Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 41011121314
Results 1,301 to 1,369 of 1369
  1. #1301
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Forks over Knives cookbook
    Thug Kitchen (original)
    How to Cook Everything Vegetarian - Mark Bittman

    i am also member of a few FB groups and I get ideas from the forums
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #1302
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    434
    Quote Originally Posted by fishwrinkle View Post
    this may have been discussed, but what are some of your favorite vegan cookbooks?
    Vegan Richa's Indian Kitchen - Richa Hingle
    Isa Does It - Isa Chandra Moskowitz
    The Mediterranean Vegan Kitchen - Donna Klein
    Vegan Eats World - Terry Hope Romero

  3. #1303
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Yesterday, we attended the 33rd annual VegFest in Toronto. It was the biggest attendance ever for this 3 day event. Over 140 vendors, presentations, music etc

    A few pics


    Rice and peas, pumpkin, callaloo, (incredibly healthy), barbecue seitan, fresh coconut drink, and freshly corn on the cob. All from Vital
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21430301_1983755681868873_6024817040353012024_n.jpg


    One of dozens of food trucks from around the city
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21430612_1983756285202146_6076600350390892188_n.jpg

    I think Hare Krishna was one of the original vendors from 1985... still serving delicious food
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21462224_1983756361868805_6079544159609803836_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21462272_1983753165202458_4574279013462987408_n.jpg

    I got my lunch at D'Beatstro. A Banh Mi Tofu sandwich
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21462390_1983754445202330_1883265658912818402_n.jpg

    Apiecalypse Now was just one of 140 vendors... hugely popular. They make incredible pizza, flavoured marshmallows, donuts... etc all vegan
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21558811_1983761858534922_2279721453938751879_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #1304
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21192592_1979650692317520_566301458334459604_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  5. #1305
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Protein and the Vegan Athlete: All You Really Need to Know

    Can you be a plant-based athlete and still meet your protein needs?

    Unless you’ve been living in some magical No Meat Athlete bubble we don’t know about, you’re probably no stranger to this question.

    And luckily, neither is science.

    For a long time, athletes, coaches, and trainers alike have worried that vegan and vegetarian diets may not be sufficient to support the nutritional requirements and performance goals of athletes. They wonder if animal products are necessary to perform at one’s highest level.

    I’m happy to report, the research says otherwise. And that there’s an easier way to think about how (and where) you get your protein on a plant-based diet.

    But before we get into the details, let’s take a step back:

    What the Heck is Protein Anyway?
    Your body contains thousands of different proteins that serve different functions, all made from amino acids. It’s the arrangement of these amino acids that determines the type and function of a protein.

    There are 20 different amino acids that combine to form proteins, and although your body requires all of them, you only have the ability to make 11 of them. These are termed non-essential amino acids.

    The other nine—those you can’t make—are termed essential amino acids, and must be obtained from the diet.

    While it is true that all animal-source foods (meat, dairy, and eggs) contain all essential amino acids, they can also be obtained by eating a variety of plant foods.

    Proteins containing all nine essential amino acids can be used immediately by the body. If a protein is low in one or more of the essential amino acids, the availability of the protein is limited until the body can complete it. Which brings us to… wait for it…

    Complete vs. Incomplete Proteins (The Old Way of Thinking)
    More often than not, when you hear someone talking about getting enough protein, they refer to something called “complete” protein.

    The notion of complete vs. incomplete protein was popularized in the 1971 book, Diet for a Small Planet, by Frances Moore Lappé. Lappé said that plant foods are an incomplete protein because they’re deficient in one or more of the essential amino acids. Thus, being a healthy vegetarian would mean that you need to combine plant proteins at each meal to get a “complete” protein.

    This led to the impression that plant proteins are completely devoid of at least one essential amino acid.

    Nope. False.

    All plant proteins have some of every essential amino acid. Did you get that? All of them.

    While certain (quite delicious, I might add) foods—like quinoa, chia, buckwheat, and soy—contain all nine essential amino acids in roughly equal amounts, other plant proteins have a lower amount of at least one essential amino acid.

    But that’s not a problem because your body does the work of making complete proteins for you.

    All you have to do is rub your belly three times, wiggle your nose, and count to ten…

    Only kidding. It’s actually way cooler than that.

    Your body creates a “pool” of amino acids from the food you eat throughout the day. So, if you eat oats in the morning, a salad at lunch, and legumes for dinner, your body will pool together all the essential amino acids from these foods and use them as needed to make proteins.

    This means you don’t have to worry about getting all the essential amino acids at any given meal. As long as you are eating an assortment of plant foods over the course of a day, your body will take care of the rest.

    Beautiful, isn’t it?

    Lysine: The Limiting Amino Acid in Vegan Diets
    Alright, so there is one thing in particular we vegans need to consider more than others.

    Lysine (very different than Lysol… do not consume that).

    Lysine is an essential amino acid that plays an important role in producing carnitine—a nutrient that helps convert fatty acids into energy and helps lower cholesterol, and it also helps produce collagen—a fibrous protein found in bone, cartilage, and skin. Lysine is considered a limiting amino acid because plant foods generally only contain a small amount of it.

    The Recommended Daily Allowance of lysine is 38 mg per kg (1 kg = 2.2 lbs) of body weight. So, if you weigh 132 lbs (60 kg), you would need 2,280 mg of lysine. (Update: Calculation corrected)

    Some vegan nutritionists argue that meeting your daily lysine need is more important than meeting your overall daily protein need.

    By focusing only on the amount of protein in food, you might hit a huge number of one thing, but totally miss the mark on something else. If you aim instead for your daily lysine requirements, you’ll almost certainly meet your overall protein requirements as a result.

    Foods richest in lysine are tempeh, seitan, lentils, and tofu. Amaranth, quinoa, pistachios, and pumpkin seeds are also good sources. Here’s a chart that breaks down the amounts of these high lysine foods:

    Food Serving Lysine (mg)
    Tempeh 1/2 cup 754
    Seitan 3 oz 656
    Lentils 1/2 cup 624
    Tofu 1/2 cup 582
    Amaranth 1 cup 515
    Quinoa 1 cup 442
    Pistachios 1/4 cup 367
    Pumpkin seeds 1/4 cup 360

    Okay, So How Much Protein Do I Actually Need?
    Protein and amino acid needs are the same for women as for men, and the amount is based on body weight in kg. For the general adult population (ages 19-59 years), the Recommended Daily Allowance for protein is 0.8 g/kg/day. That means if you weigh 60 kg (132 lbs), you would need 48 g of protein per day.

    Put into practice? One cup of cooked oatmeal contains about 6 g of protein, add a tablespoon of peanut butter (4 g of protein) and ½ cup of soy milk (4 g protein) and you are up to 14 grams of protein at breakfast, which would be almost 30% of your daily requirement.

    For athletes, however, it is a little different:

    In a 2009 joint position paper on nutrition and athletic performance, the American College of Sport Medicine, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and the Dietitians of Canada recommended a higher protein intake for athletes. They said that:

    Endurance athletes require a protein intake of 1.2-1.4 g/kg/day.
    Strength athletes require a protein intake of 1.2-1.7 g/kg/day.
    Vegetarian athletes should increase their protein intake by 10% because plant proteins are less well-digested than animal proteins. Intake should be 1.3-1.8 g/kg/day.
    In other words, if you’re a vegan endurance athlete who weighs 60 kg (132 lbs), you need roughly 78-108 g of protein per day. Or about 40% more than non-vegan, non-athletes.

    That might sound hard to do on a vegan diet, but let’s look at a few examples to see just how easy it is.

    At first glance, that may seem difficult to do on a vegan diet, but don’t despair! It’s not as hard as you might think.

    A Day in the Life
    So far, this has been a lot of science and numbers. And while we all love science, sometimes it’s easier to just see examples. So, let’s put this all into perspective and look at sample menus for two vegan athletes:

    Troy

    Troy is 5’10” and weighs 155 lbs (70.3 kg). He’s training to run the Boston Marathon.

    His protein requirement is: 70.3 kg x 1.3 g PRO = 91 g/day

    His lysine requirement is: 70.3 kg x 38 mg = 2,671 mg/day

    Here is a sample menu showing how easy it is for Troy to meet his protein (including lysine) needs.

    Meal Food Protein Lysine
    Breakfast 2 slices whole grain bread 7.3 g 93 mg
    2 Tbsp peanut butter 8.0 g 290 mg
    8 oz soy milk 9.2 g 439 mg
    Banana 1.3 g 59 mg
    Snack 1/2 cup hummus 4.0 g 291 mg
    2 lavash crackers 4.0 g 144 mg
    1 cup veggie sticks 1.3 g 102 mg
    Lunch 1 cup vegetarian baked beans12.0 g 488 mg
    Medium baked potato 4.3 g 263 mg
    1 cup broccoli 3.6 g 234 mg
    Snack Orange 1.2 g 62 mg
    1/3 cup pistachios 8.2 g 489 mg
    Dinner 5 oz firm tofu 12.0 g 651 mg
    1 cup quinoa 8.1 g 442 mg
    1/2 cup peas 3.9 g 463 mg
    1/2 cup corn 2.3 g 272 mg
    Snack 1/4 cup dry roasted chickpeas 3.6 g 243 mg
    1 cup strawberries 1.0 g 37 mg

    TOTAL 95.3 g 5,062 mg
    Boom. Troy nailed it.

    Sarah

    Sarah is 5’2” and weighs 125 lbs (56.8 kg). She’s a power lifter.

    Her protein requirement is: 56.8 kg x 1.6 g PRO = 91 g/day

    Her lysine requirement is: 56.8 kg x 38 mg = 2,158 mg/day

    Here is a sample menu showing how easy it is for Sarah to meet her protein (including lysine) needs.

    Meal Food Protein Lysine
    Breakfast 3/4 cup steel cut oats 7.5 g 501 mg
    1 Tbsp chia seeds 2.0 g 150 mg
    1 Tbsp cocoa nibs 1.0 g 70 mg
    Kiwi fruit 1.1 g 200 mg
    Snack 6 oz soy yogurt 6.0 g 439 mg
    3 Tbsp pumpkin seeds 6.6 g 270 mg
    Lunch Medium whole grain bagel 10.0 g 186 mg
    2 Tbsp peanut butter 8.0 g 290 mg
    8 oz soy milk 9.2 g 439 mg
    Snack 1/3 cup roasted soybeans 22.6 g 427 mg
    Orange 1.2 g 62 mg
    Dinner 1 cup cooked amaranth 9.3 g 515 mg
    1/2 cup black beans 7.6 g 523 mg
    1/2 cup lentils 8.9 g 624 mg
    1/2 cup cooked spinach 3.0 g 115 mg


    TOTAL 104 g 4,811 mg
    Sarah had no trouble hitting her lysine goals for the day.

    Looking deeper at these two examples, you’ll notice they both include a well-rounded mix of:

    Fruits,
    Veggies,
    Legumes, and
    Nuts.
    And they don’t include any:

    Protein powders,
    Fake meats, or
    Crazy mega protein meals.
    See, it’s really not hard to hit your dietary requirements as a plant-based athlete, even without resorting to processed foods and protein powders as so many athletes assume you need to.

    Let’s Put the Protein Myth to Rest
    The idea that plant sources are insufficient to meet protein requirements is an outdated myth. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics supports the notion that an appropriately planned vegan or vegetarian diet can meet the energy and macronutrient needs (including protein) of athletes.

    But the key words here are appropriately planned. Meeting your protein needs as a vegan athlete isn’t rocket science, but it may take a little effort or at least forethought.

    Eat a variety of foods throughout the day.
    Include high-lysine foods when possible.
    Know roughly how many grams you need and plan accordingly.
    While the protein question may never go away completely, at least you know you can be healthy and reach your goals.

    And now you know the science to prove it.


    Sauce: Protein and the Vegan Athlete: All You Really Need to Know | No Meat Athlete
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #1306
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-hhmimhhgmfokmjjo-1.jpg

    Velovegan: Vegan meat delivered by bike to your door

    Each weekend Ben Mueller-Heaslip and his partner make amazing vegan meats, then, Velovegan delivers those 'meats' all over Toronto - by bike. dandyhorse caught up with the founder of Toronto's only vegan food bike delivery service to find out a bit more about what it's like being vegan and working on two wheels.
    When and why did you start Velovegan?

    Well, it's hard to say when I started. I'd been developing recipes for vegan meats ever since I became vegan many years ago, mostly because there weren't as many options back then as there are now and most of what was available was pretty terrible. So I was making vegan meats, and it was way better than what people could get from stores, so my friends wanted some, then they started buying it and people I didn't know wanted to buy it, so I decided that I should go into business. It became official about two years ago.

    Why deliver by bike?

    Why deliver by bike? Because it's just the best way to do the job!


    I cover most of the city, from Scarborough to the Humber River, and get every day's route done in a couple hours. It costs me almost nothing and it's mostly a lot of fun. I wouldn't be able to have this business any other way: the cost of running a car for business wouldn't let me make it the sort of business I want it to be. And I just hate driving. Driving is not fun. I'd have to pay myself way more to drive, so much more that I wouldn't be able to hire myself to do the job.

    Carrying the food is no problem. I worked as a bike courier for many years so my legs in good shape, and I've done a lot of cross-country bike camping rides where I've had to carry a lot more weight for a lot longer distances. I've got panniers and my panniers have panniers. When there are too many orders I hire my friend Smitty to ride for me and he's a fantastic courier. Now that business is getting really busy I'm trying to get him on as a regular employee. And since some stores have started carrying our products, you'll sometimes see me biking really slow with a big stack of orange crates full of burritos and pies strapped to the back rack of the bike.

    What is vegan meat?

    My meats are seitan, the base of which is wheat protein. It has the amazing property of being able to take on a great variety of textures depending on the process used to make it. My goal in making this stuff has been to create vegan meat that cooks the same way as the carnivores versions of the food. My father, for example, if he gets a package of vegan burgers or sausages from a store they stick to the grill of the barbeque and come out with the texture of either styrofoam or mush, because these things are badly made. My sausages, even my father can cook them properly. Just because you're vegan doesn't mean that your experience of cooking or eating should be any less than it would be if you're not vegan, and being able to barbeque a sausage is a nice part of life.

    Why did you decide to only do vegan meat instead of offering full vegan meals?

    Two reasons: first, every vegan already has vegetables so they don't need me to provide them. Second, a good business has to address a real need. Good, fresh, vegan meats, with a lot of variety, delivered at a good price is a real need and that's the service I'm providing.

    Do you know of any other vegan food delivery by bike services?

    Nope, I am the only one. There's a company in Minnesota that does it, but they don't deliver here. There are vegan restaurants that you can order from who use UberEATS and Foodora, but they're doing full meals and the delivery element is separate from the restaurant business. Unless there's something I haven't heard about, it's just me.

    Favourite part of the day?

    Being on the road. I love cooking, but it's a damn lonely thing. I usually try to time my cooking sessions to start with the first pitch of a Jays game so I don't get bored. Business administration is not fun for me. My partner does a lot of that stuff and she's way better at it than I am. What I like is when that work is done, the bike gets packed, and then I'm on the road. A lot of my regular clients are really great people and we have ongoing conversations, about baseball, or cycling, or politics, or their pets. You get to know people seeing them every week and I really value that. I wouldn't want to do this work if it wasn't like that.

    Every Christmas I do a special run to give some presents and cards to the people who ordered most often during the year. Last year, one of my clients reciprocated my present by taking me and my son up for a flight in his little plane he's got at Buttonville airport, and he let me fly the plane. That was totally the best thing that's come to me from starting the business.

    How does delivering healthy food by bike make the city a better place?

    Toronto's a pretty tough city. Anyone who spends any time on the road here knows that, and they probably have a pretty good idea by now why it's that way. I'm trying to make a life for my family, not to change the world. But I'm trying to run the business right. When I started Velovegan I thought a lot about what it means run a business morally, and came up with a few principles: Nobody has the right to hurt anyone else to make money, make the product affordable to everyone, treat anyone working for you like family. I don't know if it makes a difference that a family on your street is vegan, or it their vegan meat is delivered by bike instead of a van. But doing things this way makes me feel like part of a community of people that cares about each other, and it makes me want to do it again every day.

    Is there anything else you'd like to add?

    Yes! Velovegan meats are sold at Victoria's Whole Foods at 1450 Gerrard East, and that our burritos, pot pies, and Jamaican Patties are on the menu at the Sideshow Cafe at 1300 Gerrard.

    I'd give a shout out to Natalia and David at Lady Marmalade for giving me the use of their restaurant's kitchen in their off hours even though I've set off their burglar alarm so many times.

    sauce Velovegan | dandyhorse magazine
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  7. #1307
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,254
    Great story! Thanks for sharing some local news and interests.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  8. #1308
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Have a beautiful sunday/funday with healthy treats

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21078336_1265872053541800_7873788701566819394_n.jpg


    Is sugar really as addictive as cocaine? Scientists row over effect on body and brain
    Heated debate has greeted an article in a medical journal suggesting sugar should be considered an addictive drug, as experts deride the claims as ‘absurd’

    Sauce: https://www.theguardian.com/society/...P=share_btn_fb

    Article:
    An article suggesting that sugar should be considered an addictive substance, and could even be on a par with abusive drugs such as cocaine, has sparked a furious backlash with experts describing the claims as “absurd”.

    In a narrative review published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine the authors write that sugar could act as a gateway to alcohol and other addictive substances, adding that like sugar, like cocaine and opium, is refined from plants to yield pure white crystals – a process they say “significantly adds to its addictive properties.”

    The article was co-authored by cardiovascular research scientist James J DiNicolantonio and cardiologist James H O’Keefe, both from Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute in Kansas, together with William Wilson – a physician with the nonprofit US group practice Lahey Health.

    “Consuming sugar produces effects similar to that of cocaine, altering mood, possibly through its ability to induce reward and pleasure, leading to the seeking out of sugar,” they write, citing rodent studies which show that sweetness is preferred even over cocaine, and that mice can experience sugar withdrawal.

    Speaking to the Guardian, DiNicolantonio said that the consumption of sugar was a grave concern. “In animals, it is actually more addictive than even cocaine, so sugar is pretty much probably the most consumed addictive substance around the world and it is wreaking havoc on our health.”

    The trio are not the first to explore whether sugar should be considered addictive, but the article has come under fire from some in the field, who say while sugar consumption can lead to problematic health issues, it it is not addictive or a drug of abuse.

    Hisham Ziauddeen, a psychiatrist at the University of Cambridge, said that the rodent studies had been misunderstood by the authors, and added that a review of the matter he co-authored last year did not support the idea that sugar was addictive to humans.

    “The rodent studies show that you only get addiction-like behaviours if you restrict the animals to having [sugar] for two hours every day. If you allow them to have it whenever they want it – which is really how we consume it – they don’t show these addiction-like behaviours,” he said.

    “What this means is that it is the combination of that particular kind of intermittent access and sugar that produces those behaviours. Further you get the same kind of effect if you use saccharin … so it seems to be about sweet taste rather than sugar.”

    Ziauddeen added that it was not surprising that even rats hooked on cocaine might prefer sugar, pointing out that many animals would naturally look for sweet things, not cocaine.

    Maggie Westwater, a co-author of the study with Ziauddeen, said that the anxious behaviour sometimes shown by rodents after eating sugar was far from a clear sign of addiction. “Since such ‘withdrawal’ often occurs in the context of extended fasting, we cannot say if the behaviours were precipitated by previous sugar consumption or by hunger,” she said, adding that unlike for cocaine, rodents would not seek sugar if it was paired with an unpleasant event, like an electric shock

    The authors of the latest study also point to parallels between the effect of cocaine and sugar on the brain, pointing out that both interact with the same reward system.

    But Ziauddeen said that was not surprising. “The reality is that quite simply the brain’s rewards system and the circuits that control eating behaviour are the same ones that respond to drugs of abuse,” he said. But, he added, unlike sugar “drugs of abuse seem to hijack those systems and turn off their normal controls.”

    Tom Sanders, emeritus professor of nutrition and dietetics at King’s College London said that it was “absurd to suggest that sugar is addictive like hard drugs.”

    “While it is true that a liking for sweet things can be habit-forming it is not addictive like opiates or cocaine,” said Sanders. “Individuals do not get withdrawal symptoms when they cut sugar intake.”

    However, DiNicolantonio said that while sugar consumption in humans didn’t lead to physical withdrawal signs, there were biochemical signs of withdrawal in the brain – a point contested by Ziauddeen.

    But not everyone disagreed with the authors.

    Robert Lustig, professor of paediatrics at the University of California San Francisco said he shared the concerns of DiNicolantonio and colleagues. “I do believe that sugar is addictive, based on its metabolic and hedonic properties,” he said. Lustig has previously argued that sugar is the “alcohol of the child”. However, while he said he believed sugar was a drug of abuse, he considered it a weak one, on a par with nicotine, rather than drugs like heroin.

    But Ziauddeen cautioned that sugar, in itself, is not dangerous. “From an eating, metabolism and obesity point of view, sugar is not this terrific demon by itself, because of some innate property of it,” he said. “Where the problem lies is that there are huge amounts of sugar that are put into various foods that substantially boost the calorie content of those foods.”

    Sanders agreed, noting that our taste for sugar is a trait that humans are born with and that sweetness helps us recognize foods rich in vitamin C.“The main health hazard from sugar is dental decay – it only contributes to obesity directly via over consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages,” he said.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  9. #1309
    oh my TVC 15
    Reputation: Forster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    3,365
    I dunno, sugar is harder to snort, unless it's powdered sugar, which is used to cut cocaine sometimes. On a more serious note, non-sugar replacements also tend to make people eat sweeter foods and creates a similar problem to eating actual sugar.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  10. #1310
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Quote Originally Posted by fishwrinkle View Post
    this may have been discussed, but what are some of your favorite vegan cookbooks?

    oh she glows - all of them
    eaternity
    chloe's.... - all of them
    vegan cooking for carnivores
    I follow Facebook group called No Meat Athlete. I haven't purchased the cookbook yet. The author posts excellent healthy recipes and relevant information


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-nma-centered-small.png


    sauce: https://go.nomeatathlete.com/cookbook-info
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  11. #1311
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Dangerous Food

    1)
    Mushrooms

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1433430256-gettyimages-466713631-1.jpg
    Not every mushroom is created equal. Crimini mushrooms might make perfect pasta toppers, but some species contain poisons that can kill.

    2)
    Tomatoes

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gettyimages-538605211.jpg
    The juicy, red fruit contains a poison, Glycoalkaloid, in its leaves, which is known for causing upset stomachs, severe cramping, and anxiety. So steer clear of the leaves and stems.

    3)
    Rhubarb Leaves

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1433429549-gettyimages-181824457.jpg
    Rhubarb might bake up all kinds of delicious sweets, but the leaves are poisonous, causing breathing trouble, seizures, kidney failure, and in some cases, death.

    4)
    Peanuts,

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1433430719-gettyimages-483596111.jpg
    One of the most common allergies is to peanuts. The most severe reaction is anaphylaxis, which can lead to severe constriction of the airways, shock, and even loss of consciousness. It is dangerous enough to cause death if left untreated

    5)
    Potatoes

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gettyimages-124759490.jpg
    Potatoes have poisonous leaves and stems, but even so, potato poisoning is rare. Most potato related deaths come from eating green potatoes or drinking potato leaf tea

    6)
    Cherries

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gettyimages-518495799.jpg
    Watch out for cherry seeds, which contain poisonous hydrogen cyanide.


    7)
    Almonds

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gettyimages-540999231.jpg
    This seed (no, it isn't actually a nut) may pack in many health benefits- but they are potentially full of poison. Bitter almonds while in their raw form, are full of cyanide.They need to go through a specialized heat treatment(more than DIY oven roasting) in order to remove toxins.

    8)
    Stone fruit seeds
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1496346861-gettyimages-157618414.jpg

    Apples and stone fruits - cherries, plums, apples, pears, peaches, and apricots- are nature's candy , but stay away from the seeds (as well as the bark and leaves) They contain amygdalin, a compound that produces cyanide . large does can lead to dizziness, and vomiting, increased blood pressure, kidney failure, coma and even death

    9)
    Elderberry

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1433430148-gettyimages-163250875.jpg
    We love us some berries, but the elderberry plant, used in medicinal syrups, sodas, and liquors can cause a severely upset stomach, so stay away from the stems and leaves.

    10)
    Castor oil

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gettyimages-98449813.jpg
    Castor oil comes from the castor bean plant, which is loaded with the poison ricin. Make sure the beans your castor oil was made from adhered to all safety guidelines.

    11)
    Kidney and Lima beans

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1499889669-gettyimages-88175433.jpg
    These legumes are good for you, unless prepared incorrectly. Soak red beans for several hours to remove lectins which can kill the cells in the stomach and cook and drain lima beans thoroughly to get rid of the chemical compound linamarin, which can turn into hydrogen cyanide.

    12)
    Nutmeg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1499889996-gettyimages-126372509.jpg
    Though its great to have on hand for baking, ingesting a significant amount can lead to psychotic symptoms like disorientation, hallucinations and hyper-excitation
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  12. #1312
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegan looters

    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  13. #1313
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21768221_1547305261988280_3808533715449069803_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  14. #1314
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030

    4 Strategies to Make Going Vegan Easier for Athletes

    1. Snack Smart

    Aside from eliminating animal products from your diet, going vegan also means limiting processed foods. When you’re filling up on vegetables, fruits, nuts and beans, you’re going to have less room for potato chips and cookies. But you want to avoid fitting all of your calorie and nutrient needs into three meals, Starla Garcia, M.Ed, RDN, LD, a registered dietitian in Houston, Texas, says.

    “Plant-based athletes may need to eat more than three times per day to meet their calorie and protein needs,” she says. “Plan ahead for three meals and two to three snacks that all include a source of plant-based protein to help you stay satisfied and full in between your meals as well.”

    Frazier also recommends preparing healthy snacks that are both nutrient- and calorie-dense. “Some great options include foods that are high in protein and healthy fats like nuts, avocado and nut butters or hummus with a whole-grain bagel or pita,” he says.

    2. Prepare for Social Situations

    You can have a social life once you go vegan or plant-based, even if your friends don’t follow suit, Frazier says. It might mean suggesting a restaurant, looking up the menu ahead of time to see what healthy vegan dishes are available, or eating dinner before meeting your friends. “Once you go vegan, it’s not going to be as easy as popping by a nearby McDonald’s to get some quick calories in,” Frazier says.

    In fact, you’ll find that some of the unhealthiest dishes on a menu are vegan. From French fries to onion rings, ordering greasy dishes for the sake of sticking to a vegan diet doesn’t make things better. In addition to researching menus, Frazier likes to pack nutritious snacks that he can munch on to avoid temptations. This way, you can spend time with your friends and have something to eat, too.

    3. Focus on Getting Key Nutrients

    Although many vegetables and grains are packed with nutrients that are universally essential, athletes especially want to focus on B12 vitamins (which are most commonly found in animal products), D3 vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids. For B12, excellent vegan sources include nutritional yeast, seaweed, blue green algae, chlorella and spirulina. For D3, seek out mushrooms, tofu and fortified soy and almond milk. Omega-3s are also fairly easy to come by in walnuts, chia seeds and flax seeds, Garcia says. Or, if you’re feeling more adventurous, try microalgae oils, which can be found at vitamin shops.

    4. Team Up with a Nutritionist

    As you transition to a vegan diet, identifying your nutrient needs won’t be as simple as white and black. Garcia recommends working with a registered dietitian to come up with a game plan. She also advises getting yearly or bi-annual lab work done to ensure you aren’t experiencing low levels of certain vitamins and minerals during intense training periods. “It would be a shame to end up with a fracture because you aren’t getting enough calcium, or become anemic simply from a lack of B12 or iron during your marathon training season,” she says.

    Should You Go Vegan?

    Transitioning to a vegan lifestyle takes some preparation and planning, but it can be done. Taking a more active approach to your nutrition can help you successfully make the shift. And if you can’t quit meat and dairy cold turkey, not all is lost. Start small by eating one vegan meal a day and replacing cow’s milk with almond milk. Eventually, you won’t miss the cheese and might feel more ready to make the leap.

    Frazier says to talk to other athletes who have made the lifestyle change to see what worked for them and what didn’t. “Becoming a vegan doesn’t need to be a scary, all-or-nothing commitment,” Frazier says. “It’s OK to start with ‘micro-commitments’ in the beginning before fully committing to this lifestyle if you’re unsure as to whether it will work for you and your goals.”

    sauce and further links: Everything an Athlete Needs to Know About Going Vegan
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  15. #1315
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21768156_10214566752232669_5762858478917780361_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #1316
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    "Learn what's in season and be aware of what fruits and vegetables shouldn't be available locally at a particular time of year."


    People are being duped': Marketplace exposes homegrown lies at farmers markets

    Some farmers market vendors push bogus homegrown stories to consumers looking for fresh local fruits and veggies — and Marketplace has the hidden camera footage to prove it.

    The Marketplace team went undercover at 11 bustling markets across Ontario this summer to ask vendors where their produce comes from and then tested the veracity of those claims using surveillance and other investigative techniques.

    The results suggest many consumers could be paying premium prices for produce with fake backstories about where it was grown.

    At four of the markets, the investigation exposed five different vendors who claimed to be selling fresh produce they had grown themselves but who were actually cashing in by reselling wholesale goods purchased elsewhere.

    At a fifth market, the team discovered a vendor passing off Mexican produce as Ontario-grown.

    Most of the markets Marketplace visited had vendors known as resellers, who sell produce they didn't grow. They purchase wholesale fruits and vegetables from places such as the Ontario Food Terminal in Toronto — Canada's largest wholesale market — and take it to farmers markets to sell for a profit.

    When asked directly, many resellers were upfront about the fact they didn't grow the produce, but others were not.

    Follow the truck

    At the Peterborough Farmers' Market, one of the largest and longest running in Ontario, Marketplace identified two resellers making misleading claims about their products.

    The largest of these vendors, Kent Farms, operates two different stalls at the market. One is run by James Kent, and the other by Brent Kent.

    They say they're third generation farmers and have properties northeast of Toronto in Newcastle, Orono and Lindsay.

    They told undercover Marketplace journalists that most of the produce they were selling was grown on their family farms, or was from neighbouring properties.

    Marketplace started digging after noticing the cucumbers Brent Kent claimed to have grown were labelled with stickers from a large multinational corporation that grows greenhouse vegetables 500 kilometres away in Kingsville, Ont., located south of Windsor on the northwestern shore of Lake Erie.

    To determine where the Kents were getting the rest of their produce, Marketplace followed a Kent Farms truck the day before the Peterborough market.

    Long before dawn, the truck drove 100 kilometres from James Kent's property in Newcastle to the Ontario Food Terminal in Toronto. There, the journalists witnessed James Kent and his employees loading their truck with more than 50 boxes of produce including peppers, zucchinis, strawberries and radishes.

    At market the next day, James and Brent Kent were seen unloading boxes that looked to be the same as those from the terminal. Staff at Brent Kent's stall peeled stickers off peppers and James Kent transferred vegetables from wholesale boxes to farm bushels.

    When undercover Marketplace journalists asked about the zucchinis, James Kent said: "They're mine." He also claimed the radishes were from his neighbour "across the field."

    "He buys all my strawberries," he said. "The last thing I can do is say no to him when he sells me some radishes."

    Brent Kent said he grew the peppers that Marketplace filmed having their stickers removed earlier that day.

    'Believe in transparency'

    Both James and Brent Kent declined to be interviewed.

    In an emailed statement, James Kent said they "believe in transparency" and are committed to their customers. He said he grows some of what he sells and purchases some Ontario produce at the food terminal because he believes it's a "benefit to consumers to provide products from other regions of Ontario."

    Marketplace found four more examples of vendors at markets in Burlington, Gravenhurst, Orillia and Toronto who weren't clear or upfront about what they were selling.

    A vendor at the Burlington Mall Farmers' Market southwest of Toronto told undercover Marketplace journalists that the tomatoes he was selling were from his farm, which he said is called Koornneef. But Koornneef Produce is actually a large wholesaler that only sells produce at the Ontario Food Terminal.

    At a popular market in downtown Toronto, a vendor displayed a "Homegrown Chemical Free" banner and said all of the products were from his farm. But Marketplace noticed boxes from a wholesale distributor at the food terminal underneath the table. That wholesaler told Marketplace he doesn't market his produce as chemical-free.

    In Orillia, located two hours north of Toronto, a pepper that a vendor claimed was local had a sticker from a 750-acre producer in Sinaloa, Mexico.

    Farther north in Gravenhurst, a vendor claimed to have personally picked strawberries on his farm the day before market, but Marketplace discovered he doesn't even have a farm.

    When the journalists followed up with the owners of each stall, two admitted to reselling at certain points in the season and said the misleading claims were made in error. One refused to respond at all, and the other said he doesn't grow anything and his staff member misspoke.

    But it's not just the consumer who's being hurt by reseller lies.

    A 2016 study from the Greenbelt Farmers' Market Network, an organization that connects more than 100 farmers markets in southern Ontario's Greenbelt, found small-scale farmers, like Lauren Nurse, are growing increasingly reliant on markets as a source of income.

    The study says nearly half of farmers surveyed rely on markets for 75 per cent or more of their income, up from just a quarter of farmers five years earlier.

    Nurse says she finds it very frustrating when resellers bring seasonal produce and undercut her on price.

    "Our sales drop … It really hits our bottom line."

    Who's in charge?

    There are no provincial regulations anywhere in Canada against reselling at farmers markets, so it's left to each individual market to set and enforce its own rules. Some markets prohibit or limit reselling but the majority do not.

    It's a different story in some states south of the border.

    In California, for example, each stand is inspected and vendors are required to display a certificate that outlines the produce they grow.

    No reselling of wholesale or out-of-state produce is permitted and markets are inspected by the state on a quarterly basis.

    Vendors who are caught breaking the rules can face suspensions, fines or even jail time.

    Ed Williams, the man in charge of inspecting markets in Los Angeles County, says the system is important to prevent fraud and ensure "the consumer is not getting ripped off."

    In Canada it falls to the provinces to decide whether to regulate the industry, so Marketplace put its findings to Jeff Leal, Ontario's minister of agriculture and rural affairs.

    He says reselling means consumers can access produce on a "four-season" basis that might not be available in Ontario's growing season. However, to "protect the integrity" of markets, he urges vendors to give correct information about the origin of produce.

    In addition, he says his ministry will investigate every complaint it receives and work with farmers markets to get them resolved.

    But unlike in California, there are no legal consequences for resellers who lie about growing the produce they sell.

    Dead giveaways

    So how can consumers guard against being misled?

    Nurse says the best way is to learn what's in season and be aware of what fruits and vegetables shouldn't be available locally at a particular time of year.

    Another dead giveaway, she says, is discarded wholesale packaging behind a vendor's stall.

    She says it's unfair consumers have to go to such lengths to protect themselves.

    "People should be able to have confidence in the food they're buying and who they're buying it from."
    'People are being duped': Marketplace exposes homegrown lies at farmers markets - Business - CBC News
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  17. #1317
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  18. #1318
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    ^ I watched the follow up video where they go vegetarian for 21 days. They should have done more research, lots of errors, "I need my protein" and the gal was saying how she felt so tired after the first day and they both concluded at the end that it is very hard. I think a big part of it was that they don't tend to eat very healthy even as meat eaters, the gal is overweight and I'm not sure they were used to really cooking fresh dishes and they were in McDonald's at one point.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  19. #1319
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Happy Hump Day

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22141250_482454342116807_7674375712668796403_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  20. #1320
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Perfect for chunkin'

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22406562_10101718847552805_1064371731822776352_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  21. #1321
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22405905_1443897645691705_6116595990618489615_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  22. #1322
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22519160_10214147708951471_4268360093402387702_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  23. #1323
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22310585_1492936667466039_3066392424537721058_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  24. #1324
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    13 Things You Didn't Know About Nuts That Every Self-Respecting Vegan Should




    National Nut Day is Saturday October 21, which means we’re hitting the bulk foods section at our local grocery stores to create sophisticated raw desserts, whip up creamy sauces, and slather oh-so-satisfying nut butters onto just about everything (there’s also talk about filling a Mr. Peanut piñata with nuts, but we’ll see). Of course, we all know that nuts are part of a healthy diet, but for this national holiday, we wanted to know more about one of our favorite snacks, which is why we’re highlighting 13 little-known facts about nuts in honor of National Nut Day. After a quick read, you’ll see why we’ve got never-ending love for nuts.

    1. What’s a nut?
    According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a “nut” is a hard, one-seeded fruit that does not split open to release seeds when ripe.

    2. What’s not a nut?
    Botanically speaking, peanuts aren’t really nuts—they’re legumes, which consist of edible seeds encased within a pod (a la peas). Already knew that? Well, walnuts, almonds, and pecans are not nuts either—they’re drupes, a type of fruit with a typically fleshy outer casing that surrounds a shell or pit that encases a seed (think mangos, cherries, and plums). So, whether we eat the outer part or the seed determines our layman’s classification of fruit or nut—we associate the fleshy part with a “fruit” and the seed with a “nut.”

    3. Almonds can act as prebiotics
    According to a 2008 study by the American Society for Microbiology, consuming almonds might help increase healthy gut bacteria. We wonder if anyone is working on an almond-flavored kombucha … prebiotics and probiotics all in one!

    4. Thanks, Boston
    The first published recipe for peanut butter and jelly sandwich was included in The Boston Cooking School Magazine of Culinary Science and Domestic Economics, Volume 6 in 1901. Author Julia Davis Chandler advised, “Try making little sandwiches, or bread fingers, of three very thin layers of bread and two fillings, one of peanut paste … and currant or crab-apple jelly.”

    5. Bolivia nuts?
    Brazil nuts (which are mostly sourced from Bolivia) are one of the highest natural sources of selenium, a mineral that helps protect against prostate cancer and raise testosterone.

    6. Killer cashews
    From simple snacking to creating indulgent cashew cheeses and raw desserts, cashews are staples in vegan cuisine. But beware of the shells because they are severely toxic, as cashews come from the same plant family as poison ivy.

    7. Silly sandwiches
    There are plenty of delicious sandwich creations that expand upon the traditional peanut butter sandwich—peanut butter and banana, peanut butter and chocolate, and peanut butter and … kimchi? Minneapolis’ GYST Fermentation Bar serves The Sandor, which pairs peanut butter and kimchi on a focaccia roll. Apparently, according to Eater, the combination actually works.

    8. The (allergen-free) friendly skies
    In July 2017, an Australian couple called for a nut ban on airlines after their son suffered a severe allergic reaction on a Singapore flight. Their request is not the first of its kind. In 2014, a woman started a petition that would force airlines to create a three-row, nut-free buffer zone for those with nut allergies. The topic has gained much attention throughout the years, but no airline has officially banned passengers from consuming nuts or peanuts.

    9. How bizarre
    Andrew Zimmern, celebrity food personality and host of Bizarre Foods, will eat almost anything … except walnuts.

    10. Pennsylvania Planters
    Planters, the nationally recognized nut company with the lovable Mr. Peanut mascot, was founded in 1906 by an Italian immigrant in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. The company began with just six employees and two head roasters and is now part of the Kraft Heinz Company.

    11. One more reason to love chocolate
    Nut farmers love chocolate companies, as they purchase 40 percent of the world’s almonds and 20 percent of the world’s peanuts.

    12. Hit it hard
    Macadamia nuts are not for the weak, as it takes 300 pounds of pressure per square inch to crack their shells, the hardest of all nuts.

    13. Wet ‘n’ wild
    Do you soak your nuts? If not, you might want to consider it, as soaking has been shown to aid in digestion and increase the bioavailability of a nut’s nutrients. Put your nuts in a bowl or jar, submerge them completely with water, add a pinch of sea salt, and let them sit on the counter for seven hours (overnight). Rinse, and enjoy those bioavailable nutrients!

    sauce: 13 Things You Didn't Know About Nuts That Every Self-Respecting Vegan Should
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  25. #1325
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Friday Funnies

    Be proud let loose



    One of the perks of going on a plant-based diet many people report is an end to constipation, or at least far more regular digestion. That said, at first, that isn’t the case for everyone — as your digestive system adjusts to taking in more fiber, you might experience some increased irregularity and bloating.

    More about the benefits when you stop eating meat, dairy, eggs : What Happens To Your Body When You Stop Eating Meat, Dairy & Eggs - The Daily Berries
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  26. #1326
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Good deal except these aren't pumpkins... they're gourds. Oh my gourd

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22728804_10159471391025228_145490586069900057_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  27. #1327
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-5dkqhzf.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  28. #1328
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22555258_1930125503903613_1424622260192897677_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  29. #1329
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22539982_503723020006846_785756746022853338_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  30. #1330
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22366462_1860736380610302_4533910961028544374_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  31. #1331
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22045958_753310364855514_6162363799258415404_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  32. #1332
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18519438_1503999553008237_7061262424219240308_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  33. #1333
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,254
    WOW
    I like the purple cabbage!
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  34. #1334
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    WOW
    I like the purple cabbage!
    Natural beauty!
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  35. #1335
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Sexy veggies

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-20767716_1795473797134110_7688129204786489699_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  36. #1336
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Plant Protein Shown to be Better than Animal Protein for Building Muscle


    New research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that both plant-based protein and meat build muscle equally well however because plant-protein comes with less 'baggage' in the form of harmful components it's the more beneficial protein source to use.

    A study published last week in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that dietary protein derived from plant sources built muscle just as well as protein from meat sources. However meat also comes with additional components that are harmful to our health, including antibiotic residue, hormones, saturated fat, trans-fats, endotoxins, cholesterol, Neu5Gc, heterocyclic amines and contaminants such as high levels of metals including copper and arsenic. These undesirable elements increase inflammation and promote various diseases thus making meat a less desirable option when building muscle and long term health are considered.

    From 2002 to 2005, researchers from the Hebrew Senior Life's Institute for Aging Research and University of Massachusetts Lowell observed the muscle mass, strength, and bone density of 3,000 participants with varied dietary habits in the 17 to 72 age range. They found that while higher protein intake led to better overall musculoskeletal health, the source of dietary protein—plant or animal—was irrelevant. “We know that dietary protein can improve muscle mass and strength,” lead researcher Dr. Kelsey M. Mangano said. “However, until now, we did not know if one protein food source was better than another in accomplishing optimal results.”

    And there’s no comparison between animal foods and plant foods when it comes to providing immune-boosting and cancer-fighting nutrients. Animal foods are either exceedingly low or devoid of antioxidants and tend to offer concentrated amounts of individual nutrients, like protein or calcium, while being deficient in many others. By contrast, plant foods are rich in antioxidants and provide a wide spectrum of vitamins, minerals, and other health-promoting nutrients.

    Only plants contain powerful substances called phytochemicals, which scientists are now discovering protect us from cancer, heart disease, and other serious illnesses. Plants are also the primary source of all minerals in our diet. Minerals are derived from the earth and make their way into the food supply via plants. The only reason animal foods contain any minerals at all is because the animals eat plants. And plants are our only sources of dietary fiber, which binds in our intestines with fat, cholesterol, environmental pollutants and disease-causing hormones to eliminate these dangers from the body. Fiber also protects against bowel cancers, yet 97% of Americans don't meet the daily requirements for fiber intake.

    Professional bodybuilders and weightlifters such as Mr Universe Barny Du Plessis, multiple world-record holding strongman Patrik Baboumian, or Icelandic weightlifting champion Hulda B. Waage, amongst many others, are living proof of Mangano’s findings. People are already ditching whey in favor of vegan protein powders, which have seen a significant increase in sales, and a few months ago the largest collection of vegan muscle ever gathered in London for the Vegan Athlete's Summit.

    Additional discussion:

    The study published February 8, 2017 confirmed (as we long suspected) there were no differences in muscle mass based on people’s dietary pattern, and those eating mostly legumes were benefitting as much as those eating red meat.

    So now we know that there is no disadvantage in muscle gained whilst using plant-based protein. Now, there isn't much point in looking at this study in isolation, so let's look at other critical factors to determine which is the more ideal protein source for building muscle. Whatever protein source bodybuilders and those wanting to gain muscle mass choose, they're going to eat a much higher amount of protein so careful consideration of the source is required.

    And we already know from countless other experiments even small amounts of animal protein causes inflammation and promotes disease (including heart disease and cancer), and most recently: "Red meat intake, particularly unprocessed red meat, was associated with an 58% increased risk of diverticulitis".

    Regarding the inflammatory effect of animal protein:

    The beneficial anti-inflammatory properties of a plant-based diet come from the avoidance of inflammatory foods such as animal products, as well as the inclusion of micronutrient-rich, whole plant foods. Plant foods are a rich source of phytochemicals, which support our endothelial cells that line the inside of our entire vascular system. These cells play an important role in maintaining the elasticity and dilation of our blood vessels by producing a gas called nitric oxide. The health and performance of these cells is determined by the types of foods that we eat. Saturated animal fats as well as refined vegetable oils are two factors that have been shown to damage these cells. When these cells become damaged, the blood vessels become stiff, inflamed, and paralyzed, impairing the flow of blood. This damage also promotes the development of plaque formation, causing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). This damage can occur after consuming a single high-fat meal of animal products and lasts for several hours.

    This same inflammation takes place throughout our entire body, including our lungs, causing both immediate and long term damage. Scientists have now discovered that bacterial endotoxins found in our bloodstream following a meal of animal products is what causes this inflammatory response and occurs within hours after eating. Watch this two-part video response by Dr. Michael Greger, as he explains this process in greater detail. "After a meal of animal products, people suffer from endotoxemia, their bloodstream becomes awash with bacterial toxins, known as endotoxins. A single meal of meats, eggs, and dairy can cause a spike of inflammation within hours that can stiffen one's arteries." Normal blood flow can be significantly reduced up to 50% lasting for up to 5-6 hours. Repeating this cycle with more animal products continues the progression of this inflammatory process. "This can set us up for inflammatory diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers one meal at a time."

    When considering what we already know about the harmful effects of animal protein from previous studies in addition to the findings from this study (showing there is no disadvantage in using plant-based protein for building muscle) it's clear that plant-based protein is a much better source for those wanting to gain muscle, particularly as higher amounts of protein are typically going to be ingested.
    sauce: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...uilding-muscle
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  37. #1337
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,254
    Vegan porn
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  38. #1338
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Good article focusing on protein


    The high-protein craze may actually carry some risks

    If there’s one claim that’s almost certain to boost sales of a food these days, it’s to say the item is high in protein.

    Consumers cannot seem to get enough protein — they often turn to it because they’ve shunned carbohydrates, and also associate it with increased muscle mass. While many nutritionists say eating extra is usually harmless — if it’s part of a balanced diet and doesn’t all come from animal sources — and small increases can indeed help with weight control by increasing satiety, others are not convinced, citing the lack of long-term research on high-protein diets.

    They’re especially uncertain about how the body reacts to or uses processed protein isolates and powders, which have skyrocketed in popularity.

    A growing body of evidence suggests that some segments of the population should be cautious about hopping on the high-protein bandwagon, infants and young children in particular. Some studies have linked high protein intake in early childhood to a risk of obesity later in life. Researchers are still trying to understand https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27749711

    Pregnant women, meanwhile, are commonly advised to boost protein intake. But in a recent study of a group of women who consumed relatively high amounts of protein, children born to the mothers who consumed the most during pregnancy were shorter at birth and through mid-childhood than children of mothers who consumed the least protein.

    Karen Switkowski, lead author of the study, said that “while it’s important for women to eat enough protein to support the growth of their baby, they might want to be cautious about going far beyond the recommended amounts.” (She said there’s not enough data yet, though, to set specific pregnancy-related recommended levels, adding, “I think that more research needs to be conducted in this area in different populations before translating the findings into any guidelines.”)

    Walter Willett, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, extends that caution to people of all ages, citing protein’s role in cell multiplication. He explains that protein — especially from animal sources, and in particular from dairy — boosts a growth-promoting hormone that makes cells multiply faster, which is vital early in life but not necessarily later on in life.

    “Overly rapid cell multiplication is one of the underlying factors for cancer,” Willett said. “It seems pretty clear that we don’t want to have our cell-growth accelerator to the floor from the day we’re born until the day we die.”

    Some studies on later-life protein consumption, meanwhile, have raised an important concern.

    One preliminary study, which evaluated the self-reported diets of more than 100,000 women between ages 50 to 79, appeared to find a significantly higher rate of heart failure among those who ate a lot of animal protein than among those who ate less of it.

    Older adults are often told to seek out extra protein, largely to help them maintain muscle mass, which deteriorates as one ages. Willett said that’s not bad advice, but not to go overboard. “Having some hormonal boost from protein sources may not be a bad thing. It may be good — although the most important way to maintain muscle mass is resistance training,” he said.

    How much protein, then is good?

    Most nutrition experts are reluctant to cite a single number because individual needs are so variable, but Willett offers some guidance — along with a few qualifications.

    “I think a range for total protein between about 12 to 20 percent of calories is okay; pushing higher, especially with protein supplements, is certainly not necessary and has potential long-term hazards,” he said.

    I am particularly concerned about adding protein supplements, such as whey protein, which has a strong effect on cell multiplication,” he said, then added some practical advice: If protein is taking the place of foods high in sugar or refined starch — white bread, for example — it will benefit the body. But if it’s replacing foods rich in whole grains and healthy fats, it won’t.

    John Swartzberg, a professor emeritus at the University of California at Berkeley School of Public Health, said certain groups definitely should ignore the *increase-your-protein message.

    It has long been known that too much protein is harmful for people with chronic kidney disease. (Kidneys are responsible for eliminating the products of protein metabolism, and those products accumulate in the blood when kidneys don’t function well.) But it can also exacerbate damage to kidneys that someone may not yet know are already impaired, before clear evidence of poor kidney function is apparent.

    Swartzberg said some studies show that about 1 in 9 Americans have impaired kidney function, many of them unaware of it. For such people, following the high-protein trend will accelerate a decline in kidney health. “It’s an asymptomatic problem until it’s mid-stage kidney disease,” he said. People who want to assess their kidney status, he advises, can request a blood test for creatinine for initial screening.


    Even for those with healthy kidneys, Swartzberg urges caution about excess protein. While some nutrition experts say there’s no evidence suggesting eating even twice the recommended daily allowance for protein, Swartzburg says there isn’t enough long-term data to conclude that such a high number is either good for you or safe. He suggests an amount somewhere between 100 and 150 percent of the recommended daily allowance, which is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight; that translates to between about 54 grams and 82 grams of protein for an adult who weighs 150 pounds. “I certainly would not eat excessive protein. I would never take any protein supplements. And I wouldn’t advise my children to, either,” he says.

    Preventive cardiologist Stephen Devries, the executive director of the nonprofit Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology in Deerfield, Ill., recommends avoiding or only eating only minimal amounts of animal protein; he is also cautious about what he calls “artificially enhanced protein,” such as protein powders, even ones derived from plants. He recommends getting your protein instead from beans, lentils, nuts and tofu. “These are terrific sources of protein, and they’re the ones we should concentrate on, rather than the artificial sources, whether they come from animals or plants.”

    Some people think the benefits of extra protein give them a free pass to simply eat more — but protein calories are still calories.

    Marion Nestle, a professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University, said, “If you eat a lot of extra protein, you’re either breaking it down for energy or you’re turning it into sugar and into fat — one or the other.”

    Her general advice is for people to stop obsessing over protein. “It is most definitely not a nutrient of concern. Most people get twice as much as they need without thinking about it,” she said. “My nutrition pet peeve is calling foods ‘protein,’ as in ‘Would you like some protein with that salad?’ If the salad has beans or grains or cheese, it already has protein.”

    sauce: https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.fb75ac5b1937
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  39. #1339
    mtbr member
    Reputation: milliesand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    370
    From The Guardian:

    A worried resident in Germany alerted police to what he thought was a second world war bomb in his garden. Officers found … a particularly large zucchini.

    Police were summoned to the scene in Bretten, near the south-western city of Karlsruhe, on Thursday morning by a worried 81-year-old man.

    They said in a statement Friday that officers determined “the object, which really did look very like a bomb” was actually a 40cm (nearly 16in) courgette.

    The offending vegetable, which was very dark in color, weighed about 5kg (11lbs). Police believe someone threw it over a hedge into the garden.

    Unexploded wartime bombs are unearthed frequently during construction work in Germany, often forcing authorities to evacuate residents while they are defused.

  40. #1340
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    All calories are equal, so goes the conventional wisdom. But it seems some may be more equal than others. The way the body processes the same calories may vary dramatically from one person to the next


    Wider understanding

    How the bacteria in your gut may be shaping your waistline


    A CALORIE is a calorie. Eat too many and spend too few, and you will become obese and sickly. This is the conventional wisdom. But increasingly, it looks too simplistic. All calories do not seem to be created equal, and the way the body processes the same calories may vary dramatically from one person to the next.

    This is the intriguing suggestion from the latest research into metabolic syndrome, the nasty clique that includes high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unbalanced cholesterol and, of course, obesity. This uniquely modern scourge has swept across America, where obesity rates are notoriously high. But it is also doing damage from Mexico to South Africa and India, raising levels of disease and pushing up health costs.
    Metabolic syndrome can still be blamed on eating too much and exercising too little. But it is crucial to understand why some foods are particularly harmful and why some people gain more weight than others. Thankfully, researchers are beginning to offer explanations in a series of recent papers.

    One debate concerns the villainy of glucose, which is found in starches, and fructose, found in fruits, table sugar and, not surprisingly, high-fructose corn syrup. Diets with a high “glycaemic index”, raising glucose levels in the blood, seem to promote metabolic problems. David Ludwig of Boston Children’s Hospital has shown that those on a diet with a low glycaemic index experience metabolic changes that help them keep weight off, compared with those fed a low-fat diet. This challenges the notion that a calorie is a calorie. Others, however, blame fructose, which seems to promote obesity and insulin resistance. Now a study published in Nature Communications by Richard Johnson, of the University of Colorado, explains that glucose may do its harm, in part, through its conversion to fructose.

    Dr Johnson and his colleagues administered a diet of water and glucose to three types of mice. One group acted as a control and two others lacked enzymes that help the body process fructose. The normal mice developed a fatty liver and became resistant to insulin. The others were protected. The body’s conversion of glucose to fructose, therefore, seems to help spur metabolic woes.

    You are what you eat, maybe

    Even more intriguing is the notion that the same diet may be treated differently by different people. Four recent papers explored this theme. In one, published in Science in July, Joseph Majzoub, also of Boston Children’s Hospital, deleted in mice a gene called Mrap2. Dr Majzoub and his colleagues showed that this helps to control appetite. Surprisingly, however, even when the mutant critters ate the same as normal mice, they still gained more weight. Why that is remains unclear, but it may be through Mrap2’s effect on another gene, called Mc4r, which is known to be involved in weight gain.

    The second and third papers, published as a pair in Nature in August, looked at another way that different bodies metabolise the same diet. Both studies were overseen by Dusko Ehrlich of the National Institute of Agricultural Research in France. One examined bacteria in nearly 300 Danish participants and found those with more diverse microbiota in their gut showed fewer signs of metabolic syndrome, including obesity and insulin resistance. The other study put 49 overweight participants on a high-fibre diet. Those who began with fewer bacterial species saw an increase in bacterial diversity and an improvement in metabolic indicators. This was not the case for those who already had a diverse microbiome, even when fed the same diet.

    Jeffrey Gordon, of Washington University in St Louis, says these two studies point to the importance of what he calls “job vacancies” in the microbiota of the obese. Fed the proper diet, a person with more vacancies may see the jobs filled by helpful bacteria. In the fourth paper, by Dr Gordon and recently published in Science, he explores this in mice. To control for the effects of genetics, Dr Gordon found four pairs of human twins, with one twin obese and the other lean. He collected their stool, then transferred the twins’ bacteria to sets of mice. Fed an identical diet, the mice with bacteria from an obese twin became obese, whereas mice with bacteria from a thin twin remained lean.

    Dr Gordon then tested what would happen when mice with different bacteria were housed together—mouse droppings help to transfer bacteria. Bacteria from the lean mice made their way to the mice with the obese twin’s bacteria, preventing those mice from gaining weight and developing other metabolic abnormalities. But the phenomenon did not work in reverse, probably due to Dr Gordon’s theory on the microbiota’s job vacancies. Interestingly, the invasion did not occur, and obesity was not prevented, when the mice ate a diet high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables. The transfer of helpful bacteria therefore seems to depend on diet.

    Dr Gordon hopes to be able to identify specific bacteria that might, eventually, be isolated and used as a treatment for obesity. For now, however, he and other researchers are exposing a complex interplay of factors.

    One type of calorie may be metabolised differently than another. But the effect of a particular diet depends on a person’s genes and bacteria. And that person’s bacteria are determined in part by his diet. Metabolic syndrome, it seems, hinges on an intricate relationship between food, bacteria and genetics. Understand it, and researchers will illuminate one of modernity’s most common ailments.

    sauce: https://www.economist.com/news/scien...runderstnading
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  41. #1341
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    What Would Happen If Everyone in the UK Stopped Eating Meat?

    I think, deep down, we all know the meat industry isn't that great. Whether you've watched Cowspiracy, read those George Monbiot-type articles about how meat production is catastrophically bad for the environment, or just listened to someone at a party go on about how Food, Inc. was, like, so dark it almost made them give up eating burgers, you'll be aware of the ramifications of industrial animal farming.

    So it's no wonder that around 20 percent of 16 to 24-year-olds in the UK now follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, and around 12 percent of all adults in the UK are vegetarian. The amount of red meat being eaten in Britain has declined almost year-on-year since 1950, and this trend looks set to continue.

    Which makes you wonder: what would actually happen if the whole of Britain just stopped eating meat? Would farmers all lose their jobs? Would we be healthier and happier? Would the streets look like something out of a Mike Leigh film, greyscale, with loads of people sat around starved of protein, their hair falling out, their translucent skin bruising at the lightest touch?

    To find out, I spoke to experts in food policy, environmental science and meat-related health.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-8485gsd-1-.jpg

    IMPACT ON THE ECONOMY AND FARMING
    Professor Timothy Lang, Professor of Food Policy at City University London


    VICE: Hi Tim. Would it be possible to maintain a farming industry without animals here in Britain?

    Timothy Lang: Well, that's a big debate going on in my world: can we imagine British farming without animals? Or can we imagine carrying on doing what we're doing and making it even more brutal? Animals, cows and sheep are major sources of greenhouse gasses, and we're using a lot of "hidden" land for them. Amazonian forest is being chopped down for the purpose of growing soya, which is then fed to the animals in Europe which you eat. We're growing a huge amount of cereals here in Britain and across Europe, which are then fed to animals. Animals used to be part of a fertility cycle, a rotation in farming, but have become an end in themselves. We've made animals not just competitors to us in terms of land use, but also major users of land, resources and indeed food. We have to dramatically reduce animal use in Britain.

    What would actually happen to our farming landscape if meat was taken out of the equation?

    Well, for a start we would dramatically increase our horticulture. The good things for your diet and mine are actually plants. Fruits, vegetables, cereals; staple foods. And there has been a catastrophic drop in the production of these things in Britain. If we stopped eating meat we would have to resuscitate and reinvest and re-skill ourselves in horticulture. And we have to do that anyway, certainly with climate change. When I was a farmer in the uplands on the Pennines, 50 years or so ago, even then, we'd experimented with growing crops in parts where people would say, "Oh, that's sheep country." You could grow swedes, turnips, brassicas and potatoes very easily and very well, and historically they did.

    We would have to re-skill a lot. It would mean the transformation of British agriculture. The politicians are frightened, but they have to address this issue. Climate change is going to make them do it. The food system is being forced to change by climate, by water stress, by population changes, by geopolitics. We've got a food system based on a population being well fed by very, very intense agricultural methods. We now know that has to change.

    How long would it take for farmers to re-learn and shift their methods?

    That can't be done tomorrow. It's taken 50 to 70 years to get into the mess we're now in. We have to make a very dramatic change in approach very quickly. We should have a 30 year plan. The Labour government started a 20 year plan and then the coalition abolished it and nothing happened. They went back to a Thatcherite notion that markets will resolve themselves. The current government is working on a 25 year food strategy, but it's all about supporting industry and industry taking a lead. Industry cannot resolve this. It's going to have to be consumer culture changes. I'm a critic of the thinking that's going on at the moment in government. As a public, we're going to have to take the movement towards discussion.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-13123183_1757511807826596_632202625248294315_o.jpg

    IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT
    Professor Nick Hewitt, Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry, Department of Environmental Science, Lancaster University


    VICE: Hi Nick. What would happen to the environment if we all stopped eating meat?
    Nick Hewitt: Eating meat makes a large contribution to the greenhouse gasses that people in the UK produce. If everyone stopped eating it, the food-related greenhouse gas emissions would reduce by about 35 percent. It's one very effective way to make a big dent in emissions.

    Why?
    It's particularly cattle – beef is by far the worst. Cows chew grass and digest it in conditions in the stomach with no oxygen, and that releases methane. That's the principle reason. Also, the way the grassland is fertilised causes greenhouse gas emissions. Transporting the food around does contribute, but it's relatively small, unless you use air freight. Lorries aren't too bad. The biggest lifestyle choice you could make to reduce greenhouse gasses is to stop eating meat. It's hard to think of another single lifestyle change we could make that would have the same effect.

    So using the same farmland for plants would be the quickest way to reduce emissions?
    Yeah. You'd still have to be careful with your fertilization, but using land for meat is the least efficient way of producing protein. It's just an inefficient way of producing food. By growing plants on the land and eating those, it's much more efficient, so we would be greatly reducing those greenhouse gas emissions.

    Would it make more of a difference if everyone was vegan?
    Yeah, it would make more of a difference, because obviously if you're vegetarian but eat cheese that's related to the dairy industry and cows. If you eliminate cheese and meat, you'd reduce emissions even further.

    Hypothetically, then, meat-free Britain is a lot cleaner.

    Our government has put targets on the national greenhouse gas emissions and said that, by 2050, UK emissions have to be reduced by 80 percent of what they were in 2010. It's very hard to see how we'd ever meet that target without reducing emissions from every sector – transport, heating, fuel, food. Food currently makes up about 20 percent of total emissions. If the government wants to reduce [emissions] by that overall figure, we have to reduce emissions from food.


    Why aren't the government telling us that via campaigns or something?


    What they are trying to do at the moment is reduce food waste. So, obviously, the more food wasted – and there is a hell of a lot of food wasted – the more unnecessary emissions there are. So if you cut waste, you'll cut emissions. That's the government focus right now. If the government are serious about this they would try to introduce interventions to get people to eat less meat or go vegetarian. The numbers show that. So, hypothetically, if we were all vegetarian in this country, we'd change things drastically. Sadly, in some very large countries, meat is seen as a status symbol and its consumption is increasing drastically. Anything we can do to help that is a help.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-15825899_1600938539923180_4595222864051964700_n.jpg


    IMPACT ON THE HEALTH OF THE POPULATION
    Ian Givens, Professor of Food Chain Nutrition at University of Reading's School of Agriculture


    VICE: What would happen to the health of British people if we all gave up meat?

    Ian Givens: There isn't any real association between white meat and cancer or cardiovascular problems. It's tends to be relatively neutral.

    Red meat, though, is a different story. There is an issue in Britain of malnutrition of young females. There is good evidence from several surveys that women, especially between the ages of 11 and 18, have a suboptimal level of a number of key nutrients, and one is iron. In fact, half the population are below the lowest level of iron intake. If you look back over the last 10 years or more, there's been a consistent decrease in iron intake, and that – without too much of a doubt – is down to the reduction of red meat intake, because it's the best form of iron. The question is: does that matter? Probably not in the short term, but one wonders what happens in the long term.

    So we'd have to make sure we were supplementing young women especially with more nutrients?

    That's what the evidence suggests. There are other issues about zinc, too, and vitamin B12, which would have to be supplemented. But then you have to balance that with the fact that red meat increases the risk of getting colon cancer. Most evidence now says that processed meat has a high increase of relative risk for colon cancer, higher than red meat. If you look at the increase of cancer per amount of red meat per day it's still quite striking.

    Overall, then, do you think this new Britain would be healthier?
    There would be some health benefits. Colon cancer has the highest prevalence of any cancer that's available to both men and women. The evidence suggests that the risks of colon cancer associated with processed meat especially would be reduced. Processed meat is bacon, sausages, salami, deli meat, hotdogs, luncheon meat and so on. I'm less sure about red and white meats. The BMIs of vegetarians and vegans are also significantly lower and they have lower risks associated with obesity.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-0d9583c4-e4cd-4a0b-9558-07295128f317_tablet.jpg
    Sauce: https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/y...ource=vicefbuk
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  42. #1342
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23376271_1555298227859117_6959161768818563839_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  43. #1343
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Beans beans
    Good for your heart
    The more you eat
    The more you save the planet from environmental degradation, and improve your health



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23380117_1556607584432898_3589847142086365246_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  44. #1344
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    602
    I would try by starting off with casseroles that contain all of your micro and macro nutrients. This will make it easy to meal prep and transition. Then as you learn more about what you need to eat you can get pickier and will not be missing nutrients. Perhaps a Quinoa and 5 bean Chili or something similar. Just heaping portions of diverse proteins and vegetables all mixed into one recipe. Then as you learn more about what you have to include in your diet you can branch out more.

  45. #1345
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    Chicken wings are vanishing from the locker room. Superstars are slimming down—and speeding up. If 'skinny ball' has arrived, could the performance-enhancer sparking a revolution be...veganism?

    The Secret (but Healthy!) Diet Powering Kyrie and the NBA | Bleacher Report
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  46. #1346
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    ^ nice
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  47. #1347
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    VEGETARIAN DIETS CAN REDUCE HEART DISEASE RISK BY ALMOST 50 PERCENT COMPARED TO EATING MEAT

    Here’s some news that will bring a sigh of relief to farm animals: Research from the American Heart Association indicates that plant-based diets might be the best choice to reduce heart failure, even for people that haven’t previously had cardiac conditions. Heart failure occurs gradually and doesn’t necessarily mean your heart stops working. Instead, the organ isn’t strong enough to pump blood throughout your body or is unable to draw in enough blood to supply your body with nutrients. Fairly common, the organization estimates that 6.5 million Americans, over the age of 20, have heart failure.

    The preliminary findings were presented at the organization’s Scientific Sessions 2017, which brings researchers and clinicians together to discuss the latest heart health science, according to a release.

    Scientists looked at five different dietary plans to determine which cut heart failure risk the most: convenience (including fast food and pasta), plant-based, sweets, Southern (which included sweet beverages and fried foods) and alcohol/salads. People who consumed mostly produce decreased their risk of heart failure by 42 percent, according to a release, compared to those who ate less fruits and vegetables. The other plans weren't associated with better health. While some studies have shown that a good diet can help decrease plaque buildup in your arteries, this study shows that diet is important in preventing heart failure even for people who don’t already have cardiac concerns.

    "Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don't already have it," study co-author Dr. Kyla Lara, an internal medicine specialist, said in a statement.

    Using data from a study by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the team looked at data for 15,569 people who did not have coronary artery disease or heart failure. Then, researchers analyzed health records from 2007 to 2013, looked at diets as reported through questionnaires, assigned participants to one of the dietary plans and identified records of 300 hospital visits for heart failure.

    As previously reported, cardiologist at NYU Langone Health Eugenia, Gianos told Newsweek that research has shown vegan and Mediterranean diets are the best for reducing cancer and heart disease risk.

    While you don’t have to give up all animal products, cardiologist Dr. Gary Fraser believes that those who are the most strict, receive the most benefit. In a story on the NIH site, he explained, “The trend is almost like a stepladder, with the lowest risks for the strict vegetarians, then moving up for the lacto vegetarians and then the pescatarians and then the non-vegetarians.”

    For those who really just don’t want to be vegetarian, Gianos said even incorporate more meatless meals into your diet a few times a week can help. Your heart, and cows, will thank you.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23380215_2013434175567690_7169251050715543892_n.jpg

    Vegetarian Diets Can Reduce Heart Disease Risk by Almost 50 Percent Compared to Eating Meat
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  48. #1348
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Name:  22519642_1675084962524550_402907195719869901_n.jpg
Views: 146
Size:  58.0 KB
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #1349
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-22090000_1686013108139496_1457863941978743913_n.jpg


    Americans Like Fruits More Than Veggies, But We Aren't Eating Much Of Either, Says New CDC Report

    The advice to eat our fruits and veggies is always with us, but it’s not influencing most Americans to eat much of either. That’s according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that looked at fruit and vegetable consumption by state, with breakdowns by age, income, race/ethnicity and gender.

    Adults should consume 1.5-2.0 cups of fruits and 2.0-3.0 cups of vegetables per day, according to national dietary recommendations. (For reference: a cup of fruit is the equivalent of about one large banana or a medium-sized grapefruit; a cup of vegetables is the equivalent of about one medium-sized sweet potato or 12 baby carrots).

    The report found that overall just 12.2% of Americans meet the fruit recommendations standard, and even fewer meet the vegetables standard at 9.3%.

    The state-by-state comparison didn’t reveal any dietary all-stars, but there were a few notable disparities. Residents of West Virginia own the bottom of the rankings with the lowest consumption of fruits (7.3%) and veggies (5.8%) of any state. At the high end, residents of Washington D.C. eat the most fruits (15.5%), and Alaskans eat the most veggies (12%).

    Here are a few of the other state stats:

    Texas: Fruits 12.1%, Veggies 10.9%
    Florida: Fruits 14%, Veggies 10.3%
    New York: Fruits 14%, Veggies 9.6%
    California: Fruits 13.6%, Veggies 11.2%
    Ohio: Fruits 10.6%, Veggies 6.9%
    Colorado: Fruits 13.5%, Veggies 11.6%
    Kentucky: Fruits 8%, Veggies 6.3%

    The race/ethnicity evaluation showed that Hispanic Americans eat the most fruits and veggies (15.7 and 10.5%, respectively), with White Americans eating the fewest fruits (11.2%) and Black Americans eating the fewest veggies (5.5%), on average.

    By age group, Americans in the 31-50 age group eat the most fruits (13.8%), while those 18-30 eat the least (9.2%). For veggies, those 51 and older eat the most (10.9%), and again those 18-30 eat the least (8.8%).

    By gender, there’s no contest: women eat more fruits and vegetables than men by quite a lot (fruits: 15.1% vs 9.2%; veggies: 10.9% vs. 7.6%).

    By income, the gap between high and low was significant, with those in the lowest income bracket consuming the least fruits and veggies (11%, 7%), and those in the highest bracket consuming the most (13%, 11.4%). (This stat in particular says much about the cost and availability of quality produce, and the targeting of junk food to lower income brackets.)

    The report’s summary is predictably not so cheery: “Despite the positive health benefits of consuming fruits and vegetables, the findings from this study corroborate data showing that the vast majority of adults consume insufficient amounts, with lower intakes among men, young adults, and adults living in poverty.”

    The hope is that these statistics can inform more effective state-based health outreach efforts, and nudge the needle upward across every category.

    “States can use this information to inform the development of policies and programs that help all adults regardless of sociodemographic group to consume more fruits and vegetables and thus help prevent costly chronic diseases,” the report concludes.

    Closing with some good news: we are eating slightly more fruits and vegetables than we were in 1970, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The most consumed vegetables? Potatoes and tomatoes, by far, says the USDA (roughly half of both are frozen or canned); onions come in third. Apples and oranges take the top two spots for our favorite fruits.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23659525_2016738438570597_4118552670125928864_n.jpg


    Sauce: https://www.forbes.com/sites/daviddi.../#31af4aa33a13
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  50. #1350
    oh my TVC 15
    Reputation: Forster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    3,365
    Potatoes and Tomatoes eh? We don't eat many potatoes anymore (not on the diet plan), we eat a lot of Tomatoes, but they mostly taste like guck.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  51. #1351
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Americans Like Fruits More Than Veggies, But We Aren't Eating Much Of Either, Says New CDC Report

    Closing with some good news: we are eating slightly more fruits and vegetables than we were in 1970, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The most consumed vegetables? Potatoes and tomatoes, by far, says the USDA (roughly half of both are frozen or canned); onions come in third. Apples and oranges take the top two spots for our favorite fruits.
    [/url]
    Except the tomato is a fruit, so their numbers are all off! Come on USDA, you should know this!
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  52. #1352
    oh my TVC 15
    Reputation: Forster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    3,365
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Except the tomato is a fruit, so their numbers are all off! Come on USDA, you should know this!
    Finally some real fake news. Didn't they also decide tomato paste on pizza crust counted as a vegetable in school lunches?
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  53. #1353
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    Finally some real fake news. Didn't they also decide tomato paste on pizza crust counted as a vegetable in school lunches?
    Wikipedia:

    The ketchup as a vegetable controversy refers to proposed United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) regulations, early in the presidency of Ronald Reagan, that intended to provide more flexibility in meal planning to local school lunch administrators coping with National School Lunch Plan subsidy cuts enacted by the Omnibus Regulation Acts of 1980 and 1981.[1][2] The regulations allowed administrators the opportunity to credit items not explicitly listed that met nutritional requirements. While ketchup was not mentioned in the original regulations, pickle relish was used as an example of an item that could count as a vegetable.[3] A similar controversy arose in 2011, when Congress passed a bill prohibiting the USDA from increasing the amount of tomato paste required to constitute a vegetable; the bill allowed pizza with two tablespoons of tomato paste to qualify as a vegetable.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  54. #1354
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    I think it's both...Veguit!

    Most people actually categorize fruits and vegetables by taste. Most people consider fruits to be any sweet part of a plant, except sugar cane or corn syrup. The non-sweet parts of plants and fungus are usually considered vegetables just because of the taste. Although mushroom are neither fruit or vegetable (they are aliens)

    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is knowing not to put a tomato in a fruit salad." some guy
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  55. #1355
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I think it's both...Veguit!

    Most people actually categorize fruits and vegetables by taste. Most people consider fruits to be any sweet part of a plant, except sugar cane or corn syrup. The non-sweet parts of plants and fungus are usually considered vegetables just because of the taste. Although mushroom are neither fruit or vegetable (they are aliens)

    "Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is knowing not to put a tomato in a fruit salad." some guy
    So a sweet potato is a fruit? Or maybe it's a fregetable.
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  56. #1356
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    ^ good one chaz
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  57. #1357
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Non GMO too


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23755305_10215110480894166_2310750503218380249_n.jpg

    I'm pretty certain that the Fruit Loops have a shorter shelf life.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  58. #1358
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,792
    ^So what IS that, freeze-dried all-ready-cooked corn on the cob?
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  59. #1359
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,254
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post

    I'm pretty certain that the Fruit Loops have a shorter shelf life.
    That might be a good thing.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  60. #1360
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-23795549_10212804328015001_1451144657321367035_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  61. #1361
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Forget Milk and Eggs. These 8 Vegan Substitutes Will Make Your Holiday Baked Goods 100 Times Better

    1. Aquafaba
    Aquafaba is the water you find in a can of chickpeas, and this stuff is amazing! You can whip it using a mixer and produce beautiful, fluffy meringue, which makes it the perfect ingredient for making macarons and vegan lemon meringue pie.

    2. Flax egg
    Flax eggs are our favorite for cakes, quick loaves, muffins, and cupcakes. You might think you know the flax egg, but we have a twist: use one tablespoon of ground flax and three tablespoons of aquafaba to replace each egg. Then, mix the ground flax and aquafaba in a small bowl and leave to gel at room temperature for approximately 10 minutes. If you use this egg substitute, your cakes will be light and fluffy with a great rise and tender crumb.

    3. Applesauce
    For baked goods that you want to be moist and tender (eg, gingerbread cake or pumpkin muffins) you can also try a quarter-cup of applesauce mixed with a half-teaspoon of baking powder. This mixture will provide a tender crumb, but it might not be so light and fluffy. One half of a mashed banana with a half-teaspoon of baking powder will also work, but it can provide a little banana flavor to your bake (which we think is a good thing!).

    4. Soy, almond, cashew milk
    These milks beautifully replace dairy milk in a cake or muffin. Some say soy works best because of its protein content, but we have great luck with nut milks as well. Try adding a teaspoon of vinegar per cup of plant-based milk and allow it to sour on the counter for a few minutes. This creates a buttermilk-like liquid and deepens the flavor of your bakes. This works especially well for pancakes you might be making for holiday brunches. Just remember that some people have allergies to soy or nuts and that if you use almond or cashew milk, your treats might not be school-friendly.

    5. Pea, oat, rice milk
    One great thing about pea-, oat-, and rice milks is that they are often allergy-free. Also great is the fact that they make for ideal dairy substitutes when baking for people who might have allergies. Rice milk tends to be a little thin, so you might want to add an extra teaspoon of oil or applesauce for each cup of rice milk you use.

    6. Canned coconut milk
    The secret to making delicious vegan cheesecakes, whipped cream, and pumpkin pie is canned coconut milk. Really, what you want is the coconut cream and not the milk, so leave your can in the refrigerator until the cream becomes firm and separates from the milk. Then, you can drain the milk and save it to use in smoothies.

    7. Vegan butter and vegetable shortening
    Cake or muffin recipes that call for dairy butter can be made with vegan butter instead. Vegan butter also makes a great butter substitute when you are making vegan buttercream. If you are baking a pie, try using 50/50 vegetable shortening and vegan butter to replace butter in a pie crust, as you will still get that buttery flavor and the tender texture.

    8. Coconut oil
    This magic stuff works pretty well as a butter substitute. Try using coconut oil in cakes, cupcakes, or muffins, or make a crumble topping. As a bonus, coconut oil is palm oil-free, as some vegan butters might not be.

    Sauce Forget Milk and Eggs. These 8 Vegan Substitutes Will Make Your Holiday Baked Goods 100 Times Better
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  62. #1362
    Magically Delicious
    Reputation: Cleared2land's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,254
    I prefer almond butter.

    remove metal top, pop in microwave for 30 seconds to soften. Add goji berries, honey, cinnamon and sea salt. Mix and enjoy.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  63. #1363
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-24232283_1433438946753327_4749236991068682281_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  64. #1364
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    In case you're wondering

    ATTACH=CONFIG]1170683[/ATTACH]
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-24232857_1716190585081857_563748697649960770_n.jpg  

    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  65. #1365
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-24301035_10212439231389540_8317390918362954791_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  66. #1366
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,956
    this thread needs a steak...

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-pr_ts004.jpg


  67. #1367
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,429
    No it doesn't.

  68. #1368
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-clean-meat-cover-large.jpg


    ABOUT THE BOOK:

    Paul Shapiro gives you a front-row seat for the wild story of the race to create and commercialize cleaner, safer, sustainable meat-real meat-without the animals. From the entrepreneurial visionaries to the scientists’ workshops to the big business board rooms-Shapiro details that quest for clean meat and other animal products and examines the debate raging around it. Since the dawn of **** sapiens some quarter million years ago, animals have satiated our species’ desire for meat. But with a growing global population and demand for meat, eggs, dairy, leather, and more, raising such massive numbers of farm animals is woefully inefficient and takes an enormous toll on the planet, public health, and certainly the animals themselves.

    But what if we could have our meat and eat it, too? The next great scientific revolution is underway-discovering new ways to create enough food for the world’s ever-growing, ever-hungry population. Enter clean meat-real, actual meat grown (or brewed!) from animal cells-as well as other clean foods that ditch animal cells altogether and are simply built from the molecule up.
    Whereas our ancestors domesticated wild animals into livestock, today we’re beginning to domesticate their cells, leaving the animals out of the equation. From one single cell of a cow, you could feed an entire village. And the story of this coming “second domestication” is anything but tame.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

    When Paul Shapiro took his first bite of clean meat, more humans had gone into space than had eaten real meat grown outside an animal. In addition to being among the world’s first clean meat consumers, Shapiro serves as the vice president of policy engagement for the Humane Society of the United States, the world’s largest animal protection organization.
    A TEDx speaker and an inductee into the Animal Rights Hall of Fame, Shapiro has published dozens of articles about animals in publications ranging from daily newspapers to academic journals. You can read more about his work and contact him at Paul-Shapiro.com
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  69. #1369
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,030
    10 Ways to Veganize Classic Hanukkah Dishes

    Latkes, challah, rugelach, and even brisket are made kinder and more delicious by nixing all animal ingredients.

    Hanukkah is an eight-day festival that’s filled with traditional Jewish foods that warm the soul. The holiday of lights puts a glimmer in our eye every time we think about the aroma of a fresh batch of veganized latkes or a steaming bowl of matzo ball soup. While meat and milk can never be eaten together according to kosher laws, many traditional recipes contain one or the other. This year, we’re making it easier than ever to practice kindness during Hanukkah by eliminating all animal products from iconic Jewish dishes. Here are 10 foods that can be easily veganized for enjoying by the glow of the menorah this Hanukkah.

    Name:  VegNewsEdgyVegMatzoBallInLine.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  150.8 KB
    Matzo Ball Soup
    Many Jewish grandmothers will tell you that the secret behind a good matzo ball soup is schmaltz—or solidified chicken fat. We beg to differ. A great matzo ball soup is a mix of aromatic veggies cooked down in a rich vegetable broth and adorned with several gorgeous matzo balls. These steamy recipes from blogs The "V" Word, The Edgy Veg, and Hell Yeah It’s Vegan prove that schmaltz has no place in matzo ball soup.

    Name:  VegNewsVeatsBrisketInLine.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  60.3 KB
    Brisket
    A great resource for Jewish vegans is Jewish Veg—an organization that encourages members of the Jewish faith to opt for plant-based lifestyles. The group boasts prominent advisory board members, such as animal-rights legend Alex Hershaft, and the Humane Society of the United States’ Paul Shapiro, amongst other notables. Another perk? Jewish Veg has a scrumptious recipe for seitan-based brisked that’s braised in red wine. For you non-cooking types, we hear Dallas’ vegan eatery V-Eats makes an eyebrow-raising brisket of their own.

    Name:  VegNewsKugelUnconventionalBakerInLine.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  135.4 KB
    Kugel
    A craveable carby dish, this noodle casserole makes for a unique dessert (yes, noodles for dessert, what’s the problem?). The base is usually farfel (egg noodles) which get a hefty coating of a sweet cream cheese sauce mixed with eggs before hitting the oven. Blogger Audrey Snowe’s vegan version uses gluten-free ribbon noodles, a cashew-based sweet cheese sauce, and tangy raisins folded in for an extra sweet treat.

    Name:  VegNewsMyDarlingVeganChallahInLine.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  217.2 KB
    Challah
    A braided bread used in many-a traditional Jewish celebration, the original version is normally coated in egg wash to give the top a sheen. Turns out that plant-based milk (such as soy or cashew) makes a viable substitute for the wash, and a chickpea flour base combined with active dry yeast creates a fluffy, brioche-like texture with zero animal products. Sarah McMinn over at My Darling Vegan perks her challah up by topping it with poppy seeds, but you can opt for sesame or go au naturel.

    Name:  VegNews.Latkes.HannahKaminskyInLine.jpg
Views: 11
Size:  151.2 KB
    Latkes
    These tiny pancakes—made with grated vegetables—are what Hanukkah is all about! Go classic potato or switch it up with other grated root veggies (such as carrots, beets, and sweet potatoes). The binding agent is traditionally eggs, but vegan cookbook queen Isa Chandra Moskowitz’ recipe (lifted from her classic cookbook Veganomicon) creates perfectly crispy latkes with just corn or potato starch. We like ours hot straight from the pan with a big dollop of chunky applesauce. Speaking of which...

    Name:  VegNewsApplesauceKathyPatalskyInLine.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  122.8 KB
    Apple Sauce
    A traditional condiment to latkes, this one is already usually vegan, but that doesn’t mean we can’t dress ours up with creative flavors. Start with a classic recipe and make it tart with the addition of cranberries, spicy with a dash of cayenne, or add a pinch of salt for a salted caramel apple flavor before slathering it all over your latkes of choice.

    Name:  VegNewsBlintzesAnnieShannonInLine.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  200.0 KB
    Blintzes
    Every culture has its version of delicate pancakes, and Jewish cuisine is no exception. Blintzes are thin, crepe-like pancakes usually stuffed with sweetened cheese or fruit fillings. The batter is made with eggs and milk, but every good vegan knows that a simple swap for plant-based alternatives will result in just-as-delicious pancakes. Excerpted from Annie and Dan Shannon’s cookbook (inspired by Julia Child) entitled Mastering the Art of Vegan Cooking, these blueberry blintzes—made with a smooth tofu and vegan cream cheese filling—are perfect for your holiday spread.

    Name:  VegNewSweetsbyCHLOEMatchaBabkaInLine.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  70.3 KB
    Chocolate Babka
    A pull-apart dessert bread that melts in your mouth, we’re not ashamed of eating this chocolate-filled wonder for breakfast during the entire eight-day celebration. Similar to banana bread but with airy pockets of chocolate, the key to a great babka is lots of butter (vegan, of course!). Make your own with Oh Holy Basil’s stunning recipe or, if you’re near New York City, pop into Sweets by CHLOE to pick up its version of the Hanukkah staple—which adds an aromatic dose of matcha to the bread.

    Name:  VegNewsSufganiyotMayimBialikInLine.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  68.0 KB
    Sufganiyot
    If you love doughnuts as much as we do, you’ll want to make several batches for the holidays. Other times of the year, we might consider baking our doughnuts to eliminate some of the gluttonous-factor. However, oil is celebrated during Hanukkah as it is used to light the menorah, giving us very good reason to go full-fry on these powdered, sugar-topped wonders. Jewish vegan activist Mayim Bialik's version nails the classic, jelly-filled recipe, but feel free to experiment with vegan custard, dairy-free Nutella, or chocolate fillings.

    Name:  VegNewsItsRainingFlourRugelachInLine.jpg
Views: 10
Size:  107.6 KB
    Ruggelach
    More dessert? Yes, please! These bite-sized pastries are what Hanukkah dreams are made of, and making them sans animal products is a cinch. Start with a simple dough recipe, choose your filling of choice (perhaps crushed hazelnuts, apricot jam, or cinnamon sugar), cut, roll, bake, and then cry happy tears as you devour them by the dozen.

    Sauce: 10 Ways to Veganize Classic Hanukkah Dishes
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

Page 14 of 14 FirstFirst ... 41011121314

Similar Threads

  1. Vegan SS?
    By bigboarder1 in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: 07-19-2015, 07:55 PM
  2. Any vegetarian riders out there?
    By stumblemumble in forum Nutrition and Hydration
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: 08-09-2012, 07:59 PM
  3. My Dog Is Now A Vegan?
    By Dirdir in forum Arizona
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-17-2012, 11:50 AM
  4. Vegetarian
    By hdo_1975 in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 07-29-2009, 07:52 AM
  5. Anyone here a Vegetarian or Vegan?
    By DownHillFast in forum Arizona
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: 10-29-2004, 09:02 PM

Members who have read this thread: 145

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •