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  1. #251
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    I just got back from Barbados last night... and I survived a week there. Turns out that they eat quite a bit of vegetarian style meals.

  2. #252
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    Welcome back brother. Was wondering where you'd gotten off to. Did you happen to bring the mountain bike( and camera)? How was the food?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  3. #253
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    There was no bike for this trip. My gf and I went for my brother's wedding so most of the week was already planned for us.

    The food wasn't that bad, but it wasn't excellent either. I visited a couple of really good restaurants, but most of the food on the island is geared towards using local fare cheaply. Local vegetables are a staple of every dish. Rice and pasta (macaroni pie) are also big on the island. For the carnivores, local fish (flying fish when it is in season) and pork are big. Many of the things on the island are imported (chocolate, bottled water, cheese, milk, etc.) making them hard to get and/or expensive.

    It was pretty easy for me to eat well as a vegetarian. The people are really friendly, and many were willing to adjust menu items for me. Plus, the people were very supportive of the vegetarian lifestyle there. Something that can be hard to come by in some places.

  4. #254
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    I live in cattle country. Ranching is the county's largest private sector employer. No factory livestock here -- the supermarkets and butcheries carry local beef. You can select the source ranch. I have little doubt I have seen my dinner previously grazing along the traIl during a ride.

    OTOH -- I really do not the source of the produce in the market.

  5. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnbryer View Post
    I'm trying very hard to be vegan. It's not easy. Fake meat does not = vegetarian. I hate that stuff. It's nasty.

    How do the vegan's do it when you travel?

    How can we have this many non-vegans in this thread? Go troll some where else

    I use a lot of recipe's from Brenden Brazier's THRIVE books. Lots of great information there. Is anyone else using his books?
    I am bonafide meat eater.

    My brother is vegetarian.

    But I eat just about everything, vegetarian, vegan, meat....

    I did start trying Brenden Brazier's products, starting with Vega Sport stuff.... would like to incorporate more into my diet....

  6. #256
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    Just an update, I've been feeling like a million bucks lately. I'm faster than I've ever been on two wheels and two feet. I recently took up a kettlebell routine to balance out with all of the running and cycling. I am supplementing with a complete plant based protein powder and eating lots of avocados and nuts along with the standard food. I've never been this healthy, nor have I felt this good. Veganism has been a hit with me thus far.

  7. #257
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    ^^^^
    Good to hear.

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraspontane View Post
    Just an update, I've been feeling like a million bucks lately. I'm faster than I've ever been on two wheels and two feet. I recently took up a kettlebell routine to balance out with all of the running and cycling. I am supplementing with a complete plant based protein powder and eating lots of avocados and nuts along with the standard food. I've never been this healthy, nor have I felt this good. Veganism has been a hit with me thus far.




    Nice, keep it up.

  9. #259
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    I started because of perceived health benefits, but when I see things like this...

    Pig Farm Investigation | Mercy For Animals on Blip

    I don't think eating meat is wrong, but factory farms are terrible, terrible places. Some people here say they love steaks, and that is fine. I just wish they would consider buying their meat from a local farmer, farmers market, ect instead of the grocery store where 90% percent of the product comes from factory farms. The meat would probably be of a better quality, anyway.
    Last edited by ultraspontane; 01-07-2012 at 08:11 PM.

  10. #260
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daemon[CRO] View Post
    No, but it serves as an example that vegans are pretty much dependent on the supermarket being around the corner.
    i'd like to supplement this statement with empirical and historical facts and evidence if i may.

    at 6'3" i've been vegetarian/vegan (including macro in my 20's) most of my life and primarily vegan for the last 12. i've been all over the world and have not found the statement quoted above to be true. not in the least. in fact, the poorer the nation the easier it is to be vegan because they do not have the resources to dump into such an inefficient food source (i.e. meat/dairy) nor do the poor have the resources to buy what is produced, in fact, the poorer the nation the more hearty the markets are with an abundance of fruits, grains, and veggies.

    raising meat is not only an inefficient use of resources but a poor investment as well because it does not return an increase on the protein invested into it either in quantity or quality. aside from the fact that it takes an investment of around 16 lbs. of grain to produce one pound of meat, that pound of meat is also a vastly inferior nutritionally to plant based foods both in healthy fats and proteins while being packed with carcinogens (e.g. over 300 known carcinogens form when grilling meat), unhealthy fats, high in uric acid (causes gout, kidney stones, renal distress/failure, and bone density loss when the body attempts to combat the metabolic acidosis by buffering it with calcium stores from the teeth and bones in an attempt to being the body's pH back to 7.4), and that's just the free range "healthy" meats. that's not even taking into account the gmo meats and livestock pumped full of hormones and vaccines!

    interesting to note that without government subsidies meat would be around $90/lb. but that's an entirely other topic...

    further, it's a totally fabricated myth that one needs special supplements or items that can only be gotten at a "whole foods" type store to be vegan. all you do is skip the meat and dairy aisle, and if you're smart all the processed boxed foods.

    VIOLA! it's really that easy.

    i've been all over mexico and central america and guess what? easy to be vegan. lived in bangkok thailand for a while. guess what? easy to be vegan. in fact, REEEAAAAALLLLLY easy because of all the buddhists. the entire country is very, very vegan friendly. there are vegan eateries EVERYWHERE from formal sit-down establishments to little food carts and shanties on the side of the road.

    when i was in cambodia? ditto! vietnam too. all through the mediterranean and caribbean as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by 'Daemon[CRO
    ]There is a reason why there are no vegan or even vegetarian civilizations and cultures found in the world, except our First World Civilization which can just pop by local supermarket and buy some food supplements.
    again with all due respect i would most strongly disagree.

    ancient egyptians were primarily vegegarian/vegan. ethiopians and many african tribes were as well, and some still are. the people of the hunza valley in pakistan too, and they are among the longest living culture on the planet. in fact, the hunza valley has long been referred to as the original shangri-la.

    so the truth is that many cultures have for millennia been primarily vegetarian, consuming animal flesh (be it mammal or fish) only sparingly and/or infrequently or using a small amount of meat as a garnish or for flavoring only including the mayans, peruvians, incas, and most asian cultures (notably japanese & chinese). even the peasants throughout europe have been primarily vegetarian for thousands of years, being famous for their gruel and hearty bread.

    in fact, throughout history meat consumption has been primarily associated with affluence and wealth be they kings or titans of industry or even in biblical record. a quick study of history shows that even here in the u.s. meat did not become such a hugely consumed part of the diet until AFTER ww2. prior to that the diet was mostly grains and vegetables with the occasional, infrequent garnish of animal flesh.

    and interesting to note that throughout history the rich who ate diets high in meats and diary because they could afford to and did so to flaunt their wealth were not as healthy as the peasants, who not only lived longer but also were much more physically robust during the course of their lives PARTICULARLY in old age.

    and we still see the direct correlation between increased animal flesh/secretion consumption with stunted life span and quality of life. the "standard american diet" which is now high in animal flesh/secretions is directly correlated with disease and premature death. cultures who are primarily vegetarians, most notably asians, did not suffer from lifestyle diseases such as coronary artery disease, heart disease, diabetes, and the plethora of cancers that are rampant in america. however, as they adopt the american diet high in animal products/by-products the lifestyle diseases and premature death rate enters their culture.

    the fact is that most cancers, diabetes, heart/artery disease, kidney/renal disease, and even dimentias are lifestyle related disease brought on as a direct result of what one's diet.
    countless studies over the last 100 years (including many that span decades and follow subjects throughout their lives) have shown time and time again that vegetarians on average not only live 10-20 years longer than carnivores, but also that the rates of the above mentioned lifestyle diseases plummets as one moves closer to a wholly plant based diet.

    the evidence is there and is irrefutable. plain and simple.

    Quote Originally Posted by 'Daemon[CRO
    ]On the other hand, I really ADMIRE vegan folks who live on farms and can eat what they grow with their own hands.
    again, not necessary to grow one's own food to be vegan or even primarily vegetarian. simply skip all the garbage in the market (animal flesh/secretions, processed foods, refined sugars). hit the produce section, the dried goods section, and read all labels before putting it into your cart.

    heck, i don't grow my own food and have found it comically easy to maintain a vegan diet all over the globe.
    Last edited by monogod; 01-16-2012 at 11:18 AM.
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  11. #261
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    ^^^Take the time to read what monogod wrote there. An informed response.

    I'll just add that as he alluded to, historically it was only the wealthy who could afford meat at every meal and it was the wealthy who had higher rates of obesity and related health problems. In modern societies today this has largely flipped, meat is now a readily available cheap source of calories and it is the wealthy who can afford to live off of only veggies, grain etc.
    In less wealthy societies today the historic norm still prevails, it is the poor who live off of grain while the wealthy can afford to eat meat with every meal.
    Fact is that our modern society has it ass backward. Meat is not an efficient way to feed a nation, it does take 16 pounds of grain to produce a pound of meat, and a lot of calories are lost in that process.
    "...like sex with the trail." - Boe

  12. #262
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    Soylent Green for me.

  13. #263
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumblemumble View Post
    ^^^Take the time to read what monogod wrote there. An informed response.

    I'll just add that as he alluded to, historically it was only the wealthy who could afford meat at every meal and it was the wealthy who had higher rates of obesity and related health problems. In modern societies today this has largely flipped, meat is now a readily available cheap source of calories and it is the wealthy who can afford to live off of only veggies, grain etc.
    In less wealthy societies today the historic norm still prevails, it is the poor who live off of grain while the wealthy can afford to eat meat with every meal.
    Fact is that our modern society has it ass backward. Meat is not an efficient way to feed a nation, it does take 16 pounds of grain to produce a pound of meat, and a lot of calories are lost in that process.
    I'm not all against meat, but, yes, we certainly don't need to eat as much meat as the production output in "First World" countries might suggest. As far as I know in "olden times" the poorer people would eat meat only once a weak, or less if they were reeealy poor. I think that's about enough. You can get most of any nutritious elements from other sources.

  14. #264
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    Monogod crushed haters with his awesome. And to try and sway you all back to the original topic, I just made my lunch for work: sautéed portobello cap in a balsamic reduction on German dark wheat with lettuce, tomato, horseradish mustard and cheese, and mayo. Kind of want to eat it now.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  15. #265
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    Without reading the whole thread and probably restating others comments (apologies). I bet if people had to go out and kill, gut and process their own meat we would be a huge society of veg's.

  16. #266
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    I was a vegetarian for about 3 years before going back to eating meat. I just missed it too much and gave in to a lack of willpower.

    It was an interesting exercise though; and not just the dietary aspect of it. It also gave me an insight into just how petty and small so many people are. I never preached, never proselytized, never tried to impact anyone else's food choices. Yet the mere fact that I chose not to eat meat made me the target of everything from eye rolling, to group ridicule, to downright hostility.

    I was constantly justifying my choice to people who would delight in trying to trip me up, thinking that if I was willing to eat this, then I had no right to choose not to eat that. Then there were the people who delighted in trying to trick me into eating meat. "Hope you enjoyed your vegetable soup because it was made with chicken stock. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!"

    I also had a co-worker who thought it was funny to email me photographs of uncooked meat. Really not sure what reaction he was hoping for but he didn't get one.

    I just don't get it. I choose not to eat green beans, because I don't care for the taste. Yet, that doesn't annoy people. Why should me not eating meat get people so riled up?

  17. #267
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    Fueling the Vegan way (it's not half bad actually)

    I'm not generally one for shameless plugging or self-promotion, but in the spirit of the thread, I figure I could at least pass along a vegan fueling product for on-the-bike consumption. As a semi-pro level mtb. racer, I found I needed something other than bars, gummies, and gels during rides and races. So I spent ~1 year developing a product that is raw, all-natural and easy to eat. It's called CocoNutz Fuel. The product is vegan, non-GMO, and gluten-free, and utilizes coconut oil throughout to provide natural energy for a rider who needs something more than a gel / gummy. Additionally, it is in a form factor that is actually edible WHILE riding, and is dispensed from a flip top tube.

    Though I personally don't follow a strict vegan lifestyle (gotta have a hamburger every once in awhile), I found that while riding, eating something real helps to keep a settled stomach (I even down these during 1.5 - 2 hour XC races and they work great).

    So, if you want to check out the product, head on over to the website. I'm all about finding a better way to fuel during exercise, and I think that this product stands out quite nicely.
    Last edited by thezaugg; 02-07-2012 at 10:30 AM.
    The new Energy Bar - CocoNutz Fuel.

  18. #268
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    Vegetarian and gluten free - never felt better. I do like to "huck my meat" though.
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  19. #269
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheezy Rider View Post
    I was a vegetarian for about 3 years before going back to eating meat. I just missed it too much and gave in to a lack of willpower.

    It was an interesting exercise though; and not just the dietary aspect of it. It also gave me an insight into just how petty and small so many people are. I never preached, never proselytized, never tried to impact anyone else's food choices. Yet the mere fact that I chose not to eat meat made me the target of everything from eye rolling, to group ridicule, to downright hostility.

    I was constantly justifying my choice to people who would delight in trying to trip me up, thinking that if I was willing to eat this, then I had no right to choose not to eat that. Then there were the people who delighted in trying to trick me into eating meat. "Hope you enjoyed your vegetable soup because it was made with chicken stock. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!"

    I also had a co-worker who thought it was funny to email me photographs of uncooked meat. Really not sure what reaction he was hoping for but he didn't get one.

    I just don't get it. I choose not to eat green beans, because I don't care for the taste. Yet, that doesn't annoy people. Why should me not eating meat get people so riled up?
    Here's a question, how did all those people know you were vegetarian? I work with a a guy every day for the last 3 years and just now found out he was a vegan, I just though he ate gross food. You have to go out of your way (preach) to let people know you are vegan/vegetarian.
    "Do not touch the trim"

  20. #270
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    Sorry dude, pretty sure the first time you go out to lunch with coworkers and ask for the substitution or removal of meat/cheese/mayo/insert animal product, people look at you like a leper, then ask, then make jokes. That's how I've seen it happen in almost every case. Maybe your workplace is special.

    Now can we please stop arguing in circles/debating the plus-minus of a veg diet and get back on topic with the sharing of yummy recipes that don't contain animal bits?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  21. #271
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    Made some mashed potatoes the other night that were pretty damn tasty. Used Yukon Golds, and added/mashed in some steamed cauliflower and leeks. I also added heavy cream and cheddar, but those can be left out.

    Turnips, rutabagas, parsnips are also get to add to such concoctions.

  22. #272
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    Has anyone tried the unsweetened original almond/coconut milk from Blue Diamond? I just bought is since they didn't have regular almond milk and man is that **** tasty! I would stick to regular almond milk or soymilk for cooking though, the coconut is a bit prominent and may leave a taste in the dish, I imagine it would be awesome in a dessert recipe.

    Dubthang: have you tried par boiling red potatoes, baking them, then mashing and seasoning them? It's a lot of work for a side but if you make a **** ton it's so worth it. It's maybe like a special occasion thing I guess.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  23. #273
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post

    Dubthang: have you tried par boiling red potatoes, baking them, then mashing and seasoning them? It's a lot of work for a side but if you make a **** ton it's so worth it. It's maybe like a special occasion thing I guess.
    I haven't. I did try baking slices of Yukons to dry them out, and then layering them in a dish to use as a crust for quiche. Came out amazing.

  24. #274
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivet View Post
    Here's a question, how did all those people know you were vegetarian? I work with a a guy every day for the last 3 years and just now found out he was a vegan, I just though he ate gross food. You have to go out of your way (preach) to let people know you are vegan/vegetarian.
    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Sorry dude, pretty sure the first time you go out to lunch with coworkers and ask for the substitution or removal of meat/cheese/mayo/insert animal product, people look at you like a leper, then ask, then make jokes. That's how I've seen it happen in almost every case. Maybe your workplace is special.
    That's exactly what happened. I inadvertently outed myself by asking for a salad when there was no vegetarian option on the menu at a business function. I really didn't think it was a big deal but it became the focal point of the conversation for the rest of the meal with me having to defend myself and my personal choice. The people at that meal made a point of bringing it up at every future business function (Wheezy Rider's a vegetarian - smirk - ) and it snowballed from there.

    So no, I didn't go out of my way to let people know I was a vegetarian.

    But for the record, even if I had chosen to bring it up, I don't see how simply telling somebody something about yourself equates to preaching. If I tell you which football team I support, is that preaching? How about if I tell you what my musical tastes run to? Why shouldn't I be able to mention my food preferences without being accused of preaching? Why should I have to keep it a secret?

  25. #275
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheezy Rider View Post
    That's exactly what happened. I inadvertently outed myself by asking for a salad when there was no vegetarian option on the menu at a business function. I really didn't think it was a big deal but it became the focal point of the conversation for the rest of the meal with me having to defend myself and my personal choice. The people at that meal made a point of bringing it up at every future business function (Wheezy Rider's a vegetarian - smirk - ) and it snowballed from there.

    So no, I didn't go out of my way to let people know I was a vegetarian.

    But for the record, even if I had chosen to bring it up, I don't see how simply telling somebody something about yourself equates to preaching. If I tell you which football team I support, is that preaching? How about if I tell you what my musical tastes run to? Why shouldn't I be able to mention my food preferences without being accused of preaching? Why should I have to keep it a secret?
    Preach it brotha! Bwahahaha!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

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