunch breaks. And I’ve found mornings and weekends best for dedicated workouts (yoga, running, swimming, spinning, Pilates, etc.).


    These routines are a work in progress, and I know that my ability to maintain them is strongly tied to my socioeconomic status and where I live. If I had more personal or financial stress, or lived in a different neighborhood with a long commute to work, I’d probably sleep less and eat more. I certainly wouldn’t be doing Pilates.

    Research from the chamber won’t alleviate these socioeconomic drivers of obesity. But a better understanding of human physiology and metabolism — with the help of the chamber — might level the playing field through the discovery of effective treatments. As Lex Kravitz, an NIH neuroscientist and obesity researcher, told me, “Even if a slow metabolism isn’t the reason people become obese, it may still be a place to intervene for weight loss.” The same goes for the other common illnesses — diabetes, cardiovascular disease — linked to extra weight.

    More immediately, science from the chamber should debunk our metabolism myths. It certainly debunked mine.
    sauce https://www.vox.com/2018/9/4/1748611...st-weight-loss
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  82. #1682
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    Eat your veggies

  83. #1683
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    Sleeping with ginger on my palms will remove all the toxins?!

    BRB. Going to stock up on ginger!
    The cake is a lie.

  84. #1684
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    Visualizing garlic on my third eye will help me find love...

  85. #1685
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    ^ good ones

    Sprinkling turmeric around your neck fixes back pain ... I wish
    F*ck Cancer

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  86. #1686
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-40393559_473458559836390_7255515328606633984_n.jpg
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  87. #1687
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41543087_1813135245449756_2184318202358530048_n.jpg
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    Eat your veggies

  88. #1688
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41991188_10104147440288791_3806057167102935040_n.jpg
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  89. #1689
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    Both are terrific!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-42058358_316849505564084_2411168728436703232_n.jpg
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    Eat your veggies

  90. #1690
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    What monsters would do this?

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-42123578_1477141935763824_3776140847280553984_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  91. #1691
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    Why It’s So Hard to Give Up Cheese

    Which foods do you find most addictive? That’s the question University of Michigan researchers asked. The idea was, which foods lead you to lose control over how much you eat? Which ones are hard to limit? Which ones do you eat despite negative consequences? The researchers surveyed 384 people and here is what they found:

    Problem food #5 is ice cream.
    Problem food #4 is cookies.

    Chips and chocolate were tied for #3 and #2.

    But the most problematic food of all was—drum roll, please—pizza. Yes, gooey cheese melting over a hot crust and dribbling down your fingers—it beat everything else.

    And here is what matters: The question was not, which foods do you especially like, or which foods leave you feeling good and satisfied. Rather, the question was, which foods do you have a problem with? Which ones lead you into overeating, gaining weight, and feeling lousy? Which foods seduce you, then leave you with regrets?

    So, why did pizza top the list? Why are we so often tempted to dig in and overdo it?
    Three reasons: salt, grease, and opiates.

    As you have no doubt experienced, salty foods can be habit-forming. French fries, salted peanuts, pretzels, and other salty foods are hard to resist, and food manufacturers know that adding salt to a recipe adds cash to the register. A Lay’s potato chips commercial in the 1960s said, “Bet you can’t eat one”—meaning it’s impossible to eat just one. Once the first salty chip passes your lips, you want more and more.

    Your body does need some salt—about a gram and a half per day, according to U.S. health guidelines. In prehistoric times, however, salt was not so easy to come by. After all, potato chips and pretzels had not yet been invented. So people who managed to get their hands on salt were more likely to survive. Your neurological circuitry is set up to detect it, crave it, and jump in when you’ve found it.

    As you will remember from fifth-grade biology, your tongue is very sensitive to the taste of salt. And brain scanning studies show that your brain is extra attuned to it, too. Deep inside the brain, in what is commonly called the “reward center,” brain cells make the feel-good neurotransmitter dopamine, and in certain situations it floods out of the cells, stimulating neighboring cells. If you find a particularly abundant source of food, your brain rewards you by releasing some dopamine. If you were to have—shall we say—a romantic, intimate encounter, your brain has a similar reaction. It gives you more dopamine. Dopamine rewards you for doing things that help you or your progeny to live on. And scientists believe that dopamine plays a role in our desire for salt.

    So is there really a lot of salt in pizza? A fourteen-inch Domino’s cheese pizza has—catch this—3,391 milligrams of sodium. Just one slice delivers 400 milligrams. It’s in the crust and in the toppings, and there is a lot in the cheese. So salt is one of the reasons that pizza attracts us.

    Pizza is also greasy, and that greasy-salty combination seems to get us hooked, too, just as it does for chips, fries, and onion rings. But pizza has one more thing. It has cheese, and cheese not only contributes its own load of salt and grease. It also contains traces of a very special kind of opiate.

    Casomorphins
    [In an earlier chapter of The Cheese Trap], I briefly mentioned casein, the protein that is concentrated in cheese. And casein has some secrets to tell.

    If you were to look at a protein molecule with a powerful microscope, it would look like a long string of beads. Each “bead” is a protein building block called an amino acid, and, during digestion, the individual amino acids come apart and are absorbed into your bloodstream so that your body can use them to build proteins of its own.

    So the calf digests the proteins in milk, breaking apart the chain of beads and using these amino acids to build skin cells, muscle cells, organs, and the other parts of the body.

    However, casein is an unusual protein. While it does break apart to release individual beads, it also releases longer fragments—chains that might be four, five, or seven amino acid beads in length. These casein fragments are called casomorphins—that is, casein-derived morphine-like compounds. And they can attach to the same brain receptors that heroin and other narcotics attach to.

    In other words, dairy protein has opiate molecules built right into it.

    Opiates in dairy products? What the heck are they doing there, you might ask. Well, imagine if a calf did not want to nurse. Or if a human baby was not interested in nursing. They would not do very well. So, along with protein, fat, sugar, and a sprinkling of hormones, milk contains opiates that reward the baby for nursing.

    Have you ever looked at a nursing baby’s face? The infant has a look of great intensity and then collapses into sleep. Of course, we imagine that to be the beauty of the mother-infant bond. But the fact is, mother’s milk delivers a mild drug to the child, albeit in a benign and loving way. If that sounds coldly biological, it pays to remember that nature never leaves anything as important as a baby’s survival to chance.

    Opiates have a calming effect, and they also cause the brain to release dopamine, leading to a sense of reward and pleasure.

    A cup of milk contains about 7.7 grams of protein, 80 percent of which is casein, more or less. Turning it into Cheddar cheese multiplies the protein content seven-fold, to 56 grams. It is the most concentrated form of casein in any food in the grocery store.

    Call it dairy crack. Just as cocaine manufacturers have found ways to turn an addictive drug (cocaine) into an extremely addictive one (crack), dairy producers have found their own ways to keep you coming back. In the Middle Ages, cheese makers had no idea that cheese might concentrate milk’s addictive qualities. But today’s cheese industry knows all about cheese craving and is eager to exploit it. It is doing its level best to trigger cheese craving in vulnerable people.

    sauce https://www.forksoverknives.com/addi...za/#gs.goT7d0w
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  92. #1692
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    The 5 Keys To A Rock-Solid Vegetarian Diet

    Tell someone that you're on or thinking about going on a vegetarian diet, and you may receive responses along the following lines:

    "Humans have been eating meat for tens of thousands of years; We're designed to eat it"
    "How will you ever get all the nutrients you need?"
    "I guess that means you can't lift weights anymore; you won't have enough strength."
    Contrary to popular belief, a vegetarian diet can help you improve your health, shed unwanted body fat, and build muscle. You just need to make sure you lay out a meat-free approach that helps you reach your goals instead of working against them. Here are some of the key building blocks of a solid vegetarian-diet foundation.

    1. Finding Your "Why"
    Whether for environmental, political, dietary, ethical, or personal reasons, be clear from the onset why you want to follow a vegetarian diet. This way of eating may require a little more thought, planning, time, and money than you're used to. Being clear on your reason can help you stay motivated when you're thinking it's about time for a bacon cheeseburger.

    2. Figuring Out Your Version Of Vegetarianism
    Choosing to follow a vegetarian diet entails more than removing meat from your plate. What about milk? What about eggs? Will you still eat fish?

    Vegetarianism is a catchall category that can be broken down into more specific diets:

    Lacto-vegetarian: Includes all dairy products, but omit eggs
    Ovo-vegetarian: Includes eggs, but omit dairy
    Lacto-ovo: Includes both dairy and eggs
    Pescatarian: Includes dairy, eggs, and fish
    Veganism: Abstains from all animal meat and products, including eggs, dairy, and honey, as well as potentially abstaining from all products made from animals, such as gelatin
    Keep in mind the local availability and price of the key foods in each diet, and understand how to combine them to meet your minimum daily nutritional requirements.

    3. Learning How To Combine Proteins
    To maintain your health, you need the nine essential amino acids (EAAs) not produced by your body. A protein that contains all nine EAAs is considered a complete protein; conversely, a protein source that is missing one or more of these EAAs is an incomplete protein.

    Without these nine essential amino acids, your body can't take full advantage of the protein you consume. You can get all nine from animal-based protein sources and from a handful of plant-based sources, such as soy and quinoa. But most plant-based protein sources are incomplete, so you have to learn how to combine these sources to get all nine EAAs.

    4. Supplementing Your Diet Wisely
    As a rule, people following a vegetarian diet don't get all the iron, vitamin B-12, and zinc they would if they consumed animal proteins. Depending on whether you include dairy, you may also need additional calcium.

    These essential nutrients play an integral role in growth and development, metabolism, neurological function, and energy production. Supplemental sources can help you meet your minimum daily nutritional needs. You may also want to add beta-alanine and creatine to your diet to get the most benefit from your exercise routine.

    5. Being Conscious Of Calories
    The foundation of a well-rounded vegetarian diet includes high-fiber, nutrient-dense foods. But some plant-based food sources, such as beans and meat substitutes, pack in a surprisingly large amount of carbs and extra calories. The challenge of some vegetarian diets is to get all the complete protein you need without overshooting the mark on daily calories.

    But fear not: There are plenty of vegetarian food options that can get you the fiber and protein you need without all the extra calories—and that still give you the feeling of fullness that helps you stick with any diet.

    And the next time someone at the gym asks you why you have so much energy, you can just give them a nod and a wink and tell them it's all about what you eat.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-41295308_2212192082358564_5101128787693666304_n.jpg

    Sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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