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  1. #1201
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    Vegan Cyclist Rides 2000 Miles to Save Rhinos

    Matt Meyer is towing a 350-pound rhino replica along the Pacific coast of the US for two months to raise funds to save the endangered animal.

    Vegan advocate Matt Meyer is riding his bicycle while hauling a 350-pound replica of a rhinoceros (which he named “Lunar”) down the entirety of the Pacific coast of the US for the purpose of raising funds and awareness for the endangered species. Amidst his 2,000-mile journey, Meyer spoke to media outlet The Orange County Register about his experience. “I don’t have children of my own,” Meyer said. “But I have nieces and nephews and I couldn’t let them inherit a planet without rhinos. The cyclist formed a bond with the animals while working as a safari tour guide in his homeland, South Africa, and became vegan after making the connection that rhinos are no different from animals such as cows. Meyer has stopped at schools along his journey to educate students about the plight of rhinos, and is hoping to raise $250,000—of which he has raised $100,000 thus far—to donate to organizations that work to end the poaching of rhinos in Africa and Asia. On the other side of the world, vegan cyclist Jackson Long is set to embark on a journey across Europe to raise awareness for animal-rights later this summer.

    love this pic...


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-0612_ocr_l-rhinoguy-02a-1.jpg






    sauce
    South African rides through Orange County to save rhinos – Orange County Register
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  2. #1202
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    Nectarines

    The differences between a peach and a nectarine can be a little fuzzy. After all, these two relatives of the almond taste very much alike. But fans of nectarines favour the stone fruit for its smooth skin and smaller pit. The cherry on top is that nectarines are nutritional powerhouses for older adults. Indeed, when we sink our teeth into a nectarine, we're getting plenty of vitamin C, beta-carotene and fiber. And that's not all.

    Nectarines are a low in calories.

    A small nectarine has fewer than 60 calories. If you crave something sweet, try dressing up plain yogurt with nectarine slices or other stone fruit, such as cherries or peaches.

    2. Nectarines are good for your eyes.

    Nectarines contain lutein, an antioxidant that can reduce the risk of cataracts. Increasing the amount of lutein in our diets has also been associated with lower risks of age-related macular degeneration. One small nectarine contains about 150 micrograms of lutein.

    3. Nectarines keep blood sugar in check.

    Nectarines have a low glycemic index, in the low 40s. That means they won't cause a quick rise in blood sugar, which can lead to crashes and mood swings. As such, nectarines also curb our sugar cravings.

    4. Nectarines keep us energized.

    Credit the copper, not the calories, in nectarines for this benefit. A medium nectarine contains six to nine per cent of the recommended daily intake of copper. Copper is an essential mineral that helps our bodies absorb iron and prevent anemia. The potassium in nectarines also keeps us going. Low potassium levels can cause hypokalemia, a condition that can leave us feeling tired and weak.

    Nectarines promote heart health.

    Chalk it up to all that copper, which also helps with blood pressure control and heart function. The fruit's potassium also plays a role in heart health. A medium nectarine contains about 285 milligrams of potassium or roughly eight per cent of what we need every day. Upping potassium intake has been linked to lower blood pressure and reduced risk of stroke.

    6. Nectarines are good for the skin.

    There are many nutrients in nectarines that promote healthy skin. One of them is vitamin E, which can act as an anti-inflammatory and also protects skin from free radical damage caused by ultraviolet light. A medium nectarine contains about five per cent of our daily vitamin E needs.

    How to Add Nectarines to Your Diet

    Nectarines are perfect for eating out of hand with little preparation required, save for a simple rinse under the tap. Nectarines are at their best when they yield slightly to the touch, have taut skin and are fragrant. To ripen nectarines leave them on the kitchen counter, out of direct sunlight, for two to three days before eating. After that, store them in the fridge.

    The perk of being so closely related to the peach is that nectarines can be used in any recipe calling for its fuzzy cousin. Sliced nectarines are perfect as a topping on pancakes or waffles. For vegetarian diets nectarines also pair with almonds, honey and soft cheeses, like unripened goat cheese or ricotta. A few minutes on a grill turns halved nectarines into a caramelized delicacy.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-o-nectarines-570.jpg



    Sauce:
    Nectarines Are Juicy, Sweet And Good For YouÂ*|Â*Lifetime Daily
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  3. #1203
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    ^^^ nice, i love nectarines. only .99/lb lately too.

    almost at 6 months vegan here.

  4. #1204
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomit View Post
    ^^^ nice, i love nectarines. only .99/lb lately too.

    almost at 6 months vegan here.
    Congrats!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-13244689_10153455663227554_1283001653016843365_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  5. #1205
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    New documentary: What The Health

    What the Health is the groundbreaking follow-up film from the creators of the award winning documentary Cowspiracy. The film follows intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the secret to preventing and even reversing chronic diseases – and investigates why the nation’s leading health organizations don’t want us to know about it. With heart disease and cancer the leading causes of death in America, and diabetes at an all-time high, the film reveals possibly the largest health cover-up of our time.
    With the help of medical doctors, researchers, and consumer advocates, What the Health exposes the collusion and corruption in government and big business that is costing us trillions of healthcare dollars, and keeping us sick.
    Join Kip as he tracks down the leading and most trusted American health nonprofits to find out why these groups are staying silent, despite a growing body of evidence. Audiences will be shocked to learn the insidious roles played by pharmaceutical companies, agribusiness, and processed animal food companies in the nation’s health, especially in the most vulnerable communities, and will cheer at the transformation and recovery of those who took their lives into their own hands.
    What The Health is a surprising, and at times hilarious, investigative documentary that will be an eye-opener for everyone concerned about our nation’s health and how big business influences it.





    Website: WHAT THE HEALTH
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    Eat your veggies

  6. #1206
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    Article is 6 weeks old but avocados are priced like gold. I paid $5 for 2 avocados at my local market. In two weeks they will 4 for $5 and mushy, most will probably get thrown out.



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.b4283127e262
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  7. #1207
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    New documentary: What The Health








    Website: WHAT THE HEALTH
    on netflix too.

    yay!

  8. #1208
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    The rise of vegan culture

    DISTANT are the days of Annie Hall, when Woody Allen resigned himself to a plate of alfalfa sprouts and mashed yeast. Over the years, vegan eating has gone from tasteless to trendy to making inroads into the mainstream. One sign of the times: in 2016, Tyson Foods, the largest meat processor in the United States, bought a 5 percent stake in the plant-based protein producer Beyond Meat. (The company’s best-known product, the Beyond Burger, is pinkened with beet extracts and reportedly sizzles when grilled.) No longer fettered by associations with hippie kooks or radical politics, veganism has ascended to the astral plane of aspirational living. These days it keeps mixed, and more glamorous, company: famous bodies belonging to the likes of Tom Brady and Beyoncé have been fueled by vegan diets.

    Sociology graduate student Nina Gheihman is researching social aspects of veganism’s spread. Veganism was at first closely bound to the ideology of the animal-rights movement, she explains, which initially aimed at a range of targets, like wearing fur and testing products on animals. Once activists shifted focus to farm conditions and food, veganism took on the features of what scholars call a “lifestyle movement.” Over time, it’s become more closely associated with general environmental concerns and a “healthism” mentality, bound up with notions of perfecting the body. Trustworthy numbers on how many people identify as vegan are hard to come by, says Gheihman, but a growing number practice veganism in some way: incorporating meat and dairy substitutes in their meals, or restricting their diets at certain times of day or for a period of weeks.

    Social scientists have studied veganism as it relates to animal-rights activism, but there’s been less research into the current lifestyle movement’s mechanisms and structure. Gheihman is especially interested in analyzing leading figures whom she’s provisionally termed “lifestyle advocates,” arguing that they have changed the nature of lifestyle activism. They usually come from fields not typically associated with activism, she says, especially entrepreneurship—and the “cultural work” they do isn’t strictly defined by their official occupations. This work has expanded veganism beyond its ideological core, enabling a greater variety of people to participate even if they don’t conform all aspects of their lives to all its tenets.

    Gheihman sorts these players into three categories. Some lifestyle advocates create opportunities for consumption—for example, by starting a vegan meal-kit subscription service, opening a restaurant, or stocking plant proteins in their grocery stores. Another group works in what she calls “knowledge production,” creating the educational resources—films, books, and blog posts—that people circulate to share culinary tips and advice, or to persuade others to change diets. Third, and most abstract, is the kind of advocacy involved in what she calls “meaning production” or “interpretive work.” These figures change the cultural associations of veganism: “the symbolic essence of what veganism means,” as Gheihman puts it. Brady is a striking case: by lending his name to a line of meal-kits from vegan start-up Purple Carrot, he links veganism with the macho physicality of pro football. (“TB12 Performance Meals” claim to help “athletes and active individuals stay at their peak” and “maximize your performance on the playing field” for $78 a week.)

    Gheihman plans to conduct field research and interviews to examine the evolution of veganism in two other national contexts. The first is France, “the obvious place to study a food movement, because it is so central to the notions we have around what makes good food, or proper food.” The country’s cuisine might seem inimical to cashew cheese, or chickpea runoff (called “aquafaba”) as an egg-white substitute, but the hierarchical structure of its food culture could pave the way for dramatic change. In recent years, haute cuisine chefs, catering to a high-end international clientele, have had to experiment with vegan menus and pastry-making. Their trickle-down influence has been amplified by a network of vegan food blogs and cookbook writers—even as other institutions resist the spread of this lifestyle. The French ministry of health, Gheihman points out, warns that following a régime végétalien will result in nutritional deficiencies and long-term health risks, and the government’s nutritional standards for school cafeterias mandate a dairy product with every meal.

    The second case is Israel, where by some estimates, nearly 5 percent of the population is vegan; Tel Aviv has earned a reputation as one of the vegan capitals of the world. The Israeli Defense Force even provides animal-free menus in mess halls, and leather-free boots and helmets to vegan soldiers. But beyond the numbers, Israel provides an interesting contrasting example, Gheihman explains, in part because veganism there remains firmly rooted in animal-rights concerns, and is practiced across the political and the religious spectrum. She is also interested in how the vegan lifestyle has evolved within Israel’s cultural context, undergirded by national symbolism surrounding land and water usage, and informed by the country’s farming traditions and Mediterranean diet.

    Gheihman’s own vegan lifestyle, meanwhile, reaches well beyond the radius of her individual plate. She’s involved with the Council for Sustainability, the Harvard Vegan Society, the Ivy League Vegan Conference, and the Boston Plant-Based Millennials, which hosts monthly potlucks. “There’s one this Sunday, actually,” she adds, not quite casually.
    My lunch on saturday
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19275197_1943116909266084_725755841418105576_n.jpg




    sauce:A Harvard sociologist studies how veganism went from tasteless to trendy | Harvard Magazine
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  9. #1209
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19149285_1567370616671075_8812752485070259809_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  10. #1210
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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  11. #1211
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    My favorite Vegan bakery is Bunner's located in Kensington Market, here in Toronto. On caturday we admired the wide array of baked goods including vegan "passionfruit" pride cupcakes. We bought some savoury pockets (stuffed with jackfruit)... I had one for dinner soooooo good

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19399893_1946920325552409_1503497992108257717_n.jpg

    I liked this mango fruit stand display

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19399035_1946921548885620_5628808230074391722_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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