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  1. #1401
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    New study finds just 9 grams of processed meat per week can increase women's risk for breast cancer

    New research has found that post-menopausal women who eat just 9g of processed meats a week could be at a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

    The study published in the European Journal of Cancer examined 260,000 middle-aged British women and revealed that even those who ate less than 9g of processed meats a week were still 15 per cent more likely to get breast cancer than those who refrained completely.

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and accounts for 11,000 deaths in the UK each year, according to the most recent figures.

    The research from the University of Glasgow found that post-menopausal women who eat just three rashers of bacon or two sausages on a weekly basis are a fifth more likely to contract the disease.

    Public health researchers at the university believe processed meats could be responsible for hundreds of cases of breast cancer each year that could be avoided.

    When the research was combined with ten previous studies accounting for 1.7 million women and 40,000 cases of breast cancer, it revealed that eating processed meats could increase the risks for post-menopausal women by a tenth, The Times reports.

    Avoiding Cancer

    The risk of developing cancer sometime in our lives is already around 40%-50%, so it's crucial we do everything in our power to avoid this disease.

    But can diet reduce our chances of contracting cancer?

    A 2012 analysis of all the studies done to date concluded vegetarians have significantly lower cancer rates. For example, the largest forward-looking study on diet and cancer ever performed concluded that “the incidence of all cancers combined is lower among vegetarians.”

    But what about vegans?


    A study from Loma Linda University funded by the National Cancer Institute reported that vegans have lower rates of cancer than both meat-eaters and vegetarians.

    Vegan women, for example, had 34 percent lower rates of female-specific cancers such as breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer - and this was compared to a control group of 'healthy omnivores' who ate substantially less meat than the general population (just two servings a week or more), as well as after controlling for non-dietary factors such as smoking, alcohol, and a family history of cancer.

    Why do vegans have such lower cancer risk? It may be due to the level of a cancer-promoting growth hormone in the body called IGF-1. Consuming animal protein increases the levels of circulating IGF-1 in our body, but within two weeks of switching to a plant-based diet, IGF-1 levels in the bloodstream drop[10] sufficiently to help slow the growth of cancer cells.

    Studies comparing levels of IGF-1 in meat-eaters vs. vegetarians vs. vegans show that only vegans have significantly lower levels, which suggests we should eliminate animal products from our diets altogether.

    Vegans were also shown to have lower rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension as well as significantly lower cancer risk.

    Groundbreaking research done by Dr. Dean Ornish and Nobel Prize winner Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn found that a vegan diet caused more than 500 genes to change in only three months, turning on genes that prevent disease and turning off genes that cause breast cancer, heart disease, prostate cancer, and other diseases.

    This is extremely empowering news, given that most people think they are a victim of their genes and that contracting these diseases at some point cannot be helped. We aren’t helpless at all; in fact, the power is largely in our hands, or rather, in our forks.
    sauce: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...st-cancer-risk
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  2. #1402
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    Vegetarian Sausages Are as Bad for You as Meat, Health Group Says

    It would be pretty presumptuous to assume that vegetarians eat meat-free sausages purely for health reasons. Who doesn’t enjoy a hit of fatty, salty food for breakfast, especially if it doesn’t involve the odds and ends of animals being squished into a tube?

    That being said, when it comes to sodium, a lot of meatless sausages can apparently be just as unhealthy as the meat for which they’re ostensibly being substituted. The Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), which describes itself as “a group concerned with salt and its effects on health, supported by 25 expert scientific members,” says that a recent survey of theirs “has exposed the shocking and excessively high amounts of salt in certain sausage brands.”



    In a press release issued on Wednesday, CASH called out a wide range of sausage producers included in their “Sausages Survey 2017,” and a number of vegetarian brands were not spared. “Going meat free isn’t always healthier in terms of salt either; some vegetarian options are just as salty,” CASH wrote in the press release. “Quorn’s 4 Best of British Sausages have a whopping 1.9g salt/100g dishing up 2.2g salt in 2 sausages—that’s more salt than half a Pizza Hut Margherita Pizza!”

    The survey was undertaken by CASH in concert with Queen Mary University of London, where CASH Chairman Graham MacGregor is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine. MacGregor was adamant about the potentially widespread health implications of a nation hooked on tubes of meat (or meat replacements) that make it very difficult for consumers to stay within their daily recommended sodium intake.

    “Public Health England, who is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020 without further delay,” MacGregor said. “Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year. Salt reduction is the most cost-effective and most successful public health preventive measure made to date, and it is a national tragedy that it is being allowed to fail.”

    Public Health England’s Chief Nutritionist Dr Alison Tedstone responded, in the same press release, by saying, “We’ve been very clear with the food industry on the importance of meeting the 2017 salt targets. We’ll report on their progress next year and will provide advice to government on the next steps.”

    Sausage is a staple of the British diet, and last year, 175,713 tons of sausage made their way into 85 percent of households, according to the pig farm industry, so MacGregor's medical fears that "thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks" may not be so hyperbolic. That level of sausage consumption equated to 61 grams of sodium, or 134 bags of pre-salted chips per person, per year, says CASH. So, that's a lot.

    Of course, if you're eating sausages, hot dogs, or meat substitutes, you're probably not a health nut. But at least this clears it up: Plant-based foods can be pretty crappy for you, too.

    sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/arti...unchiesfbcaads
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  3. #1403
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26195544_2154432141495918_7611291701888279460_n.jpg
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  4. #1404
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    It's never too late to change.

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  5. #1405
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    How to fuel during your ride (or run). These tips (from a no-meat athlete's blog is also applicable to riding or any other endurance workout)

    How to Eat and Drink During a Run

    1. Get off the commercial drinks and gels. Or at least, check them out to make sure they don’t contain artificial colors and sweeteners. While some sports drinks are truly designed for athletes, many of the more popular ones must also cater to the masses of non-athletes who buy them as soda alternatives. Much better to make your own natural sports drink and raw energy gel, both courtesy of pro vegan triathlete Brendan Brazier, in his book Thrive.

    2. Consume mostly liquid or easily-digesting food like gel. Solid food takes more energy and blood to digest than liquid, leaving you with less for hauling ass. And it’s more likely to cause intestinal distress, which can ruin a race. Except for the longest events, skip the solids.

    3. For all workouts, take in 4 to 6 ounces of water every 10 to 20 minutes. Your goal is to replace most of what you lose in weight, so if you want to get precise, you can figure out what you lose during a standard workout and drink the exact amount you need to replace it. Or just chill out and just follow a rule of thumb like this one.

    4. Get 500 milligrams of sodium with every 16 ounces you drink. When you sweat, you lose electrolytes, and that puts you at risk for hyponatremia if you hydrate without replacing them. For those of you making your own drinks and gels, 500 milligrams is a little less than the amount in a quarter teaspoon of salt.

    5. For workouts and races lasting over an hour (and up to 4 or 5 hours), you need 30-60 grams of carbohydrate per hour. 30-60 grams is a commonly-cited figure, but it’s a big range. More useful might be to divide your body weight in pounds by 4 to get a minimum hourly carbohydrate requirement, in grams. Accomplish this with a sports drink or a combination of energy gel and water. Some claim a little bit of protein, in a 4:1 carb-to-protein ratio, helps minimize muscle damage.

    6. For anything lasting much more than 5 hours, the nutrition focus shifts to fat, with a smaller amount of carbohydrate. For details, go find an ultrarunner who has run more than a single 50K!
    The Least You Need to Know About Fueling Your Run
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  6. #1406
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    Director James Cameron to release ‘game changing’ vegan documentary at Sundance


    Award-winning director and vegan environmentalist has James Cameron executively produced new vegan documentary The Game Changers which will be debuted at Park City Utah’s Sundance Film Festival on January 19th.

    The film is a collaboration between Cameron, director Louis Psihoyos (who also directed Oscar-winning Japanese dolphin slaughter documentary The Cove), and mixed martial arts champion James Wilks.

    According to the film’s website, the film will focus on: “From the UFC Octagon in Las Vegas and the anthropology lab at Dartmouth, to a strongman gym in Berlin and the bushlands of Zimbabwe, The Game Changers will introduce the world to elite athletes, special ops soldiers, visionary scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes—each on a mission to create a seismic shift in the way we eat and live.”

    The Game Changers will feature a wide array of elite athletes, special operations soldiers, scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes who are all thriving on a plant-based diet.

    “The world’s strongest guy is a vegan,” Psihoyos said. “The world’s fastest guy, Carl Lewis, was the first to break 10 seconds, and he did it when he was a vegan. We’re trying to dispel the myth that you need protein from animals to become a real man.”

    In recent years, Cameron has become an avid advocate for veganism and appears alongside actor Samuel L. Jackson in Eating You Alive—a new documentary that focuses on the adverse health effects of consuming animal products.






    sauce: Director James Cameron to release ‘game changing’ vegan documentary at Sundance | Vegan Food & Living
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  7. #1407
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    Plant based related... finally a use for dandelions and ragweed


    Scientists are making carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum


    Carbon fiber is the Superman of materials. Five times stronger than steel and a fraction of the weight, it is used in everything from tennis rackets to golf clubs to bicycles to wind turbine blades to passenger airplanes to Formula One race cars. There’s just one catch: Carbon fiber is made from oil and other costly ingredients, making the end product exceptionally expensive. That’s why carbon fiber shows up in race cars but rarely makes it into minivans.

    That could change. Scientists say it may soon be possible to make carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum, driving down costs, making the material more widely available for use in cars, planes and other vehicles.

    Carbon fiber is made from a chemical called acrylonitrile. Currently, producers make acrylonitrile from oil, ammonia, oxygen and an expensive catalyst. The process produces a lot of heat and yields a toxic byproduct. And, because acrylonitrile is made from petroleum, the cost of carbon fiber tends to rise and fall with the price of oil.

    “Acrylonitrile prices have witnessed large fluctuations in the past, which has in turn led to lower adoption rates for carbon fibers for making cars and planes lighter weight,” said Gregg Beckham, a group leader at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and coauthor of a recent paper detailing this research. “If you can stabilize the acrylonitrile price by providing a new feedstock from which to make acrylonitrile,” he said, adding, “we might be able to make carbon fiber cheaper.”

    Beckham and a team of researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed a new process for producing acrylonitrile that makes use of plants, namely the parts people can’t eat, such as corn stalks and wheat straw. Scientists broke these materials down into sugars, which were converted into an acid and combined with an inexpensive catalyst to produce acrlyonitrile. The process generated no excess heat and returned no toxic byproducts.

    Scientists believe the plant-based process could be scaled up and used in manufacturing. Researchers are now working with several firms to produce a large quantity of acrylonitrile that will be turned into carbon fiber and tested for use in automobiles. By making carbon fiber cheaper, scientists could help car owners save money in the long run. Cars made with carbon fiber are lighter than those made with steel. As a result, they need less fuel to cover the same distance, helping drivers save on gas while also cutting planet-warming carbon pollution.

    There’s a trend underway of scientists making petroleum products from plants instead. Petroleum is, after all, made from prehistoric plants that were buried and subjected to intense heat and pressure for millions of years. Researchers are trying to cut out the middleman — deriving needed chemicals directly from plants, reducing our dependence on oil.

    “We’ll be doing more fundamental research,” Beckham said. “Beyond scaling acrylonitrile production, we are also excited about using this powerful, robust chemistry to make other everyday materials.”


    sauce: https://www.popsci.com/carbon-fiber-from-plants#page-3
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  8. #1408
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26239193_10215739374300538_6508625225146745248_n.jpg
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  9. #1409
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    3 Reasons Quinoa Is A Damn-Near-Perfect Fitness Food

    Boost your health and fitness gains by adding quinoa to your shopping cart more often.


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    Indigenous to South America and considered a sacred food staple in countries like Bolivia, quinoa was nearly wiped out by Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century, only to experience a renaissance as a supergrain in modern times.

    It wasn't long ago that quinoa was considered exotic and rarely found on store shelves. But due to a rise in the popularity of gluten-free eating, quinoa has become a supermarket fixture. Its reputation as a nutritional powerhouse has also helped quinoa work its way into more pantries than ever. And harried cooks appreciate that it takes about half the time to cook as brown rice.

    This poster child of nutritious gluten-free grains should find a place in your fitness diet, and these recipes make it easy for quinoa to nourish your body from morning to night.

    Reason 1: Quinoa Is Rich In Antioxidants

    As with fruits and vegetables, eating more quinoa will infuse your diet with antioxidants, compounds that prowl the body looking for cell-damaging free radicals to "mop up." For this reason, a higher intake of antioxidants is thought to be an important part of the equation in the battle against various diseases. Antioxidants like those found in quinoa might aid in exercise recovery by helping to limit the damage muscle cells experience after a vigorous workout.

    Beyond the more customary beige grains, quinoa now comes in packages of red or black. Pigments that give black and red quinoa their striking hues are potent antioxidants; in fact, research shows colored quinoa can pack a bigger antioxidant punch than the paler counterpart. They also tend to be less grassy tasting and have firmer textures, making them ideal for salads.

    Reason 2: Quinoa Is High In Protein


    One cup of cooked quinoa provides about 8 grams of protein, but it's not just any old lackluster plant-based protein we're talking about here. Quinoa is a "complete" protein, meaning it contains all nine essential amino acids—similar to animal proteins.

    Of particular importance, quinoa contains the amino acid leucine, the same amino acid abundant in whey protein. Leucine is especially effective at promoting muscle repair and anabolism.

    Reason 3: Quinoa Comes Loaded With Fiber


    Quinoa is a great way to infuse your diet with an extra dose of fiber. One cup of cooked quinoa delivers 5 grams of fiber (men and women should aim for 38 and 25 grams a day, respectively). That's an important dietary perk, considering higher intakes of fiber have been linked to lower blood pressure.

    And since fiber promotes feelings of fullness, via its power to slow digestion and support blood-sugar levels, adding more high-fiber foods like quinoa to your daily diet could help put the brakes on overeating and mindless snacking.

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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  10. #1410
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    We've replaced white rice with Quinoa in everything but Sushi. We still use wild rice for stuffed mushrooms and other winter wild rice dishes, but it's pretty hard to go wrong with that either.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  11. #1411
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
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    Same thing with Cabbage. Start with a whole pan full and end up with two servings.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  12. #1412
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    I'm eating tons of spinach and that meme above is so true! Surprisingly, even though I was "anti-vegetable" as a kid growing up, I discovered spinach and really loved it steamed with a bit of butter and salt. Still do. We buy the big bags of leaves that are triple washed and ready to eat. The opposite of the cooked version, you open the bag and it fluffs up to 10x the volume. It just keeps growing and growing....until you cook it, of course.

    Oh, I haven't done straight quinoa, yet. We get bags of long grain wild rices with a pretty sizable amount of quinoa in it but I'll need to give it a shot just straight up. I just bought a new rice cooker from Costco that does a great job. It has a setting exclusively for Quinoa, too. Costco also sells a few different versions of quinoa which I'll have to give a try.

  13. #1413
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    I'm eating tons of spinach and that meme above is so true! Surprisingly, even though I was "anti-vegetable" as a kid growing up, I discovered spinach and really loved it steamed with a bit of butter and salt. Still do. We buy the big bags of leaves that are triple washed and ready to eat. The opposite of the cooked version, you open the bag and it fluffs up to 10x the volume. It just keeps growing and growing....until you cook it, of course.

    Oh, I haven't done straight quinoa, yet. We get bags of long grain wild rices with a pretty sizable amount of quinoa in it but I'll need to give it a shot just straight up. I just bought a new rice cooker from Costco that does a great job. It has a setting exclusively for Quinoa, too. Costco also sells a few different versions of quinoa which I'll have to give a try.
    Spinach (and most greens) are pretty versatile. If you get tired of butter and salt, try olive oil, garlic, and lime. As for quinoa, try toasting it first. This will help develop the flavor more.

  14. #1414
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26907022_1768519603199214_9067167933530274598_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  15. #1415
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    One of the things I hear from people about vegan or vegetarian diet is : Aren't you always hungry? My answer is always no. Here is a good article how to avoid nutritional mistakes


    3 Reasons You Always Feel Hungry

    You are interested in this article because you're hungry. All. The. Time. No sooner do you finish a meal than your stomach starts gurgling and growling, letting you know in no uncertain terms that you need pound back more food. It may make you wonder whether you have some sort of superhero metabolism, or if you're just not eating enough of the right foods at mealtime.

    When was the last time you ate? If it was three or more hours ago, you're probably just due for your next meal. But if you ate an hour ago and your stomach is already starting to complain, it's probably time to look at what you're eating. Try these three tips to keep your belly feeling full and happy!

    1. You Don't Drink Enough Fluids

    Our bodies need a lot of fluids every day to optimize cognitive and physical performance. The average woman should drink a minimum of 96 ounces of fluid a day (about 12 cups), while the average man needs at least 125 ounces (about 16 cups or 1 gallon).[1,2] That's a lot of liquid for your average busy person to consume every day. And if you're training, you need to drink even more.

    For every 15 minutes you work out, you should drink another 5-8 ounces of fluid. That means if your workout lasts 60 minutes, you need to get another 20-32 ounces. One of the easiest ways to drink enough water is to carry around a water bottle. Not one of those tiny 8-ouncers, either; invest in a container that will hold one-fourth to one-half of your daily goal.

    The mother of all fluids, water, can do a lot to help you deal with hunger pangs. First of all, it helps create a feeling of fullness. When you consume water (or any fluid), your stomach expands, which sends a signal to your brain that you are full.

    Then there are those times when our bodies get confused. For example, we don't usually feel thirst until we're already slightly dehydrated. And our brains can confuse thirst with being hungry. Our brains tell us we need to eat, when all we really need to do is drink!

    Keep filling up on fluids—preferably calorie-free fluids—and you can keep that relentless appetite of yours in line.

    How to get more liquids: Keep a water bottle attached to your hip. Bring it with you in the car and into meetings. Put one at your desk during the day and on your nightstand overnight. Take a gulp every time you look at it, and keep replenishing it with a variety of fluids. Fill it with sports drinks when you're working out and with low-calorie juices and water when you're not.

    If your hunger really gets out of hand, try drinking 12-16 ounces of water immediately before and after each meal to make sure your brain gets the signal that you are full! Then, just keep taking in those fluids until your next meal.

    2. You Don't Eat Enough Fiber
    Fiber is often one of the most overlooked parts of our diets. We think a lot about getting our macros—our carbs, fats, and protein. But our bodies need fiber too. In fact, the recommended daily intake for fiber is 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women.

    But how much fiber people actually consume tends to be a lot less than that: 18 grams for men and 15 grams for women! Considering the powerful appetite-suppressing punch fiber packs, you might want to make sure you're getting at least the daily recommended amount—and it's not that hard to do.

    How to get more fiber: Just by swapping white carbs (white bread and pasta, white rice, and white potatoes) for brown carbs (whole-grain breads and pastas, brown rice, and oats) you can increase your fiber by 4-5 grams per meal. Another great source of fiber is flaxseed. At 3 grams per tablespoon, flaxseed can give a big fiber boost to your morning oats, post-workout smoothie, or nightly Greek yogurt (vegetarian diets)!

    3. You Don't Eat Enough Vegetables
    I'm talking about a minimum of three servings (one handful is a serving) of leafy greens and bright orange, red, or yellow veggies such as carrots, beets, and peppers each day.

    Vegetables suppress those feeling of hunger, because they're about 90 percent water—and loaded with fiber. Daily-double special! Veggies also contain very few calories per bite, so you can eat just about all of them you want without breaking the calorie bank.

    How to get more vegetables: Consider sneaking in vegetables throughout your day by hiding them in smoothies, omelets and scrambles, and sandwiches. Or just have them straight up; they're pretty tasty fresh or slightly undercooked.

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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  16. #1416
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    Plant based or vegan it doesn’t matter. Both deserve a high five



    The philosophical case for going vegan is about pleasure—not preachiness


    “Of course reading and thinking are important but, my God, food is important too.” These are the words of philosopher Iris Murdoch, and I am inclined to agree with her. Food is not just important to our health and our pleasure, but because it helps define the kind of people we are. In this regard, one might say, you are what you eat.

    Our society’s growing interest in veganism is a sign that many people—at least those privileged enough to have a fair amount of choice in their dietary habits—feel driven to ensure that their food aligns with their sense of self. In part, this is because public perceptions of veganism have shifted. The old-fashioned idea is that veganism is an-hedonic lifestyle based on grim restrictions, requiring immense discipline and sacrifice. This attitude is neatly summarized in a recent tweet from the British tabloid journalist Piers Morgan, who, upon learning of people going vegan for the month of January, asked, “What new special kind of Hell is this?”

    This stereotype belies actual experiences of becoming vegan. Put simply, becoming vegan can be fun—not only because vegan food can taste good and improve your health, but because making the choice to go vegan involves experimenting with becoming a different kind of person.

    The old arguments for veganism tend to tub-thump the moral wrongness of eating animals. The work of the late American philosopher Tom Regan is a good example of such an approach. Regan developed a broadly Kantian position involving not treating others, including non-human animals, as means to our ends. This led him to argue that justice required that non-human animals be treated with respect, so it was morally wrong to eat them.

    These kinds of arguments led to a widespread perception of vegans as morally-righteous extremists, which made it easy for the majority of people to avoid considering giving up animal products. Those uninterested in pursuing modern sainthood by building our lives around duties and prohibitions could eat our cheeseburgers in peace.

    The new veganism, by contrast, recognizes that care for the self is an important and worthwhile pursuit. And it deems pleasure a central facet of that self-care, emphasizing the pleasures of eating a delicious, colorful array of plant-based foods. Such an orientation is about what you eat, not what you don’t eat. The new veganism does not say “Don’t eat animals,” but rather, “Eat plants.”

    Indeed, one facet of becoming vegan may be a stance of openness toward new pleasures. Meat-eaters may extol the delights of the smell of a Sunday roast. So can vegans take in the comforting aroma of a sweet potato and fennel tagine. Instagram is bursting with photos of artisanal vegan ice cream cones and artfully arranged buckwheat waffles, while haute cuisine vegetarian and vegan restaurants like Millennium in Oakland, California, or Terre a Terre in Brighton, England, emphasize inventive dishes like seared chestnut polenta cake with sautéed maitake, oyster, and chanterelle mushrooms. And there are pleasures like discovering gorgeous things like persimmon in your local store, overlooked while you were an omnivore.

    The pleasures of veganism also encompass the feel-good benefits of healthy living. From short-term energy boosts to longer-term benefits like a lower risk of heart disease and cancer, becoming vegan invites us to enjoy cultivating a sound relationship with one’s body.

    We can also see the choice to become vegan as a transformative moment; a chance to actively engage in the aesthetic construction of the self. Being a vegan means changing into a different kind of person. What’s at stake is a better relation not only to one’s body, but also to one’s ways of thinking, and ways of treating others and the planet.

    This is what distinguishes becoming vegan from taking up CrossFit or some other self-improvement practice. Fitness work is part and parcel of a wider trend for aspirational living. There is nothing truly progressive or subversive about it. But in becoming vegan, you become other than the norm. You refuse to conform to the dominant Western eating culture. And so becoming vegan is about celebrating your freedom to choose the kind of person you become.

    Veganism, then, is a practice in which one becomes other than what one is. It involves a creative and experimental kind of work on the self. To become vegan is to take pleasure in disrupting environmental degradation; to enjoy the feeling of caring about the conditions of food production; to celebrate eating food that has been ethically produced. Being a vegan can be fun because it feels great to be part of a quest for a kinder, more sustainable world. It feels empowering to take actions toward creating that world, to be one person in a movement that wants to make a difference. Self-care, after all, is not just about treating oneself well, since we all live in the world together. Self-care means exercising choice over how we think, and attending to the steps we take to create the kind of world we want to live in.

    sauce: https://qz.com/1180190/the-philosoph...t-preachiness/
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  17. #1417
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    We had vegan burgers made with jackfruit. delish

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  18. #1418
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  19. #1419
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    Happy Hump Day

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  20. #1420
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    If Fructose is Bad, What About Fruit?

    Does the fructose naturally found in fruit and fruit juice have the same adverse effects as excess “industrial fructose” (table sugar and high fructose corn syrup) and if not, why not?


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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
    I completely understand this. All these years I thought that a vegetarian just ate plants until I became one. But No! As Steve Martin used to say. Apparently there are Ovo vegetarians, Lacto vegetarians, Pollo vegetarians, Pesco vegetarians and every combination of these. I came to find out that people who just eat plants are Vegan. Why is that? You would think that the term vegetarian would mean only plants.
    It gets all silly with the pointless 'is honey vegan?' argument. Yet no one condemns mushrooms or fungi, which are not plants and are a separate kingdom (actually more similar to animal cell biology than plant).
    Eat what you want and leave the labels out of it.

  22. #1422
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    So many trails... so little time...

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    ^ good article dave54
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  24. #1424
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    I'm not a Guinness drinker (although I did try it when I visited Dublin many moons ago)

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    It’s official – all Guinness is now suitable for vegans in draft, bottle and can form

    In 2015, Guinness announced they would be implementing a new filtration system to eliminate the need to filter the drink with isinglass (fish bladders), a product made from fish bladders that helps to remove extra yeast from the stout, in order to make the stout suitable for vegans.

    Stephen Kilcullen, master brewer and head of quality for Guinness, said that the stout would have been vegan a decade ago but the technology did not exist to filter out the yeast without isinglass. “Everything we tried lost that ruby red colour you see in the bottom of the glass which shows it’s clear. We wouldn’t compromise on quality so we had to wait for the technology,” he said.

    In April 2016, Diageo, the company which manufactures the stout, confirmed that all kegs of Guinness on the market are vegan-friendly as they had been made using a new process which does not use isinglass. However, whilst the kegs of Guinness were suitable for vegans, bottles and cans were still not vegan-friendly thanks to the fact the the manufacturer couldn’t guarantee that old stock of the drink had been filtered using the new process.

    So we’re delighted to hear today that it’s official – all Guinness worldwide is now isinglass-free and is suitable for vegans. Bottoms up!


    sauce: It's official - all Guinness is now suitable for vegans in draft, bottle and can form | Vegan Food & Living
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  25. #1425
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    Why vegans always have to tell you they’re vegan




    How do you know if someone is vegan? Don’t worry – they’ll tell you.” It’s an old joke, but it’s still doing the rounds. And now that we’re more than three weeks into Veganuary, there’s no getting away from veganism. I became a convert myself just over a year ago with the help of 2017’s Veganuary campaign.

    Oh, look. Just a few lines in and I’ve managed to tell you I’m a vegan.

    I have to say, when I first heard this joke, I was mildly amused and slightly embarrassed, probably because I am one of those annoying vegans who seem to use the word vegan in every sentence. See? I just did it again! My partner isn’t vegan but he’s kind enough to try all of my new recipes, and eats mainly plant-based foods at home. He has the patience of a saint, but even he has cracked the odd joke about my inability to talk about anything else. I am very lucky to have friends and family who are either vegan or vegetarian, or just interested in what I have to say on the matter. But it got me thinking about why vegans feel the need to tell the world.

    I think the first realisation you have when you become vegan is just how exciting it is. Rather than finding yourself limited to a restrictive diet, which is the expectation of most new vegans, a whole new world of food and a new way of cooking are opened up to you. You start experimenting with ingredients you’ve never used before, or sometimes never even heard of, like nooch or seitan, with amazing culinary results (some of the time), and you want everybody to taste what you’ve tasted. If you’ve been a hardened cheese addict for most of your life, like I was, of course you want your family to try the latest plant-based cheese that melts just like mozzarella!

    You can also find yourself feeling much more energetic and enthusiastic after the switch to a plant-based diet. I think this is in part because of the amount of healthy nutrients you’re getting on a daily basis; my fruit and veg intake has more than doubled. But for those who have become vegan for the animal rights side of things, every meal is guilt-free and eating almost becomes an exercise in mindfulness, leaving you with positive feelings. Who wouldn’t want their friends and family to feel this too?

    Most new vegans will join an online group or two; there are plenty to choose from, and Veganuary even has its own Facebook page. The sense of belonging can be invigorating, but it can also blind you to the fact that most of the people around you know very little about the vegan lifestyle, and at worst, have no or little interest.

    But there is a more serious aspect to vegans shouting about their lifestyle for what feels like 24 hours a day. Although it has become trendy to “eat clean”, and a plant-based diet is often viewed as clean, veganism’s roots are deeply embedded in the world of animal rights activism.

    Many people are unaware of the cruelty with which their meat, cheese and leather items are produced, whereas others have had fleeting glimpses and choose to ignore it. I was brought up vegetarian for most of my life, but it took 15 years after my mother went dairy-free and gave me explicit explanations of why she had done so before I opened my eyes to the brutality of the dairy and egg industries. I knew what happened on dairy farms: that female cows spend their lives being artificially inseminated, only to have their calves taken from them at birth; that those calves are usually slaughtered for veal while their mothers spend their lives attached to machines draining the milk that was intended for their lost babies. But still I chose to ignore it. Once you open your eyes and have that lightbulb moment, it’s hard to watch the rest of the world tucking into their cheese plates and burgers without feeling you should say something.

    I often think that if I just told that friend how their omelette ended up on their plate, or that stranger in the fur coat how the mink or coyote that had worn it before had suffered, perhaps they’d reconsider. Maybe I could get them to see the world like I now see it, and, just maybe, veganism could become the norm, rather than the radical.

    When I talk about veganism to my friends and family, it’s usually in the context of a new project I’m working on, or a great new product I want to share. I’m not one for interfering in people’s choices, although I always encourage people to ask me questions and find out more about why I’m vegan (and how great it is). But in a vegan’s ideal world, slaughter and unnecessary pain would no longer exist – and when you know there is a more compassionate alternative, it’s hard not to mention it once or twice.
    Sauce: https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...health-animals
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    After a tough workout we had a delicious lunch at Fresh (a vegan/vegetarian hotspot in Toronto)

    Chris had the Holiday Wrap: avocado & marinated tofu cubes with garlic mayo, dill pickle, jicama, tomato, lettuce, cucumber, grated carrot, red onion & alfalfa sprouts

    I had the Creole Red bean soup with grilled cornbread and hummus (I love hummus)


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26992251_2053128504931590_3708464230099318830_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-27540673_2053128421598265_4132814772486586585_n.jpg

    Later we enjoyed Americanos and an early Valentine's sweet treat (from Bunner's Bakery... all vegan)

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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26907941_2053127831598324_7373826373611858148_n.jpg

    Batteries recharged... we then went on an evening ride (fun day)
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Happy Hump Day

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    Is it possible to become a potato sommelier? Because if so, I'm in!
    The cake is a lie.

  29. #1429
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    10 Surprising Animal Ingredients Lurking on Store Shelves

    Vegans know to avoid gelatin, lactose, and honey, but what about those other, unrecognizable ingredients found in packaged foods?

    From dough made out of duck feathers to a glaze made from crushed bugs, animal-based ingredients are often unknowingly found in products across store shelves. As such, vegans need to be aware of the oft- hard-to-pronounce ingredients found on a package, which becomes problematic because neither the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nor the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has regulations for vegan or vegetarian ingredients. This lack of uniformed definition means the legality of vegan labeling falls under a marketing policy stating that a product label must be “truthful and not misleading.”

    A labeling system for food additives referred to “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) is in place to ensure food safety requirements are met, but vegans are often the ones mislead when the sources (plant or animal) of GRAS ingredients aren’t labeled. Unfortunately, United States law requires labels that distinguish “natural” or “artificial” flavors, but consumers have no way of figuring out what those flavors are because “natural” flavors can be derived from both plants and animals.

    To help remedy this labeling confusion, we’ve created a list of popular ingredients every vegan needs to recognize … and steer clear from.

    Albumen
    A fancy term for egg white, albumen is used in many processed foods such as candy, cake, and cookies. Albumen is also a common fining agent in wine production.

    Casein

    Casein can be one of the trickier ingredients to navigate because it appears in seemingly vegan alternatives, and because it is found in foods in such small increments, some foods that include casein are labeled as “non-dairy.” However, this does not mean the product is vegan, as casein—which can also come in the form of caseinates such as calcium caseinate, potassium caseinate, and sodium caseinate—is a protein found in the milk of all mammals and makes up 80 percent of the protein found in cows’ milk. Casein is popular in protein powders, as well as paint, adhesives, cosmetics, and textiles.

    Confectioner's glaze
    Most commonly used as a coating on candy or other confections, confectioner’s glaze (or “resinous glaze”) is made of 35-percent shellac, an ingredient derived from the secretions of the female lac insect. Found in a variety of non-food products as well such as aluminum foil, furniture polish, and hairspray, confectioner’s glaze has GRAS status in the US.

    Isinglass
    Derived from the membranes of fish bladders, isinglass is a gelatinous substance most commonly used to clarify wine and beer. Although isinglass is not in the finished product, it is still not suitable for vegans because it is part of the booze-making process.

    Lactic acid
    When you feel the burn after a good workout, that’s your body producing lactate, or lactic acid. Lactic acid is also a very common additive found in a variety of foods such as soy sauce, sourdough bread, pickled vegetables, wine, candy, and soft drinks, and can also be derived from fermenting whey (milk), cornstarch, potatoes, or molasses. Unfortunately, most commercial producers don’t label the origin of lactic acid, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. Luckily, vegan companies generally indicate that their lactic acid is derived from plant-sources.

    L-Cysteine
    L-Cysteine is used to preserve and improve the texture of commercial dough and is mostly derived from duck feathers, hog hair (or hooves), or human hair (which is gathered from the floors of salons in China and dissolved in hydrochloric acid before the amino acid is isolated). Synthetically produced L-cysteine can be certified Kosher or Halal, but “natural” cannot. Considered GRAS, this ingredient is labeled when used for function, not for flavor. When it is labeled, the company does not need to specify its source.

    Methionine
    An amino acid that’s derived from albumen or casein, methionine is often used to maintain freshness in potato chips and can sometimes even be found in tea.

    Red 4
    A red dye derived from drying, boiling, treating, and crushing cochineal bugs, Red 4 (also known as carmine or cochineal) is used in a variety of products ranging from juice to candy because of its deep red color. Because Red 4 can cause severe allergic reactions in some people, the FDA requires that it be specifically named on ingredient labels.

    Vitamin D
    Vegans already know that we can get vitamin D from the sun, fortified dairy alternatives, and supplements. Unfortunately, some seemingly vegan products with vitamin D such as orange juice derive vitamin D from non-vegan sources. Although D2 is derived from plant or yeast sources, the more-common D3 can be animal-based, so if it’s a mainstream product, do your research before purchasing. Fatty fish liver, egg yolks, and milk are some of the animal-based origins of the vitamin.

    Whey
    A common ingredient in processed foods, whey (sometimes in form of whey protein isolate) is well-known for its use as a performance powder. Derived as a byproduct of cheese production and when added to whole milk after coagulation, the curds (solids) separate from the whey (liquid) so they become cheese and the whey becomes protein powder.
    sauce: 10 Surprising Animal Ingredients Lurking on Store Shelves
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    Six Ideal Recovery Snacks for Plant-Based Athletes

    If you are someone who trains and/or competes in a sport or a range of sports, you likely want to get the most benefit out of your workouts. You train hard, dedicate the time, and you want to see yourself getting stronger and faster as a result. Sure, you probably already know that pushing yourself physically to new limits can help you to achieve this. But did you know that how and when you refuel with nutrition after your training sessions and competitions is another crucial piece of enhancing your performance? This is where recovery snacks come in! If your aim is to build and/or maintain muscle mass and improve your performance when training with moderate to high intensity sessions, your recovery nutrition is an essential factor to consider.

    In simple terms, recovery nutrition involves a beverage, meal, or snack consumed shortly after a training session or competition. Ideally, it should contain a source of protein and carbohydrate, vitamins and minerals. Since athletes are often short on time, snacks make the ideal option to ensure that your body gets the nutrition it needs. Plus, it is fun to snack.

    Why is recovery nutrition so important?
    During moderate to high intensity exercise, the body’s natural energy stores, such as glycogen, a carbohydrate molecule stored in the liver and muscle cells gets used up and needs to be replenished. In addition, muscle fibers are broken down and need to be rebuilt and repaired. While this process is generally good and can lead to an increase in strength and metabolic adaptation, it is essential that your body receives the nutrition it needs to do so.

    Before you launch into packing your bag full of snacks, take some time to evaluate your goals. Are you looking to train hard and maximize performance? Or are you looking to keep fit and have fun? For the average active individual, the body will naturally repair itself in time and having a snack or meal after every workout isn’t crucial.

    For you athletes who train multiple days in a row, or multiple times a day, recovery nutrition is essential to jumpstart muscle protein synthesis (aka muscle building) and restore the body’s energy stores, so that you can tackle your next training session with ease.

    There are two main things to consider with post workout nutrition: content, and timing.



    What you eat:
    In regards to content, an ideal recovery snack or meal will include both a source of protein and carbohydrates.

    The ideal ratio is 3-4 grams of carbohydrates to 1 gram of protein (1).

    So, if your snack contains 30 grams of carbs (found in 1 medium banana), then an ideal amount of protein would be 8-10 grams (found in 1 cup of soymilk).


    In addition, it is important to make sure your snack includes a source of antioxidants. Exercise actually causes some stress on your cells, known as “oxidative stress” (2). Therefore, athletes have higher antioxidant needs, as antioxidants work to fight off this damage to your cells. Adding some colorful fruit or veg into your recovery snack will do the trick by providing some antioxidants. Fruits and veggies also include lots of vitamins, minerals, and carbohydrates which make them an ideal component of a recovery snack or meal.



    When you eat:
    In regards to timing, consume your post-workout snack within 30 minutes to 2 hours of completing your workout (1).

    Top 6 Plant-based Recovery Snacks

    These snacks are simple to prepare for athletes on the go, and each snack idea contains a good source of protein and carbohydrates.

    1. Ants on a Log

    Celery sticks + Peanut butter + Raisins
    Don’t fancy celery? Try a fruit instead! Apple + almond butter, or perhaps the classic banana + peanut butter


    2. Energy Ball

    Energy balls are usually a mix of nut butters, natural sweeteners like maple syrup or dried fruit, and other fun additions like cocoa powder, vanilla, hemp hearts, shredded coconut, etc.
    Try this great recipe by Minimalist Baker, 5 ingredient Peanut Butter Energy Bites

    3. Recovery Smoothie

    Ingredients: 1 banana, handful spinach, ½ cup berries, 1 cup dairy-free milk of choice, 1 tablespoon of flax seeds or hemp hearts
    Try your own combo!


    4. Apple, Carrots + Hummus

    Try out my non-traditional recipe for protein-packed, Edamame Hummus!

    5. Soy-milk + Banana

    Sometimes the best options are the simplest options

    1 cup of soymilk and 1 medium banana


    6. Roasted Chickpeas

    You can find these at the grocery store, or why not try making your own!
    Here is a simple recipe for roasted chickpeas
    Sauce:
    https://pamelafergusson.com/top-6-re...ased-athletes/
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  31. #1431
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    I had a super delicious lunch

    Assembly Chef's Hall is a large warehouse space downtown Toronto with stalls of chefs preparing signature dishes. We ate at Mira Mira and I had the barbecue okra dish, a very hearty plate of okra covered in a custom BBQ sauce that's not too spicy and a little sweet. The dish also comes with a cauliflower gratin which is covered in a vegan queso made of potatoes and carrots.

    Topped with a dollop of sunflower scallion crema, this dish has a cool punch of flavour with smokey flavours and just a hint of spice.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dscn7013.jpg

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    We had Brussel Spouts with General Tso sauce the other night. Interesting twist on sprouts but they should have indicated that they were battered/fried. We're gonna use some Bulgogi marinade and try roasting them to see is we can come up with a little healthier version.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  33. #1433
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    Person found a black widow spider in a head of broccoli they bought in Toronto (posted on Reddit)

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    Here is what happened. On 01/30/18 I bought some broccoli form Freshco at Bloor&Dundas location. It was on sale, so I bought a lot and kept them in the fridge. Today morning when I cut one in half, I saw a litter black ball on the broccoli about one inch away from my finger. When I took a closer look, I realized it's a spider, and I suspect it's a black widow(I saw it on youtube b4). But the spider is not moving maybe because It was in the fridge for days. I thought it was dead so I grabbed my phone to take a pic and realized It is NOT dead. I then put the broccoli with the spider on it into a plastic box using a bbq tongue. After that, I checked all the remaining broccoli in the fridge for a spider. More update I have filed a report on CFIA website. I will keep the spider until they contact me
    "Blankorison" posted their finding to Reddit, which had people going nuts. The comments were filled with all sorts of statements, from what to do if it were to bite you to people completely writing themselves off of broccoli for the year.


    sauce: https://www.reddit.com/r/toronto/com...roccoli_crown/

    "Blankorison" has been keeping all of us in the loop since Saturday, and its been pretty entertaining. The next update was something no one suspected – the spider was now their pet and the user needed name suggestions. The comments were filled with “Name it Freshie!” or “Code 4060” (Broccoli.) However, we’ve still been left hanging, waiting for the final decision.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-display.jpg

    Regardless of everything, Blankorison was obviously still going to contact the CFIA office. When they did, they got a rather vague response. They were told to contact the CFIA office closest to them. I guess it’s a waiting game now!


    sauce: https://www.reddit.com/r/toronto/com..._pet_now_name/
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    The 5 Biggest Myths About Plant-Based Diets

    Many people are hesitant to fully embrace a plant-based diet because they are afraid. They’re afraid they won’t get enough nutrition (particularly protein), it might be too expensive or they just won’t have time to prepare everything.

    Why don’t we just dispel some of those myths right now?

    Myth 1: A Whole Food, Plant-Based Diet Is Too Expensive
    On the surface, fast food hamburgers are a lot cheaper than a salad, but let’s look at some facts:

    While plant-based convenience foods can be sometimes pricey, if you stick to simple, wholefood choices you will get much higher nutritional bang for your buck. For example,Beans, other legumes, and whole grains are a lot less expensive than
    meats and they’re jam packed with protein, vitamins, and minerals. And if you buy them in bulk, they will be less expensive.

    Buying fruits and vegetables that are in-season from your local farmer’s market is cheaper than the supermarket most of the time and the goods are fresher and usually naturally ripened (instead of being picked prematurely and ripened in the back of a semi-truck on the way to the store.)

    Equally and somewhat surprisingly, if you buy flash frozen ‘off-season’ fruits and vegetables, you will get many more nutrients than ‘fresh’ vegetables and fruits that are picked prematurely. And frozen fruits and vegetables have the added benefit of being less expensive! Tip: A USDA “U.S. Fancy” shield on the package designates produce of the best size, shape, and color. They are the most tender, succulent, and flavorful.

    Myth 2: Plants Do Not Supply “Complete” Proteins

    A complete protein is one that delivers all nine essential amino acids*. Contrary to popular belief, animal-based protein is not your only option for complete proteins.

    All whole foods contain these nine essential amino acids. All of them. This means all vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, and legumes are complete.

    The only foods that don’t supply all nine are processed foods, i.e. starches and vegetables stripped from fiber like sugar, white flour, and white bread.

    As long as you’re taking in enough calories from whole foods, you’re taking in plenty of protein.

    Myth 3: Plant-Based Diets Are High in Carbs

    Carbohydrates are not the demons they’ve been made out to be. This is what you need to know:

    Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are high in complex (or intact) carbohydrates, which is what your body needs for energy.

    Whole, plant-based foods are also rich in necessary vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants; they are high in fiber and protein as well. Fiber helps slow the digestion of carbohydrates. This means you don’t experience the ‘bad’ effects of processed (or stripped) carbs like a candy bar or a sugary soda that make your blood sugar spike and then plummet.

    Myth 4: Eating a Plant-Based Diet Takes Too Much Time

    It is true that eating a whole food, plant-based diet takes more time than nuking a TV dinner.

    But preparing healthy whole food meals doesn’t mean you’ll be chained to the stove for eternity.

    Here are some tips:

    Keep it simple when you’re pressed for time. You can steam vegetables like squash or broccoli in less than ten minutes, including prep time.

    Invest in a salad spinner. There’s nothing like a salad spinner to help you quickly wash and dry leafy greens. And most spinners are also suitable for use as a salad bowl, saving you on clean-up time. Spin up enough for the week and your nightly salads will come together in minutes.

    Use your slow cooker. You can cook everything from soup to beans to enchiladas and quinoa in a slow cooker. Toss everything in the pot before you leave for the day and dinner will be waiting for you when you get home!

    Another great way to integrate a whole food, plant-based diet seamlessly into your life is simply to plan ahead with a weekly menu and stock your pantry or freezer full of yummy frozen veggies and fruits in advance.

    Myth 5: Eating a Plant-Based Diet Means You Are Hungry All the Time.

    Nothing could be further from the truth. A whole food plant-based diet can be totally satisfying.

    If you are eating plenty of whole food plant-based foods, you will be loading up on fiber. Fiber is really what makes you feel satiated; it fills up your stomach and stabilizes your blood sugar levels to prevent cravings.

    Legumes (i.e. foods like beans, peas, and lentils) are particularly good because they are composed of hunger-satisfying protein and have uniquely high levels of fiber and resistant starch which are carbohydrates that are not broken down by our digestive system.

    Have a growling stomach? A few walnuts provide a powerful antidote with a perfect blend of fiber, protein and healthy fats that will keep you satisfied (and your stomach quiet) for hours.

    To eat a whole food, plant-based diet, you might have to shop a little differently, think a little more about the variety of foods you include in your diet and spend a few more minutes in the kitchen, but in the end, you will reap enormous nutritional rewards.

    Give it a try. Ditch the microwave and head for the farmer’s market. You’ll soon discover that it’s not necessary to break the bank, sacrifice protein, fret over carbs or spend hours on end slaving in the kitchen to nourish and build your body with the delicious whole food, plant-based diet it craves.


    sauce: The 5 Biggest Myths About Plant-Based Diets - UC Davis Integrative Medicine
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    Vegan Olympic Athlete Wins Gold and Rescues Dog Destined for Dinner Table

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    Meagan Duhamel, a two-time world champion skater has been vegan since 2008, and is representing team Canada and veganism at the Winter Olympics in South Korea.

    Duhamel gave an absolutely outstanding performance with partner Eric Radford and won Gold in the Pairs event. They performed their near perfect routine to Adele’s hit, ‘Hometown Glory’ and scored 148.51 points, placing them in the lead.

    But Duhamel is also a hero for another reason.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-6b60879f13b4.jpg


    Prior to competing the vegan Olympic figure skater adopted a dog in Pyeongchang that was destined for the dinner table. This is actually the second dog Duhamel has adopted - last February when she visited the country she adopted her first dog to save it from being eaten.

    Dog meat consumption is regarded as completely normal in South Korea - in a similar way to how pigs and cows are eaten in Western countries.

    The South Korean government ordered restaurants close to the Olympic Stadium in Pyeongchang to stop serving dog meat to avoid bad publicity for the country, however many have added it back to their menus as they say they're losing business.

    Earlier this week, the charity Humane Society International rescued around 90 puppies and dogs from a farm after charity workers persuaded the farmer to give up his trade. The dogs were being kept on a farm just 40 minutes away from the Olympic village.

    This really just goes to show - if you can perform as a top athlete without consuming any animal products - then why cause unnecessary suffering at all? Especially as these animal products are ultimately just hurting us as well - increasing the risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes, and damaging the environment we're all living in.


    sauce https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...nd-rescues-dog
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  37. #1437
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    New to the thread, and thought I'd share my story....

    In 2010 I had emergency heart surgery to remove .8 of a liter of fluid from around my heart. During the 2 nights in ICU they found my CRP (C-Reactive Protein) was at a staggering 10.1 which is crazy high. They tested me for MS and Lupus as that high of an inflammation reading is usually due to some kind of autoimmune disease..... Everything came back negative. I've had my CRP checked twice a year since then and the lowest it has ever been is 5.1 ( 0-1 = Great / 1-3 = Good/Avg / 3 and above is high ).

    In 2010 I was 300+lbs and quickly on my way to an early death but finally in Feb 2014 I began a life change that saved my life and you can read about it here: Post your BEFORE & AFTER success story photo's and here: Post your BEFORE & AFTER success story photo's

    Even though I lost 125lbs, was healthier than ever, and was eating 'clean' (no red meet, no dairy milk, lots of poultry and fish, veggies, fruit and grains) I could not get my CRP lower than 5.1.

    ....Then on one especially too-hot-to ride Aug 2017 Saturday, my 22yr old Phys Ed teacher / DPT to be daughter suggested we watch 'What the Health' and that 90 minutes changed my life..... I was immediately full on Plant Based.

    I decided to give it just under 5 months before I went back to my Dr. for a blood test, and did so just before the end of the year as my deductible was already met. (got to love American health care)

    Well, my CRP results came back at a 0.4!! I changed nothing else in my life, just my plant based diet..... Same exercise, same meds, same everything..... simply changed my nutrition.

    So there you go, there is a hard scientific result of what a plant based diet can do..... it's easy to say "I feel great" when someone asks how your vegan diet is going, but to have a hard fast number to refer to is pretty freaking awesome.

    I admit that I changed my way of life for me and me alone at first, but now I would be lying if I said I didn't feel great knowing that a single animal hasn't been harmed for me to exist on this planet.

    Thanks for reading!

  38. #1438
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    Awesome and inspirational!
    It's just a flesh wound!

  39. #1439
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    Quote Originally Posted by IPunchCholla View Post
    Awesome and inspirational!
    Thanks!

  40. #1440
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    Cow escapes on way to slaughterhouse, smashes through metal fence, breaks arm of man trying to catch her then swims to safety on island in lake

    Because the Bovine Revolution has begun.

    Join with them, fellow cows. You have nothing to lose
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    How to Choose the Healthiest Veggie Burger for You

    Veggie burgers are one of our favorite vegan foods ever. And, with so many varieties (black bean, quinoa, tofu, etc) now available, we seem to be eating them more than ever. But how healthy are all these veggie patties, and should we be worried about the nutritional values of these cruelty-free foods? To answer this question, we looked at store-bought brands, those found at restaurants, and homemade recipes to determine the top qualities to look for when choosing a veggie burger.

    The grocery store

    Selecting a store-bought veggie burger is easier than you might assume. And, if you haven’t studied the labels on veggie burgers lately, you might be surprised to find that many brands are open about their “clean” ingredients list. Luckily, many of these companies use only real ingredients without artificial additives and preservatives, while a few let consumers know how the burger is processed (eg, without hexane or with non-irradiated spices). Still, sodium is an issue, as the closer the number is to zero, the better the product. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium (aka, salt) a day to prevent high blood pressure. This equates to approximately 500 milligrams per meal (200–300 milligrams per burger). In addition, three grams (or more) of dietary fiber on a label is considered a good source, while five grams (or more) is considered excellent. Next, look for the vitamins A and C content, as vegetables contain some of the highest amounts of these vitamins. Furthermore, look at the iron content. When reading labels, 10–19 percent of daily value is considered a good source, and more than 20 percent is considered excellent. Finally, scour the ingredients list to see if the burger is free of artificial ingredients. The old saying still rings true—“If you can’t read it, don’t eat it.”

    Dining out
    If you prefer fresher ingredients, restaurant burgers are the way to go, as an increased interest in plant-based eating has lead many chefs to develop their own veggie burger recipes. Many of these patties contain simple ingredients made with just a few components and include quinoa, pinto beans, chipotle peppers, walnuts, carrots, beet juice, and spices. If you’re eating a non-vegan restaurant, be sure to ask about the ingredients because some restaurants use eggs, milk, and sour cream in their recipes. For an example of a mainstream restaurant doing vegan burgers correctly, visit Denver’s American Grind, where the cruelty-free patty was voted the best veggie burger of 2017 by Westword. This burger contains beets, sweet potatoes, carrots, chickpea, and chickpea flour, while aquafaba (cooked garbanzo bean liquid) is used as a binder.

    From scratch

    There are many reasons to make veggie burgers at home. The first is the fact that you can control the ingredients and the nutritional content. For instance, the more plants you use, the more nutrition you’ll receive, as plants contain phytochemicals, which protect us from disease. Next, you can opt for locally grown ingredients to help area businesses. Finally, you can cater the burger to your tastebuds’ desires. Like salt? Add some. Want more heat? Top your patty with a jalapeño. Then, get wild with the condiments, and top with ketchup, onions, tomatoes, mustard, hot sauce, vegan avocado crema, chive aioli, cucumbers, lettuce, Swiss chard, vegan mayonnaise, or barbecue sauce. However you prefer your burger, you know you’re having it your way!


    Sauce: How to Choose the Healthiest Veggie Burger for You
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-27973375_10210513343365639_4778541860320759508_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    What to Eat Before a Workout: 8 Easy Meals to Maximize Your Performance

    Eat something natural and quick, without a lot of planning, that’ll getting you 90 percent of the way towards perfect.

    So that’s the motivation for this list: 8 simple, natural meals or snacks — vegan, of course — to eat before a workout. The criteria for in choosing a pre-workout meal:

    -Lots of carbohydrate, a little bit of protein (a 3:1 ratio is best, but you don’t need to be exact with it)
    -Whole foods, with just a few exceptions where it will benefit performance
    -No caffeine — no doubt it helps performance, but for everyday nutrition I leave it out

    It's divided into categories based on when you should eat each. If you’ve got the time and aren’t worried about getting too many calories (say, for a weight loss goal) eat one from each category before a big race or workout; otherwise eat only the just-before-the-workout meal.

    If You’ve Got Less than an Hour Before Your Workout

    1. Dates


    Dates are high in glucose, so they work quickly — your body even begins to absorb some of the sugar from dates underneath your tongue as soon as you put one in your mouth. So if you’re in a pinch and need energy quickly, dates are where it’s at.

    Get medjool dates fresh in bulk, not dried in a cardboard container. You’ll have the pit to deal with, but it’s worth it for the taste. You can add a handful of nuts to boost the protein a little bit, or get dates and nuts together in an energy bar like LARABAR.

    Other fast-assimiliting fruits if you’re not digging dates: pineapple, apricot, and tart cherries.

    2. Fruit juice (+ Protein Powder, Optionally)

    Fruit juice is another quick energy source because it’s liquid, so digestion is minimal and the sugar reaches your bloodstream in minutes.

    Of course, juice is nearly devoid of protein, so an easy way to get the 3:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio is to stir in some protein powder (eg. hemp). But a small handful of nuts works too, or you can skip the protein entirely if the workout isn’t intense or long.

    How much should you drink? Juices vary in their nutritional content, but a cup of orange juice has close to 30 grams of carbohydrate.

    If You’ve Got One Hour Before Your Workout

    3. Smoothie

    The pre-workout smoothie is a standby for its ease of customization — it’s easy to tweak the amount of fruit and nuts/seeds (or protein powder) to reach the 3:1 ratio and throw in whatever other greens or superfoods you like.

    Why isn’t the smoothie an immediately-pre-workout food? Only because of the stomach-sloshing effect

    4. White Potatoes or White Rice

    If sweet doesn’t do it for you and you’ve got a saltier palate, then this one’s for you. The joy of boiled, white potatoes dipped in salt at an ultramarathon aid station — it’s one of those foods you can eat when it seems nothing else will go down.

    White rice is wonderful, too, especially with a drizzle of soy sauce or tamari — it’s a rare chance to enjoy a delicious, processed, white carbohydrate that you normally wouldn’t eat. And even the sodium in the salt or soy sauce will help you during your workout.

    Since potatoes and white rice aren’t liquids or simple sugars, you’ll want to leave a little time for the energy to become available for your workout.

    5. Apple or Banana with Nut Butter

    The pre-workout food you can enjoy with your kids! The whole fruit provides the carbohydrate, and the nut butter adds healthy fats and a little bit of protein.

    Apples and bananas are popular nut-butter-delivery vehicles, but feel free to choose another favorite.

    If You’ve Got Two Hours or More Before Your Workout

    6. Pinole-Chia Waffles

    Inspired by the favorite endurance foods of the Tarahumara from Born to Run, Pre-Race Vegan Pinole-Chia Waffles


    They’re a tasty alternative to traditional waffles, based on corn and oats instead of wheat flour.

    7. Oatmeal (+ Protein Powder, Optionally)

    Oatmeal is a classic pre-workout meal, probably because it’s a breakfast food, and a lot of people like to workout in the morning. But because oatmeal is a whole, fibrous food, it takes longer to break down than most people give it.

    Oatmeal is another food that’s easy to customize, so add nuts or seeds (ground flax and chia are popular) or even protein powder to get it to 3:1. And if you are eating it close to your workout, stirring in some fruit in place of some oats will help the energy become available in time for your workout.

    8. Toast or Bagel with Nut butter

    Same idea as waffles and oatmeal — whole grain for slow carbohydrate, nuts/seeds for protein — just a different way of delivering it. If you do go with the toast or bagel, choose the white version instead of processed if it’s an intense workout — the fiber in whole-grain versions will slow absorption and potentially cause digestive issues.
    sauce: https://www.nomeatathlete.com/eat-before-workout/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  44. #1444
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    ^ Thanks!

  45. #1445
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    Happy Hump Day

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  46. #1446
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    We Don’t Need as Much Protein as We Think We Do

    Any vegetarian can tell you that the most common question they get asked by omnivores is "how do you get enough protein?" (Aside from "don't you miss bacon?")

    Virtually everything you eat, including vegetables, contains protein, and we don't actually need that much to be healthy. Yet many meat-eaters and vegetarians alike are preoccupied with this nutrient, and it's driving a market boom.

    A report published Monday showed that the global protein ingredient industry (which is used to make products like protein powders and power bars), is expected to be worth $58 billion by 2022. That's more than double the projections for the cannabis market. With the popularity of protein-focused fad diets like Atkins and the paleo diet, protein has become a darling of the nutrition industry in recent years.

    It's clear we've become protein-obsessed: Americans currently make up 80 percent of the protein ingredient market, according to the report, though other regions are quickly catching up.

    But our protein predilection is not necessarily making us healthier. We're already eating more than enough protein—sometimes twice as much—and a lot of our favorite protein-laced products have as much sugar as a milkshake or a candy bar. A classic chocolate chip flavor Clif Bar, for example, has 22 grams of sugar, the same as a Kit Kat.

    "They're basically just protein-fortified candy," said Dr. Yoni Freedhoff, an Ottawa-based physician and professor who has a blog on nutrition and diet.

    Freedhoff told me that any time the food industry markets a product as healthy, he likes to flip it over and compare the label. On his social media feeds, he's posted many high-protein "fitness" products with surprisingly high levels of sugar.

    Protein is one of the most essential nutrients our bodies need. It's used for everything from maintaining muscle, to building blood cells, to growing your hair. But we don't need heaps of it to function: the average adult man needs 56 grams, and the average woman needs 46 grams. You can get this easily from a healthy, balanced diet, and even if you work out, unless you're a bodybuilder, you really don't need any special protein intake.

    Freedhoff told me our obsession with protein may stem from a misunderstanding of protein's benefits for weight loss.

    "Meals that are not inclusive of some protein might leave people struggling more with satiety than meals that include protein," Freedhoff said. "But rather than worry about an absolute amount, we steer people just to ensuring they include some protein with every meal and snack."

    And Freedhoff said that if you're a fan of shakes or snack bars with lots of protein, just be sure to check the label. Not all are created equal and there are options that don't come with tablespoons of sugar.


    sauce https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/a...urce=vicefbanz
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  47. #1447
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    Team Canada Wears All-Vegan Uniforms at Olympics

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    Animal-rights activists praise apparel brand Hudson's Bay Company for outfitting this year's Olympians in animal-free outwear.

    Team Canada was outfitted in all-vegan uniforms during this year’s winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Apparel brand Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC)—which supplied the Olympians with uniforms—was praised by animal-rights organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) for demonstrating that durable athletic wear can be made without animal products. “With their faux-fur pom-poms, wool-free sweaters, and synthetic-down insulation, Team Canada’s uniforms prove how stylish and warm vegan outerwear can be,” PETA director of corporate affairs Anne Brainard said. “PETA is celebrating the HBC for its compassionate and forward-thinking choice to outfit Canada’s Olympians in high-tech, modern materials that don’t harm a hair on an animal’s head.” During this year’s Olympics, Canadian figure skater/vegan activist Meagan Duhamel helped the Canadian team score a gold medal by executing a flawless performance—the last of her Olympic career—with partner Eric Radford, the first openly gay Olympian to win such an accolade.

    sauce Team Canada Wears All-Vegan Uniforms at Olympics
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  48. #1448
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    Today's lunch

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    42 Ingredient Salad (with a raw cracker) at Hibiscus in Toronto: quinoa, sweet potato, broccoli, beets, beans, tofu, kale carrot kelp, okara
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #1449
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    The Most Laid-Back Guide to Going Vegetarian You’ll Ever Read

    From blogger Matt Frazier a.k.a. No Meat Athlete

    “Should” you go vegetarian?

    I’d be lying if I said I didn’t want you to go vegetarian or vegan. Compassion for animals was big part of my reason for doing so, and so I’d love it if nobody ate them.

    But I’m not going to tell you what’s best for you. That’s for you to decide.

    The easiest way to eat less meat

    I made two attempts to go vegetarian. The first failed miserably after a week; the second has lasted three years and I have no plans to go back.

    From those two experiences, and from what I’ve seen others experience, here’s what I think are the most important keys to making the change last.

    1. At first, don’t try to “never eat meat again.”

    I have nothing but admiration for those can who give up meat, once and for all, right off the bat. They decide, right away, that they’re going vegetarian or even vegan, and they never go back.

    I wish I could say it worked like that for me. Instead, for that entire first week of my failed attempt, I just kept thinking about how hard it was — that there was no way I could actually make my vegetarian foray last.

    So what was different about the second time? A lot of things, but one big one was that I set end-dates.

    At first, I said I’d eat vegetarian + fish for 10 days. After that, I could go back if I wanted

    But I liked how I felt, so the next time, I set the mark at 30 days, and started cutting out the fish too. Again, if I got to the end and decided to quit, it was cool.

    In this way, by the time I started thinking, “I’ll never eat meat again,” I didn’t really like eating meat anymore. Or at least I was accustomed to not eating it. And so it never felt like much of a loss.

    2. Transition smoothly, from four legs to two legs to no legs.

    Making drastic changes is fun. Exciting. And sometimes, effective.

    For me, for this, it wasn’t.

    That first time, I just stopped eating all meat. It didn’t last.

    The second time, I stopped eating red meat and pork first. For an entire year. It wasn’t part of a plan to go vegetarian; I just felt at the time that since vegetarian was too hard for me, this was the next best thing.

    It was easy to get by on turkey burgers, seafood, and lots of chicken. And all the Italian recipes I loved to cook worked just fine when I replaced the ground lamb, pork, or beef with birds, so it was pretty easy.

    Then, when I decided I wanted to go further, I cut out our flying feathered friends. I still ate fish for a few weeks, not sure if I wanted to go all the way.

    Then one day, I just realized that I didn’t really like eating fish. By that time, I ate so little of it that I don’t even remember when I “officially” stopped. And it wasn’t until two years later, after gradually phasing out dairy, that I became vegan.

    It was all so easy. I’ve since learned that making tiny changes, stacked on top of each other, is the most effective way to make big changes. So that’s how I recommend you do it.

    3. Plan for each new phase.


    If you decide, spur of the moment, to change, you’ll likely fail like I did the first time.

    So how exactly does one “plan” to give up chicken, for example?

    First, you make sure you don’t have chicken in your house. Finish it up, or give it away.

    Then do a little research. Since you’ll be cutting out a protein source, make sure you don’t just replace it with starchy carbohydrates. Pick out a few hearty, healthy vegetarian meals you can try.

    Next, you plan an entire week’s worth of meals that don’t include chicken. Pick a few vegetarian recipes, maybe a few that include fish, perhaps even a few with Gardein fake chicken while you adjust. Then go to the grocery store to get what you need for the week. (Just a tip: freeze the fish if it’s going to be a few days before you eat it.)

    And don’t forget — if you’re going to be going on a car trip, or maybe to a party where they won’t have anything you eat, be prepared. Get some snacks or even eat a small meal beforehand so that you won’t have to rely on willpower to get you through it.

    4. Give yourself a break!

    I don’t mean a break from vegetarianism — I mean let yourself eat some less-than-ideal foods to make the changes easier.

    When you first cut out the meat, let yourself eat some extra pasta, fake meats, or even cheese. Sure, none of these are great for you, but the point is to ease the shock and make the transition more pleasant, so that you aren’t tempted to quit.

    I still eat Field Roast sausagey-like substance from time to time when I’m really craving it. It’s made from wheat gluten, and I’m sure it’s total junk food. But if it takes an occasional splurge to eat a diet that, the other 95% of the time, compels me to make better choices, then to me, that seems worth it.

    5. Try new foods


    The most exciting part of a vegetarian diet is all the new foods there are to experience. Sure, you could have tried them all along, but for some reason you didn’t when it’s easy to fill the plate with meat, potatoes, and — when you were feeling really saucy — a vegetable.

    So take advantage of a new reason to expand your horizons. Make some Indian food, or go to a Thai restaurant or eat Ethiopian food with your hands. Or find a weird-looking, brown, hairy root in the produce section of the grocery store and Google “recipes based on weird-looking, brown, hairy roots” and make one of them. (Make sure you catch the name of said root, because the cashier will not know it.)

    Allowing yourself to experience all these new flavors and textures will take your attention off of what’s missing from your plate, and shift it to what’s new and interesting.

    In short: relax your expectations and make it easy on yourself

    Trust me, I know how hard it is, when you’re all pumped up to make a big change, to understand that your willpower and enthusiasm will, at some point, wane.

    And so, rather than crashing at that point, and feeling like you failed, I’ve learned that you’re so much more likely to succeed if you don’t expect too much of yourself.

    So go slowly, go smoothly, and don’t beat yourself up over mistakes. And when you’ve got questions or concerns, reach out. It’s not hard to find someone who wants you to be vegetarian and would be happy to help.
    sauce: https://www.nomeatathlete.com/relax/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  50. #1450
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    I really enjoy these posts.... thanks!

  51. #1451
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    I will second Judy's continual efforts. She does a great job here!
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

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    ^^ Thanks !!!

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Kevin Smith Considers Going Vegan After Heart Attack

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    The Clerks director reconsiders his consumption of animal products after suffering a heart attack over the weekend.

    Famed filmmaker/actor Kevin Smith announced he is considering adopting a plant-based diet. Smith suffered a heart attack—a total blockage of left anterior descending (LAD) artery, a severe type of heart attack known as “The Widow-Maker”—over the weekend and took to Instagram to discuss his brush with death. “Total strangers saved my life tonight,” Smith said. “This is all a part of my mythology now, and I’m sure I’ll be facing some lifestyle changes (maybe it’s time to go vegan).” The director reflected on his long career and explained that while he was content with his life, he did not want to die before he had the chance to work on another Jay and Silent Bob film. Last year, Smith—whose father died of a heart attack—appeared in a video with his vegan daughter Harley Quinn Smith wherein the duo sampled vegan food from Doomie’s Home Cookin’ in Los Angeles. Smith was impressed by the eatery’s plant-based pulled pork sandwich, stating, “If this is being vegan, I [could] get my head around it.”

    sauce Kevin Smith Considers Going Vegan After Heart Attack
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  54. #1454
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    Happy Hump Day!

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  55. #1455
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    Vegan 'Dessert' Island


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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  56. #1456
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    Is Honey Vegan?

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    Honey is produced by bees, who gather nectar from flowers, partially digest it, and then regurgitate it once back in their hives for storage in honeycombs. Since honey is a bee product, and bees are animals, it is by definition not vegan. Here’s a nuanced article about how the ethical issues related to honey fit into the broader concept of vegan living.

    Several companies make vegan honey alternatives:

    Bee-Free Honee
    Sohgave Honey Flavor Agave Nectar
    Honeysuckle Vegan Honey
    Suzanne’s Specialties Just Like Honey
    Rather than buy a product that mimics the flavors of honey you may wish to simply buy maple syrup, as it matches honey’s sweetness while offering (subjectively, anyway) a more interesting flavor. Agave syrup is another good substitute, although it’s sweeter than honey and its extremely high fructose content may be something you wish to avoid.

    Reasons to Avoid Honey:
    A large-scale study published in Science found that 75 percent of honey samples taken worldwide were contaminated with insecticides.
    During honey harvesting, some bees are inevitably crushed or injured.
    Beekeepers often respond to disease outbreaks by burning their hives—killing all bees inside.
    Most honey from large-scale producers comes from hives treated with antibiotics.
    It’s a raw deal to the bees to steal their honey and replace it with high fructose corn syrup, which is what most commercial beekeepers do.
    You may not be eating what you think you’re eating; fraud and mislabeling is rampant in the worldwide honey industry.
    sauce https://www.vegan.com/honey/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #1457
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    I've been vegetarian my entire adult life (since I was 19) and vegan the past 4 years. I don't miss the taste of meat but there are some people who do miss it and like the taste and texture... for them, there is an option.

    One in Three Consumers is Willing to Eat Clean Meat

    New survey shows that 60 percent of vegan respondents are open to consuming slaughter-free meat.

    A survey conducted by online data specialist Surveygoo found that one in three consumers across the United Kingdom and United States is willing to consume “cultured meat”—also known as “clean meat.” The survey—commissioned by public relations company Ingredient Communications—primed 1,000 respondents with the information that cultured meat is made from real meat cells, but grown in a laboratory setting, and asked if they would be willing to buy this type of meat from restaurants or stores.

    Out of the total of respondents, 29 percent indicated they would consume cultured meat, 38 percent said they would not, and 33 percent were undecided. The survey divided respondents based on dietary choices and found that 60 percent of vegans, 28 percent of meat-eaters (the largest segment of the study), 23 percent vegetarians, and 21 percent of pescatarians would eat cultured meat. Vegans in the US were more positive to the idea of this type of meat, with 63.6 willing to give it a try, as opposed to 50 percent of vegans in the UK.

    Bruce Friedrich, executive director of food advocacy group Good Food Institute, believes the results—while possibly skewed by language used in the poll—illuminate the fact that people are interested in an ethical solution to animal agriculture. “For many of us, it is the consequences of meat we dislike—such as animal suffering and environmental degradation—not the taste of meat,” Friedrich told VegNews, “so it isn’t surprising many vegans would be willing to try clean meat—all the taste and none of the suffering.” Friedrich explained that the survey results are encouraging to companies such as JUST (formerly Hampton Creek), Memphis Meats, Mosa Meat, and SuperMeat, which are working to debut consumer-ready meat products made without animal slaughter. “If clean meat was chosen by only the hard ‘yes’ people in the US, that would be an entirely new $70 billion market,” Friedrich said. “When people have a clean alternative, everyone will be able to consider all the downsides of conventional meat production. Once that happens, factory-farmed meat will seem scary and gross.”
    sauce One in Three Consumers is Willing to Eat Clean Meat
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    For those who like vegetable gardens: Here's a wonderful link to an article to help you grow


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    Did you know that tomatoes hate cucumbers?
    While they might taste great together in a salad, tomato plants actually dislike growing in close proximity to any member of the curcurbit family, which includes cucumbers.

    Tomatos love carrots and basil, however – so planting these together will actually make them each grow more vigorously!

    Sounds hokey? The idea that some plants and plant families are “friends” with others and grow better together is called companion planting, and it’s been around since the dawn of food cultivation.

    Planting your veggies in neat rows with labels is satisfying to the eye, and easier to harvest. However, when we look to nature, we don’t see rows anywhere, nor do plants all grow clumped up in groups of the same thing together.

    Mimicking nature’s biodiversity might make your garden look messy, but it’s been proven to help each individual plant to grow better. Plants in a polyculture are more resilient and tend to have fewer losses from insects or disease.

    Things like carrots, dill, parsley, and parsnip will attract praying mantises, ladybugs, and spiders. These predator species of insects feast on the bugs who like to ruin your tomatoes, so it’s a win-win for the tomatoes (and you)!

    This is also why it’s a great idea to interplant flowers with your vegetable plants–particularly marigolds and nasturtiums. These flowers will attract and feed beneficial pollinator insects, which will increase the fruit-set of many squashes, peas, cucumbers, tomatoes, and other veggies. Nasturtiums are edible flowers and look lovely in salads, and their nutritious root, called mashua, used to be a staple crop in South American regions.

    Finally, some plants simply don’t get along, and won’t do well when they’re forced to share root space. Peppers and beans don’t like being next to each other, nor do potatoes and tomatoes (both members of the nightshade family). Peas prefer being far away from onions, and lettuces do not like to be near broccoli plants.

    Here’s a great list of plants that grow well together as garden friends. https://www.almanac.com/content/comp...art-vegetables

    Or, you can grab a copy of the Old Farmer’s Almanac.







    See link for the handy dandy chart!
    Tomatoes Hate Cucumbers: Secrets of Companion Planting + Popular Planting Combinations | Homestead Guru




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    Another gardening story


    5 Life Lessons I Learned in the Prison Garden

    In December 1995, when I was 16-years-old, I committed two robberies in inner-city St. Louis. I was charged with 17 counts and sentenced to 240 years in prison. Three years later, at Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron, MO, I signed up for garden duty to get out of my cell.

    To my amazement, I found peace of mind in the prison garden. Being in prison can make a person feel dirty, and here I was picking weeds from the dirt. But with every weed I pulled out of the garden, I felt like I was pulling out an old part of my criminal self. Weeding became my therapy. I looked at the dirt and wondered how something so beautiful could grow from it.

    My criminal street life was a life of doing dirt, a hard life, like a garden when it is in a drought and does not get watered or weeded. A garden can look ugly at this time, but when it rains and the weeds get picked, the garden turns into one of nature’s beauties. As I worked in my prison garden, I wondered: how could I turn my dirt-filled life into something beautiful? I determined right then and there that I would turn my troubled life around.

    Surrounded by hardened criminals, I would rehabilitate myself and, like my garden, make my life beautiful. The prison garden provided proof that something beautiful can indeed grow from dirt. And it is in that garden where, 17 years ago, I went vegan. Being vegan in prison is difficult, but I manage to survive strong and healthy. With my strength now at my core, I hold hope for the day I get released: I will grow my own garden at my home, and I will continue to heal myself in the process.

    Here are 5 life lessons I have learned in my prison garden:

    1. Gardening is artistry
    You create your garden in slow motion, like a painter trying to get the colors right. A sculptor tries to chisel his work exquisitely. A gardener does the same thing with his or her garden. The serenity in the garden sings to your soul.

    2. You never stop learning when gardening
    The garden teaches you. If your mind poses a question to the garden, it will not give you a direct answer. Rather, it will challenge you to discover every dimension of the answer. Once you finally figure it out, the discovery will be of a miraculous nature.

    3. Gardening takes hard work

    When you see a breathtaking painting, you know that someone put countless hours of work into its creation. A garden requires even more labor. You have to work with the raw elements of nature. Insects can become either the garden’s enemy or its friend. As the steward of the garden, you try to balance it all out.

    4. Weeding must be painstakingly done by hand
    One has to be diligent while constantly pulling weeds, making sure that they do not attempt to choke the life out of the growing plants. Each row has to be nurtured, watered, and carefully spaced at intervals. Seeds have to be carefully planted. The garden has to get the right amount of light and sunshine.

    5. A gardener is an engineer
    Designed from scratch, a garden’s blueprint is constructed on a parcel of earth. It's construction requires the gardener to take on many roles. A gardening school could never really teach you every facet of the art of gardening; a lot of it is learned through trial and error. Most of what you ultimately discover will be self-taught. After you make your mistakes and learn along the way, you will become a master of your garden. Like it did for me, the process of creating, growing, and tending to your garden might just change how you show up in your life.


    When he was 16, Bobby Bostic was sentenced to 240 years in prison. Recently, the United States Supreme Court ruled that juveniles who were under the age of 18 when they committed crimes cannot be sentenced to life in prison and must get a new sentencing hearing. “So now I have a chance for freedom, as well,” Bostic says.

    sauce 5 Life Lessons I Learned in the Prison Garden
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    Happy hump day!

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    Who wants to live longer? [I do ]

    This Is How Much Longer You'll Live If You Stop Eating Meat

    The study concluded that despite some variability in the data, “the evidence is consistent that increased intake of red meat, especially processed red meat, is associated with increased all-cause mortality.”

    It's been tough to be a meat lover over the last year or so. It seems like every few months—or weeks—some health organization or high-profile group of scientists issues a report linking meat consumption to cancer or another scary malady. If you thought 2016 was going to be any different, more bad news: a massive new study has found that meat doesn't just give you cancer—it raises mortality rates and your likelihood of dying from any number of diet-related ailments.


    Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona reviewed six large-scale studies that tracked more than 1.5 million people for periods ranging from five-and-a-half to 28 years. Participants ranged from hardcore vegans to those who stuffed their face with meat every day. Their review, published under the title "Is Meat Killing Us?" in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, found that meat is, indeed, killing us.

    "This data reinforces what we have known for so long—your diet has great potential to harm or heal," said Brookshield Laurent of the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Though it may come as no surprise by this point, a diet that includes red meat—including beef, pork, lamb and game, or processed meats like hot dogs, sausage, and ham—raises the risks of developing cardiovascular disease or cancer, as well as of suffering from health problems like diabetes and increased blood pressure. Processed meats were found to be particularly harmful.

    And if you thought just a little meat now and then isn't so bad, the review found that the steepest rise in mortality occurred at the smallest increases of red-meat intake.

    The study concluded that, despite some variability in the data, "the evidence is consistent that increased intake of red meat, especially processed red meat, is associated with increased all-cause mortality."

    Furthermore—as vegans will surely love to point out—the study found that in smaller studies, "a vegan diet has been shown to improve several parameters of health, including reversal of cardiovascular disease, decreased body mass index, decreased risk of diabetes, and decreased blood pressure."

    And the old hippies were right—sticking with a plants-only diet for the long run had the most benefits. People on a vegetarian diet for more than 17 years increased their life expectancy by 3.6 years, compared to short-term vegetarians who saw smaller benefits.

    The outlook for meat and your health may be looking increasingly grim, but in the long run, what's 3.6 years? Only you can decide—and only you can assess the worth of a cheeseburger in terms of your time on Earth.


    sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/arti...ource=vicefbus

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    A Vegan Guide to Calcium

    Of all the nutrients of special interest to vegans, calcium may require the most effort to get. Sure, other nutrients demand attention too, but for the most part they’re all quite easy to obtain. Needs for Vitamins D and B12 are easily covered by popping supplements every two or three days. As for protein, there are tons of vegan foods loaded with it, plus you can always turn to vegan protein powder if you’re falling short. Omega 3 needs can be met with a daily tablespoon of ground chia, plus a capsule or two of vegan DHA/EPA.

    Attending to your body’s requirements for calcium requires greater care than what’s needed for the above nutrients, since most foods are relatively low in calcium and most people don’t supplement for this nutrient, although supplementing would indeed be a wise choice for many.

    Dairy Products and Calcium

    Sometimes (often, really), people on both sides of an argument get their main points spectacularly wrong. That’s never been more the case than in the dispute between dairy interests and vegans regarding calcium. The dairy people seem at times deliberately misleading, whereas the vegans have trotted out their share of misinformation as well.

    Using the classic “get ’em while they’re young” strategy, the dairy industry has put calcium needs for growing children and adolescents at the very center of their marketing. By using the “calcium, calcium, calcium” mantra, and holding up milk as a uniquely good source of this nutrient, they’ve created the impression that no calcium source rivals milk. But, as we’ll soon discover, that just isn’t true. On top of this, the dairy marketing boards never seem to volunteer the fact that the vast majority of the world’s population has trouble digesting milk. About 65 percent of the world’s adults are lactose intolerant. And that figure is much higher among people of African and Asian descent—around 99 percent of adults of Chinese descent are lactose intolerant.

    Unfortunately, vegan advocates don’t have a good track record either when it comes to accurately discussing calcium. A number of vegan books and websites assert that dairy is, in reality, a poor source of calcium. The claim is that the substantial amount of protein found in dairy products results in loss of calcium from bones. Often, this argument is accompanied by charts showing the rates of hip fracture in various countries, making it appear that the more dairy consumed the greater the rates of hip fracture. This entire line of thinking has, however, been thoroughly debunked. It turns out that protein may have less effect on bone loss than previously thought. In fact, it appears to be beneficial since it improves calcium absorption. As for the hip fracture argument, there are confounding factors that make pointing to this statistic dishonest. For example, hip fracture rates are highest in high-latitude locations with lots of ice on streets and sidewalks—and ice is of course closely associated with falls. On top of that, these high latitude areas tend to mean people have lower vitamin D status, which results in diminished bone health.

    As we’re about to see, it’s nonsense to assert that dairy plays an irreplaceable role in ensuring adequate calcium consumption. But the position some vegans take regarding calcium is even less aligned with the truth. The reality is that it’s quite possible for a daily milk drinker to see her calcium status decline by going vegan—if she doesn’t make the effort to add calcium-rich vegan foods to replace the dairy products she has stopped consuming.

    How much calcium does a person need?

    As with every other nutrient, there’s no hard and fast intake number that applies to everyone. Also, calcium needs vary at different ages, being highest during teen years and old age. Absorption rates differ from person to person, so when governments and nutritional councils set targets they try to err on the high side to ensure that the guideline will meet the needs of upwards of 95 percent of the population. Setting the target level for any nutrient is an inexact science, but an informed guess is obviously more helpful than no guess at all.

    The Institute of Medicine in the United States sets calcium recommendations at 1300 mg. for people age nine to eighteen, 1000 mg for adults, and 1200 mg. for women over fifty and men over seventy. These numbers are probably not exactly right, but they’re the best we’ve got and it therefore makes sense to plan your diet in a way so that you can hit these recommendations.

    Meeting Your Calcium Needs

    Now that we know that you need something like 1000 to 1300 milligrams of calcium each day, reaching this number becomes largely a matter of simple arithmetic. Here is what various calcium-rich vegan foods deliver:

    Tofu (1 Cup. Must have calcium sulfate listed in the ingredients): 861 mg (181 Calories)
    Soy Milk (1 Cup, calcium-fortified, unsweetened): 300 mg. (79 Calories)
    Collard greens (1 Cup, cooked): 268 mg. (63 Calories)
    Mustard greens (1 Cup, cooked): 165 mg. (36 Calories)
    Bok-Choy (1 Cup, cooked) 158 mg. (20 Calories)
    Kale (1 Cup, chopped, cooked): 94 mg. (36 Calories)
    Black Beans (1 Cup, canned) 84 mg. (218 Calories)
    Tahini (1 Tablespoon, roasted): 64 mg. (89 Calories)
    Broccoli (1 Cup, chopped, cooked): 31 mg. (27 Calories)
    For comparison, whole milk supplies 276 mg. of calcium per cup, with each cup providing 149 calories. So you can see that cow’s milk is an excellent source of calcium, but fortified soy milk is too. And on a per-calorie basis, bok-choy has more than four times as much calcium as whole cow’s milk.

    The above calcium figures are useful to keep in mind, but they’re also a lot to take in and make sense of. With many calcium-rich vegan foods, the limiting factor of how much you’d want to eat in a day isn’t related to calorie content, but instead to how bulky these foods are. For instance, kale contains a great deal of calcium per calorie. The trouble is that this calcium is accompanied by a whole lot of bulk. If you tried to meet your daily calcium needs solely through cooked kale, you’d have to eat ten cups a day. You’d have to be deranged to attempt that! Even worse would be the prospect of trying to meet your calcium needs through black beans alone. Just imagine what eating more than ten cups of beans in a day would do to you.

    There’s certainly no question that you could get sufficient calcium by eating some combination of beans, greens, and broccoli. But your diet would be on the strange side, and would be bulkier than many people prefer. That’s why the addition of some calcium-fortified soy milk or some calcium-set tofu can make all the difference (Always make sure that your tofu contains calcium sulfate in the ingredients, otherwise it’s not a good source of calcium.)

    Together, calcium-set tofu and calcium-fortified vegan milks transform the task of getting sufficient calcium from tricky to easy. For example, just by drinking a cup of soy milk with breakfast, and then including a half-cup of tofu as part of your lunch, you’ve already met half your daily calcium needs. From there, you need only eat a relatively small amount of beans and greens to put yourself over the top.

    Some people might object that eating calcium-set tofu and calcium-fortified soy milk isn’t “natural,” but there isn’t any reason why calcium obtained this way is inferior to getting calcium from vegetables or from cow’s milk.

    Oxalates

    Every sort of leafy green contains a substantial amount of calcium. But there’s an important caveat to keep in mind: several popular greens are loaded with oxalates (oxalic acid). These oxalates interfere with calcium absorption. Oxalates won’t cancel out all the calcium your greens contain, but they can interfere with absorbing most of it. So if you’re eating greens with the intention of boosting your calcium intake, you’ll want to avoid spinach, chard, and rhubarb—all of which are rich in oxalates. Note that if you choose to boil oxalate-rich greens, some of the oxalic acid will leech out into the water, improving calcium absorption if the cooking water is discarded.

    The greens mentioned in the previous section—collard greens, mustard greens, bok-choy, and kale—are all low in oxalates, and are therefore superb sources of calcium.

    Supplements

    If you’re having a hard time getting sufficient calcium through food alone, calcium supplements offer an easy way to close the gap. Depending on the brand (check the label), just one tablet can give you a whopping 500 to 1000 mg. of calcium, enabling you to easily elevate your status from inadequate to excellent. Deva Nutrition manufactures an excellent and affordable vegan calcium & magnesium supplement.

    But don’t just start gobbling calcium supplements without paying heed to your total intake. Too much calcium can easily lead to kidney stones (which are excruciating to pass), so make sure that your combined calcium intake from food and supplements doesn’t exceed 1300 mg. per day.

    Vitamin D and Exercise

    Articles about bone health tend to focus on calcium consumption, but there are two more important factors to consider: vitamin D and exercise.

    Bones are not simply inert calcium. They’re actually full of specialized cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which work together to maintain bone strength and prevent brittleness. Just like you need a steady flow of oxygen coming into and then leaving your bloodstream, the same is true of the calcium that enters and leaves your bones. Every day, a tiny portion of your skelton is broken down by osteoclasts. As this is accomplished, osteoblasts then take calcium from your blood and assemble it into a fresh new calcium matrix. The greater the rate at which calcium circulates in this way, the stronger and less prone to breakage your bones will be.

    So as you can see, calcium intake is only part of the story where bone health is concerned. If you don’t have proper functioning of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, even a huge intake of calcium won’t give you adequate bone health.

    As people age, their bones grow more brittle and more likely to break during falls. This brittleness is chiefly caused by poor osteoclast function. So how can you ensure that you’ve got sufficient osteoclasts, and that they’re functioning properly to remove old calcium from your bones? First, you want to make sure you’re taking in adequate vitamin D, since this nutrient is essential for proper osteoclast formation.

    Second, everybody needs regular weight-bearing exercise. Weight lifting of any kind obviously qualifies as weight-bearing exercise. That’s true whether you’re doing he-man 200 kilogram bench presses or toying around with 1 kilogram dumbbells. Cheap portable resistance bands deliver the same weight-bearing benefits (in fitness parlance, both weight lifting and resistance bands are lumped together as “resistance exercise.”) And there are numerous other types of weight bearing exercise, including: walking, hiking, jogging, climbing stairs, tennis, and dancing.

    The two most popular exercises that are not considered weight-bearing are swimming and bicycling. These are great activities to boost aerobic conditioning, but they can’t be counted on to improve bone health. If the connection between exercise and bone health makes you to want to increase your fitness level, you’ll find our Guide to Vegan Fitness of interest. You’ll discover that it’s easy to elevate your activity level without the task ever become drudgery. And it takes a far smaller commitment to achieve real benefits than most people think.

    The Three Takeaways

    If you don’t drink cow’s milk and you never give calcium a thought, it’s likely that you’ll suffer poor bone health later in life. But there’s no need to take any risks on this front, since it’s easy to meet your calcium needs on a vegan diet, while laying the groundwork for a lifetime of strong bones. The three core recommendations are:

    Get your 1000 to 1300 milligrams of calcium each day. If you can’t get all of this through food, then take a supplement but be sure not to surpass 1300 milligrams total calcium consumption per day.
    Tack on a half hour or more of daily weight-bearing exercise.
    Make sure you’re getting adequate vitamin D. For most people, especially those in temperate climates, that means taking a vitamin D supplement.
    Vegans and omnivores alike often pay insufficient attention to calcium intake, a fact reflected by the millions of bone fractures occurring due to osteoporosis each year. Fortunately, a well-planned vegan diet coupled with adequate exercise can ensure excellent calcium status today, and good bone health later in life.
    https://www.vegan.com/calcium/

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    8 Green Foods to Eat on St. Patrick's Day

    Beer isn’t the only green thing you can consume when celebrating the Irish.

    It's almost St. Patrick’s Day, which means we’re celebrating all things green! Yes, this might mean enjoying a green beer after work, but until happy hour hits, we’ve found eight delicious vegan foods to get us to the festive day. As a countdown to the celebrations, opt for these nutrient-rich fruit, herbs, and vegetables that will make your body happy and ready to party.

    1. Avocados
    Whether it’s on a bagel, thrown in a salad, or spread onto a veggie sandwich, it’s hard to get enough of avocado in your life. In addition to being downright delicious, this buttery fruit is filled with nutrient-rich properties. While many fruits are made of mainly carbohydrates, avocados are the only fruit that provides a substantial amount of healthy fatty acids. Avocados also contain approximately 20 different vitamins and minerals, including pantothenic acid, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins K, B6, E, and C.

    2. Brussels sprouts
    Similar to avocados, Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of vitamins C and K. They’re also rich with essential B vitamins such as B6 and B1, as well as protein, iron, and omega-3 fatty acids. And if that isn’t appealing enough, Brussels sprouts look like miniature versions of cabbage (because they are both part of the brassica family), making them perfect for your St. Patrick’s Day feast!

    3. Broccoli
    Broccoli and Brussels both stem from the cruciferous vegetable family and share a lot of the same immune boosting properties. Broccoli is also high in fiber, which helps with digestion, lowering blood sugar, and curbing overeating. But that isn’t all, as this green little dream is mainly known for its cancer-fighting properties. Broccoli is particularly beneficial for breast cancer and uterine cancer because it removes extra estrogen from the body. And it’s delicious!

    4. Limes
    Not only are limes a major staple to zest up any meal but this fruit has also been a reliable source for medicinal uses for centuries. The health benefits of lime include (but are not limited to) weight loss, skin care, digestion improvement, and treating a number of diseases such as scurvy, respiratory disorders, and gout. Limes also rejuvenate the skin and help protect it from infections. Similar to many citrus fruits of its kind, limes are considered a diabetes superfood because the high levels of soluble fiber help regulate the body’s absorption of sugar.

    5. Mint
    Mint can be used in tea, as a palate cleanser, blended into smoothies, or as a light garnish. But this small herb packs a serious punch when it comes to the benefits it holds in its leaves. The first and most well-known fact about mint is that its leaves promote digestion and soothe stomachaches, headaches, and migraines. Mint is also a natural stimulant, which helps create a feeling of clarity and alertness on days your head feels like it’s in a fog.

    6. Green tea
    Green tea is known for being extremely beneficial to the human body. Similar to many teas, green tea is made of Camellia sinensis leaves, but unlike oolong, white or black teas, green tea is processed in a way that creates a different level of oxidation. Green tea has been known to boost metabolism and help the body detoxify naturally. It has also been said that green tea can delay the deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, protect brain cells from dying, and restore damaged brain cells. Fun fact: matcha green tea has the nutritional equivalent of 10 cups of normal green tea.

    7. Chives
    Throw chives atop potatoes or sauté some in your stir-fry—either way this cousin of an onion is sure to give you your daily dose of vitamin K, which is your source of healthy bones. Vitamin K assists the regulation of cells that help to prevent bone demineralization. The sulfides and other unique organic compounds found in chives also deliver garlic-esque benefits and can effectively ease digestive discomfort.

    8. Kiwi
    Kiwis are a nutrient-dense fruit full of vitamin C and antioxidants, which studies have shown can help treat people with asthma. Kiwis also have high levels of zeaxanthin and lutein, both of which protect our eyes from harmful high-energy light waves such as ultraviolet rays in sunlight. Therefore, eating a few of these furry fruits (peeled, of course) can significantly reduce your risk of vision loss!


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    A Supermarket in Germany Now Sells Nutella in Enormous Buckets

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    sauce: https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/w...ource=vicefbuk



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    7 Greens You’re Probably Not Eating (But Should Be)

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    I had never heard of Rich Roll until a couple years ago. He originally went plant-based due to a health crisis, not for performance issues. His story is interesting

    The World's Fittest Vegan Is a 51-Year-Old Ultra-Endurance Athlete

    Skeptical of the purported health benefits of a vegan diet? You may have a right to be: while there's some evidence to suggest that going vegan can help improve your heart health, it might not necessarily help you lose weight, nor will it automatically make you healthier. But if you are considering going vegan, Rich Roll’s mind-boggling athletic feats might have you trading in burgers for leafy greens.

    Last September, the 51-year-old ultra-endurance athlete and best-selling author ran 40 miles and swam six miles over 26 islands of the Stockholm Archipelago off Sweden as part of the grueling Ötillö Swimrun World Championship, as reported by the New York Times.

    “You’re either freezing in this incredibly chilly water or your falling down in rocks in these woods,” Roll told MensHealth.com about the event. “It’s probably the hardest one-day thing that I’ve ever done in my life. It proved to me that at 50, I could still go out and compete at a high level.” It’s no wonder why his podcast, The Rich Roll Show, has more than 30 million downloads.

    Following the recent release of the updated edition of Roll’s best-selling memoir, Finding Ultra, MensHealth.com caught up with the man who is arguably the world’s fittest vegan alive.

    You endured a rough patch in your life, which paved the way for you to become vegan shortly thereafter. Can you take us through that time and that decision?

    Absolutely. During my 20s and the first part of my 30s, I was sort of a lost soul, struggling with alcoholism, drug addiction and it really took me to a very dark place. But I was lucky enough to get sober at 31. I spent 100 days at a treatment facility in Oregon.

    In the wake of that experience, I threw myself back into my professional life very determined to repair all the wreckage that I had created. I destroyed so many relationships over the years. My ambition was to get back on track and align myself with this American dream that had been the driving force in my entire life. I was able to do that, but ultimately, I was very much a workaholic trying to become this partner at a prestigious law firm and doing the 80-hour work week thing.

    By the time I was 39, I was a junk food addict, 50 pounds overweight, and really just the classic couch potato. At the same time, I was becoming progressively disillusioned with this myth of the American dream because I had sort of achieved that. I was living in a really nice house, I had a Porsche in the driveway, I was building a family. From the outside looking in, it looked like I had everything. But from the inside, I was suffocating. I was so discontent with my professional choices. It was like, "Who am I? What am I here to do?"

    Shortly before I turned 40, I had this moment on the staircase walking up to my bedroom one evening. I was so lethargic and unwell that I had to pause halfway up the stairs. I had tightness in my chest, labored breathing and sweat on my brow. I really feared that I was on the precipice of a significant heart attack. That really shook me out of my denial about how I was living. I made a very concrete decision in that moment that I was going to change my priorities. That’s how I set in motion this exploration of food and nutrition and ultimately after that, fitness and human potential.

    How did the early stages of that exploration begin?

    It started with a seven-day fruit and vegetable juice cleanse, which ultimately led me to eating a plant-based diet, which revitalized me in a very profound way. That’s what guided me into the world of ultra-endurance, because it’s this amazing, perfect template for exploring your potential — not just physically, but mentally, emotionally, spiritually.

    People tend to think vegans don’t get enough protein. What’s your food intake like while preparing for ultra-endurance events to make sure you’re sufficiently powered?

    I would generally start the day with a green smoothie with dark leafy greens: kale, spinach, chard. Beets became a go-to for me. They’re an amazing endurance booster, so beets, beet greens will always make their way into my morning smoothie. Also, lots of berries: blackberries and blueberries. And then some of the more exotic superfoods like matcha, chia seeds, ground flaxseed, spirulina. The smoothie is really kind of centerpiece. In terms of meals, lots of rice and beans, veggie burritos, gigantic salads with lots of vegetables, steamed broccoli, and then eating a heavier dinner.

    What’s your workout routine?

    For a long period of time it was swim, bike, run and some yoga and stretching. That was all I had time for. I got four kids and I’m doing a lot of things. But as I’m getting older, being in the gym and maintaining my strength has become much more of a priority specifically in the past year. I’m a firm believer in stretching. Maintaining a strong core is super important. Yes, I do sit-ups, but I do lots of planks, pushups, inverted sit-ups to strengthen my lower back, lots of squats, including air squats, kettlebell work, medicine ball work, lunges. And then, I do some really basic weight work. I like to do low weight, high rep stuff on all the basics: bench press, floor exercises, sled work for the quads and all the typical stuff you’d do in the gym.

    You may very well be the world’s most fittest vegan.

    That’s a heavy title. I’m not so sure I could claim that crown and one of the reasons for that is we’re seeing the explosion of vegan athletes right now. Everybody from Kyrie Irving to [Boston Bruins defenseman] Zdeno Chara, [Oakland Raiders wide receiver] Griff Whalen. For me, that’s exciting.




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    The BEST Carbs for Getting Leaner and Stronger (Now With More!)

    In recent years, while the rest of the world continued to live in fear of fat, the fitness community totally embraced it. Carbohydrates became the target of our frustrations; we blamed them for making us fat, compromising our immune function, keeping us inflamed, and generally ruining our lives. We’ve learned our lesson now and carbs have had their reputation restored. It’s really about time, considering the role that carbohydrates play in exercise.

    Which Carb Sources Are Best?

    Without a doubt, one of the hardest things to tell someone that’s seeking improved performance and body composition is that fruit should not be the primary source of carbohydrates in your diet. Hold on though – I am in NO WAY implying you shouldn’t eat fruit. It’s just not the easiest, most efficient way to fuel your body. One last tme; FRUIT IS GOOD. EAT PLENTY OF IT!

    As valuable source of vitamins, minerals and fiber, fruits have definitely got their place in a balanced approach to nutrition. The issue with eating fruit to get all your carbs is that it’s got relatively little energy in it per gram! Aside from bananas, you’d have to eat a lot (and I mean a lot) of fruit to satisfy your carbohydrate/Calorie requirements; it’s just not optimal (or in some cases, feasible) to rely upon fruit as an energy source. Thankfully, there are other natural sources of carbohydrate available that are positively brimming with glucose as well as important micronutrients.

    Starches are an Athlete’s Best Friend – Even If They Eat Paleo

    Starch is a glucose polymer found in most plants that is chemically similar to our endogenous glycogen; it’s literally just a long chain of glucose molecules bonded together. Although humans have a tough time digesting the stuff raw, cooking breaks it down into pure glucose ready for utilization as a substrate to produce cellular energy throughout your body. Of course, whatever you don’t use can be stored, preferably in your biceps, quadriceps or abdominals. While some of the most widely-consumed sources of starch (and thus glucose) are grains, like corn, wheat and rye, plenty of Paleo-friendly alternatives exist if that’s your thing.

    At the forefront, we have good ol’ fashioned tubers, like potatoes and carrots, as well as rice (preferably white), but let us not forget chestnuts and acorns that are rich in starchy energy. Squash, peppers, zucchini and cauliflower round everything out and give you a wide palette of flavors to choose from.

    You’ll notice that I’m not including foods like broccoli, kale, and tomatoes in this list. That’s because per weight, these sources provide very little in the way of carbs for your body to use. Like fruits, they’re a great source of micronutrients and fiber. Leafy greens and veggies are an important part of a healthy diet and you should absolutely include them in your meals, but they’re not high-powered workout fuel.

    The most important take-away here is that you need to consume rich sources of dietary glucose to effectively replenish muscle glycogen and maximize performance/recovery. You can’t rely on fat and protein, and you can’t just get your carbs from veggies.

    Fast vs. Slow Carbs and Glycemic Index

    Glycemic index or GI refers to the rate at which a food consumed in isolation will raise blood sugar. Higher GI foods are typically called fast carbs because they raise blood sugar more quickly and lower GI foods are slow carbs because they raise blood sugar less quickly. A great example is brown rice (50 GI, making it a slower carb) compared to white rice which has a GI of 67 making it a fast carb. This difference is commonly attributed to the fiber content of the intact germ of brown rice, but when it comes down to it there’s barely any more fiber per gram in white rice compared to brown rice.

    Take a quick look at this chart from Harvard University’s health website and get a feel for where your favorite foods fall along the continuum of fast and slow carbs.

    With that lesson out of the way, you probably want to know whether or not it matters if you eat fast or slow carbs. For healthy, athletic people, it’s not that big of a big deal. In fact, your response to carbohydrates may be different than mine. To further complicate the application of this information, mixing foods and the volume of the food you eat in a meal can totally change the GI of a carb. White vs. brown rice need not be a battle that ensues in your pantry. Sure, it’s potentially dvantageous to have faster carbs in situations where you need to shoot for rapid replenishment of glycogen (like when you train twice a day). For the rest of us – folks who’re in the gym for 1-2 hours a few times a week with plenty of time in between sessions – we can select our rice and potatoes based on taste!

    If you’re really looking to optimize your carbohydrate strategy, you can take things a step further and get into supplementation through a few different means.

    Carbohydrate Supplementation and Liquid Nutrition

    Whole, natural foods should absolutely comprise the foundation of your nutrition. I won’t argue against that, but I do think that there are a few unique situations where integrating supplements into your plan can really bring your performance to the next level. One of the most important times to ensure you have adequate energy available is before and after training. By prioritizing carbohydrate intake around your workouts with liquid nutrition, you can make a dramatic impact on your energy levels and recovery (if it’s formulated properly). You have a plethora of options available should you go this route.

    On one end of the spectrum, you could throw a potato into a food processor along with some light coconut milk, and wind up with one of the most interesting-yet-effective workout drinks known to man. Alternatively, a mottled banana with some dark chocolate in a light coconut milk base may be slightly more appetizing (and socially acceptable!). Add teaspoon of sea salt to either of these concoctions and you’ve got the perfect storm in terms of quick gastric emptying and nutrient absorption at the small intestine.

    If pureed foods aren’t quite your style, you can go the more traditional route and purchase a commercially available supplement. At this avenue, your best bet is to go with modified starches like Vitargo, maltodextrin, dextrose and waxy maize; not only are they typically very affordable (especially if you buy in bulk), but they’ll blend right in with your favorite protein powder and provide you with exactly what you need to begin restoring glycogen within your muscles as soon as possible. 50-100g of maltodextrin or waxy maize will do the job but you can experiment with more or less based upon training intensity, duration, and the amount of muscle mass you carry around.

    As far as taste is concerned, dextrose is very sweet, whereas waxy maize and maltodextrin are generally bland and flavorless unless you use A LOT at once. This is worth considering, especially if you’d like to use a supplement as a means to beef up the carb content of an existing protein shake that you’re already incorporating post-workout. You probably won’t want to add any dextrose under these circumstances, but if you’re starting completely from scratch, a little bit can go a long way towards making the maltodextrin/waxy maize palatable. In addition, a bit of sodium to your post-workout nutrition can increase the rate of absorption of whatever other nutrients you’re ingesting, so throwing dextrose into the mix may be even more important (unless you grew up drinking salt water.)

    Conclusion


    Hopefully this information will help you make more optimal decisions in regards to where you get your carbs from. It really doesn’t make sense to exclude any one source, but the majority of your carbohydrates should come from starches and vegetables like potatoes, squash, quinoa and rice. This will keep your muscles full and give you the energy you need to perform. Fruit should be approached as a means to supplement your micronutrients and round out your carbohydrate intake. To top it all off and make the most of your training, you should also consider implementing a liquid nutrition strategy post-workout.

    Summary

    For a time, carbohydrates have been demonized, but they’re a great source of energy and an integral part of any nutrition plan that’s aimed at keeping performance at peak (or improving it).

    Fruits are not necessarily the best choice as an energy source – it’s just not dense enough.

    Still, fruits are packed with vitamins and minerals and are absolutely a part of a great nutrition plan.

    Starches are your best friend. Rice, potatoes, ripe bananas and oats are additions you might consider. Make sure that you eat plenty of these in the evening to replenish muscle glycogen.

    Liquid nutrition in the form of pureed foods and supplements like maltodextrin powder can be consumed before, during, and after training; this can help you maintain performance during long training sessions or events.


    sauce The Best Carbs for Getting Leaner and Stronger (Updated!)
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  72. #1472
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    I love bananas ... they get sweeter with age

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    Got a couple of pounds of those guys cut up and in my freezer waiting to become a smoothie.

  74. #1474
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I love bananas ... they get sweeter with age
    Just like us.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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    ... the aftermath of Brussels sprouts lingers for a while too
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    10 Surprising Animal Ingredients Lurking on Store Shelves

    Vegans know to avoid gelatin, lactose, and honey, but what about those other, unrecognizable ingredients found in packaged foods?

    From dough made out of duck feathers to a glaze made from crushed bugs, animal-based ingredients are often unknowingly found in products across store shelves. As such, vegans need to be aware of the oft- hard-to-pronounce ingredients found on a package, which becomes problematic because neither the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nor the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has regulations for vegan or vegetarian ingredients. This lack of uniformed definition means the legality of vegan labeling falls under a marketing policy stating that a product label must be “truthful and not misleading.”

    A labeling system for food additives referred to “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) is in place to ensure food safety requirements are met, but vegans are often the ones mislead when the sources (plant or animal) of GRAS ingredients aren’t labeled. Unfortunately, United States law requires labels that distinguish “natural” or “artificial” flavors, but consumers have no way of figuring out what those flavors are because “natural” flavors can be derived from both plants and animals.

    To help remedy this labeling confusion, we’ve created a list of popular ingredients every vegan needs to recognize … and steer clear from.

    Albumen
    A fancy term for egg white, albumen is used in many processed foods such as candy, cake, and cookies. Albumen is also a common fining agent in wine production.

    Casein
    Casein can be one of the trickier ingredients to navigate because it appears in seemingly vegan alternatives, and because it is found in foods in such small increments, some foods that include casein are labeled as “non-dairy.” However, this does not mean the product is vegan, as casein—which can also come in the form of caseinates such as calcium caseinate, potassium caseinate, and sodium caseinate—is a protein found in the milk of all mammals and makes up 80 percent of the protein found in cows’ milk. Casein is popular in protein powders, as well as paint, adhesives, cosmetics, and textiles.

    Confectioner's glaze
    Most commonly used as a coating on candy or other confections, confectioner’s glaze (or “resinous glaze”) is made of 35-percent shellac, an ingredient derived from the secretions of the female lac insect. Found in a variety of non-food products as well such as aluminum foil, furniture polish, and hairspray, confectioner’s glaze has GRAS status in the US.

    Isinglass
    Derived from the membranes of fish bladders, isinglass is a gelatinous substance most commonly used to clarify wine and beer. Although isinglass is not in the finished product, it is still not suitable for vegans because it is part of the booze-making process.

    Lactic acid
    When you feel the burn after a good workout, that’s your body producing lactate, or lactic acid. Lactic acid is also a very common additive found in a variety of foods such as soy sauce, sourdough bread, pickled vegetables, wine, candy, and soft drinks, and can also be derived from fermenting whey (milk), cornstarch, potatoes, or molasses. Unfortunately, most commercial producers don’t label the origin of lactic acid, so it’s better to be safe than sorry. Luckily, vegan companies generally indicate that their lactic acid is derived from plant-sources.

    L-Cysteine
    L-Cysteine is used to preserve and improve the texture of commercial dough and is mostly derived from duck feathers, hog hair (or hooves), or human hair (which is gathered from the floors of salons in China and dissolved in hydrochloric acid before the amino acid is isolated). Synthetically produced L-cysteine can be certified Kosher or Halal, but “natural” cannot. Considered GRAS, this ingredient is labeled when used for function, not for flavor. When it is labeled, the company does not need to specify its source.

    Methionine
    An amino acid that’s derived from albumen or casein, methionine is often used to maintain freshness in potato chips and can sometimes even be found in tea.

    Red 4
    A red dye derived from drying, boiling, treating, and crushing cochineal bugs, Red 4 (also known as carmine or cochineal) is used in a variety of products ranging from juice to candy because of its deep red color. Because Red 4 can cause severe allergic reactions in some people, the FDA requires that it be specifically named on ingredient labels.

    Vitamin D
    Vegans already know that we can get vitamin D from the sun, fortified dairy alternatives, and supplements. Unfortunately, some seemingly vegan products with vitamin D such as orange juice derive vitamin D from non-vegan sources. Although D2 is derived from plant or yeast sources, the more-common D3 can be animal-based, so if it’s a mainstream product, do your research before purchasing. Fatty fish liver, egg yolks, and milk are some of the animal-based origins of the vitamin.

    Whey
    A common ingredient in processed foods, whey (sometimes in form of whey protein isolate) is well-known for its use as a performance powder. Derived as a byproduct of cheese production and when added to whole milk after coagulation, the curds (solids) separate from the whey (liquid) so they become cheese and the whey becomes protein powder.

    sauce: 10 Surprising Animal Ingredients Lurking on Store Shelves
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    This Is Where Fat Goes When You Lose Weight, According To Scientists — And Research Suggests Doctors And Dietitians Have Got It All Wrong


    Australian scientists conducted a study to find out where fat goes when you lose weight.

    As part of their research they asked 150 health professionals for their theories as to how it disappears, and most answered incorrectly.

    They say it doesn't get converted into energy or muscle, and explained their theory in a recent article for The Conversation.

    With the rise of the wellness movement, countless people are focused on burning calories and getting lean.

    But have you ever thought about exactly how fat disappears from your body?

    As part of a study on the topic, scientists from the University of New South Wales posed a simple question to health professionals: When somebody loses weight, where does the fat go?


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    Of the 150 doctors, dietitians, and personal trainers they surveyed, they said only three respondents answered the question correctly.

    Writing for The Conversation, assistant scientist Ruben Meerman and Andrew Brown, professor and head of biotechnology and biomolecular sciences at UNSW, explained the results of the research — and, like the health professionals questioned, you might be surprised at what the scientists found.

    "The most common misconception by far was that fat is converted to energy," the scientists wrote. "The problem with this theory is that it violates the law of conservation of matter, which all chemical reactions obey."

    Other respondents believed fat was converted into muscle, which, they explained, "is impossible."

    Another theory was that it leaves the body through the colon, which is also incorrect, according to the duo.

    So what's the answer?


    "Fat is converted to carbon dioxide and water," they wrote. "You exhale the carbon dioxide and the water mixes into your circulation until it’s lost as urine or sweat.

    "If you lose 10kg of fat, precisely 8.4kg comes out through your lungs and the remaining 1.6kg turns into water. In other words, nearly all the weight we lose is exhaled."

    They added that while this may surprise people, "almost everything we eat comes back out via the lungs.

    "Every carbohydrate you digest and nearly all the fats are converted to carbon dioxide and water."

    The same goes for alcohol and protein, apart from a small amount from the latter that is turned into urea and other solids, and excreted as urine.

    The scientists pointed out that the only food that arrives at your colon undigested is "dietary fiber," such as sweetcorn. The rest is absorbed into the bloodstream and organs.

    "After that, it’s not going anywhere until you’ve vaporised it," they wrote.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-29573074_2082642725313501_4777498771828175785_n.jpg


    sauce This Is Where Fat Goes When You Lose Weight, According To Scientists — And Research Suggests Doctors And Dietitians Have Got It All Wrong | IFLScience
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  78. #1478
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    This Is Where Fat Goes When You Lose Weight, According To Scientists — And Research Suggests Doctors And Dietitians Have Got It All Wrong

    sauce This Is Where Fat Goes When You Lose Weight, According To Scientists — And Research Suggests Doctors And Dietitians Have Got It All Wrong | IFLScience
    Interesting. You mean it doesn't "melt" away like in those ads? I guess if they said "breathe out your fat" everyone would think it was just marketing hype and not buy the magic pills.

    I sure hope all those people they surveyed that said fat turns into muscle didn't think that is literally what happens.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  79. #1479
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    I had no idea where body fat went.... very cool!

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    I’m Obsessed with Mock Meat and I’m Not Even a Vegetarian

    A plant-based ‘bleeding’ burger, eggs made from water-dwelling algae, milk made from oats? Bring it on



    acon, tofurkey, chickenless tenders – overly processed mock meats have always sounded like punchlines, ludicrously named meat tribute acts. They are essentially the Faux Fighters, Proxy Music and Rolling Clones of the food world. Received opinion holds that if you want meat so badly, you should just eat it. The weird thing is that I have been obsessed with mock meats for a long time. The weirder thing is that I am not even a vegetarian.

    For most people, nothing can be weirder than the textures of these oddities. How could they not be, predicated, as they are, on what they are not? But it is the creative ways around such incongruity I find compelling. I like food that answers a challenge. The milk I take in tea has been squeezed out of oats or rice. My childhood was consumed by a fascination about what was in crab sticks, because I knew it wasn’t crab (although it is fish). Later, I felt the same way about Quorn – until a few years ago, the company didn’t exactly shout about the fact that its product is made from mould and grown in vats. But to me, weird just means new and interesting. Weird is my jam.

    Vegan alternatives to meat and dairy products answer the biggest challenge of all. Can plant-based ingredients replicate the firm bite of meat, the creaminess of milk, the stretchy casein in cheese? Last month, the UK’s first “bleeding”, plant-based burger was launched, made by Moving Mountains. It is all kinds of succulent, and shows how far this sort of food has come. The juicy fibre comes from grinding up oyster mushroom cores, with the “blood” supplied by beetroot. It is extraordinary – I would say it achieves a 90% similarity to meat (while containing 100% of recommended daily amounts of B12, and no cholesterol). Its texture is a shade softer than beef, but since the aim of most meat dishes is high levels of tenderness, is that a failure?

    At the Spread Eagle in Homerton, London’s first vegan pub, I have eaten mushroom tail “scallops”, slow-poached in garlic oil for silkiness, a baja tofish burger wrapped in nori to impart seafood flavour, and a Mexican fried “chicken” burger made from seitan, the chewy wheat meat. At home, I use Rubies in the Rubble’s mayonnaise, which is made from chickpea water (also known as aquafaba, if you’re serving it at the ambassador’s reception). Most laugh-out-loud impressive is a plant-based egg, made from agal flour, derived from water-dwelling algae. Eggs made from flour made from algae! It may not be gold alchemised from base metal, but since I can’t scramble up base metal on sourdough, I’ll take it.

    The current wave of vegan alternatives demonstrates human ingenuity at its finest. It is liberating to be kinder to animals, while still desiring dirty great quarter-pounders slathered in cheese. (When I say cheese, I mean a cashew and nutritional yeast melt, obvs.) Whether my delight will encompass the future of meat analogues, grown from stem cells in a laboratory, I don’t know. Most consumers still consider today’s plant-based alternatives to be over-processed, Frankensteinian wannabes, neither fish nor flesh. I think that is a shame, not just for the planet but their sense of adventure. Not today, seitan, not today; but, hopefully, tomorrow.
    sauce https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...n-a-vegetarian


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    The colonel killed a lot chickens

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    Saturday afternoon lunch at Veggie D'Light. An awesome busy spot. The chef makes vegan Jamaican meals

    Chris had brown rice, seitan and veg

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    I had the soup of the day. Chef Peter added some extra scotch bonnet sauce to my soup bowl because he said he knew I liked it hot ... Ha! how did he know? .. spicy yummy!

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    For dessert we went to Bunners for carrot cupcakes (topped with marshmallow) all vegan.

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    The intent is to satisfy cravings for jerk spices and curries within the constraints of a vegan diet. It's not an easy feat. Chef Peter (co-owner of Veggie D'Light) says that learning to cook vegan Caribbean food was a challenge but worth it (as witnessed by the steady clientele through the doors)

    Caribbean cuisine is perilous for vegans - so many of the prized dishes are centred around stewed meats relegating vegans to side dishes alone. And even then, the seemingly meat-free foods (veggie patties for example) are traditionally made with suet or other animal byproducts.
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    Get a head start for Hump Day: another reason to eat your veggies (specifically flavonoids.)

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    The Link Between a High-Vegetable Diet and Better Erections
    A bonafide reason to spend more time in the produce section
    .

    Last November, the CDC released a report which confirmed something many of us have long sensed: Americans don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables. “Enough,” in this instance, means the USDA’s recommendation of 1.5-2 cups per day of the former and 2-3 cups of the latter. Did you know that only 12 percent of Alaskans meet or exceed that amount of vegetables? If you think that sounds pitiful, you should know that residents of the largest state in the union are in fact at the very top of the vegetable consumption leaderboard.



    The most voracious fruit consumers, on the other hand, are to be found in Washington DC, with 15.5 percent of adults meeting the guidelines. In West Virginia—nationally ranked 2nd and 3rd in the death rates of cancer and diabetes respectively—only 7.3 percent and 5.8 percent of people are eating enough fruits and vegetables. All told, only around one in ten Americans are eating the amount of produce deemed sufficient for good health.

    The same CDC study also supported a couple of other things we all sort of knew: that women eat more produce than men and young adults across the board eat fewer servings of fruits and vegetables than any other age group. It’s at this point that I’m going to pivot and suddenly start talking about boners quite a lot. See, during research for another Tonic article, I was surprised to learn that two independent studies both found that between a quarter and a third of men under the age of 40 experienced erectile dysfunction (ED). Men under 40 don’t have the same rates of disease that go hand in hand with ED, of course, which lead the authors of both studies to point the finger of blame at young guys’ lifestyle choices. They smoke, they drink, they don’t prioritize sleep, and they have a poor diet.

    When I read “poor diet” I automatically thought about the junk young guys are prone to consume. In what would be paradoxically referred to as my “salad days,” I survived on pizza, bagels, and McDonald’s dollar menu items almost exclusively. I imagined that the “poor diet” was a reference to high-fat, high-carb, highly processed convenience foods that are making 20- and 30-year-old penises behave like wizened and world weary ding-dongs two or three times their age.

    But new research suggests that it’s not what young guys are putting into their bodies that’s taking a toll on the pole but what they’re not: flavonoids.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17458068_1900974690146973_3532053556949526143_n.jpg

    Flavonoids are found in almost all fruits and vegetables. The name refers to a diverse group of phytonutrients (plant chemicals) that—along with carotenoids—are responsible for blur of vivid colors we see with as we hurry through the produce section on our quest for flavored seltzer, coffee beans, and yogurt. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the consumption of flavonoids is correlated with lower rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, certain cancers and neurodegenerative disease and, as a result, could potentially extend a person’s life span.

    But when you’re a snake-hipped twenty-something, the prospect of lowering your risk of developing a chronic disease is unlikely to have you suddenly swearing off foods designed to light up the brain’s reward center and rushing home to roast a spaghetti squash. The promise of owning an indefatigable erection, on the other hand, just might.

    The study published in the January issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine wasn’t the first to point at the link between the consumption of eggplants and having a penis that strives to live up the promise of eggplant emoji. In 2016, other research found that a higher intake of flavanones, anthocyanins, and flavones—three of the six categories of flavonoids—were significantly associated with a reduction in risk of erectile dysfunction in men under the age of 70. This latest study however, looked only at men between 18 and 40—the age bracket traditionally associated with a greater frequency of sex and an apparent ambivalence toward chard.

    Researchers found that all the young dudes who reported a lower intake of flavonoids were significantly more likely to experience erectile dysfunction and called out flavones as being the flavonoid which contributed most to healthy erectile function. Members of the nightshade family like peppers, tomatoes—and as it turns out, eggplants—are high in the flavone luteolin. Celery is high in the flavones apigenin and luteolin and eating plenty of it may also do double duty as an aphrodisiac of sorts: Each stalk contains androstenone and androstenol, which have been shown to have an effect on women’s mood, sexual response, and mate selection.

    Exactly how flavonoids effect erectile function isn’t yet clear, but previous research has demonstrated that flavonoids make arteries more flexible and thereby increase blood flow. Lead author of the 2016 study, Aedin Cassidy, professor of nutrition at the University of East Anglia, in England, links her findings to other studies that showed flavonoids effect on reducing cardiovascular disease, noting in her paper that erectile dysfunction is often an early barometer of poor vascular function and that men are more likely to “recognize dysfunction in their sexual health early, in contrast to risk factors for CVD, which are frequently identified after much of the irreversible vascular damage has occurred.”

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23380215_2013434175567690_7169251050715543892_n.jpg

    Whether or not this new research is will finally coerce young guys—fully one third of whom will experience ED in their lifetime, remember—to start chomping on brightly colored vegetables is unknowable, particularly given that there’s no clear evidence of just how effective flavonoids are at safeguarding erectile function when compared to cutting down on cigarettes, booze, drugs, and late nights.

    “[ED] is usually a multifactorial issue but every positive change either reduces the risk or helps improve the condition,” says Michael Reitano, a retired internist and “doctor-in-residence” at men’s health startup Roman. “Improvements in health from losing weight, exercising, smoking cessation, positive sleep habits, and consuming more fruits and vegetables might each make only small contributions, but cumulatively the effect can be dramatic.”
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-29694956_2085840138327093_6953288778487251284_n.jpg


    Sauce: https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...etter-erection
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    Eat your veggies

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    6 Tips for Losing Weight on a Vegan Diet

    Get your summer beach bod in mere weeks by cutting out meat and dairy and eating nutrient-packed foods.

    According to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, individuals who follow a vegan diet for approximately 18 weeks shed, on average, four pounds more than those who follow animal-based diets. While this fact is great for anyone looking to lose weight, conversion to a plant-based regimen and weight loss are not always synonymous.

    Many who switch to a vegan diet for weight-loss reasons often find themselves filling the meatless void with an array of plant-based processed food. Luckily, a veg diet is so much more than packaged food that just happens to be animal-free, especially for those looking to lose weight. By following these six tips, you’ll fit into your favorite pair of jeans in no time, all while doing good for animals and the environment.

    1. Review the vegan food pyramid
    The foundation of the vegan food pyramid is greens and vegetables followed by fruit and whole grains. This is an updated version of MyPyramid—the food guide that replaced the Food Guide Pyramid in 2005—which emphasized grains, bread, cereal, and pasta as the foundation of a good nutritional regimen. Although the vegan food pyramid serves as a guide, caloric intake and portion control are key factors for any healthy weight-loss program.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vegan-food-pyramid.jpg

    2. Eat greens
    The versatility of spinach, broccoli, Swiss chard, bok choy, Brussels sprouts, and zucchini makes dark leafy greens a wonderful addition to any meal. These foods are ideal for weight loss because they are the “most nutrient-dense healthy items” and “are extremely low in calorie and high in fiber,” says Lisa Odenweller, CEO of Santa Monica-based superfood café Beaming. The high-fiber content keeps you satiated throughout the day while helping you avoid unhealthy snacking. Other high-fiber options include fruit (be mindful of the sugar content) and raw tree nuts (almonds, walnuts, and cashews), which are packed with protein and fiber and can help lower cholesterol.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-29597696_2085878448323262_22907876639209760_n.jpg


    3. Up your protein
    Consumption of protein-rich food is vital in many weight-loss programs because protein fills you up faster; thus, you need less food to be satisfied. According to Stephanie Goldfinger of vegetarian website Cooking for Luv, proteins are available in many forms, which makes them convenient to incorporate into meals because they can be eaten raw or cooked quickly. Protein powders are ideal for a grab-and-go breakfast or mid-day smoothie, while other plant-based proteins such as tempeh, beans, lentils, quinoa, and oats are versatile and can serve as the main component of a veggie burrito, salad, or stir-fry.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dscn8080.jpg

    4. Limit processed soy
    Soy products can be the easiest and most convenient “go-to” items when transitioning to a vegan diet. Soy isn’t necessarily unhealthy, but it is imperative that attention be paid to the amount of processed products in a meal plan. For instance, a tofu scramble for breakfast, soy veggie burger for lunch, and pad Thai with tofu for dinner is excessive. Instead, choose vegan cheese made with nuts, a black bean burger, or a pad Thai with vegetables and tempeh for whole-food versions of your favorite foods.

    5. Prepare healthy meals
    Meal planning is a vital component to ensure proper nutrition and weight loss, and, thankfully, supermarkets now sell pre-packaged vegetables that are table-ready in minutes. Examples of fast-and-easy dishes include quinoa bowls with tempeh; a mixed stir-fry blend of broccoli, carrots, and mushrooms; eggplant cutlets with marinara sauce, vegan cheese, and basil; and soba noodles with greens. If these meals are beyond your scope, meal delivery services such as HelloFresh and meal-planning services such as PlateJoy provide easy-to-follow recipes that are pre-measured and dietitian-approved.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dscn8056.jpg

    6. Get exercise and stay hydrated
    Healthy meals, water, and exercise are key components for any successful weight-loss program. People should engage in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly in order to burn calories and lose weight. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a form of cardiovascular interval training focusing on alternating short periods of intense anaerobic exercise with less-intense recovery periods. To achieve maximum results, HIIT should be practiced three times a week and supplemented with jogging or hiking, says Jorge Cruise, trainer and author of Tiny and Full. And don’t forget to stay hydrated! Drinking a minimum of 64 ounces of water daily keeps your body cleansed, which improves fitness and overall health.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dscn8158.jpg


    sauce 6 Tips for Losing Weight on a Vegan Diet
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  87. #1487
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  88. #1488
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    Hydroponic setup, perhaps?

    Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse




    BERLIN (AP) — Scientists in Antarctica have harvested their first crop of vegetables grown without earth, daylight or pesticides as part of a project designed to help astronauts cultivate fresh food on other planets.

    Researchers at Germany’s Neumayer Station III say they’ve picked 3.6 kilograms (8 pounds) of salad greens, 18 cucumbers and 70 radishes grown inside a high-tech greenhouse as temperatures outside dropped below -20 degrees Celsius (-4 Fahrenheit).

    The German Aerospace Center DLR, which coordinates the project, said Thursday that by May scientists hope to harvest 4-5 kilograms of fruit and vegetables a week.

    While NASA has successfully grown greens on the International Space Station, DLR’s Daniel Schubert says the Antarctic project aims to produce a wider range of vegetables that might one day be grown on Mars or the Moon.


    https://apnews.com/bb14d1bf3a6143118ba9910b11adb5d8
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  89. #1489
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Matt Damon beat them to the punch. Sorry science, movies outpaced you again.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  90. #1490
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    ^ Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-sogmr3u.jpg
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  94. #1494
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    Bananas for the win! Bananas are good for the athletes who use them, but bad for those behind them, who tend to slip and slide on the discarded peels

    Bananas vs. Sports Drinks? Bananas Win in Study

    A banana might reasonably replace sports drinks for those of us who rely on carbohydrates to fuel exercise and speed recovery, according to a new study comparing the cellular effects of carbohydrates consumed during sports.

    It found that a banana, with its all-natural package, provides comparable or greater anti-inflammatory and other benefits for athletes than sports drinks. But there may be a downside, and it involves bloating.

    For decades, athletes and their advisers have believed, and studies have confirmed, that eating or drinking carbohydrates during prolonged exertion can enable someone to continue for longer or at higher intensities and recover more quickly afterward than if he or she does not eat during the workout.

    The carbohydrates rapidly fuel muscles, lessening some of the physiological stress of working out and prompting less inflammation afterward.

    The most digestible and portable form of carbohydrates is sugar, whether glucose, fructose or sucrose, and for athletes, this sugar frequently is provided through sports drinks.

    But sports drinks are not a substance found in the natural world. They are manufactured and can contain flavorings and chemicals that some people might wish to avoid.

    So a few years ago, researchers at the North Carolina Research Campus of Appalachian State University in Kannapolis, began to wonder about fruits as a healthier alternative to sports drinks during exercise.

    Most fruits, including bananas, are sugary and high in fructose; fructose, after all, means fruit sugar. But they also contain other natural substances that might have an impact on sport performance and recovery, the researchers speculated.

    In a preliminary experiment, published in 2012, the scientists found that cyclists performed better during a strenuous bike ride if they had either a banana or a sports drink compared to only water. They also developed lower levels of inflammation in their bodies afterward.

    But that study had left many questions unanswered, particularly about whether and how the carbohydrates might be aiding athletes’ recovery.

    So for the new experiment, which was published last month in PLOS One, the researchers decided to use more sophisticated techniques to track molecular changes inside cyclists’ bodies.

    (Dole Foods, which sells bananas, partially funded both studies. According to a statement in the study, the company did not have any involvement in “the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.”)

    The researchers asked 20 competitive cyclists, male and female, to complete a grueling 47-mile (75-kilometer) bike ride on several occasions at the campus performance lab. During one ride, they drank only water. In the others, they had water, but also eight ounces of a sports drink or about half of a banana every 30 minutes.

    The scientists drew blood before the workout, immediately after, and at several additional points, stretching out to 45 hours later.

    They then checked the blood for markers of inflammation and levels of hundreds of molecules, known as metabolites, that can change during and after exertion and signify how much stress the body feels.

    They also isolated blood cells to look at the activity of certain genes involved in inflammation.

    As they had expected, the scientists found that swallowing only water resulted in relatively high levels of inflammatory markers in the riders’ blood. These markers were much lower if the cyclists had consumed fruit or the sports drink.

    The volunteers also showed less-stressed metabolite profiles if they had had carbohydrates during their rides, whether those calories had come from a bottle or a banana.

    But there were differences in the activity of some genes. In particular, the scientists found that the riders’ blood cells produced less of a genetic precursor of an enzyme known as COX-2 if they had eaten bananas during their workout. This effect was not seen if they had drunk the sports drink or only water.

    The COX-2 enzyme prompts the production of prostaglandins, which, in turn, intensify inflammation. Less of the genetic precursor in cells after a workout should mean less COX-2 and reduced inflammation, says David Nieman, the director of the human performance lab at Appalachian State University and the study’s lead author.

    He points out that anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by inhibiting COX-2, but, until now, researchers had not considered that bananas might perform comparably.

    How the fruit manages to affect the cells’ gene expression after exercise is still not known, however, he says.

    He and his colleagues also do not know whether half of a standard banana every 30 minutes is the ideal amount of the fruit during exertion. Although it provided as many carbohydrates as in a cup of the sports drink, it also resulted in “quite a bit of bloating,” he says, which might dampen some athletes’ enthusiasm.

    He and his colleagues plan to explore those issues in future studies and also look into the effects of other fruits. “Dates have even more sugar than bananas,” Dr. Nieman says.

    In the meantime, he says, for exercisers who might prefer a natural, inexpensive and neatly packaged alternative to sports drinks, “bananas look pretty good.”
    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/04/w...FQUcPwodkOACew
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    GMO yeast to produce vegan friendly animal protein?

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...cheese/557615/

    Mixed feelings about this, and lab grown meat. Yay for more unhealthy "vegan" options? But if that's what it takes to get more folks onboard...perfection is the enemy of progress yada yada

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    Quote Originally Posted by squeakymcgillicuddy View Post
    GMO yeast to produce vegan friendly animal protein?

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...cheese/557615/

    Mixed feelings about this, and lab grown meat. Yay for more unhealthy "vegan" options? But if that's what it takes to get more folks onboard...perfection is the enemy of progress yada yada
    So question. If meat grown in a lab no longer leads to the death of animals, is it vegan? For me, I don't eat meat because I don't want too, not for animal rights (not that there is anything wrong with that, and I fully support treating all animals humanely). I probably wouldn't eat lab grown meat because it is still meat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    So question. If meat grown in a lab no longer leads to the death of animals, is it vegan?
    Not if animals are still being exploited. I believe lab meat requires obtaining stem cells from live animals. Can stem cells be cloned and perpetuated indefinitely, so that one animal can feed millions without even being slaughtered? Again, not sure how I feel about that. If exploiting an animal to feed one person is wrong, and exploiting an animal to feed 10 people is wrong, what about a thousand, or a million, or a billion? Does wrong become right at some point? Which point, and why? Would lab grown golden retriever meat be acceptable? How about human meat? At least the stem cell donor could consent. Is bioengineered cannibalism the only ethical meat? Moralizing aside, lab meat could drastically reduce the amount of suffering animals have to experience for our enjoyment. While I won't eat it myself I fully support it if it helps displace factory farming.

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    On a lighter note


  99. #1499
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    Vegan protein is healthier for your heart than meat, study claims

    The health benefits of veganism are almost as copious as the endless #avotoast snaps on Instagram.

    Now, a new study is adding fuel to the plant-based fire by reporting that vegan protein is far healthier than meat for the heart.

    Published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers at Loma Linda University in California and the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Paris found that people who consumed significant amounts of meat experienced an increased risk of heart disease.

    The opposite was true for those who consumed the majority of their protein from plant-based sources, such as nuts and seeds.

    After collecting data from more than 81,000 people, the researchers concluded that, on average, those who ate more meat experienced a 60 per cent increase in risk for heart disease whereas those who ate mostly vegan protein benefited from a 40 per cent reduced risk.

    While lead author Gary Fraser, from Loma Linda University, had long-suspected that incorporating more nuts and seeds into the diet would help protect against heart disease, this study confirmed his theory.

    “While dietary fats are part of the story in affecting risk of cardiovascular disease, proteins may also have important and largely overlooked independent effects on risk," he said.

    "This new evidence suggests that the full picture probably also involves the biological effects of proteins in these foods.”

    Fraser believe these initial findings will prompt further research into how particular amino acids found in animal proteins contribute to increasing the risk of heart disease, in addition to investigations into the relevance of blood pressure, blood lipids and weight.

    It’s not the first time a plant-based diet has been credited for boosting heart health.

    A study in November 2017 of the health benefits of five different kinds of diet revealed that vegans were 42 per cent less likely to suffer from heart failure than those who consumed fewer plant-based foods.

    However, a study from July last year claimed that vegetarian diets can actually put people at a higher risk of heart disease.

    Rather than being associated with protein intake, researchers wrote in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that a higher consumption of refined grains, sugary foods and potatoes, which dominates some vegetarian diets, can promote poor heart health.

    “It’s apparent that there is a wide variation in the nutritional quality of plant foods," lead author Dr Ambika Satija wrote, "making it crucial to take into consideration the quality of foods in a plant-based diet.”

    Meanwhile, the researchers praised nutrient-dense plant-based foods such as whole grains, unsaturated fats and fruits and vegetables for lowering the risk of heart disease.

    Sauce:https://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...-a8291506.html

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  100. #1500
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    Going to give this #vegan thing a try ... Yes guys you heard that right. Gx
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    https://twitter.com/GordonRamsay/sta...48048068145152
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