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  1. #1601
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    Friday funnies

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #1602
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    9 NEW MEDICAL REASONS TO NEVER EAT MEAT

    While there are no new medical articles demonstrating the health benefits of adding bacon and burgers to your diet, there are many studies that reinforce that idea that eating nothing but fruit, vegetables, grains, and legumes is optimal for your health. In fact, new data consistently reminds us of the benefits of a vegan diet, which makes it fairly safe to conclude that avoiding meat is one of the most important health decisions a person can make. Although most of these studies are observational—meaning they could not feasibly randomize people to eat or skip meat and follow them for decades—together they illustrate that whether meat comes from cows raised on grass or corn, and whether you know the farmer or not, meat is an inflammatory food with an inherent chemical structure that promotes cancer growth. Unlike the new data showing that the more servings of fruit and vegetables you eat, the more likely you will avoid chronic diseases and delay death, eating meat has the opposite result, leading to disease and early death. If you were ever wavering about your commitment to make it a bean burger rather than a beef burger, reviewing these nine new medical observations should keep you on track for a long and healthy life.

    1. Type 2 diabetes
    In a long-term study from Finland that followed more than 2,000 men over the course of 19 years, replacing even one percent of calories from animal proteins with plant proteins lowered the risk of developing diabetes by 18 percent.

    2. Liver disease
    A growing health concern is called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In an analysis of more than 3,000 subjects in the Netherlands, increased dietary proteins from animal sources (meat) were associated with a greater risk (reaching 50 percent higher) of developing NAFLD.

    3. Asthma
    A study that focused on the relationship between processed red meat consumption and asthma symptoms found that eating cured red meat more than four times a week increased the odds of having worsened asthma by 76 percent.

    4. Colon cancer
    The health community was stunned (although some of us weren’t) when, in October 2015, the World Health Organization announced its results of a comprehensive analysis demonstrating that processed red meats such as bacon and hot dogs cause colorectal cancer. In a more recent analysis, 400 studies were examined and found that the risk of colorectal cancer increased by 12 percent for each 100 grams of red and processed meats eaten daily. The study also found that whole grains and vegetables decreased the risk.

    5. Depression
    In an analysis of 21 studies examining diet and depression, eating red and processed meats increased the risk of depression by more than 25 percent, while fruit and vegetables had the opposite effect by 20 percent.

    6. Stomach cancer
    Researchers combined 42 studies relating diet to stomach cancer and found that a higher intake of red meat increased the risk of stomach cancer by 70 percent, while processed red meat increased the risk by 80 percent compared to those who shunned meats.

    7. Head and neck cancer
    A Netherlands study of more than 120,000 subjects (who were followed for more than 20 years) says that the consumption of processed red meat is associated with developing cancers of the head and neck. The risk was increased as much as 50 percent compared to the low- or non-meat eaters studied.

    8. Gestational diabetes
    Developing diabetes during pregnancy (known as “gestational diabetes”) can complicate pregnancies and have an impact on the health of the offspring. However, recent analysis suggests that high red-meat consumption increased the risk of gestational diabetes by more than 200 percent. Once again, processed red meat also increased the risk by approximately double compared to people who eat fewer amounts of meat.

    9. Degenerative arthritis
    For the first time, diets high in saturated fats like butter, egg yolks, meats, and even palm oil have been linked to increased risks of destruction of joint cartilage commonly known as degenerative joint disease or DJD. The inflammatory nature of meat was identified in the study. Saturated fatty acids in meat deposit on the cartilage in joints, weakening them and making them more prone to damage.



    sauce https://vegnews.com/2017/4/9-new-med...never-eat-meat

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    F*ck Cancer

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  3. #1603
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    Why E. coli keeps getting into our lettuce


    Consumers have grown to love convenience salads, from tubs of pre-washed baby spinach to bags of chopped romaine.

    There’s only one problem with these modern-day conveniences: They’re regularly implicated in foodborne illness outbreaks.

    The latest, a nationwide flare-up of E. coli infections, has sickened 84 people in 19 states and hospitalized 42. Most of the victims grew ill after eating chopped romaine lettuce from a farm near Yuma, Ariz.

    Such outbreaks are rare overall but more common in certain types of foods. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that leafy greens cause roughly a fifth of all foodborne illnesses.

    And food safety experts say convenience greens — those handy bags of pre-chopped and pre-washed salads — carry an extra risk because they come in contact with more people and machinery before they arrive on your plate.

    Recent industry efforts and federal rules have attempted to reduce outbreaks. But the risks will never completely disappear, experts say.

    “We’re always going to have these cases, unfortunately, because consumers have gotten used to this product,” said Bill Marler, a prominent food safety lawyer who represents several patients sickened by the lettuce. “The product has risks, in my opinion.”

    Federal regulators haven’t yet uncovered the source of this latest outbreak linked to lettuce. But the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are urging consumers to throw out romaine that could be from Yuma, where most lettuce is grown during the winter season.

    Most of the 84 people grew ill after eating at restaurants that use bagged, pre-chopped lettuce in their salads. This strain of E. coli, known as 0157: H7, produces a toxin that can disrupt liver function. The majority of victims are women, a reflection of the fact that women generally eat more salads.

    Government regulators have long known that greens and lettuces pose a particular food safety risk. According to one CDC analysis, leafy vegetables were responsible for 22 percent of foodborne illnesses between 1998 and 2008, the latest period for which detailed attribution data is available.

    A more recent analysis of outbreak data from 2013 concluded that “vegetable row crops” — lettuces plus broccoli, asparagus, celery and some other vegetables — account for 42 percent of E. coli infections. In the past four months, E. coli infections linked to leafy greens in Canada and the United States have caused 151 illnesses and two deaths.

    “Leafy greens continue to be a problem, and we’ve looked at leafy greens and fresh produce with concern,” said Robert Tauxe, the director of the CDC division that responds to foodborne illness outbreaks. “Back 15 to 20 years ago, there was a huge concern in food safety around foods of animal origin. ... But beginning about 10 years ago, the produce side has become more and more prominent.”

    Contamination can occur on the farm when birds make frequent flights overhead or low-lying fields flood with contaminated water. E. coli can also be spread by farmworkers who don’t wash their hands or via farm equipment that has manure on it.

    Once the greens are picked, they move to a packaging plant, where they’re exposed to more workers and more equipment. Product from multiple farms is often bagged in the same facility, which further increases the odds of cross-contamination.

    While packers frequently rinse lettuce with a chlorine wash to kill pathogens, studies have shown those sprays are only partly effective. The same is true of washing fruits and vegetables at home, Tauxe said, because pathogens “cling” to the surface of produce and can even enter the inside of a leaf or fruit after they've been cut open.

    There's no “kill step” that destroys pathogens for foods eaten raw, as there is for a well-done burger or a glass of pasteurized milk.

    “This is why it’s so important that the people who grow food do everything they can to minimize contamination,” said Sandra Eskin, who heads the food safety project at the Pew Charitable Trusts. “Lettuce grows in the dirt. It’s eaten raw. There’s no opportunity to cook it to kill bacteria.”

    By all accounts, farmers and regulators have made progress toward making lettuce and leafy greens safer. Since 2006, when E. coli from fresh spinach sickened nearly 200 people and hospitalized 100, the produce industry has launched several initiatives to tighten farm safety rules for leafy greens and lettuces.

    In 2011, Congress passed the Food Safety Modernization Act, which included new standards for irrigation water quality, worker hygiene and equipment sanitation, and went into effect for large farms in January. Smaller farms will have to comply with the rules by early 2020.

    But despite these efforts, the number of outbreaks and infections linked to leafy greens has largely remained flat over the past 10 years, with 11 outbreaks and 242 illnesses per year on average, according to CDC.

    Eskin and Tauxe say they believe the new rules will help — but they will not eliminate the risk completely.

    “Produce is not grown in sterile environments,” Eskin added. “Anybody who knows anything about food safety understands that.”
    sauce: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.29e7cb8ccc07
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #1604
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    Another good reason to grow your own. There's something about organic vegetable gardening that just feels right. Wonderful therapy too.
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  5. #1605
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    The 5 Keys To A Rock-Solid Vegetarian Diet

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    Tell someone that you're on or thinking about going on a vegetarian diet, and you may receive responses along the following lines:

    "Humans have been eating meat for tens of thousands of years; We're designed to eat it"
    "How will you ever get all the nutrients you need?"
    "I guess that means you can't lift weights anymore; you won't have enough strength."
    Contrary to popular belief, a vegetarian diet can help you improve your health, shed unwanted body fat, and build muscle. You just need to make sure you lay out a meat-free approach that helps you reach your goals instead of working against them. Here are some of the key building blocks of a solid vegetarian-diet foundation.

    1. Finding Your "Why"
    Whether for environmental, political, dietary, ethical, or personal reasons, be clear from the onset why you want to follow a vegetarian diet. This way of eating may require a little more thought, planning, time, and money than you're used to. Being clear on your reason can help you stay motivated when you're thinking it's about time for a bacon cheeseburger.

    2. Figuring Out Your Version Of Vegetarianism
    Choosing to follow a vegetarian diet entails more than removing meat from your plate. What about milk? What about eggs? Will you still eat fish?

    Vegetarianism is a catchall category that can be broken down into more specific diets:

    Lacto-vegetarian: Includes all dairy products, but omit eggs
    Ovo-vegetarian: Includes eggs, but omit dairy
    Lacto-ovo: Includes both dairy and eggs
    Pescatarian: Includes dairy, eggs, and fish
    Veganism: Abstains from all animal meat and products, including eggs, dairy, and honey, as well as potentially abstaining from all products made from animals, such as gelatin
    Keep in mind the local availability and price of the key foods in each diet, and understand how to combine them to meet your minimum daily nutritional requirements.

    3. Learning How To Combine Proteins
    To maintain your health, you need the nine essential amino acids (EAAs) not produced by your body. A protein that contains all nine EAAs is considered a complete protein; conversely, a protein source that is missing one or more of these EAAs is an incomplete protein.

    Without these nine essential amino acids, your body can't take full advantage of the protein you consume. You can get all nine from animal-based protein sources and from a handful of plant-based sources, such as soy and quinoa. But most plant-based protein sources are incomplete, so you have to learn how to combine these sources to get all nine EAAs.

    4. Supplementing Your Diet Wisely
    As a rule, people following a vegetarian diet don't get all the iron, vitamin B-12, and zinc they would if they consumed animal proteins. Depending on whether you include dairy, you may also need additional calcium.

    These essential nutrients play an integral role in growth and development, metabolism, neurological function, and energy production. Supplemental sources can help you meet your minimum daily nutritional needs. You may also want to add beta-alanine and creatine to your diet to get the most benefit from your exercise routine.

    5. Being Conscious Of Calories
    The foundation of a well-rounded vegetarian diet includes high-fiber, nutrient-dense foods. But some plant-based food sources, such as beans and meat substitutes, pack in a surprisingly large amount of carbs and extra calories. The challenge of some vegetarian diets is to get all the complete protein you need without overshooting the mark on daily calories.

    But fear not: There are plenty of vegetarian food options that can get you the fiber and protein you need without all the extra calories—and that still give you the feeling of fullness that helps you stick with any diet.

    And the next time someone at the gym asks you why you have so much energy, you can just give them a nod and a wink and tell them it's all about what you eat.

    https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #1606
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    a friend of mine is trying to convince me to eat healthy, he will eat meat at times but perfers the vegan diet.... he is trying to tell me that i should be concerned about the amount of meat i eat.... I mainly eat meat, very seldom eat any form of veggies except for hot peppers and sweet corn. I would be perfectally happy just eating a steak or 2 for dinner and some hot peppers with maybe an ear of sweet corn. I ride my mountain bike for my job as an uber bike messenger and also just joined IMBA and Cambir in the chicago area and am planning on checking out some trails in the area as well. not sure if i could ever eat a primay diet of plant based foods, however he made something with black beans, corn and brown rice that was good. Also am one not to believe in having a regular physician or regular medical examinations.... if you feel ok why stir up trouble. however some of the vegan recipes do look interesting and may be worth an occasional try.

  7. #1607
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    Welcome, Brian.

    Probably the best suggestion to give you would be to have your blood tested during a physical. If that comes back with no issues, carry on!

    You don't mention your age, but when still in my 40s I was bullet proof and could wolf down steaks with poppers (jalapenos stuffed with cheese). Eventually it all caught up and damn near killed me. Now pushing 64 with a much more balanced diet, act like a kid on the bike for hours. It all comes down to choices, and some diet choices not only gunk up your engine, it makes your joints swell and hurt before you move. Where's the fun in that?

    Ohhh, I'm not "vegan" as I still enjoy milk, eggs, fish and chicken...with veggies and fruits

  8. #1608
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    i am 45, have not been to a doctor for a physical in at least 15 years, my thought is if you feel ok there is no reason to go look for trouble. I am on the bike for at least anywhere from 5 miles to 30 miles a day 5 days a week since i do uber eats delivery by bike. thinking about trying his food occasionally but i love my 3/4 raw daily red meat like steak and burgers

  9. #1609
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianR60077 View Post
    i am 45, have not been to a doctor for a physical in at least 15 years, my thought is if you feel ok there is no reason to go look for trouble. I am on the bike for at least anywhere from 5 miles to 30 miles a day 5 days a week since i do uber eats delivery by bike. thinking about trying his food occasionally but i love my 3/4 raw daily red meat like steak and burgers
    There is a little bit of a logical flaw in this line of thinking. Many conditions can be caught early with simple, routine checks, which prevent them from becoming a real problem. I'm 32 with a healthy weight and last year I was diagnosed with essential hypertension. Basically, high blood pressure with absolutely no known cause. It's just there. I felt fine for 30 years, but left untreated, I absolutely put myself at risk for stroke, heart problems, or kidney issues. One little pill a day, and I'm good.

    As an anecdotal side note, I keep track of my BP at home and it tends to be a few points lower if I eat primarily veg. Not so much to go off medication, but it does have an affect.

    Don't think of it as all or nothing. Start slow. Try for one meatless meal a day, or meatless Monday, or whatever works for you. A big source of 'failure' is when people assume it's all or nothing, and they drastically change their diet, feel crappy, fall back to their old way, and then feel guilty for failing.
    The cake is a lie.

  10. #1610
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubikeman View Post
    There is a little bit of a logical flaw in this line of thinking. Many conditions can be caught early with simple, routine checks, which prevent them from becoming a real problem
    ^ A thousand times this.

  11. #1611
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    typically i do not trust any medical doctor, i trust my mechanic that works on my car, harley and bike without a doubt but a doctor.... umm no. my friend is all about being health concious since he turned 31... i still believe i am totally bullet proof and nothing to worry about and being adopted have no clue to my actual parents health history but enjoy being outside doing the bike delivery for work, right now sitting by the lake on the beach waiting for the next delivery

  12. #1612
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    Well, if a head in the sand approach works well for you, then that's all that matters I guess. However prostate cancer is just one example where your approach will go from curable to terminal because it wasn't caught early enough with a simple office visit and blood test.

    To each their own.........

  13. #1613
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    prostate cancer doesnt happen until much later in life like most anything else

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    Wow.... just wow

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    the biggest problem i have with doctors is you have to pay something generally in the form of a co pay to listen to them telling you dont drink 7 to 10 cups of coffee a day, dont drink a 6 pack or more a day of soda, sleep more than 4 to 5 hours a night, drink water, dont go out and drink every day, make sure you eat more fruits and vegetables, dont eat of red meat or fried food.... like there is any proof that they know what they are saying.

  16. #1616
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    ....... ah, my bad.

    1) Registered today
    2) 1st post is in a vegan/vegetarian health based thread and it's that you only eat meat
    3) ....

    I could go on, but it's clear to me now that I fell for your trolling. Congrats! Job well done! You da man!

  17. #1617
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    i will sometimes eat his type of food, but i know someone who lived to be 80 eating only meat never ate any fruits or vegetables, never drank any water either coffee, coke, and alcohol and soda, smoked 2 cartons of cigarettes a week, no exercise and worked the highest stress job there is a police officer. he didnt die from health issues he died in a car crash. so these doctors tell you what they want and really cannot prove they know what they are talking about plus get kick backs from drug companies

  18. #1618
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    I do love the smoothies my friend makes, they are the best breakfast ever, usually he uses like 3 bananas, blue berries, strawberries, depending on the store sometimes we get raspberries and black berries too. I like fruit but typically stay away from vegetables in favor of red meat. but fruit smoothies are the bomb....

  19. #1619
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    Happy Hump Day!

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  20. #1620
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    Works that slow, huh?

    If you're lucky, you'll make it to "much later in life" one of these days.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  21. #1621
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    The fish knew this all along.

    A cohort study conducted by researchers at nonprofit medical research organization Cochrane found that consuming fish oil supplements has no positive benefits on cardiovascular health.


    Fish oil supplements for a healthy heart 'nonsense'


    Cochrane researchers looked at trials in over 100,000 people and found little proof that it prevented heart disease.

    They say the chance of getting any meaningful benefit from taking omega-3 is one in 1,000.

    Eating oily fish, however, can still be recommended as part of a healthy diet.

    The review mainly looked at supplements rather than omega-3 from eating fish. Experts still believe the latter is good for the heart as well as general health.

    The NHS says people should try to eat two portions of fish per week, one of which should be oily fish, such as salmon, fresh tuna or mackerel, to get enough "good" fats.

    Omega-3
    Omega-3 is a family of fats that includes:

    ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) - which the body can't make for itself but is found in vegetable oils, nuts and seeds
    EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) - which the body can make from ALA but are also present in oily fish and fish oils, including cod liver oil
    Some brands of milk, yoghurt, bread and spreads have extra omega-3 (usually ALA) added to them.

    But when it comes to fish oil supplements, Cochrane lead author, Dr Lee Hooper, from the University of East Anglia, said: "We can be confident in the findings of this review which go against the popular belief that long-chain omega-3 supplements protect the heart.

    "This large systematic review included information from many thousands of people over long periods.

    "Despite all this information, we don't see protective effects.

    "The review provides good evidence that taking long-chain omega-3 [fish oil, EPA or DHA] supplements does not benefit heart health or reduce our risk of stroke or death from any cause.

    "The most trustworthy studies consistently showed little or no effect of long-chain omega-3 fats on cardiovascular health."


    Some fish contain small amounts of chemicals that may be harmful if eaten in large amounts.

    Shark, marlin and swordfish may contain small amounts of mercury and should be avoided by women who are pregnant or planning a baby and by all children under 16.

    Other groups should eat no more than one portion of these fish each week.

    Prof Tom Sanders, a nutrition expert at King's College London and honorary director of Heart UK, said: "Current dietary guidelines to prevent cardiovascular disease encourage fish consumption, rather than taking supplements.

    "This study provides no evidence to suggest that this dietary advice should change."

    Buy vegetables
    Prof Tim Chico, a cardiologist from Sheffield University, said: "There was a period where people who had suffered a heart attack were prescribed these on the NHS. This stopped some years ago.

    "Such supplements come with a significant cost, so my advice to anyone buying them in the hope that they reduce the risk of heart disease, I'd advise them to spend their money on vegetables instead."

    Dr Carrie Ruxton, from the Health and Food Supplements Information Service, said early studies of omega-3 fats had found a protective benefit for the heart, but it wasn't always easy to pick up the modest effects of dietary change, particularly in older people on medication.

    "For those who won't eat mackerel, salmon or herring, a daily fish oil supplement is a useful way of meeting recommendations," she said.

    "Omega-3s are also used by the body to maintain the health of the eyes, immune function and brain so it's not all about the heart."
    sauce https://www.bbc.com/news/health-44845879
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  22. #1622
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37858272_2006285689422603_8231610508491358208_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  23. #1623
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    i am still considering trying my friends vegan diet.... however i have never been concerned about physical health and figure there is nothing to worry about being only 45 and invincable and bullet proof. have not had a physical in 15 years and in no rush too either

  24. #1624
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37787928_1803021966457506_481250286652882944_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  25. #1625
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-37978062_10215041903214962_5371046746145161216_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  26. #1626
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion

    Here is my pre ride smoothie.

    Oatmeal 1/4 cup
    Walnuts 1/8 cup
    Strawberries 1/4 cup or one large or two small
    Frozen pineapple 1/4cup
    Banana 1
    Soy milk 1 cup
    Pitted Dates 3 or 2 depending size

    Blend 40 second in the bullet.

    Enjoy




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #1627
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    No almond butter?
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  28. #1628
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    No almond butter?
    I checked: A serving of almond butter is equal to approximately 2 tablespoons. If you eat this amount of almond butter, you'll get approximately 7 grams of protein. It's slightly less than the 8 grams in a 2-tablespoon serving of peanut butter.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  29. #1629
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    Thanks for your efforts!

    For some unsubstantiated reason, I have thought almond butter would have been higher in protein than peanut butter.

    Personally, I like almond butter better. I will warm a jar of almond butter (short nuke) to soften, add sea salt, honey and some dried berries like cranberries, acai, or goji and enjoy.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  30. #1630
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    I’d been feeling poorly, so I went to a natural physician a year ago on a recommendation. Turns out my liver wasn’t functioning due to heavy toxins from construction materials and parasites, probably from third world countries I’ve lived in. I just got done with nearly a year long liver cleanse, and feel great. Mostly beef bile salt cleanse.

    That said, I eat a heavy diet of meat. Mostly wild game I’ve killed and processed myself. I don’t think there is a healthier food you can put in you’re body than elk meat. Look up it’s nutrition facts, it astoundingly healthy.

    I think most of the problem with meat is in nitrates and fats. Fatty meats like bacon and burgers, and processed meats will put you in the grave. Lean meats are legit.

    We’ve also started a small organic garden for our kids. Hopefully we can do more of that in the future. I’d love one day to get off of processed foods altogether.

    I don’t think I could ever intentionally be vegan or vegetarian. Elk roast and sweet potatoes are all you need.

  32. #1632
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    14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat!

    1. Spinach

    Spinach is a dull verdant green which is stacked with press, and only 3 measures of it contain 18 mg of spinach.

    2. Broccoli

    Broccoli is another astounding wellspring of iron and in addition other fundamental supplements, for example, vitamin K, magnesium, vitamin C and invigorates the assimilation of iron.

    3. Lentils

    Only some lentils contains more iron than a 8-ounce steak, alongside protein, potassium and dietary fiber.

    4. Kale

    Kale has a high substance of iron, with only 3 measures of it containing 3.6 mg of iron. It can productively treat iron deficiency and weakness.

    5. Bok Choy

    Bok Choy is a heavenly Chinese cabbage which is stacked with iron and vitamin A.
    6. Heated Potato

    Only 1 extensive potato contains 3 times more iron than 3-ounces of chicken, and additionally, it can be arranged scrumptiously.

    7. Sesame Seeds

    Trust it or not, a solitary tablespoon of sesame seeds contains 1.3 mg of iron which can without much of a stretch be added to your day by day abstain from food.

    8. Cashews

    Cashews are stacked with protein and have a high substance of iron, with 1 container containing 2 grams of iron.

    9. Soybeans

    Only a solitary measure of cooked soybeans contains 8-9 mg of iron, and over that, they are an extraordinary wellspring of protein also.

    10. Chickpeas

    1 single measure of chicken peas contains 4.7 mg of iron, which is the greater part of the every day prescribed dose for a grown-up male.

    More: :
    ◾dark Chocolate
    ◾Tofu
    ◾Swiss Chard
    ◾Kidney Beans

    sauce 14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat! – Mr Healthy Advisor
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  33. #1633
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    Wow 0 calories, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, 0 sugar, 0 sodium... wonder if these assorted cupcakes are vegan too?

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  34. #1634
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    https://draxe.com/elk-meat/

    I hate to troll, but some vegans continuously lump all meat into one category. All meat is not hot dog quality. I'm all for personal food choices without giving any grief about it, but I think we need to be honest about healthy meat options that do exist.
    Last edited by deerkiller; 1 Week Ago at 09:48 PM. Reason: spelling

  35. #1635
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    If you're vegan and like football, the Tennessee Titans are the team to root for this season.

    Vegan meals all the rage for Titans, with 15 players converted

    Something about the word "vegan" scares many athletes away. Doubts about protein, taste and fulfillment immediately arise. Some never can get past that point.

    Then there's the 15-and-growing number of Tennessee Titans players who set aside those doubts and jumped on a plant-based meal plan, which is a phrase that is a little easier to swallow. Still, it's a bit of a surprise to catch 250-pound NFL players scavenging through large black bags for extra vegan lunch meals after practice.

    Yes, beware of the meal thiefs.

    What started as a couple's personal undertaking has become a full-fledged Titans plant-based meal movement that is entering Year 2 of the program. It began when Titans linebacker Derrick Morgan decided to try a plant-based diet nearly a year-and-a-half ago, enlisting the help of his wife, Charity, to join him and re-educate herself to cook vegan. Morgan's teammates saw, smelled and tasted the food that his wife made during the 2017 season. One-by-one, players asked to join the vegan meal plan, and they were sold.

    "When they realized that their production didn't go down, their stats didn't go down, they didn't die on the field, they were like 'sign me up' because the food already looks and smells good," said Charity, who has been a Le Cordon Bleu-educated professional chef for 15 years. "Last year was a test run for a lot of the guys to realize you can be plant-based and successful."

    It all starts in the Morgan home, where Charity often begins at 6 or 7 a.m. making lunches from scratch for the guys. This year, it takes an average of four hours to make all the food she needs for those on the meal plan. It took much longer in 2017 before she added two assistants.

    During training camp, the players get two meals plus a snack every day. Some players request another meal so they can eat it for dinner when they get home.

    Converting skeptics

    On this particular morning, it's "chik'n taco" day. The order calls for 16 meals, three tacos per meal along with a container of rice, a container of beans and a side of guacamole.

    Primary ingredients consist of five pounds of soy curls (used as meat substitute), five pounds of uncooked sofrito rice, five pounds of Puerto Rican beans, 15 avocados to make homemade guacamole, and a variety of seasoning, spices and sauces. The soy curls, rice and beans make 10 pounds each when cooked and rehydrated

    Lunch is ready at 11:30 a.m., but the team's lunch time was moved back to 1 p.m. Charity and her assistant for the day, Jessica, must decide whether to prep the tacos ready-made with toppings and fillings inside and risk letting the tacos get soggy. They decide against it, leaving the tortillas wrapped in foil and allowing the players to prep the tacos themselves. Presentation is important, but quality and taste of the food is even more essential.

    The food is put into separate containers with the players' numbers written on top, placed in a black bag and delivered to the Titans facility. Right after practice ends, the Titans' vegan crew digs in.

    "In the beginning, I didn't number because I thought everybody knew who was on chef Charity Morgan's meal plan," Morgan said. "But no, we have to number. I'll call them toddlers. They don't grab just one bowl of rice, one bowl of beans and one set of tacos."

    Pro Bowl defensive tackle Jurrell Casey has a wide smile when you ask about his plant-based lifestyle. He was originally one of the biggest skeptics, questioning how it would affect his strength, then he saw how it changed him as a player.

    Casey and several other Titans raved about how it helps speed up recovery, decreases inflammation and increases their energy.

    The Titans' vegan group grew from one to 11 members, mostly starters, by the end of last season. They lost a handful of players to free agency and injuries. But the current crew of 15 represents a diverse mix from linemen to receivers to specialists.

    Some players from the original plant-based crew kept their eating pattern even while away from the team in the offseason.

    "I didn't really change much to it," said Casey, who admits he still eats fish from time to time. "It's been good. I still love it. I feel great. It helps me keep my weight down, too, because it can get too high in offseason as I eat a little bit more."

    Casey got down to his ideal weight of 285-290 pounds by the start of training camp. He's still a handful for nearly every guard or center that tries to block him, shown by his six sacks, prowess against the run and a third consecutive Pro Bowl in 2017.

    'It's my heart, soul and culture in the food'
    Sauces are Charity's specialties. Every day the guys get a different sauce, all homemade, including sour cream, pesto, chimichurri and chipotle sauces.

    "It's my heart, soul and culture in the food," Charity said. "I make sure it's layered with flavors."

    She regularly sprinkles hemp seeds on dishes. She uses pink Himalayan salt and maple syrup/brown sugar instead of refined salt and sugar. She also makes recovery smoothies with 20 grams of protein. She prefers a holistic cooking style, so there are very few processed items, like soy or corn, used.

    The first step was getting players to trust that going plant-based wouldn't hurt their football livelihood. Many players saw the evidence of that in Year 1.

    "Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part," said Derrick, whose diet is 100 percent plant-based and who led the Titans in sacks last season. "I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself."

    Charity added: "A lot of stereotypes are being debunked with the Titans."

    Linebacker Wesley Woodyard, the Titans' leading tackler in 2017, often talks about how he used to feel sluggish after heavy-meat meals, but he hasn't had that experience once since switching to a plant-based diet.

    The lifestyle change has helped many on the team grow closer, and they hold each other accountable.

    Last season, seitan burgers and jackfruit cheesesteaks were locker-room favorites. They were often the Friday "reward" meals.

    This year, Charity started a group text with the vegan crew, often asking if there are any preferences for meals. They rarely respond, trusting her to surprise them with a new cooked meal.

    Meals are often based on traditional meat dishes, with a meat or dairy substitute swapped in. Charity has a garden in her backyard where she grows many of the vegetables that go into her food, such as okra, curled kale, lilac bell peppers and collard greens.

    "There's no such thing as a go-to meal in my kitchen. Since April 9, we haven't repeated one meal," she said. "My favorite meal is the meal I haven't made. I don't want it to be boring. I want to create every day."

    Many elite athletes such as Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, tennis star Serena Williams and Germany's strongest man Patrik Baboumian have embraced a vegan lifestyle, but the Titans are at the forefront with their large plant-based movement. And it's flourishing heading into Year 2.
    Sauce NFL - Preseason Week 1 live - schedule, key players, fantasy impact, injuries and more
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  36. #1636
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    sorry, double post, i deleted it.

    see my link above.

  37. #1637
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    I buy blueberries year round but nothing beats the taste of fresh wild blueberries. We picked up 2 baskets of wild blueberries on our recent trip to Timmins, Ontario. Blueberries grow wild in northern Ontario, and we often stop along the way on the rides to pick and eat a handful.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38411777_1598954563566879_2216340662473719808_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38656440_2182066048704501_8785248762361544704_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38600747_2182075965370176_7604651665320312832_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38647458_2183145675263205_3852404300927991808_n.jpg

    And yes bears love blueberries too.... we saw alot of bear poop

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38448968_1603016543160681_6995167699751927808_n.jpg
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  38. #1638
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    Out of curiosity, how much did you pay for each basket?
    Around here (Portugal), and also in France going by my cousins word, we only found them in small packages, between 100g and 200g.

  39. #1639
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianR60077 View Post
    prostate cancer doesnt happen until much later in life like most anything else
    really an ignorant statement. just sayin. And if you have medical insurance and don't use it you are really foolish.

  40. #1640
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    Out of curiosity, how much did you pay for each basket?
    Around here (Portugal), and also in France going by my cousins word, we only found them in small packages, between 100g and 200g.
    We paid $30 cdn per basket. I'll try to find out how large the baskets are... I can only go by the pic. As soon as we got them home we freeze them.
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  41. #1641
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    https://draxe.com/elk-meat/

    I hate to troll, but some vegans continuously lump all meat into one category. Al meat is not hot dog quality. I all for personal food choices without giving any grief about it, but I think we need to be honest about healthy meat options that do exist.
    If you aren't going to post in the Single Speed forum with links and commentary about the virtues of gears, or in the Fat Bike forum about the benefits of skinny tires, then you don't need to do the same here.

    That said, please feel free to start your own thread about healthy meats, and hunting/farming practices. I am sure that there are many MTBR folks that are interested in exactly that. People that will find the knowledge beneficial to their lives that would not look within this (or any vegan/vegetarian) thread for information regarding the consumption of animals. I'm not saying that your input is wrong, but it would be better served in a location that warrants it.

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    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    really an ignorant statement. just sayin. And if you have medical insurance and don't use it you are really foolish.
    That depends on the person. I believe the current "treatments" for prostate cancer are one or more of: surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. I reject all those as being too debilitating, so what is the point of having the test? That being said, I'm going for my first physical exam in 40 years. It won't make any difference to me, but my gf is making me go.

  45. #1645
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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.
    Probably not anymore than an alcoholic that is trying to quit craving a drink. I've been on a plant based diet now for 7 years after being a meat and potatoes kind of guy for 48 years. I am also a recovering alcoholic/pot head/addict with almost 25 years of sobriety.
    it will just take time and clean living to get over the cravings. I don't miss any of that stuff now and haven't for many years.
    Change begins by doing something different.

  46. #1646
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    Probably not anymore than an alcoholic that is trying to quit craving a drink. I've been on a plant based diet now for 7 years after being a meat and potatoes kind of guy for 48 years. I am also a recovering alcoholic/pot head with almost 25 years of sobriety.
    it will just take time and clean living to get over the cravings. I don't miss either now and haven't for many years.
    Thanks for your reply!

  47. #1647
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    Quote Originally Posted by winginit View Post
    If I am staying away from beef and I crave a hamburger. Is my body telling me I am missing protien or iron or something from my diet? Thanks.
    Read up on vegetarians and protein and iron sources and how much you need, Cyclelicious has posted some articles/links above.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  48. #1648
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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    If you aren't going to post in the Single Speed forum with links and commentary about the virtues of gears, or in the Fat Bike forum about the benefits of skinny tires, then you don't need to do the same here.

    That said, please feel free to start your own thread about healthy meats, and hunting/farming practices. I am sure that there are many MTBR folks that are interested in exactly that. People that will find the knowledge beneficial to their lives that would not look within this (or any vegan/vegetarian) thread for information regarding the consumption of animals. I'm not saying that your input is wrong, but it would be better served in a location that warrants it.
    Well, I understand your frustrations with my post, but misinformation is misinformation. For instance, in the above post about vegan foods that contain more iron than meat, the measurements and types of meats are ambiguous and misleading. The units or portions of vegan foods have been referred to as a "measure" or some other undefined or unpopular term, and there is no chart of comparison to popular meat choices of equal quantity.

    An 8 oz elk steak has approximately 7.467 miligrams of iron. Other meats probably have less. But lets be honest, instead of using arbitrary quantities.

    Veganism has probably done great things for a lot of people. I clicked on this thread to learn more about it.

    I'm certainly becoming more of an organic food type person, especially the older i get. If i can learn something here, i'm all ears. Currently, i strive to be gluten and dairy free whenever i can without offending the cook, and i'd like to move on to cutting out processed or "cured" meats as well.

    However, information must be factual, to the best of our abilities. If i find something here to be misleading, or intentionally unclear, i don't feel remorse in pointing that out.

    Meat may not be for you, and veganism may not be for you.

    But truth is for everyone.

  49. #1649
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    Well, I understand your frustrations with my post, but misinformation is misinformation. For instance, in the above post about vegan foods that contain more iron than meat, the measurements and types of meats are ambiguous and misleading. The units or portions of vegan foods have been referred to as a "measure" or some other undefined or unpopular term, and there is no chart of comparison to popular meat choices of equal quantity.

    An 8 oz elk steak has approximately 7.467 miligrams of iron. Other meats probably have less. But lets be honest, instead of using arbitrary quantities.

    Veganism has probably done great things for a lot of people. I clicked on this thread to learn more about it.

    I'm certainly becoming more of an organic food type person, especially the older i get. If i can learn something here, i'm all ears. Currently, i strive to be gluten and dairy free whenever i can without offending the cook, and i'd like to move on to cutting out processed or "cured" meats as well.

    However, information must be factual, to the best of our abilities. If i find something here to be misleading, or intentionally unclear, i don't feel remorse in pointing that out.

    Meat may not be for you, and veganism may not be for you.

    But truth is for everyone.
    Here is what you don't grasp. This is a vegan thread aimed at vegans. Vegans don't care about the comparison to meat because meat is not a food option for them. Remember, the thread is titled Vegetarian and Vegan Passion.

    It doesn't matter if the measurements are not 100% accurate because the science is still sound. Yes, spinach does have a lot of iron in it, and that is all that really matters. An adult male only needs 8 mg of iron a day. Cyclelicious brings a lot to this thread, but this is not the end all, be all for vegan and vegetarian info. This place should be a jumping off point to do your own research about what is right for you and your dietary choices.

    I commend you for wanting to eat better. You evidently have a love for elk, and that is your choice for your region. Here in Maine, it would be deer or moose if I was a meat eater, but I am not. Going organic is great, especially if you are supporting your local farmers, and being dairy free will provide you with more energy and less chemical dependencies (dairy creates similar euphoria to some drugs). I have yet to fully break free from the dairy grasp, but I try (I love pizza though).

    Best of luck in your own search for better health.

  50. #1650
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    Does anyone follow Pamela Popper ? She has some good video shorts and lectures on YouTube. It is scientific based, not just opinions.
    I have been 'low' grain, meat and dairy for a few years now. It has worked well for me.
    But, Doctor Popper has made a solid argument for a plant based lifestyle. I may be ready to cross over to the dark side.

  51. #1651
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slowhead View Post
    Does anyone follow Pamela Popper ? She has some good video shorts and lectures on YouTube. It is scientific based, not just opinions.
    I have been 'low' grain, meat and dairy for a few years now. It has worked well for me.
    But, Doctor Popper has made a solid argument for a plant based lifestyle. I may be ready to cross over to the dark side.
    I haven't heard about Doctor Popper. Please post up a video I'm curious to learn more
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  52. #1652
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat!


    sauce 14 Vegetarian Foods That Have More Iron Than Meat! – Mr Healthy Advisor
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Vegans don't care about the comparison to meat because meat is not a food option for them. .
    The vegan comparison to meat is my whole complaint with veganism. I have respect for veganism, until they start with their phony stats about meat.

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    that said, what are you guys using for non dairy creamer for your coffee?

    I'm looking for something good, right now i'm using almond mild and stevia, which is ok, but not great.

    Everything i've tried is kind of, well, blah.

  54. #1654
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I haven't heard about Doctor Popper. Please post up a video I'm curious to learn more
    https:youtu.be/QDZsg3hv77I
    This video is her commenting on several popular topics. I think she mentions her involvement with Forks Over Knives at the 3:00 mark.

  55. #1655
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerkiller View Post
    that said, what are you guys using for non dairy creamer for your coffee?

    I'm looking for something good, right now i'm using almond mild and stevia, which is ok, but not great.

    Everything i've tried is kind of, well, blah.
    I drink it black. If the coffee is good it doesn't need anything in it..
    Change begins by doing something different.

  56. #1656
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-38403405_2068504076557006_3088711707850178560_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #1657
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-39208391_2126916170889940_2420954223010119680_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  58. #1658
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    Report Finds Traces of a Controversial Herbicide in Cheerios and Quaker Oats

    An environmental research and advocacy group has found traces of a controversial herbicide in Cheerios, Quaker Oats and other breakfast foods that it says could increase cancer risk for children.

    The report comes amid longstanding debate about the safety of the chemical glyphosate, which federal regulators maintain is not likely to cause cancer.

    In its report, released Wednesday, the Environmental Working Group said that it tested 45 samples of breakfast foods made from oats grown in fields sprayed with herbicides. Then, using a strict standard the group developed, it found elevated levels of glyphosate in 31 of them.

    “There are levels above what we could consider safe in very popular breakfast foods,” said Alexis Temkin, the group’s toxicologist who helped with the analysis in the report.
    The findings by the group, which has opposed the use of pesticides that may end up in food, were reported widely. But the question of whether glyphosate is safe is not so simple.

    In fact, it is central to a raging international debate about the chemical that has spawned thousands of lawsuits, allegations of faulty research supporting and opposing the chemical and a vigorous defense of the herbicide from Monsanto, the company that helped develop it 40 years ago and helped turn it into the most popular weedkiller in the world.

    Scott Partridge, a vice president at Monsanto, said in an interview on Wednesday that hundreds of studies had validated the safety of glyphosate and that it doesn’t cause cancer. He called the Environmental Working Group an activist group.

    “They have an agenda,” he said. “They are fear mongering. They distort science.”

    Central to critiques of the glyphosate, which prevents plants from photosynthesizing, is a 2015 decision by the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer to declare glyphosate a probable carcinogen.

    That spurred a federal case in the United States over such claims and prompted California to declare it a chemical that is known to cause cancer.

    Last week, a California jury found that Monsanto had failed to warn a school groundskeeper of the cancer risks posed by its weedkiller, Roundup, of which glyphosate is an active ingredient. The man’s lawyers said he developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma after using the weedkiller as part of his job as a pest control manager for a California county school system.

    Monsanto was ordered to pay $289 million in damages. The company says it is facing more than 5,200 similar lawsuits.

    Some research points to other potential health effects of glyphosate. In a study published last year in Scientific Reports, a journal from the publishers of Nature, rats that consumed very low doses of glyphosate each day showed early signs of fatty liver disease within three months, which worsened over time.

    But many regulators and researchers say glyphosate is safe.

    The classification by the International Agency for Research on Cancer has been disputed by United States and European regulators. And a recent major study, published by researchers at the National Institutes of Health, “observed no associations between glyphosate use and overall cancer risk.”

    In December 2017, the federal Environmental Protection Agency issued a draft human health risk assessment that said glyphosate was most likely not carcinogenic to humans.

    The E.P.A. is currently reviewing public comments on that assessment as part of a standard review, and will decide on whether or not the agency needs any “mitigation measures” by 2019, a spokesman said Wednesday.

    The United States Food and Drug Administration, which regulates domestic and imported food to make sure it does not exceed levels set by the E.P.A., said that based on 2016 samples, it had not found any violations of E.P.A. standards with glyphosate. More recent samples are still under review, an agency spokeswoman said.

    The F.D.A. said Wednesday that it would consider the Environmental Working Group’s findings.

    Both Quaker Oats and General Mills, which makes Cheerios, said that their products were safe and met federal standards.

    “While our products comply with all safety and regulatory requirements, we are happy to be part of the discussion and are interested in collaborating with industry peers, regulators and other interested parties on glyphosate,” a Quaker spokesman said Wednesday.

    A General Mills spokeswoman said, “Our products are safe and without question they meet regulatory safety levels.”

    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/15/h...imes&smtyp=cur
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  59. #1659
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    Apparently only the squirrels understand

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-39403736_2395206880497409_574223370694950912_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  60. #1660
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    Good vid explaining the role of fat


    F*ck Cancer

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    Eating pasta could save your life

    Eating pasta could help you live longer, a new study suggests.

    Following low-carb diets, such as Atkins, increases the risk of dying young, experts found.

    Scientists say people who eat a “moderate” amount of carbs can expect to live four years longer. They suggest an optimum level of 50 to 55 percent of calories from carbohydrates, which are typically found in potatoes, pasta and bread.

    Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston analyzed data on 432,179 people. They found people who ate fewer carbs had a 20 percent higher risk of premature death.

    And those who ate more than the recommended amount had a 23 percent higher risk. The findings are published in The Lancet Public Health journal.

    Low-carb diets tend to result in a lower intake of healthy fruit, vegetables and grains — and more meat. This can lead to a loss of nutrients, harmful inflammation and biological aging.
    The Atkins diet has proved popular with fad dieters because it can lead to rapid weight loss. It says meals should include full-fat dairy, eggs and meat, such as chicken, beef and bacon.

    But those who replaced carbs with protein and fat from animal sources fared worst in the study.

    While low-carb diets have long been touted as being great for weight loss, Harley Street nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert told The Sun that plans like Atkins have helped “fuel the myth” that carbs make you fat.

    “The view that all carbohydrates should be cut from someone’s diet is quite simply wrong,” she said.

    But the truth is that not all carbs are created equal.

    Refined foods like white pasta, bread and pastries lack much of the fiber and other nutrients common to wholesome carbohydrates and provide quick-release energy that can leave us feeling deflated quickly.

    Cutting all carbs out can leave you feeling tired and moody.

    And that’s because our brains rely on the glucose found in carbohydrates as fuel.

    Carbs also affect how much serotonin — the happy hormone — we produce.

    So cut out all carbs and you could find yourself circling the drain.

    “Just because carbs are not essential for survival, that doesn’t mean they aren’t beneficial,” said Rhiannon. “Many carb-containing foods are healthy and nutritious, such as fruit and vegetables.”

    “These foods have all sorts of beneficial compounds and provide a variety of health benefits. Although it is possible to survive on a zero-carb diet, it is definitely a bad idea and not an optimal choice because you’re missing out on foods that science has shown to be beneficial.”

    The scientists who have just published this latest study say people who insist on a low-carb diet should opt for veggies and nuts instead.

    Study leader Dr. Sara Seidelmann said: “Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with protein or fat are gaining widespread popularity as a health and weight loss strategy.”

    “However, our data suggests that animal-based low-carb diets, which are prevalent in North America and Europe, might be associated with shorter overall lifespan and should be discouraged.”

    “Instead, if one chooses to follow a low-carb diet, then exchanging carbs for more plant-based fats and proteins might actually promote healthy aging in the long term.”


    sauce https://nypost.com/2018/08/17/cuttin...o-dying-young/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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