Page 15 of 15 FirstFirst ... 51112131415
Results 1,401 to 1,417 of 1417
  1. #1401
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    New study finds just 9 grams of processed meat per week can increase women's risk for breast cancer

    New research has found that post-menopausal women who eat just 9g of processed meats a week could be at a greater risk of developing breast cancer.

    The study published in the European Journal of Cancer examined 260,000 middle-aged British women and revealed that even those who ate less than 9g of processed meats a week were still 15 per cent more likely to get breast cancer than those who refrained completely.

    Breast cancer is the most common female cancer and accounts for 11,000 deaths in the UK each year, according to the most recent figures.

    The research from the University of Glasgow found that post-menopausal women who eat just three rashers of bacon or two sausages on a weekly basis are a fifth more likely to contract the disease.

    Public health researchers at the university believe processed meats could be responsible for hundreds of cases of breast cancer each year that could be avoided.

    When the research was combined with ten previous studies accounting for 1.7 million women and 40,000 cases of breast cancer, it revealed that eating processed meats could increase the risks for post-menopausal women by a tenth, The Times reports.

    Avoiding Cancer

    The risk of developing cancer sometime in our lives is already around 40%-50%, so it's crucial we do everything in our power to avoid this disease.

    But can diet reduce our chances of contracting cancer?

    A 2012 analysis of all the studies done to date concluded vegetarians have significantly lower cancer rates. For example, the largest forward-looking study on diet and cancer ever performed concluded that “the incidence of all cancers combined is lower among vegetarians.”

    But what about vegans?


    A study from Loma Linda University funded by the National Cancer Institute reported that vegans have lower rates of cancer than both meat-eaters and vegetarians.

    Vegan women, for example, had 34 percent lower rates of female-specific cancers such as breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer - and this was compared to a control group of 'healthy omnivores' who ate substantially less meat than the general population (just two servings a week or more), as well as after controlling for non-dietary factors such as smoking, alcohol, and a family history of cancer.

    Why do vegans have such lower cancer risk? It may be due to the level of a cancer-promoting growth hormone in the body called IGF-1. Consuming animal protein increases the levels of circulating IGF-1 in our body, but within two weeks of switching to a plant-based diet, IGF-1 levels in the bloodstream drop[10] sufficiently to help slow the growth of cancer cells.

    Studies comparing levels of IGF-1 in meat-eaters vs. vegetarians vs. vegans show that only vegans have significantly lower levels, which suggests we should eliminate animal products from our diets altogether.

    Vegans were also shown to have lower rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension as well as significantly lower cancer risk.

    Groundbreaking research done by Dr. Dean Ornish and Nobel Prize winner Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn found that a vegan diet caused more than 500 genes to change in only three months, turning on genes that prevent disease and turning off genes that cause breast cancer, heart disease, prostate cancer, and other diseases.

    This is extremely empowering news, given that most people think they are a victim of their genes and that contracting these diseases at some point cannot be helped. We aren’t helpless at all; in fact, the power is largely in our hands, or rather, in our forks.
    sauce: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...st-cancer-risk
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #1402
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Vegetarian Sausages Are as Bad for You as Meat, Health Group Says

    It would be pretty presumptuous to assume that vegetarians eat meat-free sausages purely for health reasons. Who doesn’t enjoy a hit of fatty, salty food for breakfast, especially if it doesn’t involve the odds and ends of animals being squished into a tube?

    That being said, when it comes to sodium, a lot of meatless sausages can apparently be just as unhealthy as the meat for which they’re ostensibly being substituted. The Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH), which describes itself as “a group concerned with salt and its effects on health, supported by 25 expert scientific members,” says that a recent survey of theirs “has exposed the shocking and excessively high amounts of salt in certain sausage brands.”



    In a press release issued on Wednesday, CASH called out a wide range of sausage producers included in their “Sausages Survey 2017,” and a number of vegetarian brands were not spared. “Going meat free isn’t always healthier in terms of salt either; some vegetarian options are just as salty,” CASH wrote in the press release. “Quorn’s 4 Best of British Sausages have a whopping 1.9g salt/100g dishing up 2.2g salt in 2 sausages—that’s more salt than half a Pizza Hut Margherita Pizza!”

    The survey was undertaken by CASH in concert with Queen Mary University of London, where CASH Chairman Graham MacGregor is Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine. MacGregor was adamant about the potentially widespread health implications of a nation hooked on tubes of meat (or meat replacements) that make it very difficult for consumers to stay within their daily recommended sodium intake.

    “Public Health England, who is now responsible, must get tough on those companies not complying and set new mandatory targets to be achieved by 2020 without further delay,” MacGregor said. “Otherwise, thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks every year. Salt reduction is the most cost-effective and most successful public health preventive measure made to date, and it is a national tragedy that it is being allowed to fail.”

    Public Health England’s Chief Nutritionist Dr Alison Tedstone responded, in the same press release, by saying, “We’ve been very clear with the food industry on the importance of meeting the 2017 salt targets. We’ll report on their progress next year and will provide advice to government on the next steps.”

    Sausage is a staple of the British diet, and last year, 175,713 tons of sausage made their way into 85 percent of households, according to the pig farm industry, so MacGregor's medical fears that "thousands of people will die from unnecessary strokes and heart attacks" may not be so hyperbolic. That level of sausage consumption equated to 61 grams of sodium, or 134 bags of pre-salted chips per person, per year, says CASH. So, that's a lot.

    Of course, if you're eating sausages, hot dogs, or meat substitutes, you're probably not a health nut. But at least this clears it up: Plant-based foods can be pretty crappy for you, too.

    sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/arti...unchiesfbcaads
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  3. #1403
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26195544_2154432141495918_7611291701888279460_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #1404
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    It's never too late to change.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26219702_1810774802330709_1785849228390592243_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  5. #1405
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    How to fuel during your ride (or run). These tips (from a no-meat athlete's blog is also applicable to riding or any other endurance workout)

    How to Eat and Drink During a Run

    1. Get off the commercial drinks and gels. Or at least, check them out to make sure they don’t contain artificial colors and sweeteners. While some sports drinks are truly designed for athletes, many of the more popular ones must also cater to the masses of non-athletes who buy them as soda alternatives. Much better to make your own natural sports drink and raw energy gel, both courtesy of pro vegan triathlete Brendan Brazier, in his book Thrive.

    2. Consume mostly liquid or easily-digesting food like gel. Solid food takes more energy and blood to digest than liquid, leaving you with less for hauling ass. And it’s more likely to cause intestinal distress, which can ruin a race. Except for the longest events, skip the solids.

    3. For all workouts, take in 4 to 6 ounces of water every 10 to 20 minutes. Your goal is to replace most of what you lose in weight, so if you want to get precise, you can figure out what you lose during a standard workout and drink the exact amount you need to replace it. Or just chill out and just follow a rule of thumb like this one.

    4. Get 500 milligrams of sodium with every 16 ounces you drink. When you sweat, you lose electrolytes, and that puts you at risk for hyponatremia if you hydrate without replacing them. For those of you making your own drinks and gels, 500 milligrams is a little less than the amount in a quarter teaspoon of salt.

    5. For workouts and races lasting over an hour (and up to 4 or 5 hours), you need 30-60 grams of carbohydrate per hour. 30-60 grams is a commonly-cited figure, but it’s a big range. More useful might be to divide your body weight in pounds by 4 to get a minimum hourly carbohydrate requirement, in grams. Accomplish this with a sports drink or a combination of energy gel and water. Some claim a little bit of protein, in a 4:1 carb-to-protein ratio, helps minimize muscle damage.

    6. For anything lasting much more than 5 hours, the nutrition focus shifts to fat, with a smaller amount of carbohydrate. For details, go find an ultrarunner who has run more than a single 50K!
    The Least You Need to Know About Fueling Your Run
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #1406
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Director James Cameron to release ‘game changing’ vegan documentary at Sundance


    Award-winning director and vegan environmentalist has James Cameron executively produced new vegan documentary The Game Changers which will be debuted at Park City Utah’s Sundance Film Festival on January 19th.

    The film is a collaboration between Cameron, director Louis Psihoyos (who also directed Oscar-winning Japanese dolphin slaughter documentary The Cove), and mixed martial arts champion James Wilks.

    According to the film’s website, the film will focus on: “From the UFC Octagon in Las Vegas and the anthropology lab at Dartmouth, to a strongman gym in Berlin and the bushlands of Zimbabwe, The Game Changers will introduce the world to elite athletes, special ops soldiers, visionary scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes—each on a mission to create a seismic shift in the way we eat and live.”

    The Game Changers will feature a wide array of elite athletes, special operations soldiers, scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes who are all thriving on a plant-based diet.

    “The world’s strongest guy is a vegan,” Psihoyos said. “The world’s fastest guy, Carl Lewis, was the first to break 10 seconds, and he did it when he was a vegan. We’re trying to dispel the myth that you need protein from animals to become a real man.”

    In recent years, Cameron has become an avid advocate for veganism and appears alongside actor Samuel L. Jackson in Eating You Alive—a new documentary that focuses on the adverse health effects of consuming animal products.






    sauce: Director James Cameron to release ‘game changing’ vegan documentary at Sundance | Vegan Food & Living
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  7. #1407
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Plant based related... finally a use for dandelions and ragweed


    Scientists are making carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum


    Carbon fiber is the Superman of materials. Five times stronger than steel and a fraction of the weight, it is used in everything from tennis rackets to golf clubs to bicycles to wind turbine blades to passenger airplanes to Formula One race cars. There’s just one catch: Carbon fiber is made from oil and other costly ingredients, making the end product exceptionally expensive. That’s why carbon fiber shows up in race cars but rarely makes it into minivans.

    That could change. Scientists say it may soon be possible to make carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum, driving down costs, making the material more widely available for use in cars, planes and other vehicles.

    Carbon fiber is made from a chemical called acrylonitrile. Currently, producers make acrylonitrile from oil, ammonia, oxygen and an expensive catalyst. The process produces a lot of heat and yields a toxic byproduct. And, because acrylonitrile is made from petroleum, the cost of carbon fiber tends to rise and fall with the price of oil.

    “Acrylonitrile prices have witnessed large fluctuations in the past, which has in turn led to lower adoption rates for carbon fibers for making cars and planes lighter weight,” said Gregg Beckham, a group leader at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and coauthor of a recent paper detailing this research. “If you can stabilize the acrylonitrile price by providing a new feedstock from which to make acrylonitrile,” he said, adding, “we might be able to make carbon fiber cheaper.”

    Beckham and a team of researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed a new process for producing acrylonitrile that makes use of plants, namely the parts people can’t eat, such as corn stalks and wheat straw. Scientists broke these materials down into sugars, which were converted into an acid and combined with an inexpensive catalyst to produce acrlyonitrile. The process generated no excess heat and returned no toxic byproducts.

    Scientists believe the plant-based process could be scaled up and used in manufacturing. Researchers are now working with several firms to produce a large quantity of acrylonitrile that will be turned into carbon fiber and tested for use in automobiles. By making carbon fiber cheaper, scientists could help car owners save money in the long run. Cars made with carbon fiber are lighter than those made with steel. As a result, they need less fuel to cover the same distance, helping drivers save on gas while also cutting planet-warming carbon pollution.

    There’s a trend underway of scientists making petroleum products from plants instead. Petroleum is, after all, made from prehistoric plants that were buried and subjected to intense heat and pressure for millions of years. Researchers are trying to cut out the middleman — deriving needed chemicals directly from plants, reducing our dependence on oil.

    “We’ll be doing more fundamental research,” Beckham said. “Beyond scaling acrylonitrile production, we are also excited about using this powerful, robust chemistry to make other everyday materials.”


    sauce: https://www.popsci.com/carbon-fiber-from-plants#page-3
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  8. #1408
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26239193_10215739374300538_6508625225146745248_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  9. #1409
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    3 Reasons Quinoa Is A Damn-Near-Perfect Fitness Food

    Boost your health and fitness gains by adding quinoa to your shopping cart more often.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-3-reasons-quinoa-damn-near-perfect-fitness-food-header-830x467.jpg

    Indigenous to South America and considered a sacred food staple in countries like Bolivia, quinoa was nearly wiped out by Spanish conquistadors in the 16th century, only to experience a renaissance as a supergrain in modern times.

    It wasn't long ago that quinoa was considered exotic and rarely found on store shelves. But due to a rise in the popularity of gluten-free eating, quinoa has become a supermarket fixture. Its reputation as a nutritional powerhouse has also helped quinoa work its way into more pantries than ever. And harried cooks appreciate that it takes about half the time to cook as brown rice.

    This poster child of nutritious gluten-free grains should find a place in your fitness diet, and these recipes make it easy for quinoa to nourish your body from morning to night.

    Reason 1: Quinoa Is Rich In Antioxidants

    As with fruits and vegetables, eating more quinoa will infuse your diet with antioxidants, compounds that prowl the body looking for cell-damaging free radicals to "mop up." For this reason, a higher intake of antioxidants is thought to be an important part of the equation in the battle against various diseases. Antioxidants like those found in quinoa might aid in exercise recovery by helping to limit the damage muscle cells experience after a vigorous workout.

    Beyond the more customary beige grains, quinoa now comes in packages of red or black. Pigments that give black and red quinoa their striking hues are potent antioxidants; in fact, research shows colored quinoa can pack a bigger antioxidant punch than the paler counterpart. They also tend to be less grassy tasting and have firmer textures, making them ideal for salads.

    Reason 2: Quinoa Is High In Protein


    One cup of cooked quinoa provides about 8 grams of protein, but it's not just any old lackluster plant-based protein we're talking about here. Quinoa is a "complete" protein, meaning it contains all nine essential amino acids—similar to animal proteins.

    Of particular importance, quinoa contains the amino acid leucine, the same amino acid abundant in whey protein. Leucine is especially effective at promoting muscle repair and anabolism.

    Reason 3: Quinoa Comes Loaded With Fiber


    Quinoa is a great way to infuse your diet with an extra dose of fiber. One cup of cooked quinoa delivers 5 grams of fiber (men and women should aim for 38 and 25 grams a day, respectively). That's an important dietary perk, considering higher intakes of fiber have been linked to lower blood pressure.

    And since fiber promotes feelings of fullness, via its power to slow digestion and support blood-sugar levels, adding more high-fiber foods like quinoa to your daily diet could help put the brakes on overeating and mindless snacking.

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  10. #1410
    oh my TVC 15
    Reputation: Forster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    3,431
    We've replaced white rice with Quinoa in everything but Sushi. We still use wild rice for stuffed mushrooms and other winter wild rice dishes, but it's pretty hard to go wrong with that either.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  11. #1411
    oh my TVC 15
    Reputation: Forster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    3,431
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	26195544_2154432141495918_7611291701888279460_n.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	87.3 KB 
ID:	1176638
    Same thing with Cabbage. Start with a whole pan full and end up with two servings.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  12. #1412
    Mr. Buck E. Fikes
    Reputation: Oh My Sack!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,831
    I'm eating tons of spinach and that meme above is so true! Surprisingly, even though I was "anti-vegetable" as a kid growing up, I discovered spinach and really loved it steamed with a bit of butter and salt. Still do. We buy the big bags of leaves that are triple washed and ready to eat. The opposite of the cooked version, you open the bag and it fluffs up to 10x the volume. It just keeps growing and growing....until you cook it, of course.

    Oh, I haven't done straight quinoa, yet. We get bags of long grain wild rices with a pretty sizable amount of quinoa in it but I'll need to give it a shot just straight up. I just bought a new rice cooker from Costco that does a great job. It has a setting exclusively for Quinoa, too. Costco also sells a few different versions of quinoa which I'll have to give a try.

  13. #1413
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,431
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    I'm eating tons of spinach and that meme above is so true! Surprisingly, even though I was "anti-vegetable" as a kid growing up, I discovered spinach and really loved it steamed with a bit of butter and salt. Still do. We buy the big bags of leaves that are triple washed and ready to eat. The opposite of the cooked version, you open the bag and it fluffs up to 10x the volume. It just keeps growing and growing....until you cook it, of course.

    Oh, I haven't done straight quinoa, yet. We get bags of long grain wild rices with a pretty sizable amount of quinoa in it but I'll need to give it a shot just straight up. I just bought a new rice cooker from Costco that does a great job. It has a setting exclusively for Quinoa, too. Costco also sells a few different versions of quinoa which I'll have to give a try.
    Spinach (and most greens) are pretty versatile. If you get tired of butter and salt, try olive oil, garlic, and lime. As for quinoa, try toasting it first. This will help develop the flavor more.

  14. #1414
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26907022_1768519603199214_9067167933530274598_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  15. #1415
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    One of the things I hear from people about vegan or vegetarian diet is : Aren't you always hungry? My answer is always no. Here is a good article how to avoid nutritional mistakes


    3 Reasons You Always Feel Hungry

    You are interested in this article because you're hungry. All. The. Time. No sooner do you finish a meal than your stomach starts gurgling and growling, letting you know in no uncertain terms that you need pound back more food. It may make you wonder whether you have some sort of superhero metabolism, or if you're just not eating enough of the right foods at mealtime.

    When was the last time you ate? If it was three or more hours ago, you're probably just due for your next meal. But if you ate an hour ago and your stomach is already starting to complain, it's probably time to look at what you're eating. Try these three tips to keep your belly feeling full and happy!

    1. You Don't Drink Enough Fluids

    Our bodies need a lot of fluids every day to optimize cognitive and physical performance. The average woman should drink a minimum of 96 ounces of fluid a day (about 12 cups), while the average man needs at least 125 ounces (about 16 cups or 1 gallon).[1,2] That's a lot of liquid for your average busy person to consume every day. And if you're training, you need to drink even more.

    For every 15 minutes you work out, you should drink another 5-8 ounces of fluid. That means if your workout lasts 60 minutes, you need to get another 20-32 ounces. One of the easiest ways to drink enough water is to carry around a water bottle. Not one of those tiny 8-ouncers, either; invest in a container that will hold one-fourth to one-half of your daily goal.

    The mother of all fluids, water, can do a lot to help you deal with hunger pangs. First of all, it helps create a feeling of fullness. When you consume water (or any fluid), your stomach expands, which sends a signal to your brain that you are full.

    Then there are those times when our bodies get confused. For example, we don't usually feel thirst until we're already slightly dehydrated. And our brains can confuse thirst with being hungry. Our brains tell us we need to eat, when all we really need to do is drink!

    Keep filling up on fluids—preferably calorie-free fluids—and you can keep that relentless appetite of yours in line.

    How to get more liquids: Keep a water bottle attached to your hip. Bring it with you in the car and into meetings. Put one at your desk during the day and on your nightstand overnight. Take a gulp every time you look at it, and keep replenishing it with a variety of fluids. Fill it with sports drinks when you're working out and with low-calorie juices and water when you're not.

    If your hunger really gets out of hand, try drinking 12-16 ounces of water immediately before and after each meal to make sure your brain gets the signal that you are full! Then, just keep taking in those fluids until your next meal.

    2. You Don't Eat Enough Fiber
    Fiber is often one of the most overlooked parts of our diets. We think a lot about getting our macros—our carbs, fats, and protein. But our bodies need fiber too. In fact, the recommended daily intake for fiber is 38 grams for men and 25 grams for women.

    But how much fiber people actually consume tends to be a lot less than that: 18 grams for men and 15 grams for women! Considering the powerful appetite-suppressing punch fiber packs, you might want to make sure you're getting at least the daily recommended amount—and it's not that hard to do.

    How to get more fiber: Just by swapping white carbs (white bread and pasta, white rice, and white potatoes) for brown carbs (whole-grain breads and pastas, brown rice, and oats) you can increase your fiber by 4-5 grams per meal. Another great source of fiber is flaxseed. At 3 grams per tablespoon, flaxseed can give a big fiber boost to your morning oats, post-workout smoothie, or nightly Greek yogurt (vegetarian diets)!

    3. You Don't Eat Enough Vegetables
    I'm talking about a minimum of three servings (one handful is a serving) of leafy greens and bright orange, red, or yellow veggies such as carrots, beets, and peppers each day.

    Vegetables suppress those feeling of hunger, because they're about 90 percent water—and loaded with fiber. Daily-double special! Veggies also contain very few calories per bite, so you can eat just about all of them you want without breaking the calorie bank.

    How to get more vegetables: Consider sneaking in vegetables throughout your day by hiding them in smoothies, omelets and scrambles, and sandwiches. Or just have them straight up; they're pretty tasty fresh or slightly undercooked.

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #1416
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    Plant based or vegan it doesn’t matter. Both deserve a high five



    The philosophical case for going vegan is about pleasure—not preachiness


    “Of course reading and thinking are important but, my God, food is important too.” These are the words of philosopher Iris Murdoch, and I am inclined to agree with her. Food is not just important to our health and our pleasure, but because it helps define the kind of people we are. In this regard, one might say, you are what you eat.

    Our society’s growing interest in veganism is a sign that many people—at least those privileged enough to have a fair amount of choice in their dietary habits—feel driven to ensure that their food aligns with their sense of self. In part, this is because public perceptions of veganism have shifted. The old-fashioned idea is that veganism is an-hedonic lifestyle based on grim restrictions, requiring immense discipline and sacrifice. This attitude is neatly summarized in a recent tweet from the British tabloid journalist Piers Morgan, who, upon learning of people going vegan for the month of January, asked, “What new special kind of Hell is this?”

    This stereotype belies actual experiences of becoming vegan. Put simply, becoming vegan can be fun—not only because vegan food can taste good and improve your health, but because making the choice to go vegan involves experimenting with becoming a different kind of person.

    The old arguments for veganism tend to tub-thump the moral wrongness of eating animals. The work of the late American philosopher Tom Regan is a good example of such an approach. Regan developed a broadly Kantian position involving not treating others, including non-human animals, as means to our ends. This led him to argue that justice required that non-human animals be treated with respect, so it was morally wrong to eat them.

    These kinds of arguments led to a widespread perception of vegans as morally-righteous extremists, which made it easy for the majority of people to avoid considering giving up animal products. Those uninterested in pursuing modern sainthood by building our lives around duties and prohibitions could eat our cheeseburgers in peace.

    The new veganism, by contrast, recognizes that care for the self is an important and worthwhile pursuit. And it deems pleasure a central facet of that self-care, emphasizing the pleasures of eating a delicious, colorful array of plant-based foods. Such an orientation is about what you eat, not what you don’t eat. The new veganism does not say “Don’t eat animals,” but rather, “Eat plants.”

    Indeed, one facet of becoming vegan may be a stance of openness toward new pleasures. Meat-eaters may extol the delights of the smell of a Sunday roast. So can vegans take in the comforting aroma of a sweet potato and fennel tagine. Instagram is bursting with photos of artisanal vegan ice cream cones and artfully arranged buckwheat waffles, while haute cuisine vegetarian and vegan restaurants like Millennium in Oakland, California, or Terre a Terre in Brighton, England, emphasize inventive dishes like seared chestnut polenta cake with sautéed maitake, oyster, and chanterelle mushrooms. And there are pleasures like discovering gorgeous things like persimmon in your local store, overlooked while you were an omnivore.

    The pleasures of veganism also encompass the feel-good benefits of healthy living. From short-term energy boosts to longer-term benefits like a lower risk of heart disease and cancer, becoming vegan invites us to enjoy cultivating a sound relationship with one’s body.

    We can also see the choice to become vegan as a transformative moment; a chance to actively engage in the aesthetic construction of the self. Being a vegan means changing into a different kind of person. What’s at stake is a better relation not only to one’s body, but also to one’s ways of thinking, and ways of treating others and the planet.

    This is what distinguishes becoming vegan from taking up CrossFit or some other self-improvement practice. Fitness work is part and parcel of a wider trend for aspirational living. There is nothing truly progressive or subversive about it. But in becoming vegan, you become other than the norm. You refuse to conform to the dominant Western eating culture. And so becoming vegan is about celebrating your freedom to choose the kind of person you become.

    Veganism, then, is a practice in which one becomes other than what one is. It involves a creative and experimental kind of work on the self. To become vegan is to take pleasure in disrupting environmental degradation; to enjoy the feeling of caring about the conditions of food production; to celebrate eating food that has been ethically produced. Being a vegan can be fun because it feels great to be part of a quest for a kinder, more sustainable world. It feels empowering to take actions toward creating that world, to be one person in a movement that wants to make a difference. Self-care, after all, is not just about treating oneself well, since we all live in the world together. Self-care means exercising choice over how we think, and attending to the steps we take to create the kind of world we want to live in.

    sauce: https://qz.com/1180190/the-philosoph...t-preachiness/
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  17. #1417
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,166
    We had vegan burgers made with jackfruit. delish

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-26804447_2049198285324612_5760028014638283741_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

Page 15 of 15 FirstFirst ... 51112131415

Similar Threads

  1. Vegan SS?
    By bigboarder1 in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: 07-19-2015, 07:55 PM
  2. Any vegetarian riders out there?
    By stumblemumble in forum Nutrition and Hydration
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: 08-09-2012, 07:59 PM
  3. My Dog Is Now A Vegan?
    By Dirdir in forum Arizona
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-17-2012, 11:50 AM
  4. Vegetarian
    By hdo_1975 in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 07-29-2009, 07:52 AM
  5. Anyone here a Vegetarian or Vegan?
    By DownHillFast in forum Arizona
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: 10-29-2004, 09:02 PM

Members who have read this thread: 135

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •