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  1. #1201
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    Vegan Cyclist Rides 2000 Miles to Save Rhinos

    Matt Meyer is towing a 350-pound rhino replica along the Pacific coast of the US for two months to raise funds to save the endangered animal.

    Vegan advocate Matt Meyer is riding his bicycle while hauling a 350-pound replica of a rhinoceros (which he named “Lunar”) down the entirety of the Pacific coast of the US for the purpose of raising funds and awareness for the endangered species. Amidst his 2,000-mile journey, Meyer spoke to media outlet The Orange County Register about his experience. “I don’t have children of my own,” Meyer said. “But I have nieces and nephews and I couldn’t let them inherit a planet without rhinos. The cyclist formed a bond with the animals while working as a safari tour guide in his homeland, South Africa, and became vegan after making the connection that rhinos are no different from animals such as cows. Meyer has stopped at schools along his journey to educate students about the plight of rhinos, and is hoping to raise $250,000—of which he has raised $100,000 thus far—to donate to organizations that work to end the poaching of rhinos in Africa and Asia. On the other side of the world, vegan cyclist Jackson Long is set to embark on a journey across Europe to raise awareness for animal-rights later this summer.

    love this pic...


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-0612_ocr_l-rhinoguy-02a-1.jpg






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    South African rides through Orange County to save rhinos – Orange County Register
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  2. #1202
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    Nectarines

    The differences between a peach and a nectarine can be a little fuzzy. After all, these two relatives of the almond taste very much alike. But fans of nectarines favour the stone fruit for its smooth skin and smaller pit. The cherry on top is that nectarines are nutritional powerhouses for older adults. Indeed, when we sink our teeth into a nectarine, we're getting plenty of vitamin C, beta-carotene and fiber. And that's not all.

    Nectarines are a low in calories.

    A small nectarine has fewer than 60 calories. If you crave something sweet, try dressing up plain yogurt with nectarine slices or other stone fruit, such as cherries or peaches.

    2. Nectarines are good for your eyes.

    Nectarines contain lutein, an antioxidant that can reduce the risk of cataracts. Increasing the amount of lutein in our diets has also been associated with lower risks of age-related macular degeneration. One small nectarine contains about 150 micrograms of lutein.

    3. Nectarines keep blood sugar in check.

    Nectarines have a low glycemic index, in the low 40s. That means they won't cause a quick rise in blood sugar, which can lead to crashes and mood swings. As such, nectarines also curb our sugar cravings.

    4. Nectarines keep us energized.

    Credit the copper, not the calories, in nectarines for this benefit. A medium nectarine contains six to nine per cent of the recommended daily intake of copper. Copper is an essential mineral that helps our bodies absorb iron and prevent anemia. The potassium in nectarines also keeps us going. Low potassium levels can cause hypokalemia, a condition that can leave us feeling tired and weak.

    Nectarines promote heart health.

    Chalk it up to all that copper, which also helps with blood pressure control and heart function. The fruit's potassium also plays a role in heart health. A medium nectarine contains about 285 milligrams of potassium or roughly eight per cent of what we need every day. Upping potassium intake has been linked to lower blood pressure and reduced risk of stroke.

    6. Nectarines are good for the skin.

    There are many nutrients in nectarines that promote healthy skin. One of them is vitamin E, which can act as an anti-inflammatory and also protects skin from free radical damage caused by ultraviolet light. A medium nectarine contains about five per cent of our daily vitamin E needs.

    How to Add Nectarines to Your Diet

    Nectarines are perfect for eating out of hand with little preparation required, save for a simple rinse under the tap. Nectarines are at their best when they yield slightly to the touch, have taut skin and are fragrant. To ripen nectarines leave them on the kitchen counter, out of direct sunlight, for two to three days before eating. After that, store them in the fridge.

    The perk of being so closely related to the peach is that nectarines can be used in any recipe calling for its fuzzy cousin. Sliced nectarines are perfect as a topping on pancakes or waffles. For vegetarian diets nectarines also pair with almonds, honey and soft cheeses, like unripened goat cheese or ricotta. A few minutes on a grill turns halved nectarines into a caramelized delicacy.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-o-nectarines-570.jpg



    Sauce:
    Nectarines Are Juicy, Sweet And Good For YouÂ*|Â*Lifetime Daily
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  3. #1203
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    ^^^ nice, i love nectarines. only .99/lb lately too.

    almost at 6 months vegan here.

  4. #1204
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    Quote Originally Posted by nomit View Post
    ^^^ nice, i love nectarines. only .99/lb lately too.

    almost at 6 months vegan here.
    Congrats!

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  5. #1205
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    New documentary: What The Health

    What the Health is the groundbreaking follow-up film from the creators of the award winning documentary Cowspiracy. The film follows intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the secret to preventing and even reversing chronic diseases – and investigates why the nation’s leading health organizations don’t want us to know about it. With heart disease and cancer the leading causes of death in America, and diabetes at an all-time high, the film reveals possibly the largest health cover-up of our time.
    With the help of medical doctors, researchers, and consumer advocates, What the Health exposes the collusion and corruption in government and big business that is costing us trillions of healthcare dollars, and keeping us sick.
    Join Kip as he tracks down the leading and most trusted American health nonprofits to find out why these groups are staying silent, despite a growing body of evidence. Audiences will be shocked to learn the insidious roles played by pharmaceutical companies, agribusiness, and processed animal food companies in the nation’s health, especially in the most vulnerable communities, and will cheer at the transformation and recovery of those who took their lives into their own hands.
    What The Health is a surprising, and at times hilarious, investigative documentary that will be an eye-opener for everyone concerned about our nation’s health and how big business influences it.





    Website: WHAT THE HEALTH
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  6. #1206
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    Article is 6 weeks old but avocados are priced like gold. I paid $5 for 2 avocados at my local market. In two weeks they will 4 for $5 and mushy, most will probably get thrown out.



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.b4283127e262
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  7. #1207
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    New documentary: What The Health








    Website: WHAT THE HEALTH
    on netflix too.

    yay!

  8. #1208
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    The rise of vegan culture

    DISTANT are the days of Annie Hall, when Woody Allen resigned himself to a plate of alfalfa sprouts and mashed yeast. Over the years, vegan eating has gone from tasteless to trendy to making inroads into the mainstream. One sign of the times: in 2016, Tyson Foods, the largest meat processor in the United States, bought a 5 percent stake in the plant-based protein producer Beyond Meat. (The company’s best-known product, the Beyond Burger, is pinkened with beet extracts and reportedly sizzles when grilled.) No longer fettered by associations with hippie kooks or radical politics, veganism has ascended to the astral plane of aspirational living. These days it keeps mixed, and more glamorous, company: famous bodies belonging to the likes of Tom Brady and Beyoncé have been fueled by vegan diets.

    Sociology graduate student Nina Gheihman is researching social aspects of veganism’s spread. Veganism was at first closely bound to the ideology of the animal-rights movement, she explains, which initially aimed at a range of targets, like wearing fur and testing products on animals. Once activists shifted focus to farm conditions and food, veganism took on the features of what scholars call a “lifestyle movement.” Over time, it’s become more closely associated with general environmental concerns and a “healthism” mentality, bound up with notions of perfecting the body. Trustworthy numbers on how many people identify as vegan are hard to come by, says Gheihman, but a growing number practice veganism in some way: incorporating meat and dairy substitutes in their meals, or restricting their diets at certain times of day or for a period of weeks.

    Social scientists have studied veganism as it relates to animal-rights activism, but there’s been less research into the current lifestyle movement’s mechanisms and structure. Gheihman is especially interested in analyzing leading figures whom she’s provisionally termed “lifestyle advocates,” arguing that they have changed the nature of lifestyle activism. They usually come from fields not typically associated with activism, she says, especially entrepreneurship—and the “cultural work” they do isn’t strictly defined by their official occupations. This work has expanded veganism beyond its ideological core, enabling a greater variety of people to participate even if they don’t conform all aspects of their lives to all its tenets.

    Gheihman sorts these players into three categories. Some lifestyle advocates create opportunities for consumption—for example, by starting a vegan meal-kit subscription service, opening a restaurant, or stocking plant proteins in their grocery stores. Another group works in what she calls “knowledge production,” creating the educational resources—films, books, and blog posts—that people circulate to share culinary tips and advice, or to persuade others to change diets. Third, and most abstract, is the kind of advocacy involved in what she calls “meaning production” or “interpretive work.” These figures change the cultural associations of veganism: “the symbolic essence of what veganism means,” as Gheihman puts it. Brady is a striking case: by lending his name to a line of meal-kits from vegan start-up Purple Carrot, he links veganism with the macho physicality of pro football. (“TB12 Performance Meals” claim to help “athletes and active individuals stay at their peak” and “maximize your performance on the playing field” for $78 a week.)

    Gheihman plans to conduct field research and interviews to examine the evolution of veganism in two other national contexts. The first is France, “the obvious place to study a food movement, because it is so central to the notions we have around what makes good food, or proper food.” The country’s cuisine might seem inimical to cashew cheese, or chickpea runoff (called “aquafaba”) as an egg-white substitute, but the hierarchical structure of its food culture could pave the way for dramatic change. In recent years, haute cuisine chefs, catering to a high-end international clientele, have had to experiment with vegan menus and pastry-making. Their trickle-down influence has been amplified by a network of vegan food blogs and cookbook writers—even as other institutions resist the spread of this lifestyle. The French ministry of health, Gheihman points out, warns that following a régime végétalien will result in nutritional deficiencies and long-term health risks, and the government’s nutritional standards for school cafeterias mandate a dairy product with every meal.

    The second case is Israel, where by some estimates, nearly 5 percent of the population is vegan; Tel Aviv has earned a reputation as one of the vegan capitals of the world. The Israeli Defense Force even provides animal-free menus in mess halls, and leather-free boots and helmets to vegan soldiers. But beyond the numbers, Israel provides an interesting contrasting example, Gheihman explains, in part because veganism there remains firmly rooted in animal-rights concerns, and is practiced across the political and the religious spectrum. She is also interested in how the vegan lifestyle has evolved within Israel’s cultural context, undergirded by national symbolism surrounding land and water usage, and informed by the country’s farming traditions and Mediterranean diet.

    Gheihman’s own vegan lifestyle, meanwhile, reaches well beyond the radius of her individual plate. She’s involved with the Council for Sustainability, the Harvard Vegan Society, the Ivy League Vegan Conference, and the Boston Plant-Based Millennials, which hosts monthly potlucks. “There’s one this Sunday, actually,” she adds, not quite casually.
    My lunch on saturday
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19275197_1943116909266084_725755841418105576_n.jpg




    sauce:A Harvard sociologist studies how veganism went from tasteless to trendy | Harvard Magazine
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  9. #1209
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19149285_1567370616671075_8812752485070259809_n.jpg
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  11. #1211
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    My favorite Vegan bakery is Bunner's located in Kensington Market, here in Toronto. On caturday we admired the wide array of baked goods including vegan "passionfruit" pride cupcakes. We bought some savoury pockets (stuffed with jackfruit)... I had one for dinner soooooo good

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19399893_1946920325552409_1503497992108257717_n.jpg

    I liked this mango fruit stand display

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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19424335_1561173450624180_8651761866340399003_n.jpg
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  16. #1216
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    Hikers watch out, your next. Also near the top of the list? People that live in homes, tents or on the ground and folks who brush off Mosquitos. Geez, I thought it would be at least related to riding through a swarm of Gnats.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-19642761_10213988172957799_923934535586786883_n.jpg
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  18. #1218
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    Canada Day lunch

    Japan street food. Veg curry and purple rice

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    Supersonic cookie and strawberry & hibiscus cupcake ... Chris raved about the cupcake. Both treats vegan and gluten-free and packed full of flavour

    Americanos
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  19. #1219
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    Happy Hump Day

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  20. #1220
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    Crazy meat eaters

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    Our Gut Microbes Strongly Influence Our Emotional Behaviors

    The gut microbiome – the world of bacteria living in our digestive system – doesn’t just exist to give us stomach aches or to help us break down food. Research is rapidly emerging from the scientific community that suggests these little critters have a huge impact on our behavior, including (potentially) on our response to fear.

    A new study led by the University of California Los Angeles appears to have found evidence of yet another unusual link between your stomach and your brain. Namely, a selection of gut microbes seem to be linked to regions of the brain associated with mood and general behavior, the first time such a mechanism has been found in healthy humans.

    Previous research has found that the emotional responses in rodents, including those related to anxiety and depression, vary depending on the content of their gut microbiome. This link has yet to be conclusively demonstrated in humans – until now, of course.

    The team collected fecal matter from 40 different women, within which a microcosm of their gut microbiome would be contained. As these were being profiled, the same women were hooked up to a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner and shown various images of individuals, environments, situations or objects that were designed to provoke emotional responses.

    As explained in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, the team found that there were two primary groups of bacteria that appeared to have some effect on the constitution of the brain.

    The first, the Prevotella, were found most commonly within seven of the women. These participants’ brains showed a greater connectivity between the emotional, attentional, and sensory brain regions, while having smaller and less active hippocampi, the region of the brain that is related to emotional regulation, consciousness and the consolidation of short-term memories into long-term ones.

    These women appeared to experience profoundly negative emotions, including those related to distress and anxiety, when viewing negative images.

    The second bacterial group, the Bacterioids, were more prevalent in the other 33 women. Consequently, they had a very different type of brain. The frontal cortex and the insula – regions of the brain linked to problem-solving and complex information processing – had more gray matter than the other group of women. Their hippocampi were also more voluminous and active.

    These subjects, in contrast to the Prevotella-prominent women, were less likely to experience negative emotions when being shown negative imagery.

    This research is indubitably fascinating, but as with plenty of these studies, it merely proves that a strong correlation between cognition and the gut microbiome exists. The causal mechanisms are deeply uncertain at this point.

    In any case, the idea that certain gut bacteria not only influence thought processes, but the physical structure of the brain itself, is, for lack of a better word, mind-boggling.

    One of the comments also made me wonder: "how different foods, organic/non-organic, location of growing produce, etc impacts the bacteria in the gut"

    Wikipedia says Bacteriodes (the healthy microbes) thrive on plant fibers and proteins, while Prevotella live on simple carbohydrates

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacteroides


    Sauce:Our Gut Microbes Strongly Influence Our Emotional Behaviors | IFLScience
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    Ramone comes back five minutes later, obviously embarrassed.
    "What happened?", his friends ask
    Ramone answers, "the tellers all started laughing when I said "this is a stick up' and my trench coat opened"'

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    SEITAN

    Seitan is a vegan protein substitute. It is high in protein and low in fat. Seitan begins with whole wheat berries that are ground into flour. This flour is mixed with water and kneaded into an elastic dough. The dough is rinsed under water to dissolve and wash away the starch, leaving the stretchy gluten behind. When cooked, the gluten is transformed into seitan, a food with a texture and flavor quite different from its original ingredients. Depending on how it is cooked and seasoned, seitan is capable of taking on a wide range of textures and flavors. Although long a staple in Asia and some European countries, seitan has only recently become available outside of a few natural foods stores.

    TOFU

    Tofu has been a main food staple in the Orient for over 2000 years. Dried ground soya bean puree are soaked in water and then boiled producing soya milk. It is sieved and then curdled with a coagulant (e.g. calcium sulfate). When the resulting whey is drained off, the curds are pressed to form blocks of tofu.

    Tofu has absolutely no cholesterol. The fat that tofu has is monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, the “good fat” that are not harmful to blood vessels. It is also high in calcium and is a good source of vitamins and minerals.

    Two substances present in tofu – lecithin and linoleic acid – actually help to break down cholesterol and fat deposits in the organs and blood.

    TEMPEH

    Tempeh has been a favorite food and staple source of protein in Indonesia for several hundred years. It has a firm texture and a nutty flavour. Tempeh is a complete protein that contains all the essential amino acids. The proteins and isoflavones have many health promoting effects such as bone building, reducing risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers. Tempeh maintains all of the fiber of the beans and gains some digestive benefits from the enzymes created during the fermentation process.

    Tempeh is a fermented food made by the controlled fermentation of cooked soybeans with a Rhizopus mold (tempeh starter). The tempeh fermentation by the Rhizopus mold binds the soybeans into a compact white cake. Tempeh fermentation also produces natural antibiotic agents which are thought to increase the body’s resistance to intestinal infections.

    KALE

    Kale provides more nutritional value for fewer calories than almost any other food around. It boosts the body’s detoxification enzymes, helping to clear potentially carcinogenic substances more quickly. Kale provides an excellent source of Vitamin A – an important vision nutrient; Vitamin C – for antioxidant protection and immune support; Vitamin E – helps slow down loss of mental function; calcium – for healthy bones, and fiber – for colon cancer prevention.

    QUINOA

    Quinoa is a wonder grain, seed of a leafy plant with its’ origin from the Andean civilization. The United Nations classified it as a super crop due to its nutritional value of essential amino acids, iron and vitamins. Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, low in fat, it offers benefits to the heart. It is gluten-free and easy to digest .

    AVOCADO

    Avocado, a native to Central America, is rich in potassium (30% more than banana) that helps regulate blood pressure. It contains ‘oleic acid’ a monounsaturated fat that may help lower cholesterol. It is an excellent source of Vitamin E which promotes skin health and Vitamin B6 which is essential to the central nervous system function.

    ARTICHOKE

    Some of the most powerful polyphenol-type antioxidants are found in artichoke. It is an excellent source of Vitamin C which enhances iron absorption and is vital for a healthy immune system.

    MISO

    Miso is a salty buttery paste produced by fermenting soybeans, mixture of rice or barley with salt and a yeast mold (koji). It is rich in the immune boosting mineral, zinc. It is also high in iron, copper & manganese which are all important in energy production & anti-oxidant defenses.

    SHIITAKE MUSHROOM

    Long a symbol of longevity in Asia for their health promoting properties, Shiitake mushrooms have been used medicinally by the Chinese for over 6000 years. It contains an active compound called lentinan, which helps boost the immune system, promotes anti-cancerous activity and lowers cholesterol.

    EDAMAME BEAN

    Edamame beans are fresh soya beans that are harvested when the plant is still young and green. They are low in fat, calories and contain all the essential amino acids the body doesn’t make on its own. Edamame beans are high in fiber which is known to lower cholesterol and contains isoflavons which is key to lowering the risk of heart disease.



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    Hope Starbuck's introduces this in Canada

    The coffeehouse giant's vegan options are no longer limited to just guacamole on a bagel.

    Coffeehouse giant Starbucks launched a new vegan food option at select US locations this week. The new grab-and-go option, Vegan Lentils & Vegetables Protein Bowl with Brown Rice, comes loaded with butternut squash, roasted tomatoes, and sunflower seeds, and is served with a side of lemon-tahini dressing. Availability is currently limited to select locations in San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York City, and Washington, DC. “This new bowl is also an excellent source of protein, and has more than one cup of fruits and vegetables, and is certified vegan,” a spokesperson for Starbucks stated in a press release. In March, the international coffeehouse introduced a less exciting vegan option—an organic avocado spread that can be ordered with a vegan bagel to make DIY avocado toast. Shortly thereafter, Starbucks began testing more hearty vegan options (such as Cauliflower Tabouli Salad) through its “Mercato” concept at 100 Chicago locations. On the drinks front, the company introduced almond milk to all of its menus last year, and has since been experimenting with using plant-based milks to create signature drinks—some of which are vegan-friendly, including a four-drink line created to benefit Lady Gaga’s anti-bullying organization, the Born This Way Foundation.
    Sauce: Starbucks Launches Certified Vegan Lunch Option



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-summer_2_-_lentils_and_veggies_resized.jpg

    Made with butternut squash, roasted tomatoes, and sunflower seeds, and served with lemon – tahini dressing. With 23 grams of protein, this new bowl is also an excellent source of protein, and has more than one cup of fruits and vegetables, and is certified vegan. The new Vegan Lentils & Vegetables Protein Bowl with Brown Rice replaces the Hearty Veggie & Brown Rice Salad Bowl and will be available year-round at select company-operated Starbucks stores in the U.S., and select licensed store locations in the US.

    Available for $7.45 - $8.45.
    sauce:https://news.starbucks.com/facts/wha...ks-this-summer
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    This is awesome! I'll bet the Dairy Industry is fuming!


    Progress! Canada's New Draft Food Guidelines Favor Plant-Based Protein and Eliminates Dairy As a Food Group


    Last fall, when the Canadian government began consulting the public on its plan to revise national food guidelines, I wrote that the existing food guide had lost all usefulness and credibility because lobbyists and economic concerns, rather than science, had been the driving force behind their structure and content.

    I wrote that we don’t need food categories (other countries have done away with them) but if we retain them we absolutely don’t need a milk category, and the “meat and alternatives” category should instead be “protein” that gives due prominence, given their health advantages, to legumes.

    Frankly, this was pie-in-the-sky. Despite these suggestions being based on sound nutrition science, I wasn’t optimistic that government would escape the long reach of the animal foods industries that have been effective in maintaining undue prominence in dietary guidelines since the 1940s.

    Happily, I was very wrong.

    The Canadian government has issued new draft healthy eating recommendations, which would overhaul the antiquated system of food categories—focusing instead on eating patterns—and emphasize the importance of including a “high proportion of plant-based foods.” The milk category is indeed gone in the draft recommendations, and the powerhouse legume has been elevated above animal foods.

    The draft food guide’s first, foundational recommendation establishes the importance of whole foods and specifies that plant-based foods (such as legumes) are a preferred source of protein. The recommendation is for “regular intake of vegetables, fruit, whole grains and protein-rich foods, especially plant-based sources of protein.”

    The draft guidelines also encourage a shift away from animal foods by advising that people eat foods with unsaturated fat instead of saturated fat (saturated fat is found almost exclusively in animal foods). The recommendation is for the “inclusion of foods that contain mostly unsaturated fat, instead of foods that contain mostly saturated fat.”

    There’s no more dairy food group, a win not only for public health but also cultural inclusivity, given that up to 90 percent of some non-European ethnicities are lactose intolerant. It’s also a huge win for the cows who really don’t want us to kill their babies so we can steal their milk. Instead, the guidelines will sensibly advise people to drink water.

    The draft guidelines acknowledge that our food system is inextricably linked to our environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, soil degradation, decreases in water quality and availability, and wildlife loss. The draft food guide states that “diets higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based foods are associated with a lesser environmental impact.” Expanding our conception of health to include environmental considerations makes sense because our short- and long-term mental and physical health are directly related to the health—or not—of our environment.

    The guidelines are based on a comprehensive review of health evidence, considering both quality and source of the information, as well as actual information about Canadians’ eating habits. Industry-commissioned reports were excluded from consideration.

    Still, the draft guidelines are not without concerns. Industry and economic influences linger. For example, in the first guiding principle—after acknowledging up-front the healthfulness of plant-based foods—an unnecessary non-sequitur sentence talks about the nutritive value of animal foods. And it is recommended that people “limit”—rather than “avoid”—saturated fat, even though this unhealthy form of primarily animal fat is linked to a variety of preventable lifestyle diseases.

    Nevertheless, these draft guidelines are a dramatic improvement, putting Canada alongside Brazil as a world leader in taking back our eating recommendations from industry and promoting evidence-based eating patterns to benefit our health and planet.

    This food guide hasn’t been finalized yet, so now is a critical time to participate by saying what you like (and don’t like) about the draft. Industry is already organizing and lobbying, trying to unfairly retain its foothold at the expense of our health. We need our voices to be equally loud.



    Sauce: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...s-favor-plants
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  30. #1230
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  31. #1231
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    Ok, I'm going to give this thing a try. Saw a news story last night that really got me thinking. I think it's the right thing to do. Won't be an easy change...but should be worth it!
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  32. #1232
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    Nothing wrong with easing in, maybe just start a few days a week and go from there.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  33. #1233
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    ^I agree Chazpat. Start with one or 2 meat-free days per week. Keep reading up on plant based diets. really try to stay away from processed foods... it's incredible how much those industries (sneakily) add dairy and meat protein in food

    I was vegetarian for decades... I totally gave up dairy 3 years ago. My hubby eats fish (for the Omega3) once or twice per week but eats plant based the remaining days.
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  34. #1234
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    Lunch at Mean Bao

    Tofu & veg steam bun sandwich (vegan)

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  35. #1235
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    awww that face

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  36. #1236
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    Vegan omega 3 Guide: What vegans need to know about omega 3 fatty acids


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-omega3dhaepa.jpg

    Just as there are many kinds of protein, there are likewise numerous forms of fat. Chemistry and nutrition graduate students can spend months studying the functions of these various protein and fat molecules. But simply gaining an understanding of how to meet your body’s needs for protein and fat is relatively straightforward. Just a little reading on these two topics can enable you to avoid some of the most common pitfalls associated with vegan nutrition.

    We’ve saved the protein story for another page. The point of this article is to keep you from coming up short where your omega 3 fats are concerned. There are three omega 3 fats that are relevant to human nutrition: ALA (alpha-linolenic acid); DHA (docosahexaenoic acid); and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid). We’ll examine here why these fats are so important, and conclude with some recommendations to ensure that your dietary needs for these fats are met. First let’s take a broader look at all dietary fat, so that we can understand omega 3 fats in their proper context.

    Dietary fat comes in three forms: saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated. Researchers have not found that dietary saturated fat plays any crucial role in nutrition, so there is no minimum intake recommendation. Many health organizations, however, set a maximum intake recommendation for saturated fat, as too much saturated fat is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. Monounsaturated fat (which is abundant in nuts, avocados, and olive oil) is likewise not essential in the diet, but there is some evidence that there are health benefits associated with its consumption in moderation.

    In contrast to saturated and monounsaturated fats, two different polyunsaturated fats are essential nutrients. That is, if you don’t get sufficient amounts of these two fats, there is clear evidence that your nutritional status will be impaired. The first of these essential polyunsaturated fats is an omega-6 fat, and this is the easy one to get. In fact, it’s so abundant in plant-based foods that vegans never need to worry about getting enough (so long as they’re not following an extreme low-fat diet). The other essential polyunsaturated fat is the omega-3 fatty acid ALA mentioned earlier, which is inconveniently rare in the plant kingdom. While most fat-containing vegan foods contain some ALA, it’s usually present in tiny and grossly inadequate amounts.

    There are some excellent vegan sources of ALA, though. Both chia and flax seeds are loaded with ALA, while hemp seeds, walnuts, walnut oil, and canola oil are decent sources too. Broccoli and many leafy greens likewise contain a high percentage of their fat as ALA, but very little total ALA since these foods contain only tiny amounts of fat in the first place.

    Vegans can easily meet their ALA needs by consuming a little ground chia or ground flax seeds every day. These seeds are so rich in ALA that it’s possible to cover your entire day’s needs with just a tablespoon. With chia it’s desirable to grind the seeds for better absorption by the body, and with flax it’s imperative to do so—flax is essentially indigestible unless the seeds are ground up. It’s wise to grind right before eating, since ground seeds quickly go rancid without refrigeration. A mortar and pestle or a cheap spinning-blade coffee grinder will do the job in seconds. Just don’t use a burr-style coffee grinder, or any grinder that’s not based on a spinning blade, or you’ll ruin your machine!

    Once you’ve ground your chia or flax, it can be consumed in a number of ways. Both chia and flax will vanish into a fruit smoothie, making it the easiest possible way to get your daily dose of ALA—but grind an extra teaspoon since some will inevitably stick to your glass and blender. If you like making oats or other hot cereals for breakfast, you can mix in your chia or flax just before serving. Or you could just take the lazy man’s approach and stir your ground seeds into a glass of soymilk. If you want to get a little fancier, chia lends itself to a delicious vegan pudding.

    Walnuts have somewhat less ALA than flax or chia, but they’re still among the richest vegan sources of this fat. You’ll need to eat about six walnut halves to get the ALA found in a tablespoon of ground flax or chia. It’s probably best to eat raw rather than roasted walnuts, as the fats will be more intact if not exposed to heat. Hemp seeds have a lot less ALA than flax, chia, or walnuts, but they have a terrific nutty flavor and are a delicious salad topping. It’s hard to satisfy your ALA needs entirely through hemp seeds but they’re a welcome secondary source.

    Finally, both canola oil and walnut oil are excellent sources of ALA. You can meet your needs with one tablespoon per day of either of these oils. Choose cold-pressed oils and store them in the refrigerator to keep them fresh. Then use this oil for salad dressings or to lightly sauté vegetables over low heat.

    DHA and EPA
    While the above-mentioned seeds, walnuts, and oils are rich sources of ALA, they don’t contain any DHA or EPA. Although neither DHA nor EPA are considered essential in the diet, they may be important for preventing chronic disease and they are crucial for brain health.

    The reason that DHA and EPA aren’t considered essential nutrients is that the body can convert ALA into these two fatty acids—assuming it’s getting sufficient ALA in the first place. So it’s possible (but not yet certain) that some vegans can fully satisfy their body’s DHA and EPA needs solely by consuming sufficient amounts of ALA-rich vegan foods. The trouble is that people vary dramatically in their ability to convert ALA to DHA and EPA. So the only way to be sure your body is taking in sufficient amounts of these latter two nutrients is to supplement.

    Most DHA/EPA supplements are made from fish oil. But it turns out that fish don’t actually produce DHA and EPA on their own. They get it from algae, either by eating it directly or by eating other marine life that have consumed algae. There are several vegan brands of DHA/EPA that are algae-derived (these brands typically come in vegan capsules, whereas fish-based brands usually come in gelatin capsules.)

    Per milligram of DHA/EPA, algae-based supplements are far more expensive than fish-based supplements. But they’re also much lower on the food chain and therefore less prone to contamination. And of course, no fish are killed to create algae-based supplements and there’s less impact on the oceans too. The fish oil industry has decimated menhaden populations (the tiny species of fish most commonly caught and refined into fish oil.)

    Are Omega 3 Deficiencies Possible?
    Whether through flax, chia, walnuts, canola oil alone or through some combination of these foods, it’s easy to get plenty of ALAs. But unless you make a point of eating these foods daily, it’s likewise easy to fall far short of your optimal intake. It’s reasonable to suspect that a great many vegans are ingesting virtually no omega 3 fats on a daily basis.

    What are the risks of inadequate ALA consumption? Although outright deficiency is rare, getting too little of this nutrient can impact skin health and immunity. Insufficient ALA intake may also reduce growth rates in children. So there’s really no uncertainty where ALA is concerned: if you want optimal health, then you must consume your daily tablespoon of ground chia or flax, or another ALA-rich food in sufficient quantity to provide a comparable dose.

    What about DHA and EPA deficiency risks? Here, it’s still unclear whether supplements are absolutely necessary. That said, there is good reason to believe that it’s worthwhile to take them. By weight, the human brain is about 60 percent fat, and this fat contains a significant amount of omega 3 fatty acids in the form of DHA.

    Whether you’re taking ALA alone (from flax or chia), or taking it along with an EPA/DHA supplement, you’ll likely derive some secondary benefits from consuming these nutrients. In particular, all of these omega-3 fats have anti-inflammatory properties that are potentially protective of heart and circulatory system health.

    Recommendations
    This article covered a lot of ground, but the take home points couldn’t be simpler. Since ALA can convert to DHA and EPA, but DHA and EPA supplements won’t revert back to ALA, everybody should be consuming a rich source of ALA every day.

    To cover your needs, take at least a tablespoon of the either ground chia or ground flax daily (or another source containing an equivalent quantity of ALA). The benefits are potentially enormous and the cost is practically nothing. A tablespoon of chia or flax costs just pennies. In fact the glass of soy milk you might stir your chia into costs at least five times more than the seeds themselves.

    You can buy chia or flax seeds at any natural foods store, but Amazon.com probably handily beats them on price.

    You’re probably not throwing your money away by also taking a vegan DHA/EPA supplement. Since it’s possible that your body is doing a poor job of converting your dietary ALA to DHA and EPA, a supplement can go a long way towards ensuring your needs are covered. Right now we don’t have a detailed understanding of the optimal DHA and EPA dose from supplements, and this lack of understanding is aggravated by the fact that the ideal dose varies significantly from one person to the next. In the meantime, if you can afford it, taking at least a few hundred daily milligrams of EPA/DHA is prudent, and the payoffs may include improved brain function and reduced risk of depression, age-related neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric disorders. A typical vegan supplement delivers about 200 mg DHA and 100 mg EPA per capsule. If you’re going to supplement, it makes sense to take at least that much, and perhaps double that amount if you can easily afford the cost.

    The bad news here is that vegan DHA/EPA capsules are by far the most expensive supplement that vegans commonly take. While a day’s worth of B12 can cost less than a penny, and your day’s chia seeds only a few cents, two DHA/EPA capsules can set you back about 50 cents. It’s a drag that vegan DHA/EPA supplements aren’t cheap, and that there is still no conclusive proof that we need them. But it would be a bigger drag to go decades without taking the stuff and then find out that the protective effects against neurodegenerative decline were indeed compelling. Right now there is at least a reasonable possibility that this may turn out to be the case.

    On Amazon.com, the top vegan DHA/EPA brands go in and out of stock, and prices vary over time, but two excellent products are Deva Omega 3 DHA-EPA Softgels and Nested Naturals Vegan Omega 3.

    It’s a good time to be alive. Barely a hundred years ago dentistry mainly involved pliers. Twenty years ago only cutting-edge nutrition experts knew much about ALA, DHA, and EPA. We still only know a fraction of what we will ultimately learn about these fats, but there is already ample reason to make sure that you are not coming up short.

    Sauce: Vegan Omega 3 Guide: ALA, DHA, & EPA Fats
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  37. #1237
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    Happy Hump Day

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  38. #1238
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    Thought y'all might like to see a few pix of my garden.

    Though we have over an acre, a lot of it is woods and we have a good number of big oaks so not so many sunny spots. One of the sunniest is right in front of the house. I installed trellis but I knew the veggies would outgrow them so I tied some twine from the trellises to the rail on the upper balcony. Left side is some kind of Chinese squash and right side is cucumbers. Both sides also have Chinese Yard-Long beans. On the right, there are okra, a tomato and a green pepper. Went out on the balcony this evening and picked a cucumber and noticed a squash about eight inches long. Already had one squash and a ton of cukes, a little okra and a few green peppers.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vertical_garden.png

    This is in the backyard, doesn't get as much sun. I set up a string net for the beans to climb, though it is only about 6 feet high. We've grown Green Yard Long beans before and we thought some of these were green but so far we've only gotten red beans. They are about 16" long when picked, the greens were a little longer. That's four beans in the center of the photo, makes them look longer than they are. Got a couple of tomatoes back here but the !@#$% squirrels keep picking them when they are still green. I watered after I took this, we've had a lot of rainy days this summer but not the last few with temps around 90.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-beans_in_back.jpg
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  39. #1239
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    ^I dig your garden
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  40. #1240
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    Perfect!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-20246065_1597541570319984_4143424062545713984_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-20228765_1597541170320024_2938398416902280230_n.jpg

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  41. #1241
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    ^ You may want to ask NDD if those are safe to eat!

    We actually just had a discussion on GMO in the botany thread.
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  42. #1242
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Perfect!

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    Does it really matter if the pit is there or not? It'll never be ripe enough to eat, and when it finally is; you've missed your window, and it has gone bad.
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