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  1. #1101
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    I've had it but it was a long time ago, in the '90s. I just remember it being really salty and tasting like bouillon, really concentrated.

    Interesting that there may be more to it than we've realized.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  2. #1102
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    Veg Fests


    There are some great vegan festivals coming up this spring and summer. Check 'em all out here.


    Vegan Festivals
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  3. #1103
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    The story about marmite ie vegemite... I've never tried it, curious if anyone else has tried this "superfood"?

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    Ha! Oh man, I haven't tried Marmite, but have tasted Vegemite years ago. It was salty. Bouillon is a good comparison. I didn't hate it but didn't feel like adding it my diet either. I do get a little suspicious when I'm told about a new 'superfood'. There are a lot of them these days. And no guidelines on what makes one. Cool that it has benefits though! Maybe it's why those Brits are so good on the DH circuit!

  4. #1104
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    Happy Green Day

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  5. #1105
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17862494_1912479818996460_2198157926823534302_n.jpg

    It might be impossible to always eat ethically, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    Carnivores rejoiced at the news, proudly sharing it like a stack of flyers that proved they had been right all along. It fit neatly into their set of nutritional morals.

    As specialty diets have gained increased mainstream acceptance, nutrition today has started to resemble organized religion rather than conventional dietary advice. There are endless options to follow, and everyone believes theirs to be right.

    When it comes to conflicting nutritional research, the literature is seemingly endless: from low-carb, high-fat diets like the meat-heavy paleo diet, which claims to help weight loss and increase heart health, to macrobiotic meal plans, veganism, lacto-vegetarianism and debating the merit of the calorie itself. Instead of sorting through this mass of information, we typically cobble pieces of information that confirm our pre-existing beliefs together like makeshift lifejackets. Forget nuance. This is a survival mechanism. Everyone has to believe something if they are to successfully navigate those technicolour grocery store shelves.

    Of course, being able to subscribe to any specialty diet is its own privilege. It’s easy to tell people to “eat local” while proudly swinging a $25 bag of chanterelles and microgreens home from the farmer’s market. It’s another to relay the message to yourself as you pass a Popeye’s location, the smell of crispy fried chicken bubbling in the deep fryer. It’s yet another to relay the message to the millions of Canadians making minimum wage, or those who do not have access to seasonal markets, never mind the free time necessary to nurture a budding interest in organic seedlings and seasonal mushrooms.

    And cravings and economics are only the beginning of the problem. Some of our most agreed upon, nutritionally wholesome foods are destroying natural environments and local economies in their wake.
    The sudden demand for quinoa – a superfood lauded by everyone and their grandmothers for its protein-packed properties – caused the price to surge to three times what it once was. A Guardian report revealed that the price increase meant Bolivian people who had long depended on the grain as a dietary staple are no longer able to afford the product that became a luxury export seemingly overnight.

    In a similar superfood disaster, Greek yogurt is contributing to acid whey production, a toxic substance with a pH balance comparable to acid rain. A 2013 Cornell University report found that for every 7,000 gallons of milk used to make Greek yogurt, up to 4,900 gallons of acid whey is produced. Whey that isn’t properly disposed strips oxygen supplies from streams and rivers, killing marine life and damaging habitats and ecosystems. Yet yogurt companies are ending up with so much of the byproduct that Modern Farmer found Greek yogurt giants like Chobani have started paying farmers to take it off their hands. The farmers have obliged, but they themselves don’t know what to do with it.

    A handful of heart-healthy almonds might be a go-to Greek yogurt topping, but the nuts are also contributing to drought problems in California. Eighty per cent of the world’s almond supply comes from the state experiencing its worst drought on record. A report published by The Watershed Agricultural Council found that a single almond takes 1.1 gallons of water to produce. Demand for heart-healthy almonds and their affiliated products has grown so strong that The New York Times found California almond farmers are drilling thousands of feet down into aquifers to pump out water, threatening critical infrastructure like bridges, roads and irrigation canals, and even potentially triggering earthquakes.

    Meanwhile, an Associated Press investigation found that shrimp sold at global supermarkets is often peeled by slave laborers in Thailand. Yet you shouldn’t be eating it anyway, because global consumption of heart healthy, omega-3 rich seafood is depleting seafood supplies at rates that they cannot be naturally replenished, wreaking havoc on the health of our oceans, the planet’s most significant source of oxygen.

    Even the innocent banana is corrupt. A New York Times report found that conventional bananas – the world’s most popular fruit – often employ child labour while underpaying workers and abusing human rights. Large banana producers like Dole and Chiquita also cut down rain forests, contributing to deforestation and turning former lush forests into uninhabitable deserts that displace millions of species from their natural habitats, according to a Pacific Lutheran University report.

    Knowing this, I recently made the switch from conventional bananas to fair trade organic bananas that support local agriculture in Ecuador and Peru. The ethically superior bananas wear a large, reassuring green sticker that says “Wholefoods Guarantee Fair Trade Certified” over top of their bright and unblemished yellow skin. But after thinking about the choice for longer than two minutes, it started to feel like the nutritional equivalent of sending a paper airplane to Syria. There is no amount of fair trade bananas one person can buy to undo the damage that has already been done.

    The problems are so vast and beyond the scope of our grocery carts — themselves too often plagued by convenience and price — that it can feel necessary to ignore most issues if you are to continue eating and ultimately existing in the world.

    The agroindustrial complex no doubt benefits from this nutritional confusion, swooping in to tell us that Coca Cola and Skittles aren’t that bad for you because they only have 130 calories. Yet as we continue to discover new information about food and its nutritional, environmental and moral impacts, deciding that there is only one correct dietary answer is a bit like resolving to read the same book for the rest of your life.

    When it comes to debating what to make for dinner, the list of nutritional, environmental and social contradictions we face is endless. Once you begin to understand the problems of our food system, it’s all too easy to buy into the ethos that everything is bad so you might as well ignore most of it.

    Yes, it is exhausting to navigate the ethical footwork of eating in 2017. But the more we know about our flawed dietary habits, the better we can work toward improving them. To do this we have to leave sentiments of moral superiority on the table and accept that food has nothing to do with being right. It’s about admitting that, at least in some way, we are all wrong and, despite that, trying to be better.



    It might be impossible to always eat ethically, but that doesn?t mean we shouldn?t try | National Post
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  6. #1106
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    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  7. #1107
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
    The headline was going to be "Nothing's perfect, even some foods that may be included in a vegan diet." But that didn't make for good click bait.
    Banshee Prime

  8. #1108
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Well, that is depressing.

    And I don't get this:

    “Being vegan isn’t as good for humanity as you think.” That’s what the headlines said after a study published in the journal Elementa found that when veganism is applied to an entire global population, the diet wastes available farmland that could otherwise be used to feed people.

    So growing vegetables wastes farmland that could be used to grow food to feed people? What else would they use the farmland for, raising cattle that need more food than they produce?
    I interpreted that as saying there's an excess of farmland, and that vegans can feed themselves with far far less land used for food production, so even more land becomes excess. *shrug* if carnivores thought that was bad mouthing vegans and happily spread the word about it, it would only make me think they're seriously lacking intelligence.

  9. #1109
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    I'm always perplexed when people characterize veganism as expensive. It seems to be a disingenuous excuse. I occasionally like to splurge on free range organic tofu that has been blessed by the tears of a monk under a full moon during the solstice, but generally speaking I'm fine with my various beans, whole real fruit etc
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  10. #1110
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    Rice and beans, totally vegan and can't think of anything cheaper

  11. #1111
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    It seems a lot studies on Vegan diets is done by the meat and dairy industry so they put their spin on it. The meat and diary industry is "Big" business and lobbies heavily and wins when it comes to influencing what people eat. I've heard the heads of the USDA are former meat and diary execs. It's big money and they will not lose their profits at the expense of a healthier society.

  12. #1112
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    'beans, beans the magical fruit
    the more you eat, the more you toot
    the more you toot, the better you feel
    that's why you eat them every meal!'
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  13. #1113
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    'beans, beans the magical fruit
    the more you eat, the more you toot
    the more you toot, the better you feel
    that's why you eat them every meal!'
    My wife makes me lots of lentil soup. One week I was eating it for several meals that day and was experiencing some tremendous gas so I wrote my own version.

    Lentil soup, lentil soup, good for the heart,
    The more you eat it the more you fart,
    The more you fart the better you fart,
    So eat lentil soup with every fart!

  14. #1114
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17992059_1912991148945327_2174766993202353795_n.jpg


    Ramps aka wild onions are still small. They should be ready for picking next weekend


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_tricoccum
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  15. #1115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    My wife makes me lots of lentil soup. One week I was eating it for several meals that day and was experiencing some tremendous gas so I wrote my own version.

    Lentil soup, lentil soup, good for the heart,
    The more you eat it the more you fart,
    The more you fart the better you fart,
    So eat lentil soup with every fart!
    As they say, don't quit your day job!
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  16. #1116
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    As they say, don't quit your day job!
    I won't

  17. #1117
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    Name:  17862344_10211468964336399_4297176844289590082_n.jpg
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  18. #1118
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17903855_1450793158304771_7013810827726355522_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  19. #1119
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    Happy Hump day

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  20. #1120
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    Most quality dark chocolate uses soy lecithin. ( eg Lindt 70%)


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18118428_10212128535591451_5910188297849142390_n.jpg
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  21. #1121
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Most quality dark chocolate uses soy lecithin. ( eg Lindt 70%)


    Click image for larger version. 

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    True and good one!

    How about beaver anal glands.. why do they have to put that in food?

  22. #1122
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18058201_2268328506725089_8008042304978527437_n.jpg


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18058019_2268328510058422_6396188641076241263_n.jpg


    It keeps me regular
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  23. #1123
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    The Truth About Soy

    The great debate... People seem to be either for soy, or against soy. And people seem to have some very strong opinions.

    So we spent some time analysing the science and investigated further to find out why there's so much conflicting opinion and confusion floating around about this humble bean.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-w600-0ffcd96457.jpg

    Soy is one of the most researched foods on earth, so firstly let’s take look at some of the commonly believed “facts” about soy and compare this with the research…

    #1 “Does Soy Contain Estrogen?”

    No - none. Soya contains zero estrogen. (Side note: cow’s milk actually contains plenty of actual mammalian estrogen.[1])

    Soya does contain phytoestrogens (plant hormones - not human hormones). Phytoestrogens in the human body are relatively weak and can actually bring benefits, such as a lowered risk of cancer, by 'blocking' actual estrogen.[2]

    There is no evidence for soy disrupting sexual development in humans.

    Although soya beans are amongst the richest sources of phytoestrogens, it’s worth noting that phytoestrogens are not only found in soya beans. Other beans, such as coffee beans, also contain phytoestrogens.

    And phytoestrogens are found in many other foods as well, such as: apples, oats, sesame seeds, flaxseed, lentils, rice, carrots, mint, ginseng, beer, and pomegranates. Even if you completely avoid eating soy, you’re very likely still consuming phytoestrogens - but that’s not a problem.

    (N.B. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens and powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants help remove free radicals before they can cause gene mutations potentially leading to cancer. Legumes, particularly soy beans, are the richest sources of isoflavones.)

    Many people seem to think consuming phytoestrogens is “bad” but this certainly isn’t the case. The isoflavones contained in soy are actually powerful antioxidants (particularly genistein) and research has shown that they have very positive effects in protecting against cancers and other diseases.[3]

    #2 "Will Soy Affect My Fertility?"

    The 2003 Department of Health's committee on toxicity report acknowledged that there was no evidence that people who regularly eat high quantities of soya, such as the Chinese and Japanese, have altered sexual development or impaired fertility. It should be remembered that China is the world's most populous nation, with over 1.3 billion citizens, and who have been consuming soya for over 3,000 years.

    For women, a large-scale study at a Boston fertility center showed female consumption of soy improved birth rates for couples undergoing fertility treatment. [4]

    And for men, soy intake had no negative impact on fertility. A study at Harvard University found men's soy intake was unrelated to the clinical outcomes on fertility. [5]

    A 2010 meta-analysis (meta-analysis is a review of the results from many independent scientific studies) of fifteen placebo-controlled studies said that "neither soy foods nor isoflavone supplements alter the measures of bioavailable testosterone concentrations in men.”[6]. Furthermore, isoflavone supplementation has no effect on sperm concentration, count or motility, and it leads to no observable changes in testicular or ejaculate volume.

    So men's testosterone is not affected by consuming soy products.

    #3 "If men consume soy do they develop 'man boobs' (gynecomastia)"?

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-w600-f6bad0f77c.jpg

    There's a single case study[7] (scientifically weak) which reported a 60-year-old man developing breasts, as well as sexual dysfunction, after self-reporting consumption three quarts (metric: almost 3 liters) of soy milk daily for six months. His symptoms went away after discontinuation of the soy intake. We don't know the man's history or any underlying medical complications, and this hasn't been able to be reproduced.

    Extreme case studies aside, soy intake appears to be perfectly safe at normal to moderately high levels, even those above the relatively high consumption level of Asian men. Problems may arise when soy is consumed at levels 10x times the norm for several months at a time.

    Many people claim that soy consumption will alter sex hormones in men. In several studies examining soy protein or isoflavone supplementation, men did not have significant changes in testosterone, free testosterone, estrogen, sex hormone binding globulin protein, or semen quality.[8]

    However if gynecomastia is a particular concern and you aren’t already consuming a plant-based diet please note:

    “Cow milk is a source of estrogen in the diet and can constitute as much as 80% of your dietary intake of estrogen, reports Estrogen Dominance Guide. Cows give milk while they are pregnant and nursing, so their estrogen levels are significantly higher. Dairy livestock are also regularly given doses of hormones to increase their growth and milk production. That’s why conventionally raised meats and dairy can contribute to gynecomastia.”
    Also, Americans currently spend over $1 billion a year on breast augmentation, so if soy was any good at making breasts larger we'd probably know about it...

    #4 "What about soy and cancer?"

    The overall research largely points to soy having positive effects on preventing or slowing down cancer growth.

    Breast cancer
    Studies have shown that regular consumption of soy foods can actually be protective against breast cancer.

    Studies show that women who regularly include soy products are less likely to develop breast cancer, compared with other women. In January 2008, researchers at the University of Southern California found that women averaging one cup of soymilk or about one-half cup of tofu daily have about 30 percent less risk of developing breast cancer, compared with women who have little or no soy products in their diets. [9] However, to be effective, the soy consumption may have to occur early in life, as breast tissue is forming during adolescence.

    For instance, the traditional Japanese diet has 25-50 mg isoflavones (phytoestrogens) per day in 2-3 servings of soy and may be protective. In nearly 10,000 breast cancer survivors, those who ate more soy after diagnosis had a significant 25% reduction in recurrence at 7.4 years post diagnosis.[10]

    Another study on breast cancer survivors showed over a median of 7.3 years as isoflavone intake increased risk of death decreased, with women at the consuming the highest level of isoflavones having a significant 54% reduction in risk of death.[11]

    Prostate cancer
    A Chinese study[12] found that those who consumed soy had the lowest likelihood of developing prostate cancer, and, even more, soy greatly reduced the risk of the cancer metastasizing, or spreading throughout the body.

    Researchers at The Ohio State University found similar results, and found that soy intake led to an improved early immune system response to development of cancer cells.[13]

    Ovarian cancer
    Several epidemiological studies show that intake of isoflavones is linked with reduced risk of ovarian cancer. The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study, consisting of 64,327 women, found that the intake of tofu may have preventive action against ovarian cancer [14].

    A study with American women also found that the group of women with highest isoflavones intake showed lower risk of ovarian cancer [15].

    A meta-analysis found that women with highest soy intake showed a 48% lower risk of ovarian cancer than women with the lowest intake. [16]

    #5 "But what if I'm allergic to soy?"

    Although it’s very rare some people do have a genuine soy allergy and can go into anaphylactic shock if they ingest soy.

    However soy allergies within the general population are probably not higher than 0.2% and could be as low as 0.1% (290-580,000 individuals) among the U.S. population.[17]

    In contrast around 1.9% of the population have a crustacean (shell fish) allergy and 0.6% of the population have a peanut allergy.[18]

    #6 "I don't eat soy because it's genetically modified."

    Whilst GMO soy hasn’t been shown to have any negative health consequences in and of itself we can understand people’s concern with not wanting to include GMO foods in their diet. Non-GMO organic soy is available of course, although it’s a bit harder to obtain in some parts of the world.

    On his website nutritionfacts.org Dr. Gregor writes:

    Soy is one of the largest crops in America, and has been subsidized to make cheap animal feed. Most of the soy grown is GMO, but, so far, there is limited data suggesting eating GMO soy is harmful to human health.

    Research on human placental tissue, though, does suggest pesticides on GMO soy may have toxic effects, and GMO soybeans are known to have more pesticide residues than conventional and organic soybeans.”[19]
    According to Grist.org:

    “As of 2004, 85 percent of the U.S. soy crop was genetically modified, accounting for some 63.6 million acres of soybeans. Statistics for 2003 indicate that at least 55 percent of soy worldwide is now genetically modified.”
    For those who aren't on a plant-based diet (vegan diet) and are concerned about consuming genetically engineered foods, it would be worth giving some thought to the fact that when these GM soybeans are fed to animals, they end up in the animals’ flesh, eggs and milk. And once the beans are eaten by animals, there is no way to test the meat for the presence of the GMOs.

    According to Kommunikationsagentur für Wissenschaft & Innovation | genius

    “Despite methods that are becoming more and more sensitive, tests have not yet been able to establish a difference in the meat, milk, or eggs of animals depending on the type of feed they are fed. It is impossible to tell if an animal was fed GM soy just by looking at the resulting meat, dairy, or egg products.”

    #6 "Okay, but what about the environmental Impact?"

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-w600-c51f86ab5d.jpg

    We agree that conversion of vast amounts of forest to soy plantations in the Amazon is particularly worrying. Deforestation related to soy production in Brazil is responsible for 29% of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions.

    Worldwide, the size of land that is devoted to soy cultivation reaches an area the size of Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands, combined!

    However only 6% of the worldwide soy grown is actually consumed by humans.

    Around 80% of the soy grown fed to farmed animals such as chickens, cows, and pigs with the rest being used to create soybean oil.

    And that 6% isn’t being consumed just by vegetarians and vegans. It’s mostly being consumed in China, but closer to home soy is everywhere in our food supply.

    In The Dark Side of Soy by Mary Vance, she points out soy is in cereals and health-promoting foods and hidden in processed foods. Even if you read every label and avoid cardboard boxes, you are likely to find soy in your supplements and vitamins (look out for vitamin E derived from soy oil), in foods such as canned tuna, soups, sauces, breads, meats (injected under poultry skin), and chocolate, and in pet food and body-care products.

    According to Vance, the reason for the ubiquitous presence of soy is simple:

    “These days the industry has discovered ways to use every part of the bean for profit. Soy oil has become the base for most vegetable oils; soy lecithin, the waste product left over after the soybean is processed, is used as an emulsifier; soy flour appears in baked and packaged goods; different forms of processed soy protein are added to everything from animal feed to muscle-building protein powders.”
    So since (by far) the main use of soy is for animal feed, the logical way to help stop soy-related deforestation is to just stop eating meat.

    WWF Germany conducted a report that found that if every citizen of Germany were to lower their consumption of meat, only just enough to meet the country’s dietary guidelines, they would be able to save 1.8 million acres of agricultural land (825,000 hectares of which are specifically in South America).

    Additionally, if less people ate meat, more of the crops grown to feed livestock could be redirected to feed people. In fact, if everyone in America were to remove meat from their diet, there would be enough extra grain grown to feed 1.4 billion people!

    While an alarming percentage of soybeans are genetically modified, the claim that “all soy is GMO” is one of the great soy myths. Of the soy directly consumed by humans, non-GMO soy foods such as tofu, tempeh and soy milk are widely available, and they are clearly labeled non-GMO.

    #7 "Do you need to eat soy if you’re a vegan?"

    No - definitely not. It’s easy to be a healthy vegan without consuming any soy at all. There are many people who a eat a completely plant-based diet without any soy, as there are so many other delicious foods to enjoy.

    #8 "What about soya milk compared to cow milk?"

    As we stated earlier, cow milk is a the main source of estrogen in the average diet and can constitute as much as 80% of your dietary intake of estrogen, reports Estrogen Dominance Guide. As cow's milk is taken while the cow is pregnant and nursing, their estrogen levels are significantly higher. Dairy livestock are also regularly given doses of hormones to increase their growth and milk production.

    And as stated earlier, soymilk contains zero estrogen, but has twice the antioxidant content than that of cow’s milk.

    The estrogen in cow milk is thought to promote cancer growth, whilst the antioxidant effect of the phytoestrogens in soy milk is thought to protect against cancers.

    Soy milk usually contains roughly the same amount of protein as cow milk but contains 60% less saturated fat than cow milk (1% fat cow milk was used for this comparison). Soy milk usually contains a little less calcium, but triple the amount of magnesium, which is also a vital mineral for maintaining bone health, and one that is currently being underconsumed by many Americans according to the latest 2015 dietary guidelines released by the USDA.[20]

    Many people are lactose intolerant and have real issues digesting dairy products. Far fewer people have issues digesting soy and soy products.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-w600-9d18006a10.png


    #9 "But don't we need cow milk for healthy bones?"

    No, the latest research suggests soy milk is actually much better for bone health.

    Osteoperosis (weak/brittle bones) is much more prevalent in countries with the highest consumption of cow milk, and lowest in countries with highest consumption of soy products.

    The isoflavones in soy are thought to inhibit the breakdown of bones. Daidzein, an isoflavone found in soy, is actually used to create the drug ipriflavone, which is used throughout Europe and Asia to treat osteoporosis.[21]

    A study completed by Erdman in the early 1990's inspired the many studies that followed to investigate the possible benefits of soy on bone health. Erdman's study focused on post-menopausal women who consumed 40g of isolated soy protein daily for 6 months. Erdman found that these women had significantly increased bone mineral density as compared to the controls.

    A study published in 2003 by the Oklahoma State University showed that soy protein was more effective in bone formation and retention of calcium inside the body (excreting less calcium in urine) compared to milk protein. In addition, researchers also found that the benefits of soy on bone health were more pronounced in postmenopausal women who were not on hormone replacement therapy.[22]

    #10 "So where are all these anti-soya myths coming from?!"

    Well, most anti-soya stories can be traced back to one single group in the US called the Weston A Price Foundation (WAPF).

    Soy myths and hysteria and the WAPF are inseparable. Much of the fear-mongering around soy is a direct result of misinformation disseminated by the WAPF’s relentless anti-soy campaigns.

    The WAPF, registered as a nonprofit organization, is a multimillion dollar operation that lobbies for raw milk and grass-fed beef. Its members (often farmers) make financial contributions and in turn benefit from WAPF promotion. One of the WAPF’s ongoing strategies for promoting animal farming interests is a concerted effort to discredit veganism in general, and soy in particular. Soyfoods sales have climbed from $500 million in 1992 to $5.2 billion in 2011. The soy industry is expanding exponentially, thus posing a potential threat to the products the WAPF are trying to peddle. In response, the Weston Price Foundation actively publishes articles which propagate the supposed dangers of soy consumption, citing clinical and medical journals in an attempt to appear credible.[23]

    The WAPF claims to be dedicated to promoting “good nutrition” by restoring nutrient-dense animal products to the diet – particularly unpasteurised "raw" whole milk. It claims that saturated animal fat is essential for good health and that animal fat intake and high cholesterol levels have no link with heart disease or cancer. They say that vegetarians have lower life expectancy than meat-eaters, and that historically humans have always eaten large amounts of animal fat. All this, of course, completely contradicts all the leading health advisory bodies in the world, including the World Health Organisation, American Dietetic Association and the British Medical Association.

    This US-based fringe organisation is constantly citing scientifically flawed studies to promote their own agenda and has been able to use misinformation to influence a vast number of consumers, duping them into thinking of soya as some sort of dietary pariah.

    Another of the organisation's supporters was Dr Stephen Byrnes, who published an article in the Ecologist magazine claiming that vegetarianism is unhealthy and is destroying the environment. He boasted of his high animal fat diet and robust health, and unfortunately died of a stroke at 41. There were more than 40 scientific inaccuracies in the said article, including the direct misquoting of scientific studies. Incidentally, the editor of the Ecologist, Zac Goldsmith, is also an honorary board member of the WAPF.

    Another of the organisation's supporters, Kaayla Daniel PhD, sits on the board of directors and has written an entire book attacking soya ("The Whole Soy Story"). This group appears to spend more time attacking soya than promoting the foods they say we should be eating (unpasteurised "raw" milk, cream, cheese, eggs, liver, etc).

    So this solves the mystery of where much of the anti-soy misinformation being spread around actually comes from.

    In reality, there is no real scientific evidence that the consumption of soya is harmful to humans. The majority of what the WAPF says is anecdotal, untrue or based on scientifically flawed animal experiments.

    First, phytoestrogens have been shown to behave differently in different species, so studies involving animal experimentation are not applicable to humans. Second, the intestines act as a barrier to phytoestrogens, so artificially boosting levels in animals by injection has no relevance to humans. Finally, many of these experiments have exposed animals to phytoestrogens at levels far, far greater than those absorbed by people eating soya.

    Conclusion

    In summary, you can either choose to eat/drink soy products or choose not to, that's really your choice. There are plenty of other nutritious foods if you choose not to eat soy.
    sauce: https://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/...ting-the-myths
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    ^^^ Thanks, Judy! I have been confused on this and I eat a good bit of soy. Really sad when people spread misinformation for their own profit. It seems really odd that they would promote unpasteurized milk. I do consume milk but would be very afraid to drink unpasteurized.
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    Today's caturday lunch (vegan curry)

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18268410_1919660614945047_3844748712167950737_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18056031_10155269198364586_246913029945316739_o.jpg
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    Excuse my uncultured self for asking, but what's that watermelon-looking slice on top?

  27. #1127
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post
    Excuse my uncultured self for asking, but what's that watermelon-looking slice on top?
    I was thinking watermelon too. I can't wait to hear the answer. BTW, love your signature line.
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  28. #1128
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    ^ I was expecting that slice to taste sweet but it tasted like a mild radish. I just looks odd , not like the white radishes I am used to.
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  29. #1129
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^ I was expecting that slice to taste sweet but it tasted like a mild radish. I just looks odd , not like the white radishes I am used to.
    I suspect it is a pickled daikon. That was my first thought but the black specs were throwing me off as I thought they were seeds but now I suspect they are some type of herb added to the whole dish.
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  30. #1130
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^ I was expecting that slice to taste sweet but it tasted like a mild radish. I just looks odd , not like the white radishes I am used to.
    So it's a Chinese Red Meat radish? (AKA Watermelon Radish).
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^ I was expecting that slice to taste sweet but it tasted like a mild radish. I just looks odd , not like the white radishes I am used to.
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    I suspect it is a pickled daikon. That was my first thought but the black specs were throwing me off as I thought they were seeds but now I suspect they are some type of herb added to the whole dish.
    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    So it's a Chinese Red Meat radish? (AKA Watermelon Radish).
    Mystery solved! Thanks!

  32. #1132
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post
    Mystery solved! Thanks!
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  33. #1133
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    "Watermelon radishes are an heirloom variety of Daikon radish"

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...n-radishes.htm

    I get half credit?
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  34. #1134
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    ^ thanks everyone
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18119153_148545365681445_4787369484500398892_n.jpg
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  36. #1136
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    "Watermelon radishes are an heirloom variety of Daikon radish"

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...n-radishes.htm

    I get half credit?
    At least, your post is how I found watermelon radish. I think I googled red daikon.
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  37. #1137
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18198610_1919664228278019_5999832569305311651_n.jpg



    Clean Meat’ to Change Industry, Food Entrepreneur Says

    Your chicken fingers may soon be made of peas, according to food entrepreneur Bruce Friedrich.

    Cornell Students for Animal Rights hosted Friedrich, executive director of the non-profit Good Food Institute, who gave a talk on Tuesday on how animal proteins could yield sustainable and efficient alternative ways to produce meat.

    Friedrich opened his talk by discussing the inefficiency of industrial animal agriculture.

    “The vast majority of what you feed to chicken or cow is wasted,” he said. “Chicken, which is the most efficient agriculture meat, only returns one calorie for every nine calories used to feed them. That creates an 800 percent waste.”

    The inefficiency of animal food consumption raises deep concerns for the food industry, Friedrich explained. Since cereal is required to feed agriculture chickens, the farming of chicken drives up the price of cereal. This may lead to reduced access to food. When the world is already struggling to feed its population, animal agriculture worsens the problem.

    “Animal agriculture is also one of the most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global,” Friedrich said. “[This is] including land degradation, climate change and air pollution, water shortage and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity.”

    As an alternative, GFI has worked to develop plant-based meat, such as pea-based chicken. These products have gained popularity with some of the biggest tech investors in Silicon Valley, including Bill Gates, Biz Stone and Sergey Brin.

    Not only are these products more efficient, but they also create less environmental concerns.

    “Plant-based meat are in the early stages of a macro trend, similar to the way soy and almond milk changed the milk category.” Friedrich said.

    Friedrich said that Memphis Meat, another alternative meat producer, grows real meat from cow or chicken tissues in labs instead of using plant feed.

    While dairy parity makes up nearly 10 percent of the milk market, meat alternatives only represent 0.25 percent of the market. But the industry will see dramatic change in the coming decades, and by 2050, nearly 20 percent of the meat market will be alternative products, according to Friedrich.

    GFI has visited schools like Cornell, MIT and Wharton to spread awareness about animal protein alternatives. Friedrich said he hopes students will be motivated to use this knowledge to create their own start-ups in the food technology and help to solve one of the most pressing issues facing food security today.

    “When automobiles were introduced, they soon relegated horse carriages to the status of tourist attractions,” Friedrich said. “I’m absolutely convinced that we are going to get to a time, through food technology, that eating agriculture meat is like packing up your bags and going to New York in a horse carriage.”

    ?Clean Meat? to Change Industry, Food Entrepreneur Says | The Cornell Daily Sun
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  38. #1138
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18057976_1376988735701260_9147061999241480216_n.jpg
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  39. #1139
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    Chicken from Peas? Looks like the Chickpea has some competition.
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  40. #1140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    Chicken from Peas? Looks like the Chickpea has some competition.
    The local Lebanese restaurant would beg to differ.

    Their hummus is out of this world.

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  41. #1141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    The local Lebanese restaurant would beg to differ.

    Their hummus is out of this world.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    Sure, but what you gonna call the new food? Chickpea is taken and Peachicken sounds bad. How about Soylent-Chicken?
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  42. #1142
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    Hummus fingers.

    I'm trademarking that shit.
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  43. #1143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Hummus fingers.

    I'm trademarking that shit.
    I'd buy it. I've grown quite fond of Q'uorn brand "chick'n". It's made out of myco-protein. So, fungus. What's weird is that it is almost too much like actual chicken texture. I've fed them to meat-eaters who've asked, "You sure these don't have meat in them?"

  44. #1144
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    I've been playing with Vegan foods as part of a cycling diet. I actually like the diet and find it makes me feel better but am not fully committed. I have a question:

    I own ducks as pets. Eventually they will lay eggs. Do you consider it unethical to eat their eggs?

  45. #1145
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdrider View Post
    I've been playing with Vegan foods as part of a cycling diet. I actually like the diet and find it makes me feel better but am not fully committed. I have a question:

    I own ducks as pets. Eventually they will lay eggs. Do you consider it unethical to eat their eggs?
    Eggs are not vegan. Lacto-ovo vegetarian eat eggs, drink milk, etc., but don't eat meat/fish/poultry.
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  46. #1146
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    Consumer Reports Study Finds that Nearly All Ground Beef Sold in America Has Feces in It

    This brings a whole new meaning to shitty food....


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-ground-beef-contains-feces-america.jpg

    The megalithic federal bureaucracy known as the U.S. Department of Agriculture is made up of 100,000 employees who are stationed at 4,500 locations across the country. Their mission statement, in part, reads “to promote agriculture production that better nourishes Americans.”

    A recent study by Consumer Reports, however, shows that nourishing Americans consists of feeding them deadly superbugs, food poisoning pathogens, and feces.

    While it’s not surprising to the readers of the Free Thought Project that the US government could fail so miserably in their stated mission, this recent study exhibits an unrivaled level of incompetence within this behemoth bureaucracy.

    Consumer Reports tested several hundred packages of ground meat from stores across America, and their findings were shocking, to say the least.

    According to the report,

    New lab tests conducted by Consumer Reports found that of the 300 packages of ground beef purchased in stores across the country, almost all contained bacteria that signified fecal contamination.

    More than 40 percent contained Staphylococcus aureus. Almost 20 percent contained Clostridium perfringens, which causes nearly 1 million cases of food poisoning annually, many related to beef.

    A significant amount also contained superbugs, bacteria that are resistant to three or more classes of antibiotics. A key reason is the overuse of antibiotics on cattle farms.
    The irony here is that local organic farmers who have harmed no one, are being raided by SWAT teams for selling raw milk, eggs, or grass fed beef. Meanwhile, millions of people are getting sick and dying across the country by government-subsidized factory farms.

    In The Omnivore’s Dilemma, Michael Pollan points out how concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), are dependent upon the cost of corn remaining low.

    The government ensures these low corn prices by throwing billions of dollars a year the top 1 percent of corn farms in the United States. Since 1995, a whopping $85 billion has been taken from taxpayers and given to corn producers; all of this so you can have poop in your burger.

    Aside from the horrific results of feeding corn to cows, there is also the apocalyptic problem of creating superbugs by massively dosing the factory farmed cattle with antibiotics to counter the horrendously dirty conditions in which they live.

    “That practice (heavy use of antibiotics) can lead to the creation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, a major public health problem. If you get sick from these bugs, your infection can be difficult to treat,” said Urvashi Rangan, Ph.D., director of Food Safety and Sustainability at Consumer Reports.

    The consumer reports study wasn’t all doom and gloom, however. When they tested the sustainably produced, antibiotic-free, grass-fed cattle, they found that these were far less likely to have any of the bacteria.

    “This study is significant, because it’s among the largest scientific studies to show that sustainable methods of raising cattle can produce cleaner and safer ground beef,” Rangan said.

    Of course, “big government beef” is upset and defensive about these findings. When consumer reports contacted the National Cattleman’s Beef Association for a statement, they received this single comment from Kansas State University professor Mike Apley:

    If all cattle were grass-fed, we’d have less beef, and it would be less affordable. Since grass doesn’t grow on pasture year-round in many parts of the country, feed lots evolved to make the most efficient use of land, water, fuel, labor and feed.
    Amazingly enough, however, farmers can sustainably raise organic cattle to meet the market demand, without using government subsidized corn. Instead of massive amounts of chemical and mechanical inputs, the organic farmers can plan for the harsh winter months by saving the surplus from summer months.
    The good news is that the demand is shifting from factory farmed cattle to sustainable and humanely raised cattle. Despite the best attempts of the USDA to regulate sustainable farms to death, they are thriving as demand increases.

    Even some fast food chains are adopting this sustainable method. In December, California-based quick-service chain Carl’s Jr. rolled out the All-Natural Burger, which sources solely grass-fed beef from Australia.

    Besides Carl’s Jr., a grass-fed burger chain called Farm Burger, has begun to spring up from coast to coast.

    Besides sustainable beef, there is also the option of no beef. One of the fastest growing categories in food choice happens to be vegetarian.

    In the information age, ignorance is a choice, and it seems that it’s a choice more, and more people are avoiding. While this study shows that we still have an uphill battle when it comes to healthy, non-taxpayer subsidized food, it is only a matter of time before we reach critical mass.





    Sauce: Consumer Reports Study Finds that Nearly All Ground Beef Sold in America Has Feces in It
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  47. #1147
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    My daughter and I have always been into the same stuff she likes shooting, she raced motorcycles, still has her CR125. We still do the movies a lot and one thing I miss is constantly trying new restaurants because she is now vegan. But it is getting easier and I find some recipes delicious. So far my favorite is pasta, tomatoes, Kalamata olives, pepperoncinis, some of the olive juice with olive oil. And for me I crunch up feta cheese.

    I came here thinking how cool is this but am disheartened at this vegan site. Very biased. All about cats. Apparently I'm (un) ethical. It's anti-trump, anti meat industry, hordes of sad cartoons of animals about to be eaten. It's more of a daily anti blog. Just making a point that we are not all on board and some of this stuff is a bit inappropriate.

    the good news is that as I get older I am eating better than I ever have. Not coming here for anything vegan that's for darn sure.

  48. #1148
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    I really don't see that, maybe you read a lot of earlier pages that I didn't. I'm not vegan, I'm not even a vegetarian, I'm a pescatarian and I've not found this thread as you described at all. I mean, sure there is the above poop in meat post but it seems to be a lot more anti big business meat (which is really why I quit eating beef/pork/chicken), it's pretty pro organic meat if you read it.

    Glad you're eating better, regardless.
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  49. #1149
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    ^ I skimmed back about 10 pages and didn't find one cat pic ... however I did find a lot of pics of food and content of interesting diverse articles related to plant-based diets and lifestyles. If anything is political which is forbidden on MTBR... it would get taken down by the mods. (I've never had a post removed by a mod because I am careful and considerate about what I post)

    When this thread was created in 2011, the OP and others were trolled, and there were the usual posts asking "where do you get your protein" questions why we have canine teeth if we can't use them to rip apart flesh and thought numbing claims like "If we stop eating animals they would over populate and take over the world... " The thread survived because intelligence and interest lives on and a few of us have been keeping the thread going, with humour and science, news items all relevant to the topic.

    The thread kept growing as more members posted their awesome stories and shared interests and experiences. This thread reflects a cool little community and is a testament of tolerance

    There is a second vegan/vegetarian thread that has grown and sustained itself , with members sharing delicious plant-based recipes (nothing negative about that). I'ven't search the pages but I don't recall any cat pics there either
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  50. #1150
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    Animal Ingredients

    Animal ingredients are found in food, clothing, cosmetics, alcohol, clothing, medicine, and many other products. It is virtually impossible to avoid some contact with animal products in your life, but once you become familiar with the most common animal ingredients, it becomes easy to avoid most products that contain them.

    Here is a list of of common animal ingredients sorted by what types of products they are most commonly used in

    In Food Products:
    Carmine
    Casein
    Cholesterol
    Fish oil
    Gelatin / Isinglass
    Glycerin
    Lactic Acid
    Lipase
    Rennet
    Retinol
    Shellac

    In Medicine and Supplements:
    Adreneline
    Allatonin
    Bone Meal
    Cortisone / Corticosteroid
    Cystine
    Estrogen
    Gelatin
    Linoleic Acids
    Pepsin

    In Cosmetics:
    Allatonin
    Albumin
    Alpha-Hydroxy Acids
    Beeswax
    Bee Pollen
    Biotin
    Carmine
    Cysteine
    Elastin
    Fish scales / Guanine
    Glycerin
    Keratin
    Lanolin
    Snails
    Squalene
    Tallow
    Wax

    Beer/Wine Ingredients:
    Albumin
    Egg Whites
    Sea Shells
    Gelatin
    Isinglass (fish bladder)

    Clothing:
    Leather
    Fur
    Wool
    Silk
    Skins
    Animal hair
    Cashmere
    Down
    Feathers
    Suede

    Sauce Animal Ingredients
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  51. #1151
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    Saturday's treat: Vegan Poke Poke and a vegan donut mmmm!


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18274857_1922775271300248_4652460361438737536_n.jpg


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18268182_1164863503642656_1589093993135578783_n.jpg

    Explored some laneways
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18274857_1922772527967189_4099073152861451854_n.jpg
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  52. #1152
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17309343_1245302828884522_2876808333838288060_n.jpg
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  53. #1153
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    Happy Hump Day

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    30 days of recipes via Food&Wine Mag
    30 Days of Vegan Recipes | Food & Wine

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    Beware: Avocado Hand

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1494438610359-avocado-hand.jpg


    Don’t become just another avocado statistic.

    In August of 2012, Meryl Streep made headlines by raising awareness of an issue that impacts thousands, if not millions across the globe. Was it clean drinking water? Climate change? An impassioned speech about the role of art in a politically charged climate? Nope—none of the above.

    Streep became the unwitting ambassador of an issue that is far closer to home for home cooks: avocado hand. You may not have heard of this medical condition, but you or someone you know has almost certainly been affected by it. And now, the medical community is finally speaking out about the dangers of avocado hand.

    Speaking to The Times, Simon Eccles—secretary and former president of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons—said that he sees "four patients a week" with avocado hand, a.k.a. a serious cut to the hand procured while attempting to remove the pit or peel from an avocado. So why are so many home cooks being maimed while prepping their alligator pears?

    Well, for starters, avocados are so popular that the word "Guacalypse" has become part of the modern lexicons. But there are also some structural issues that make everybody's favorite fatty fruit particularly dangerous. Think Dr. Eccles is exaggerating? Think again. After asking a few friends whether they'd ever been afflicted, I quickly heard multiple anecdotes supporting the frequency of these types of injuries.

    "I had to go to the [emergency room] and get three stitches and I have lost most of the sensation in my finger," Freya Watson, a 29-year-old TV producer in London, told MUNCHIES, referring to her own experience with avocado hand. "And when I was in the [emergency room], there was a woman with the exact same injury."

    Social media is littered with documentation of these types of injuries, many under Instagram hashtags such as #avocadoinjury. Just look at these pictures uploaded by Flickr user Brett Holt, with the caption "Cut it open slicing an avocado. Be careful."

    "People do not anticipate that the avocados they buy can be very ripe and there is minimal understanding of how to handle them," Eccles told The Times, adding that labels might be the most effective way of mitigating avocado hand. "We don't want to put people off the fruit, but I think warning labels are an effective way of dealing with this. It needs to be recognizable. Perhaps we could have a cartoon picture of an avocado with a knife, and a big red cross going through it?"

    It's not inconceivable that avocado peels could become the cigarette packages of the fruit world, covered in warnings about cutting yourselves (or maybe just warning of the threat of becoming so basic that you are annoying those around you with your constant talk of avocados).

    Jokes aside, to reiterate: Improper handling of an avocado can land you in the ER with a ****ed up hand. So, next time you're de-stoning one, remember to use a flat surface, run the knife gently through the skin and around the pit, and then carefully remove the stone with a towel, or the blade of the knife. Don't become just another avocado statistic.


    Sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en_us/arti...ource=vicefbus
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  56. #1156
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    ^^^ I think I've heard of similar statistics for bagel slicers. Avocado on a sliced bagel for breakfast? That's asking for trouble, especially before the coffee takes effect.
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    If the Avocado is ripe as it should be, I cut it in half (around the pit long ways, not through the pit). Then I twist the halves. The pit always ends up in one half. Place the half with the pit on the cutting board and lightly chop the pit with a chef's knife. Hold the Avocado in one hand and twist it against the pit (secured by the knife blade). Should come right out.
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  58. #1158
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    Yep, that's what I do. Occasionally one is stubborn and sticks to the skin but it's easier to get a spoon and scrape it out rather than trying to peel it with a knife.
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  59. #1159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    If the Avocado is ripe as it should be, I cut it in half (around the pit long ways, not through the pit). Then I twist the halves. The pit always ends up in one half. Place the half with the pit on the cutting board and lightly chop the pit with a chef's knife. Hold the Avocado in one hand and twist it against the pit (secured by the knife blade). Should come right out.
    Then how do you get the pit off the blade? I usually lightly bang my knife down on the garbage can hitting the handle on the plastic garbage bin so not to damage the blade. The pit goes flying into the can. Or I will hold the knife over the garbage and hit the pit with a spoon from the top to knock it in the can.

    I bet a lot of people equally get cut trying to remove the pit from the avocado, trying to remove the pit from the knife and dicing up the avocado in the skin like I see so many chefs do it.

  60. #1160
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    I use the base of the blade near the handle and then push it off with my thumb (so grabbing the knife with my right (dominant) hand's fingers and using the right thumb. I try to keep my knifes from banging on stuff as much as practical so I don't have to sharpen them as much. It may work better with larger hands, but my wife taught me and her digits are normal size. Just need to use a knife without too deep a blade.

    When dicing the avocado in the skin, I use a duller paring knife. It has a thin blade but it's not particularly sharp. I use it for things like that and when I'm preparing green beans (using the blade against my thumb). That knife has a less pointed tip than my sharp paring knife (so I can tell them apart). I like tools that fit the purpose, so a $3 knife that's kept dull on purpose seems like a cheap investment when you use it a few times a week.
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  61. #1161
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    When I fractured a vertebrae in a crash, I was in the waiting room of the ER hanging out with a family waiting to be seen. The dad had a severe cut on his hand from a knife his kids had given him earlier that day as a birthday present. The kids felt guilty but mom and dad were in a good mood and reassured them it wasn't their fault.
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  62. #1162
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    When I fractured a vertebrae in a crash, I was in the waiting room of the ER hanging out with a family waiting to be seen. The dad had a severe cut on his hand from a knife his kids had given him earlier that day as a birthday present. The kids felt guilty but mom and dad were in a good mood and reassured them it wasn't their fault.
    I put the leather awl of my first Boy Scout knife in my thigh about an inch and a half. Never told my folks. Stupid hole bled for more than a week. Gift knives, meh.
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  63. #1163
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    Even more disappointing, is when you cut open a perfect looking avocado and find this inside

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18425378_10209520681995589_188949374671182170_n.jpg
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  64. #1164
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    My Caturday lunch

    Seaweed & miso broth bowl –Miyeokguk at Kupfert & Kim

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18447428_1926067554304353_3379028696479720552_n.jpg

    wakame, shiitake & miso broth, brown rice, daikon, carrots, organic bok choy, organic tofu, roasted mushroom, scallions, sesame seeds, dulse, house-made kimchi, added hot peppers
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  65. #1165
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    I found some interesting fruits and veggies in the market places

    These tiny sweet melons
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18403622_1926068940970881_6902076734584633264_n.jpg


    Cherimoya (we bought one). It needs to ripen.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18424034_1926077870969988_645265335767686563_n.jpg

    Sweet, pulpy, and fragrant rich cherimoya is one of the most delicious tropical fruits of Andean valley origin. These greenish-yellow, conical fruits are from the evergreen trees belonging to the family Annonaceae, in the genus of Annona. The plant has been thought to be native to Loja region of Ecuador, bordering Peru, the low rising tropical forests of Central Andean Mountains.

    Ripe fruits turn pale green to light brown and emanate sweet, fragrant aroma that can be appreciated from a distance. Inside it features, creamy pulp with smooth, shiny, black seeds embedded in the flesh. Seeds and skin are inedible.

    Very sweet and pleasant flavor annonas contain an impressive list of essential nutrients, vitamins, antioxidants, and minerals.

    The fruit has calories equivalent to that of mangoes. 100 g of fresh fruit pulp provide about 75 calories. It, however, contain no saturated fats or cholesterol. The fruit characteristically is a good source of soluble dietary fiber (3 g% or 8% of RDA) which helps lower absorption of cholesterol in the gut. The fiber also helps protect the colon mucosa from exposure to toxic substances by binding cancer-causing chemicals to it.

    Cherimoya contains several polyphenolic antioxidants. Among them, the most prominent in Annona family fruits are Annonaceous acetogenins. Acetogenin compounds such as asimicin, bullatacinare, etc., are powerful cytotoxins and have been found to have anti-cancer, anti-malarial, and anti-helminth properties.

    It is very good in vitamin-C. Vitamin-C is a powerful natural antioxidant. Soursop (A.muricata) relatively has more vitamin-C (34% of RDA). Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin-C helps the human body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals from the body.

    Also, cherimoya fruit is a good source of B-complex vitamins, especially vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine). 100 g fresh fruit provides 0.257 mg or 20% of daily recommended levels. Pyridoxine helps keep up GABA neurochemical levels in the brain. High GABA levels calm down nervous irritability, tension, and headache ailments.

    Further, it has a well balanced sodium-potassium ratio. A good potassium level in the body helps control heart rate and blood pressure, and thus, counters bad influences of sodium. It also contains more minerals weight per weight than many common fruits like apples, being rich in copper, magnesium, iron and manganese.

    Cherimoya has unique fragrant flavor and delicious taste. To prepare, wash the fruit in cold running water. Gently mop dry using a paper towel. Cut the fruit lengthwise and eat it scooping with a spoon. Discard seeds and peel.
    sauce: Cherimoya fruit nutrition facts and health benefits

    Can't wait to try it



    Thumb-size bananas (so cute )
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18425300_1926069414304167_5997646693298727861_n.jpg



    Edible cactus aka nopalitos, (I had cactus tacos a few weeks ago... yum)
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18485357_1926087197635722_5309299352421955612_n.jpg
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  66. #1166
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    Food Before it's Harvested... cool!

    Peanut

    Did you think peanuts grew in trees? Nope! Peanuts prefer sandy soil, growing underground but flowering above ground.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-9538815a1410f80f5428dd4feecd2b5f.jpg



    Sesame

    Sesame Seeds prefer a tropical climate, and come to us mostly from Africa and India.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-9ba92497f9cd0b00d69a76b2e6e7d92b.jpg


    Almond

    Almonds grow best in a Mediterranean climate, with 80 percent of the world’s supply coming from sunny California.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-5f38babcfc4b88e2d3c81f9b2a214d19.jpg


    Brussel Sprouts

    Brussel Sprouts get their name from being grown in Belgium since the 1200s, but are so ancient the Romans are known to have cultivated them.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-4dedba8dc8ec56b08fb4372203dfa965.jpg


    Pineapple

    Most people assume pineapples grow in trees, like coconuts. Actually, they grow on the ground.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-a1fb766ac1e25fbd6277259556905cfa.jpg


    Vanilla

    Vanilla beans first came to us from present-day Guatemala and Mexico.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-592691991e783be70f9d27f4eb2bb532.jpg


    Cranberry

    Cranberries grow in marshes or bogs that were originally glacial plains. Therefore they’re cultivated in northern areas like Massachusetts.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-c53214818586d51f8c26ec142207b605.jpg


    Cacao

    Cacao or cocoa, another product of the Americas, first evolved in the Amazon rainforest.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-04451afafe4024c4bf4db47cac00ffc0.jpg

    Pistachio

    Pistachio trees grow in various regions but a dry climate like that of the American West.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-a0fba52bba4c075df4ca1083b718868e.jpg


    Cashew

    Cashews seem specialized, but they actually grow in a wide range of climates.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-a0168f67622893fa09beaaf7d5a1f8e3.jpg


    sauce
    Startling Pics Of How Food Really Looks Before It’s Harvested
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  67. #1167
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    Nopalitos tacos - so good! Going to have to make some this weekend.......to the market I go!

  68. #1168
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    Throwback Thursday



    Woman Sees Donald Trump In Her Vegan Butter
    You’re fired, vegan butter.



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-55dba5051d00006e00145be4.jpeg


    I can’t believe it’s not Donald!

    Jan Castellano was getting ready to have some breakfast when she almost lost her lunch. She opened a tub of Earth Balance Organic Spread with plans to put the vegan butter on her toast — only to see what she claims is the image of Donald Trump looking right back at her.

    It wasn’t necessarily appetizing, but it was entertaining.

    “This was pretty much before I had coffee, so I was easily amused,” Castellano, 63, told The Huffington Post. “I needed to put on my glasses to make sure it was him.”

    Castellano, of Wildwood, Missouri, says she wasn’t thrilled to see The Donald, mainly because “he is everywhere these days.”

    She thought about saving the Trump-enhanced spread and sell it on eBay “so I could donate the money to Hillary Clinton.”

    But short-term hunger won out over long-term wealth.

    “It was the only butter I had, so I had to make the sacrifice,” she explained.

    Currently, only Trump’s eye and part of his mouth remain in the tub, and Castellano hopes his campaign “melts away like butter” as well.

    HuffPost reached out to Earth Balance to see if the Trump face was intentional, but the company had no comment.


    Woman Sees Donald Trump In Her Vegan Butter | HuffPost
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    Name:  250px-Agave_tequilana_2.jpg
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Size:  20.1 KB You forgot Tequila!
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  70. #1170
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    ^ Salud!
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  71. #1171
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    TGIF funnies


    Name:  18485932_10154855866494011_1636232202998539541_n.jpg
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  72. #1172
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    The Vegetarian (and Vegan) Cookbook Smackdown

    #5: The Plantpower Way
    The Authors: Ultra-endurance athlete Rich Roll and his wife, plant-based chef and artist Julie Piatt.
    The Sell: Meat is the only thing standing between you and your best self (or something).

    The Plantpower Way shines brightest in the salad section, with clever combinations like cabbage beet ginger slaw and a roasted corn and tomato number that’s perfect for summer.
    Unfortunately many recipes call for specialized ingredients like gluten-free tamari, mung beans, or soy-based pasta noodles.


    #4: Plenty
    The Author: Celebrated London chef and food writer Yotam Ottolenghi.
    The Sell: Gorgeous, restaurant-quality dishes where veggies are the star.

    This book came highly recommended by several friends and, all important, my mom. Ottolenghi isn’t a vegetarian, and so this is a good transitional book for meat eaters who are trying to reform their ways. He tops dishes with eggs, allows cheese in the mix, and even suggests pairing a few items with smoked fish or meat. Alongside some of the more strict books, this felt downright reckless.

    The recipes are fantastic, with rich flavors, great mixes of texture, and plenty of protein and fat to make the dishes feel satisfying. Unfortunately, they’re also hellishly time consuming.

    #3: The VB6 Cookbook
    The Author: New York Times food journalist and recipe writer Mark Bittman. Of all the authors on this cookbook list, I trust his judgment the most.
    The Sell: Eating plant-based breakfasts and lunches, then eating whatever you want for dinner, can make you a healthier human.

    VB6 stands for “vegan before six,” and it’s a philosophy Bittman devised to stay healthy while being a food writer. He consumes no animal products for breakfast and lunch, then eats a healthy “flexitarian” dinner. Sometimes that means meat, sometimes it doesn’t.


    #2: Oh She Glows Every Day
    The Author: Angela Liddon, a plant-based blogger turned cookbook author.
    The Sell: Nutrition-packed food that your whole family will eat.

    The creative salads are the standouts. Liddon has a gift for turning the oft-maligned side into a bona fide main dish, topped with seasoned legumes, roasted nuts, and interesting grains. She celebrates produce rather than falling into the vegetarian-cookbook trap of trying to imitate favorite animal-product-laden dishes.

    #1: Thug Kitchen: Eat Like You Give A F*ck
    The Authors: Matt Holloway and Michelle Davis are Southern California food bloggers who have turned their vegan cooking into a cookbook empire with three plant-based titless plus a whole host of veggie-amorous merchandise.
    The Sell: Fast(ish) food for adventurous eaters.

    These recipes are made for people who want to eat hearty food that doesn’t require the sacrifice of an animal, not for those looking to consume mostly lettuce and fresh-pressed kale juice. The authors helpfully categorize recipes as breakfasts, snacks and salads, soups and stews, and mains,






    For more info:

    Sauce: https://www.outsideonline.com/218612...book-smackdown
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  73. #1173
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    The Best way To Cook Mushrooms According to Science


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1495453893513-best-way-cook-mushrooms-according-science.jpg


    Grilled, fried, microwaved, or boiled? Researchers from the Mushroom Technological Research Center in Spain claim to have found the most nutritionally beneficial way to cook fungi.

    There are a multitude of ways to serve mushrooms. Smothered in butter and sat atop toast, stuffed with garlic and cheese, stirred into creamy risottos for that rich, umami flavour …

    We all have our favourite shroom recipe, but scientists from the Mushroom Technological Center of La Rioja (CTICH), Spain—yes, an actual thing—claim to have worked out the optimal way of cooking the edible fungus.

    The researchers set out to find which cooking method—grilling, frying, microwaving, or boiling—best preserved the nutritional profile of the vegetable. Mushrooms are rich in fibre, vitamins, and protein, and low in calories and fat, but can lose these properties during cooking.

    So, according to the study, if you want to get the most from your mushrooms, you should step away from the frying pan and the boiling water. The cooking methods that give the best nutritional results are grilling and microwaving.


    The study, which was published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, analysed the nutritional profile—before and after cooking—of four of the most commonly eaten mushrooms: white button mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, oyster mushrooms, and king oyster mushrooms. Scientists found that frying (unsurprisingly) increased mushrooms' fat content and caused significant loss of protein. Boiling also caused a notable loss of vitamins.

    However, when researchers grilled and microwaved mushrooms, not only were there no significant nutritional losses, but the antioxidant levels within the vegetable increased. The authors concluded: "Since cooking techniques clearly influence the nutritional attributes of mushrooms, the proper selection of treatments is a key factor to prevent/reduce nutritional losses."

    Commenting on the findings in a press release, Irene Roncero, researcher at CTICH and one of the study's authors, suggested that preparing mushrooms in oil or water caused soluble nutrient compounds to escape when cooking. She said: "Frying and boiling treatments produced more severe losses in proteins and antioxidants compounds, probably due to the leaching of soluble substances in the water or in the oil, which may significantly influence the nutritional value of the final product."

    Roncero continued: "When mushrooms were cooked by microwave or grill, there are no significant losses in nutritional value of the cooked mushrooms."

    However you decide to cook your fungi, keep in mind the wise words of culinary doyenne Julia Child: never crowd the mushrooms.


    Sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en_uk/arti...ource=vicefbus
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  74. #1174
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    James Cameron to Release Vegan Documentary


    The Game Changers will highlight a broad range of plant-based athletes, soldiers, and cultural icons to show that nobody needs animal products to thrive.

    Award-winning director and vegan environmentalist James Cameron executively produced new vegan documentary The Game Changers set for release this year. The film is a collaboration between Cameron, director Louis Psihoyos (who also directed Oscar-winning Japanese dolphin slaughter documentary The Cove), and mixed martial arts champion James Wilks. The Game Changers will feature a wide array of elite athletes, special operations soldiers, scientists, cultural icons, and everyday heroes who are all thriving on a plant-based diet. “The world’s strongest guy is a vegan,” Psihoyos said. “The world’s fastest guy, Carl Lewis, was the first to break 10 seconds, and he did it when he was a vegan. We’re trying to dispel the myth that you need protein from animals to become a real man.” In recent years, Cameron has become an avid advocate for veganism and appears alongside actor Samuel L. Jackson in Eating You Alive—a new documentary that focuses on the adverse health effects of consuming animal products.



    James Cameron to Release Vegan Documentary
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  75. #1175
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    Cool! Look forward to that.

    And Bill Nye says Plant based diets are the future.

    Bill Nye the Science Guy: "Plant-based diets are the future" | Clearly Veg

  76. #1176
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    Friday funnies

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18581595_10212500282892391_4210773219308878232_n.jpg
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  77. #1177
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    Cool! Look forward to that.

    And Bill Nye says Plant based diets are the future.

    Bill Nye the Science Guy: "Plant-based diets are the future" | Clearly Veg
    Bill Nye is the future <3
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  78. #1178
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    Cool! Look forward to that.

    And Bill Nye says Plant based diets are the future.

    Bill Nye the Science Guy: "Plant-based diets are the future" | Clearly Veg
    Depends on which future? In Star Wars future, all the Jedi and close associates appear to eat plant based diets. In the matrix and many other future movies, they eat mainly oatmeal looking glop. I just hope that Charlton Heston's future doesn't come to pass. Not looking forward to Soylent Green or any other Soylent foods.
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  79. #1179
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    Had a delish Almond Lime bowl on caturday

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18765912_1932571076987334_7181898952951023493_n.jpg
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    Is Honey Vegan?


    Honey is produced by bees, who gather nectar from flowers, partially digest it, and then regurgitate it once back in their hives for storage in honeycombs. Since honey is a bee product, and bees are animals, it is by definition not vegan. Here’s a nuanced article about how the ethical issues related to honey fit into the broader concept of vegan living.

    Several companies make vegan honey alternatives:

    Bee-Free Honee
    Sohgave Honey Flavor Agave Nectar
    Honeysuckle Vegan Honey
    Suzanne’s Specialties Just Like Honey
    Rather than buy a product that mimics the flavors of honey you may wish to simply buy maple syrup, as it matches honey’s sweetness while offering (subjectively, anyway) a more interesting flavor. Agave syrup is another good substitute, although it’s sweeter than honey and its extremely high fructose content may be something you wish to avoid.

    Reasons to Avoid Honey:

    During honey harvesting, some bees are inevitably crushed or injured.
    Beekeepers often respond to disease outbreaks by burning their hives—killing all bees inside.
    Most honey from large-scale producers comes from hives treated with antibiotics.
    It’s a raw deal to the bees to steal their honey and replace it with high fructose corn syrup, which is what most commercial beekeepers do.
    You may not be eating what you think you’re eating; fraud and mislabeling is rampant in the worldwide honey industry.





    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-12525274_833480160114327_565412842778491604_o.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-12672109_833480473447629_8617574232556699885_o.jpg




    Sauce: Is Honey Vegan?
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  81. #1181
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    Good point.
    But, it's sure good on Baklava Ice Cream...
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  82. #1182
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    You don't have to convince vegetarians and vegans

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-20160423_blp504.jpg


    Why eating more vegetables is good for the environment

    FILET mignon commands a princely sum on many restaurant menus. But bill-payers may not realise its true cost to the planet. Meat provides 17% of global calorific intake, but it requires a disproportionate amount of water and feed. And more land is given over to grazing animals than for any other single purpose. Overall the livestock sector accounts for between 8% and 18% of global emissions—about as much pollution as comes out the tailpipes of the world’s cars. Ruminant livestock, such as cattle and sheep, have stomachs containing bacteria able to digest tough, cellulose-rich plants. But along the way, huge volumes of gases are farted and belched too. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates that the world’s domesticated ruminants annually release 100m tonnes of methane—a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide.

    Much research in recent years has looked into meat’s environmental hoofprint. A study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2013 presented findings on the quantities of greenhouse gases associated with producing a kilo of protein from different animals. Chicken proved the greenest meal option at 3.7kg. Pork came second with 24kg. And cattle far behind at 1,000kg. Chicken and pork proved preferable because of the efficiency of factory farming. Reports by Chatham House, a British think-tank, on diet and climate change appeared in both 2014 and 2015. The latter noted the growing share of global crops given over to animal feed and considers the effects on food prices. The desires of rich carnivores often trump the needs of poorer cereal consumers.

    So what is a conscious consumer to do? A recent study also published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calculated the benefits of low-meat and no-meat diets using computer models through to 2050. The former daily regime included eating five portions of fruits and vegetables, less than 50g of sugar, up to 43g of red meat and a total energy content of between 2,200-2,300 calories. A vegetarian diet and a vegan diet were also analysed. Following a modest meat diet, global greenhouse gas emissions were found only to increase 7% by 2050 (compared with an expected increase of 51% according to projections from the status quo). A widespread switch to vegetarianism could curb emissions by nearly two thirds and veganism by 70%. More careful diets would also offer more direct health benefits. Gobbling too much red meat, particularly the processed sort, can increase the risk of heart disease and certain cancers. The study found that more than 5m deaths could be averted over the next three decades or so if meat were consumed modestly around the world. Over 7m could be saved if veggie-eating caught on more widely; 8m would benefit from popular veganism.

    Controlling what meat people eat will not appeal to governments anywhere, however. And given the poor nutrition from which millions suffer any campaign against animal protein could appear misguided. According to the UN, 795m people are currently undernourished. In the developing world, richer populations will develop a growing taste for the red stuff. Global meat consumption looks set to rise by more than 75% by 2050. Managing pasture well, selectively breeding creatures and changing what they eat—forage rape and fodder beet can curb methane emissions by a quarter compared with grass and clover according to research conducted in New Zealand—could all help reduce environmental hoofprints. More simply, diners in the rich world could opt for mushroom tarts and leek risottos of their own accord.

    Sauce:http://www.economist.com/blogs/econo...theenvironment
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  83. #1183
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18882056_1766077590086063_3357226712355436356_n.jpg
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  84. #1184
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    My birthday ride and a stop for lunch

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18882067_1935226510055124_4612685992638770850_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18881983_1935261163384992_5498760618141060760_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18882298_1935274166717025_5919536689976785033_n.jpg

    Later we rode to check out our shared community farm crop and picked some fresh rhubarb

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18839032_1935224093388699_6319745918929860467_n.jpg

    The leeks aren't ready yet
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18767862_1935224396722002_3145919375232484381_n.jpg

    My birthday bouquet
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  85. #1185
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    Happy birthday, Judy!

    That's a lot of leeks.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  86. #1186
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    Happy B-Day Judy.
    Nice color coordination of the bike and chair. Classy
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  87. #1187
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    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    Happy birthday, Judy!

    That's a lot of leeks.
    We can pick what we need as per our share.
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  88. #1188
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar View Post
    Happy B-Day Judy.
    Nice color coordination of the bike and chair. Classy
    I'm just trying to blend in
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  89. #1189
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-18275035_10212867302057638_9186401870018689365_n.jpg
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  90. #1190
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-bizarro-06-03-17.jpg
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  91. #1191
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    F*ck Cancer

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  92. #1192
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    7 Steps to Eating Less Meat

    1. Commit to eating less meat.
    One thing is certain: There are times when your new diet will be inconvenient. Parties, travel, dinner with friends, going out to eat. If y0u want to get through these without slipping up, you’d better be committed.

    Tell everyone you know. Post it on Facebook. Blog about it. Take a trip to the health food store and buy lots of stuff for your new diet.

    Yes, this will make it more embarrassing if you fail. That’s the point.

    2. Tie it to another goal and get excited.
    When I went vegetarian, it wasn’t really about not eating animals. It was about having more energy than ever; it was about a glimmer of hope that this diet would help me qualify for the Boston Marathon.

    Being vegetarian became part of my training. That’s what made it so easy to stick with—I wanted to qualify for Boston more than anything, and in my mind, cutting out meat became the way to do it.

    For you it might not be running. But if you can find something else that means even more to you than just “being a vegetarian,” your chances of sticking with it go way up.

    3. Start small.
    For me, the scariest part of it all was the thought, “I’ll never get to eat X again.” But it never has to be that way.

    Avoid it by starting with 10 days, during which you will not cheat. You can do anything for 10 days, can’t you?

    Once the 10 days are up, you’ll likely notice increased energy and weight loss. At that point, evaluate whether this is something you could do for 30 straight days (only 20 more!). Chances are, if you make it that far, you won’t want to go back.

    4. Phase the meat out.
    Sometimes a shocking change is exactly what you need to zap you out of your old habits. But for me, going completely vegetarian or vegan all at once probably would have been too much—phasing out meat gave my taste buds time to adjust.

    I didn’t eat red meat and pork for about a year before I went further with it. Then I quit eating poultry, and was left with a healthy, pescetarian diet of fish and plants. My plan was to stop there, but a concern for animals took over, and I phased out fish by eating it once a month or so. I soon lost the taste for it and went completely vegetarian (I’m still working on the vegan thing).

    If you’re more of the go-big-or-go-home type, I say go for it. But if that doesn’t work, give phasing out meat a try before you give up.

    5. Plan meals.
    A wise man or woman once said, “If you’re failing to plan, you’re planning to fail.” In this case, that couldn’t be more accurate.

    If you don’t eat well now, simply removing the meat from your current diet will make you less healthy. You can’t live on hamburger buns and fries, and you shouldn’t live on spaghetti with tomato sauce.

    You need to find recipes and plan meals that can stand alone, that are designed to be meatless. Bookstores are full of vegetarian and vegan cookbooks. Check out vegetarian websites. If you’re not ready to go all the way, get a pescetarian or flexitarian cookbook.

    One issue here is that most cookbooks aren’t necessarily designed for runners or other athletes. If that’s you, I’ll recommend my recipes page, where I’ve listed the vegetarian recipes I’ve found that best fit my training criteria.

    6. Get out of your box.
    A lot of people think of going vegetarian as giving up certain foods that they love. What they don’t always think about is how many new foods they’ll add.

    Without meat as a default option, cooking becomes a (healthy) challenge. So does eating out. You’re forced to explore cuisines of other cultures that have eaten little meat for hundreds of years. Indian, Thai, and Chinese menus generally offer many vegetarian options, and cooking that food at home becomes an adventure.

    Or hit your local farmers market, and learn to love buying fresh, local produce every week. This alone can add inspiration to previously lifeless cooking.

    7. Track your progress and celebrate.
    It’s fun to look back and see how far you’ve come. For me the most measurable change was in my running—I got faster and faster every week, and could run greater distances than ever before.

    Don’t forget to celebrate. Reward yourself for 10 days, 30 days, and other meatless milestones. When you give yourself a pat on the back (or a bottle of wine), you send your brain a positive signal that reinforces your healthy habits.

    Good luck; be sure to let me know it goes. I’m here to help!

    Sauce: 7 Steps to Eating Less Meat Now
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  93. #1193
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    I've recently switch to a plant based diet. My primary reason is to reduce my effect on the environment. My biggest issues were that I didn't want to loose muscle mass, im a bouncer and know how much protien it requires to maintain or build muscle on me. Since most meat substitutes don't agree with me, I've been using a product called Humanpro. It's a vegan EAA product.

  94. #1194
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    Choose garlic carefully... be sure you check where it's grown


    For thousands of years garlic has been used as food and medicine. It is been known to help fight heart disease, lower blood pressure, and improve your immune system functions; in addition treating a host of other conditions. It is super rich in antioxidants and can be eaten raw (for best potency and benefit) or prepared in every meal of the day.

    Additional benefits of eating garlic:

    Helps prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia
    Helps reduce weight
    May help reduce fatigue
    Works as a natural acne fighter
    Helps improve bone health
    Can help prevent hair loss
    Detoxifies the body
    Reduces inflammation
    A natural remedy for athlete’s foot
    Undoubtedly, many of you are not even aware that the garlic we everyday buy at the nearest grocery store or receive in your meal in a restaurant may actually originate from China. According to newest report, USA imported almost one- third of its garlic from China in 2014.

    This would not have been a problematic issue otherwise, but some of the garlic produced in China is toxic. Apart from the quality control which has always been a problem of great concern, the way of cultivating this imported garlic is extremely problematic.

    Chinese producers use law- forbidden pesticides to boost their products, and these can have devastating effects on your health, including phorate and parathion.

    Hence, in order to protect your health, you need to eliminate this garlic from your diet, and to do so, you need to learn to spot it to recognize the toxic ones cultivated and China.

    Namely, next time you go to purchase garlic, you need to note the following things:

    -Home-grown garlic is richer in taste than the one produced in China.

    — If the root and the stem are not removed, the garlic you want to buy should be safe. Chinese farmers often remove roots and stem to reduce weight and save on shipping.

    -Chinese garlic is lighter and less bulbous than the regular one.

    Therefore, we can conclude that the safest way to enjoy the benefits of the powerful garlic is to buy it from some trusted local farmers or to start growing it on your own.



    Sauce: Your Garlic is Being Imported From China, Filled With Bleach And Chemicals. Here’s How To Spot It - Holistic Living Tips
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  95. #1195
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    TGIF funnies... party on!

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  96. #1196
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    Is your booze vegan?

    Check and see

    Barnivore: your vegan wine, beer, and liquor guide



    It's an amazing lifestyle choice not a diet
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  97. #1197
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    I love spinach!


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  98. #1198
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-extra_large-1497281502-cover-image.jpg

    Monday June 12, 2017 – is World Meat-Free Day, which celebrates an initiative that hopes to get everyone to adopt a vegetarian diet for just 24 hours. The aim is to promote healthier diets, living sustainably, and cutting our carbon footprint.


    Read more: Why You Should Go Meat-Free For One Day A Year, According To Science | IFLScience
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  99. #1199
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  100. #1200
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    ^Won't work. Apples can't dance and nobody wants a Guardian buddy they can eat when they get hungry.^
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

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