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  1. #1001
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16143312_953830701414237_7653390873273846325_n.jpg

    You can also check by removing the stem at the top of the avocado. If it's lime green underneath, it's not ripe. If it's darker green or turning into brown, it's good to eat.
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  2. #1002
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    Sprouts!

    Why sprouting will be a trend in 2017



    Sprouting ticks all of these boxes, not to mention it’s easy and affordable. This trend is also primed to last all year, as it’s easy to sprout from the comfort of your own kitchen throughout winter. Keep an eye out for sprouting kits and tips on how to sprout at your local CHFA Member health food store.

    Sprouting is a safe and nutritious way to add veggies to your diet. However, there are some important safety considerations to ensure your sprouts are free from harmful bacteria. Be sure to take precautionary measures including: buying certified “pathogen-free” seeds; using sterilized containers for sprouting; and storing your sprouts in a clean, refrigerated airtight container once they’ve sprouted. Children, pregnant women, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems should speak with their health care practitioner before consuming fresh sprouts. For other safety tips, refer to this fact sheet for safe sprouting.

    What are the health benefits of eating sprouts?

    Whether you buy sprouts or germinate your own at home, there are many to choose from that provide terrific health and culinary benefits.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-sprouts.jpg

    Generally speaking, one of the big advantages of sprouts is that they are low in calories and fats, but high in digestible protein and essential vitamins and minerals. Almost any seed or grain can be sprouted with a little moisture, resulting in a crisp root tendril and colourful leaflet. The most common seeds used for sprouting are alfalfa, broccoli, lentils and the beautiful red-tinged sprout of radish seeds.

    By allowing the seed or grain to sprout, or “germinate,” nutrients naturally present in the seed are liberated. Vitamins and minerals usually locked away in the dried seed are activated during sprouting, which then allows our body to access and absorb these nutrients. In addition, sprouted foods retain a high vitamin and mineral content that many foods lose through processing.

    One of our favourite sprouts is the widely studied mung bean, a tiny green bean commonly grown in India and other Asian countries. Just one cup of mung bean sprouts can provide a substantial portion of the daily iron intake required by adults for healthy red blood cells and blood pressure.

    How you can incorporate sprouting into your 2017 healthy habits

    Because of the nutritional benefits and rise in popularity of sprouting, this technique is now being used in a wide variety of other products available at your local CHFA Member health food store. For example, sprouted flours can add a health boost to your baking, while a vegan sprouted protein powder can help you recover after an intense workout.

    On their own, sprouts can be added to salads and sandwiches or used as a garnish on soup. You can even blend them into a smoothie for a hit of protein, vitamins and minerals.

    Again, if you’re going to sprout at home, make sure you do it safely. Remember to rinse the seeds, beans or grains regularly and follow these steps for an optimal sprouting experience.


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-mung-bean-sprouts.jpg

    The Sprouting Process

    To soak, place the seeds, beans or grains in a Mason jar with filtered water. For the top, use a sprouting lid, sprouting screen or a cheese cloth fitted snuggly around the rim with an elastic band.
    During the sprouting process you will need to drain the water and rinse the seeds, beans or grains. This process needs to be done two to three times a day until they are fully sprouted.
    Once sprouted, rinse the sprouts thoroughly, drain the excess water and place the jar in direct sunlight for about an hour. The sunshine will help them “green up” and evaporate the remaining moisture.
    Once the sprouts have savoured their time in the sun, they will need to be refrigerated and enjoyed within two to three days.
    Sprouted beans with their softened texture are great in soups and dips like hummus, while sprouted seeds and grains are delicious in wraps, salads and even smoothies.

    sauce https://chfa.ca/en/lifestyle_tips/fi...utm_medium=cpm
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  3. #1003
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    I was going to post a Chia Trump head here, but just couldn't.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  4. #1004
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    ^ ha! That would be tremendous!
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  5. #1005
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    You asked for it.
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    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  6. #1006
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    ^ Love it Forster! I wouldn't garnish a salad with those sprouts though... it might leave a bitter taste
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  7. #1007
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    A Bored Japanese Chef Cut Daikon into This Insane Chain Configuration

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-c2sukwguaaarzte.jpg

    The daikon chain pic has amassed a whopping 55,000 retweets and 69,000 likes since being shared and it left many wondering how such a feat is technically possible. And to think, it all just stemmed from kitchen boredom. “The head chef gave me this daikon he cut up for fun because he was bored lol,” the caption says, according to RocketNews24.

    Though it’s unclear whether the chef was actually bored or just wanted to impress the Twitter user, it’s clear that people are fascinated by vegetables—especially carrots and daikon—being carved into things that don’t look like vegetables. Look no further than the other “bored” chefs uploading their creations to YouTube.


    Sauce: https://munchies.vice.com/en/article...ampaign=global
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  8. #1008
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^ Love it Forster! I wouldn't garnish a salad with those sprouts though... it might leave a bitter taste
    At least the Oompa Loompa skin tone makes sense in that context.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  9. #1009
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    Kung Hei Fat Choi!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16298696_1874643306113445_3274206786401069496_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  10. #1010
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-15780966_1381753148535833_1220739218964800889_n.jpg
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  11. #1011
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    High-Energy Plant-Based Snacks for Athletes

    1. Trail mix

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-img_0056_2-1024x768.jpg

    1 part raw walnuts
    1 part raw cashews
    1 part raw almonds
    1 part raw pumpkin seeds
    1/2 part vegan dark chocolate chunks
    2 parts dried tart cherries


    2. S’nuts

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-snuts-image-1024x768.jpg

    4 cups of your favorite energy-rich nuts (e.g. hazelnuts, almonds, cashews, pecans)
    2 tablespoons maple syrup
    1 teaspoon sea salt
    Large pinch each black pepper and onion powder

    Preheat the over to 350 degrees F. Combine the nuts and maple syrup in a mixing bowl and stir with a rubber spatula until the nuts are coated. Then season with salt, pepper, and onion powder and stir again to make uniform. Spread the nuts out in a single layer on a baking pan covered with parchment paper or a reusable baking sheet. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes until lightly browned. Cool and store or mix with fruit and seeds for a nutritive trail mix.


    3. Whole wheat pita with almond butter or hummus

    Prep time is almost zero: toast a whole wheat (or alternative grain) pita for a few minutes, then spread with your choice of topping. If you’re using nut butter, a drizzle of maple syrup adds a touch of sweet and some quick-burning calories. If you’re using hummus, a few drops of hot sauce make it that much better.

    4. Granola

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-img_1064-1024x768.jpg

    2 cups rolled oats
    ½ cup raw almonds (Mo suggests roasted, salted, but raw worked well for me)
    ¼ cup rough chopped pecans
    ¾ cup flax seed (I pulsed mine in the blender to barely chop)
    ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds
    3 tablespoons hemp seeds
    1 cup chopped dried tart cherries (Mo’s original recipe calls for half this amount)
    ½ cup brown rice syrup
    ⅓ cup peanut butter
    2 small pinches of kosher salt


    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

    2. Chop almonds, pecans and dried cherries at least in half, but with most pieces being even smaller.

    3. Place dried cherries into a large mixing bowl.

    4. Spread oats, chopped nuts, flax seeds and hemp seeds onto an ungreased baking sheet and toast in oven for 10 minutes. Gently shake and stir the oat mixture after 5 minutes of cooking to avoid burning the top layer and allowing both sides of the nuts and oats to brown.

    5. Remove oat mixture from the oven and add to the bowl with the dried cherries. Add salt.

    6. Decrease oven temperature to 300 degrees.

    7. In a small saucepan, melt peanut butter over medium-low heat, stirring constantly. Once the peanut butter is melted and slightly thinner, remove from heat and pour over oat mixture. Mix thoroughly.

    8. In a separate small saucepan add brown rice syrup. Over medium-high heat, bring to a boil. Bubbles will begin to form along the sides of the pan and gradually move in towards the center. When bubbles get big and meet in the middle, immediately remove from heat and pour over the oat mixture.

    9. Thoroughly mix, coat all ingredients with brown rice syrup and peanut butter.

    10. While it is still warm, pour the mixture out into the corner of a baking sheet lined with a silpat or parchment paper. Using wax paper, firmly press and spread mixture into the shape of a rectangle that is ¼ inch thick (no gaps!). NOTE: the mixture will most likely not fill the entire sheet tray. Starting in a corner will give the rectangle 2 or 3 straight edges.

    11. Bake at 300 degrees for 15 minutes or just until the edges begin to brown.

    12. Remove from oven and gently re-press the rectangle using the wax paper. Cool completely on the tray. Flip rectangle out onto a cutting board and cut into 3×5 inch bars.

    13. Wrap bars individually in plastic wrap and store in a large ziplock bag.


    Sauce

    9 High-Energy Plant-Based Snacks for Athletes | No Meat Athlete
    F*ck Cancer

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  12. #1012
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16472806_1210347662380039_4173261931079884086_n.jpg
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  13. #1013
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    Funday funnies

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  14. #1014
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    Winter Potatoes

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16640627_1445063525504169_3845731546182914011_n.jpg

    One plain potato is a good source of vitamin C and potassium, and it has about 159 calories. You'll also get some extra fiber if you eat the peel. Potatoes are high in carbohydrates but they're low in sugar, fat and sodium, and they'll stay that way if you use healthful cooking methods and recipes.

    Potatoes are high in potassium, which works in opposition to sodium to help regulate blood pressure and fluid balance. It's also essential for normal muscle and nerve function. Vitamin C is needed for normal immune system function, blood clotting and strong connective tissue and blood vessel walls.

    https://www.verywell.com/are-potatoe...or-you-2506382
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  15. #1015
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    10 reasons you need more avocados in your life!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-21381b0fb1.png

    1. Lower Risk of Cancer
    A 2007 study found that the phytochemicals in avocados encourage cancer cells to stop growing and die. Avocados are rich in cancer-fighting carotenoids, which are most plentiful in the dark-green portion of the flesh that’s closest to the skin.

    2. Blood Pressure Regulation
    Avocado's relatively high levels of potassium can help keep blood pressure under control. This is because potassium balances the effects of sodium (table salt), which can increase your blood pressure, and 200g of avocado contains 21% RDA potassium.

    3.Maintain a Healthy Heart
    A high level of homocysteine is associated with a higher risk of heart disease, but Vitamin B6 and Folic Acid found in avocados help to regulate it.
    Avocados are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which may help reduce blood cholesterol levels and decrease the risk of heart disease.
    A seven-year study published in 2013 in Nutrition Journal found that eating avocados was associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms shown to increase the risk of diabetes, stroke and cardiovascular disease.

    4.Healthy Skin
    The Vitamin C and Vitamin E in avocados helps keep skin looking nourished and healthy. Vitamin E acts as an antioxident to neautralise the oxidative effect of free radicals and can slow down the skin-aging process. Avocado (and avocado oil in particular) may even be useful in treating psoriasis.

    5.Lower Bad Cholesterol
    Avocados not only lower bad cholesterol, they also increase levels of good cholesterol. A 1996 study found that patients with high cholesterol who incorporated avocados into their diet for a week had a 22% decrease in bad cholesterol and triglycerides and an 11% increase in good cholesterol. Avocados were also found to improve cholesterol for people who already had good lipid levels, but were shown to be especially effective in those with mild cholesterol problems. Avocados contain beta-sitosterol compound, which is associated with lowering cholesterol.

    6.Blood Sugar Regulation
    The high levels of monounsaturated fats in avocados can help stop insulin resistance, which helps to regulate blood sugar levels. The high amount of soluble fiber in avocados helps maintain stable blood sugar levels. Compared to other fruits, the low carbohydrate and sugar levels in avocados also help in not raising blood sugar in the first place.

    7.Improved Digestion
    The fiber in avocados helps keep food moving through the digestive system, encouraging regular bowel movements and healthy intestines.
    Maintain Healthy Eyes
    Avocados are an excellent source of the carotenoid lutein, which reduces the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts. The Intake of fat from the avocado along with carotenoids greatly helps to improve their absorption.

    8.Boost your Immune System
    Avocados are a good source of Glutathione - a powerful antioxidant associated with immune system health, needed for the lymphoid cells.

    9.Pregnancy and Healthy Babies
    Avocados contain plenty of folic acid, which is essential for preventing birth defects of the brain and spinal cord.

    10.Healthy Fats
    Avocados have a high fat content of around 80% of their total calories—about 20 times the average for other fruits. A typical avocado contains 30g of fat, but 20 of these fat grams are health-promoting monounsaturated fats such as oleic acid.

    Healthy Fats
    Avocados have a high fat content of around 80% of their total calories—about 20 times the average for other fruits. A typical avocado contains 30g of fat, but 20 of these fat grams are health-promoting monounsaturated fats such as oleic acid.

    Phytonutrient content
    Avocados contain an amazing array of important phytonutrients. Included are phytosterols (especially beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, and campesterol); carotenoids (beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, neochrome, neoxanthin, chrysanthemaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and violaxanthin); flavonoids (epicatechin and epigallocatechin 3-0-gallate); and polyhydroxylated fatty alcohols. Alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid) and oleic acid are key fats provided by avocado.

    Sauce: 10 reasons you need more avocados in your life!
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  16. #1016
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    Heart Health

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-vnd.heartdoctorhands1.jpg


    Here are our five favorite heart-healthy tips from the experts.

    1. Lifestyle changes are paramount
    On a bold mission to prevent one million heart attacks, Joel Kahn, MD (aka, “America’s Healthy Heart Doc”) is a seasoned cardiologist who has written extensively on the topic of heart health and diet. He points out that six basic factors—including smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and a healthy diet—can reduce heart disease risk by 92 percent. He also promotes the concept of “Vitamin L” (the “L” is for lifestyle”) as the key to preventing early death. Finally, Kahn highlights four foods that are particularly good at reversing artery disease—garlic, pomegranates, bergamot (a citrus fruit), and green tea, as each offers unique, heart-protecting properties.

    2. Don’t believe the protein myth
    As a plant-based doctor and professor at New York University School of Medicine, Michelle McMacken, MD writes about the myths doctors often promote regarding protein. As an example, the belief that we need more protein (and that protein always comes from animals) and less carbohydrates to get lean are misleading and dangerous. In fact, McMacken sites research that low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets (as well as eating a lot of dairy) are actually associated with “heart disease and early death.” She reinforces Kahn’s point that lifestyle changes are the best approach to dealing with the root causes of heart disease rather than pills, which simply address symptoms.

    3. Fish is not a health food, but plants are
    Neal Barnard, MD and the experts at Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) have been leaders in the plant-based movement for decades and does not back down from making bold statements. While the mainstream likes to repeat the false notion that fish is a health food, PCRM counters these “alternative facts” with four important points: 1. Fish is high in cholesterol 2. Fish is high in saturated fat (these are two nutrients with a strong association to heart disease) 3. Fish oil supplements’ effect on heart health is still inconclusive, while some studies have shown that it can increase your risk of diabetes and cancer 4. Fish are full of toxins (such as mercury) that are dangerous to our health. So, if you’re looking for foods that reduce your risk for heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, then it’s time to look toward plants, not fish.

    4. Get your daily greens
    Leafy greens are one of the healthiest foods on the planet, especially for your heart. This affordable superfood group is packed with heart-healthy nutrients including nitrates that are linked to lower blood pressure and the prevention and reversal of heart disease. Kayli Dice, registered dietitian at Lighter, suggests loading up on leafy green vegetables every chance you get. Some of her favorite ways include a handful of frozen greens in a morning smoothie, baked into kale chips, or as sandwich fixings wrapped up in chard or collard leaves such as this tasty BLT in a Collard Wrap.

    5. Eat foods high in antioxidants, fiber and potassium
    Michael Greger, MD offers the most robust (and entertaining) collection of plant-based research on the internet, organized by topic and in video format. On his site, nutritionfacts.org, Greger provides information regarding heart disease and diet. As he explains, foods high in antioxidants, fiber, and potassium might be protective against heart disease, especially when they are part of a diet that’s low or void of animal-based food, salt, and excess fat and oil. Instead, a diet full of dark greens, beans, nuts, flax seeds, whole grains, vegetables, and spices can promote a long and healthy life.


    sauce 5 Heart Health Tips from Plant-Based Medical Pros
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  17. #1017
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    10 reasons you need more avocados in your life!

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1120605

    1. Lower Risk of Cancer
    A 2007 study found that the phytochemicals in avocados encourage cancer cells to stop growing and die. Avocados are rich in cancer-fighting carotenoids, which are most plentiful in the dark-green portion of the flesh that’s closest to the skin.

    2. Blood Pressure Regulation
    Avocado's relatively high levels of potassium can help keep blood pressure under control. This is because potassium balances the effects of sodium (table salt), which can increase your blood pressure, and 200g of avocado contains 21% RDA potassium.

    3.Maintain a Healthy Heart
    A high level of homocysteine is associated with a higher risk of heart disease, but Vitamin B6 and Folic Acid found in avocados help to regulate it.
    Avocados are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which may help reduce blood cholesterol levels and decrease the risk of heart disease.
    A seven-year study published in 2013 in Nutrition Journal found that eating avocados was associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms shown to increase the risk of diabetes, stroke and cardiovascular disease.

    4.Healthy Skin
    The Vitamin C and Vitamin E in avocados helps keep skin looking nourished and healthy. Vitamin E acts as an antioxident to neautralise the oxidative effect of free radicals and can slow down the skin-aging process. Avocado (and avocado oil in particular) may even be useful in treating psoriasis.

    5.Lower Bad Cholesterol
    Avocados not only lower bad cholesterol, they also increase levels of good cholesterol. A 1996 study found that patients with high cholesterol who incorporated avocados into their diet for a week had a 22% decrease in bad cholesterol and triglycerides and an 11% increase in good cholesterol. Avocados were also found to improve cholesterol for people who already had good lipid levels, but were shown to be especially effective in those with mild cholesterol problems. Avocados contain beta-sitosterol compound, which is associated with lowering cholesterol.

    6.Blood Sugar Regulation
    The high levels of monounsaturated fats in avocados can help stop insulin resistance, which helps to regulate blood sugar levels. The high amount of soluble fiber in avocados helps maintain stable blood sugar levels. Compared to other fruits, the low carbohydrate and sugar levels in avocados also help in not raising blood sugar in the first place.

    7.Improved Digestion
    The fiber in avocados helps keep food moving through the digestive system, encouraging regular bowel movements and healthy intestines.
    Maintain Healthy Eyes
    Avocados are an excellent source of the carotenoid lutein, which reduces the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts. The Intake of fat from the avocado along with carotenoids greatly helps to improve their absorption.

    8.Boost your Immune System
    Avocados are a good source of Glutathione - a powerful antioxidant associated with immune system health, needed for the lymphoid cells.

    9.Pregnancy and Healthy Babies
    Avocados contain plenty of folic acid, which is essential for preventing birth defects of the brain and spinal cord.

    10.Healthy Fats
    Avocados have a high fat content of around 80% of their total calories—about 20 times the average for other fruits. A typical avocado contains 30g of fat, but 20 of these fat grams are health-promoting monounsaturated fats such as oleic acid.

    Healthy Fats
    Avocados have a high fat content of around 80% of their total calories—about 20 times the average for other fruits. A typical avocado contains 30g of fat, but 20 of these fat grams are health-promoting monounsaturated fats such as oleic acid.

    Phytonutrient content
    Avocados contain an amazing array of important phytonutrients. Included are phytosterols (especially beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, and campesterol); carotenoids (beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, lutein, neochrome, neoxanthin, chrysanthemaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and violaxanthin); flavonoids (epicatechin and epigallocatechin 3-0-gallate); and polyhydroxylated fatty alcohols. Alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid) and oleic acid are key fats provided by avocado.

    Sauce: 10 reasons you need more avocados in your life!
    My own (extensive) research would indicate that the most important reason is because fresh guacamole and blue corn chips makes us happy.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  18. #1018
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    Yes love the blue chips And did you know...Blue corn tortilla chips get their color from anthocyanins, brain-boosting flavanoids, and contain slightly more protein than white or yellow corn chips. !
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  19. #1019
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    We explored chinatown on caturday. A few things caught my attention:

    Dumpling House
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16683941_1881209465456829_139703841712386706_n.jpg

    Each pocket is made by hand in the front window by a multigenerational crew of laughing ladies.They have a huge menu and a ton of vegetarian options, ranging from the spicy bean curd noodles, to a quite a few dumpling options filled with vegetables.

    The dumplings come either steamed or fried.

    I didn't know what to make of this. Not sure if the meat was faux
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16508699_1881209628790146_2556569415878316798_n.jpg


    Mini mangos!
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16684104_1881209612123481_887322646922020926_n.jpg
    Compared to a regular mango, the skin of a mini mango is thinner and edible. The seed is very similar to a mango but you don’t get mango fibres stuck between your teeth. Another advantage is the mini mangos are not as juicy so won’t leave you sticky and messy.

    Mini mangos are also known as ma phrang (Thailand), kundang buah (Malaysia), plum mango and marian mango.


    Vegan treats with Americanos
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16508708_1073958186066522_1819754902735690366_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

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  20. #1020
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    Organically Grown Food
    Organic standards vary wildly. Here's what you need to know.

    The organic farming movement has its roots in 1960s counterculture. The back-to-the-land sensibilities that emerged during that period cast a skeptical eye on the wisdom of relying on petroleum-based pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. In addition to eschewing these chemicals, organic agriculture as it’s currently defined within the United States forbids GMO crops, irradiation, and sewage sludge. An easy way to spot organic foods is to check its sticker. Organic foods start with the number 9 (Conversely, a number beginning with 8 means GMO!)

    Unfortunately, the organization in charge of setting America’s organic standards is the USDA—which happens to be the very same agency that oversees the nation’s factory farms and slaughterhouses. Given that the USDA thinks it’s acceptable to put just one meat inspector on a slaughter line killing 175 chickens per minute, it’s reasonable to wonder how serious the agency is about setting meaningful organic standards. Their history in regard to organics is troubling. During one particularly dark moment in 1998, the USDA sought to permit organic farms to use treated sewage sludge as fertilizer—despite the fact that the stuff is often thoroughly contaminated with heavy metals and other nasty substances.

    While the USDA sets organic standards, it does not oversee enforcement. That task is handled by independent certification bodies approved by the USDA. One of these certification organizations, the CCOF, offers an informative two-page summary of the reasons to choose organic. And here’s an informative interview with CCOF’s first employee, that does a great job of conveying the nuances of how organic standards and enforcement have evolved since the 1970s.

    Just as “certified humane” or “cage-free” animal products typically come up short in key areas (even if they are, on the whole, a marked improvement over factory farmed foods), it’s naive to think that every product with an organic seal has been grown without compromise. Whether it’s “cage-free” or “organic,” consumers are at the mercy of farmers who are motivated more by money than by integrity. And imported organic products arguably deserve an extra level of skepticism.

    Industrial Organic vs. Local Organic
    It’s obviously beyond the means of individuals to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the various organic standards bodies. So what’s a person to do?

    Perhaps the best place to start is to draw a distinction between local organic farmers in your community and the giant organic farms that ship nationwide. A dead giveaway is that the latter often packages their food in containers featuring slick yet homespun-looking logos. You can fairly call this stuff “industrial organic,” and it’s generally a far cry from the quality of organic produce grown locally.

    But even when it comes to industrial organics, it’s wisest to avoid an all-or-nothing point of view. On the one hand, industrial organic farms typically use many of the same monoculture practices employed by conventional agriculture, and they frequently rely on underpaid migrant labor. On the other hand, industrial organic is still far better than conventional produce, since it’s free of GMOs, sewage sludge fertilizer, and chemical pesticides.

    Nothing in life is guaranteed but you can avoid the worst of the worst by choosing organic, and give yourself a shot at the very best by choosing local organic.

    Uncertified Organics
    The bigger the organic farm, the more worthwhile it is for a farmer to devote resources to certification. Small local farmers often lack the time and money required to participate in certification programs. They’ve got their hands full actually farming, and aren’t equipped to deal with reams of paperwork for the relatively tiny amount of food they grow. These producers often sell their food at farmers’ markets, labeling it “unsprayed” rather than “organic.”

    Under best-case scenarios, “local unsprayed” is much more sustainable than industrial organic, particularly if the latter is being trucked in from thousands of miles away. The downside, of course, is that without certification you’re solely dependent on the farmer’s word. But it’s not as though every food that’s certified organic lives up to its billing either. It wouldn’t take a criminal mastermind to get away with mislabeling conventionally grown foods as organic, especially on a small scale.

    Supporting agriculture in your community is incredibly important, and any sort of small-scale local agriculture is likely to be far less dependent on petrochemical fertilizers and herbicides than are mega-farms. Locally-grown produce also has the advantage of being picked riper and delivered fresher than even the best foods grown far away. So don’t turn up your nose at your local farmer selling unsprayed produce-it’s often the best value and most sustainable food you can find, and a stepping-stone to boosting the food security of your community.

    The Dirty Dozen and the Clean Fifteen
    If you can’t purchase organic every time, you minimize your exposure to pesticides by paying attention to the “dirty dozen,” and the “clean fifteen.” Every year the Environmental Working Group tests pesticide levels in non-organic produce, and announces the varieties that are most and least contaminated. Here are their lists for 2016:

    The Dirty Dozen (plus 2): strawberries, apples, nectarines, peaches, celery, grapes, cherries, spinach, tomatoes, bell peppers, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers.

    The Clean Fifteen: avocados, corn, pineapples, cabbage, sweet peas, onions, asparagus, mangoes, papayas, kiwi, eggplant, honeydew, grapefruit, cantaloupe, cauliflower.


    sauce:Organically Grown Food
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    Awesome

    I also enjoyed it when Chef Chloe won all the cupcake wars:

  23. #1023
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    Friday Funnies

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-15726741_10154398001982054_1092949268881484966_n.jpg
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  24. #1024
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    Dumpling House in Toronto
    Lunch was under $10 vegetarian/vegan or meat dumplings


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16830813_1884991201745322_6212779744055716104_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16730186_1088251834637157_163440619814890690_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16864613_1088253987970275_2019591912332528657_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16730616_1884751875102588_2068731666123255200_n.jpg
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  25. #1025
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    That looks good.
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  26. #1026
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    Can recommend How To Not Die by Dr. Michael Greger





    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-how-not-die.jpg
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    5 Important Things You Should Know About Guacamole

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-524493b0dbfa3f1281000aa7._w.540_s.fit_.jpg

    1. Know this trick for picking the best avocados!

    Do you have a knack for picking avocados with a streak of brown inside? Or ones that aren't quite ripe enough? Here's a fairly genius tip for you: The key to your avocado's health lies under the stem "button." Peel it away and take a peek. If it comes away easily and you find green underneath, you've got a good avocado that's ripe and ready to eat. That's the kind of fruit you want to take home with you.

    2. Also? Always buy an extra avocado.

    Even when you get really good at picking avocados, you should always buy an extra one when making guacamole. If a whole avocado or even parts of a few of them have gone bad, have an extra one as a replacement to make up for it in a recipe. And if all are good? Well, there's always room in our lives for one more avocado.

    3. Avocados not ripe enough? Try a banana.

    Gauging the perfect stage of ripeness for guacamole when you want it is a little tricky, though. If you buy avocados on the unripe side a few days ahead, and they're not ripening fast enough, a banana is your friend! putting a banana in a paper bag really hurried the ripening process along.

    4. Avocados too ripe? Refrigerate until you need them.

    On the other hand, sometimes you buy avocados that are just a little too ripe and they threaten to turn into mush well before guacamole game day. The solution here is simple: Refrigerate them! Refrigeration stops the ripening process, fixing your avocados at the perfect stage of ripeness.

    5. Make guacamole ahead and use this tip to keep it green!

    Last and certainly not least — yes, you can make guacamole ahead of time. No, it won't turn brown, provided you use our handy little trick for keeping it green. The power of water to banish oxidization is the key here; you simply cover guacamole with water, and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Then pour off the water and stir. It doesn't get soggy or watery at all — the water all pours off. Give it a try!


    Sauce: Blog - 5 Important Things You Should Know About Guacamole
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  28. #1028
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    The veg ramen soup hit the spot today!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16939403_1887681001476342_6255513864008844108_n.jpg



    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-16998015_1887681144809661_6986837064811607652_n.jpg



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  29. #1029
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    8 Foods You’ll Be Surprised To Learn Aren’t Always Vegan

    Reading labels!

    1 Gummy Bears and Marshmallows
    Gelatin. That’s what most gummy bears are made of. It’s actually the third ingredient in Haribo Gummy Bears. And gelatin is made from animal bones.

    2 Non-Dairy Creamer
    Non-dairy creamer is mostly made from sugar, oil and thickeners, but there’s one sneaky ingredient that finds its way into a lot of non-dairy creamers — sodium caseinate. In case you didn’t know, sodium caseinate is a milk protein.

    3 Worcestershire Sauce
    In case you didn’t know, it’s made with fermented anchovies. Worcestershire sauce can show up in sneaky places ― like Bloody Marys ― so be on the look out next time you go to brunch. FYI, anchovies also show up in Caesar salads, olive tapenade and pasta puttanesca.

    4 Cereal
    Put down those Lucky Charms. As we just mentioned before, most marshmallows have gelatin in them, which means so do Lucky Charms. But they aren’t the only culprits in the cereal aisle. Surprisingly, Frosted Mini Wheats are also made with gelatin.

    5 Many Types Of Beer
    Yep, even beer isn’t always safe. Some beers — and actually some wines, too — are clarified using animal-based fining agents. We’re talking either gelatin, isinglass (from fish bladders) or casein.

    6 White Sugar
    If you’re trying to abstain from all animal products, you might want to look for vegan sugar. Some white sugar is processed through animal bone char to refine it and get rid of the impurities. While the end product does not contain actually bone char, it did come into contact with it.

    7 Orange Juice fortified with Omega-3
    If you look at the ingredients in Heart Healthy Tropicana fortified with Omega-3, you’ll see that it’s not only made with fish oil, but fish gelatin as well. Not a very vegetarian way to start the day.

    8 Refried Beans
    Traditional refried beans are made with lard. So next time you go out for Mexican, you might want to double check with the cook. If you’re picking up a can at the store, be sure to look for the vegetarian version (and read the ingredients carefully to make sure it’s actually vegan).


    Sauce: 8 Foods You'll Be Surprised To Learn Aren't Always Vegan | The Huffington Post

    Surprise! 7 Foods You <em>Thought</em> Were Vegan! | Serious Eats
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  30. #1030
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    Would be better if it were 0% chicken




    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — If you think that chicken sandwich you ordered at Subway did not fully taste like fowl, you may have been right.

    According to a Canadian study, a DNA test showed only half of Subway’s oven-roasted patty is made with real chicken.

    Subway was among five fast-food restaurants whose chicken the Canadian Broadcast Corporation had tested.

    The results showed the Oven Roasted Chicken patties averaged 53.6 percent chicken DNA while the Sweet Onion Chicken Teriyaki strips came in at 42.8 percent.

    The sandwich chain refuted the results of the DNA test in a released statement:

    “SUBWAY Canada cannot confirm the veracity of the results of the lab testing you had conducted. However, we are concerned by the alleged findings you cite with respect to the proportion of soy content. Our chicken strips and oven roasted chicken contain 1% or less of soy protein. We use this ingredient in these products as a means to help stabilize the texture and moisture. All of our chicken items are made from 100% white meat chicken which is marinated, oven roasted and grilled. We tested our chicken products recently for nutritional and quality attributes and found it met our food quality standards. We will look into this again with our supplier to ensure that the chicken is meeting the high standard we set for all of our menu items and ingredients.”

    In case you wondered what the rest of the patties and chicken strips are made of: It’s soy.

    The same test was done on the chicken Wendy’s and McDonald’s serve.

    Wendy’s grilled chicken sandwich averaged 88.5 percent chicken, while McDonald’s Grilled Country Chicken averaged 84.9 percent, according to the findings.

    Wendy’s response: “Wendy’s Grilled Chicken Sandwich is a whole muscle chicken breast fillet; not reformed or restructured. In addition, we use only 100% Canadian chicken in Canada. For our grilled chicken sandwich and other grilled chicken products (salads, wraps, etc.) we use a juicy, all-white meat chicken breast fillet, marinated in a blend of herbs. We do not provide ingredient percentages as we consider that information to be proprietary.”

    McDonald’s response: “Our grilled chicken sandwich is made with 100% seasoned chicken breast. The chicken breast is (a single piece) trimmed for size to fit the sandwich. We don’t release the percentage of each ingredient for competitive reasons, but on the nutrition centre people can see that our grilled chicken includes seasoning and other ingredients, just like at home.”
    DNA Test Subway Oven-Roasted Chicken Only 50% Chicken « CBS Los Angeles
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  31. #1031
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    Good stuff ! I am not vegan, or even vegetarian, but enjoy reading your posts. Very informative.

  32. #1032
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    ^ I'm happy to share!
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    Name:  41Fg27RllcL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
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    New York Times bestselling author Dr. Neal Barnard reveals the shocking truth about cheese-the dangerous addiction that is harming your health-and presents a radical program to lose weight and feel great.

    We've been told that dairy does a body good, but the truth is that cheese can be dangerous. Loaded with calories, fat, and cholesterol, cheese can make you gain weight and leads to a host of health problems like high blood pressure and arthritis. Worse, it contains mild opiates that make it additive, triggering the same brain receptors as heroin and morphine.

    In THE CHEESE TRAP, Dr. Neal Barnard presents a comprehensive program to help readers break free of their cheese addiction so they can lose weight, boost energy, and improve their overall health. This easy-to-follow diet features a treasury of healthy recipes that will tame even the toughest cravings-from pizza, to lasagna, to ice cream and cheesecake.

    sauce: https://www.amazon.com/Cheese-Trap-B...a8e52a78d6cdba
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  34. #1034
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    No one... I mean no one... is taking my cheese.
    A person has to have some kind of vise.

    Feta Fries, served by my favorite Bulgarian girls.... Mmmmmmmmm...
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  35. #1035
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    Hmm, that's making me want to eat more cheese. I don't need to lose weight.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  36. #1036
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-joes-piszza.jpg


    My Favorite pizza from a local pizzeria. It's their Vegetarian Pizza without cheese. Squash, zucchini, tomatoes, sun dried tomatoes, onion, spinach and mushrooms. Yum Yum!

  37. #1037
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    ^ The pizza looks scrumptious!

    As for the love of cheese: Only the British would say "lets throw a cheese down this and then throw ourselves down after it!"


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  38. #1038
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    Quote Originally Posted by huckleberry hound View Post
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ID:	1124396


    My Favorite pizza from a local pizzeria. It's their Vegetarian Pizza without cheese. Squash, zucchini, tomatoes, sun dried tomatoes, onion, spinach and mushrooms. Yum Yum!
    I just ate dinner and now I'm hungry again.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  39. #1039
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    Scientists have figured out what makes Indian food so delicious: Researchers have data crunched 2,500 recipes and found the secret to their success.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-imrs.jpg

    Indian food, with its hodgepodge of ingredients and intoxicating aromas, is coveted around the world. The labor-intensive cuisine and its mix of spices is more often than not a revelation for those who sit down to eat it for the first time. Heavy doses of cardamom, cayenne, tamarind and other flavors can overwhelm an unfamiliar palate. Together, they help form the pillars of what tastes so good to so many people.

    But behind the appeal of Indian food — what makes it so novel and so delicious — is also a stranger and subtler truth. In a large new analysis of more than 2,000 popular recipes, data scientists have discovered perhaps the key reason why Indian food tastes so unique: It does something radical with flavors, something very different from what we tend to do in the United States and the rest of Western culture. And it does it at the molecular level.

    Before we go further, let's take a step back and consider what flavors are and how they interact. If you were to hold a microscope to most Western dishes, you would find an interesting but not all-too-surprising trend. Popular food pairings in this part of the world combine ingredients that share like flavors, which food chemists have broken down into their molecular parts — precise chemical compounds that, when combined, give off a distinct taste.

    Most of the compounds have scientific names, though one of the simpler compounds is acetal, which, as the food chemist George Burdock has written, is "refreshing, pleasant, and [has a] fruity-green odor," and can be found in whiskey, apple juice, orange juice and raw beets. On average, there are just over 50 flavor compounds in each food ingredient.

    A nifty chart shared by Scientific American in 2013 shows which foods share the most flavor compounds with others and which food pairings have the most flavor compounds in common. Peanut butter and roasted peanuts have one of the most significant overlaps (no surprise there). But there are connections that are more difficult to predict: strawberries, for instance, have more in common with white wine than they do with apples, oranges or honey.

    Data crunching Indian recipes
    Chefs in the West like to make dishes with ingredients that have overlapping flavors. But not all cuisines adhere to the same rule. Many Asian cuisines have been shown to belie the trend by favoring dishes with ingredients that don't overlap in flavor. And Indian food, in particular, is one of the most powerful counterexamples.

    Researchers at the Indian Institute for Technology in Jodhpur crunched data on several thousand recipes from a popular online recipe site called TarlaDalal.com. They broke each dish down to its ingredients, and then compared how often and heavily ingredients share flavor compounds.

    The answer? Not too often.

    Here's an easy way to make sense of what they did, through the lens of a single, theoretical dish. Say you have a dish with 4 different ingredients, like the one below:

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-imrs.jpg

    Each one of those ingredients has its own list of flavor compounds. And any two of those ingredients' lists might have some overlap. Take the coconut and onion, for instance. We can all agree that these two things are pretty different, but we can also see (in the Venn diagram below) that there's some overlap in their flavor make-up. (Ignore the math symbols.)

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-imrs-1-.jpg

    You could create the same diagram for all the ingredients with overlapping flavor compounds, as in this diagram. There are six that have overlap. (Again, ignore the math.)

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-imrs-2-.jpg

    The researchers did this for each of the several thousand recipes, which used a total of 200 ingredients. They examined how much the underlying flavor compounds overlapped in single dishes and discovered something very different from Western cuisines. Indian cuisine tended to mix ingredients whose flavors don't overlap at all.

    "We found that average flavor sharing in Indian cuisine was significantly lesser than expected," the researchers wrote.

    In other words, the more overlap two ingredients have in flavor, the less likely they are to appear in the same Indian dish.

    The unique makeup of Indian cuisine can be seen in some dishes more than others, and it seems to be tied to the use of specific ingredients. Spices usually indicate dishes with flavors that have no chemical common ground.

    More specifically, many Indian recipes contain cayenne, the basis of curry powder that is in just about any Indian curry. And when a dish contains cayenne, the researchers found, it's unlikely to have other ingredients that share similar flavors. The same can be said of green bell pepper, coriander and garam masala, which are nearly as ubiquitous in Indian cuisine.

    "Each of the spices is uniquely placed in its recipe to shape the flavor sharing pattern with rest of the ingredients," the researchers noted.

    Milk, butter, bread, and rice, meanwhile—all of which are hallmarks of Western cuisine—were found to be associated with just the opposite: flavor pairings that match. When any of those ingredients appeared in an Indian dish, there was a good chance there would be a lot of flavor overlap.

    A lesson for all chefs

    The takeaway is that part of what makes Indian food so appealing is the way flavors rub up against each other. The cuisine is complicated, no doubt: the average Indian dish, after all, contains at least 7 ingredients, and the total number of ingredients observed by the researchers amounted to almost 200 out of the roughly 381 observed around the world. But all those ingredients — and the spices especially — are all uniquely important because in any single dish, each one brings a unique flavor.


    But the upshot should also be a thought that we might be approaching food from the wrong angle. Combining ingredients with like flavors is a useful (and often delicious) strategy, but it might be a somewhat misleading rule of thumb. Indian cuisine, after all, is cherished globally, and yet hinges on a decidedly different ingredient pairing logic.

    Sauce: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.bf5151f1df08
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  40. #1040
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    A recent review from the American College of Cardiology recommends a plant-based diet and acknowledges the damage animal products inflict on our heart/arterial health.

    The Journal of the American College of Cardiology has just published a review of some of the popular diets/eating patterns that are promoted for cardiovascular health. The aim of the review is to provide doctors with accurate advice for patients. Doctors are unfortunately not given much nutritional education during their medical training, but diet is absolutely key to preventing disease in the first place.

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death globally, and as more people die annually from CVDs than from any other cause, it's very important for us to understand what lifestyle factors can decrease our risk.

    The evidence has consistently shown that adopting a whole foods plant-based diet can not only prevent cardiovascular diseases, but halt and reverse progression of existing cardiovascular diseases.

    And the evidence has lead the President of the American College of Cardiology, Dr. Kim Williams, to state:

    “There are two kinds of cardiologists: vegans and those who haven’t read the data.”

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-d76692d147fa.jpg


    The review noted that:

    "All sources of animal protein (eggs, fish, poultry, red meat, and processed red meat) were noted to increase all-cause mortality relative to vegetable protein, with processed red meat being associated with more cardiovascular deaths and egg consumption being associated with more cancer deaths".

    "Evidence indicates that a diet that is predominantly plant based is associated with improved atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk factors, reduced coronary heart disease (CHD) progression, and beneficial effects on ASCVD. A whole food, plant-based dietary pattern plays an important role in ASCVD risk reduction."
    Other relevant parts of the study included:

    "Epidemiological studies and Randomised Control Studies indicate that plant-based diets are associated with improvement in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk factors and a decreased risk of ASCVD. Studies have been conducted both for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease with plant-based diets, often in conjunction with other heart-healthy lifestyle behaviors.
    and:

    "Furthermore, populations consuming a predominantly plant-based diet are reported to rarely develop cardiovascular disease. These include the Okinawans, the Papua Highlanders of New Guinea, the rural Chinese, central Africans, and the Tarahumara of northern Mexico".

    "Additionally, in 1995 and 2014, a whole food plant-based diet intervention was shown to result in prevention of coronary artery disease progression and angiographic disease reversal. On this basis, it appears that a whole food, plant-based diet may halt progression of coronary atherosclerosis and achieve evidence of angiographic disease regression."

    "Most recently, a large prospective cohort study of U.S. health care professionals described the association between animal versus plant protein intake and mortality outcomes. This study showed increased all-cause and CV mortality with high animal protein intake (including processed red meat, unprocessed red meat, and eggs). High plant protein intake was inversely associated with mortality rates. These findings are consistent with recommendations to increase plant protein intake and substitute plant protein for animal protein."
    If you're wanting to avoid cardiovascular disease, the evidence has never been clearer: eliminate all animal products and adopt a whole food plant-based diet.

    These findings come on top of new research published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that plant-based protein is better for building muscle than animal protein.
    Sauce: "Plant based proteins are significantly more heart-healthy compared to animal proteins" states research published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology
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    Those with nut allergies have been warned


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17191134_1436203173097527_5382256965788632275_n.jpg
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  42. #1042
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    Is it really possible to build mass, increase strength, and optimize your athletic performance without eating any animal products? Vegan strength athletes think so! Here’s how to do it the right way.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-13516217_1778729409038169_5863519983410445373_n.jpg


    Bodybuilding and strength sports have traditionally been built on a hearty diet of animal protein. Even the general public automatically associate gym-goers with eggs, chicken breast, steak, and whey protein shakes.

    So if the Western world thinks protein=animal products, can a healthy, muscular and strong body really be fueled by a diet which contains no animal protein at all?

    Yes. Vegan athletes can be found at elite level in bodybuilding, strongman, powerlifting and CrossFit. And veganism in strength sports is getting more popular, as greater numbers of people discover the benefits of a vegan diet.

    What Do Our Diets Actually Need?

    To understand how a vegan diet could work for you, put tradition aside and think about what a diet needs to contain:

    – sufficient protein, including a range of amino acids

    – carbohydrate

    – healthy and essential fats

    – fiber

    All of those things can be found in a vegan diet.

    Vegan Things You’re Already Eating

    Most of us eat plenty of foods that are vegan. Oatmeal, sweet potatoes, rice cakes, nut butters, fruit and berries, avocado, vegetables, rice, pulses, beans, nuts and seeds are all strength-sport favorites that tick the vegan box.

    How To Design A Vegan Diet

    Like any change to your diet, the decision to become vegan will need a bit of thought and planning. This is particularly true if you’re travelling for work, or for competing. But we’re strength athletes. We’re already used to planning our meals, prepping our foods, reading food labels, and thinking about macros. In that sense, we’re one step ahead of the rest of the population.

    Use a wide range of grains, legumes, pulses, plenty of vegetables and root vegetables, a variety of fruits and berries. You could add in a vegan protein powder (hemp, brown rice, pea protein – or a blend). Vegan protein bars are widely available. And vegan favorites like tofu and seitan steak (which has a fantastic leucine profile – second only to whey) are a useful addition.

    A vegan diet does not need to be boring! How about a vegan curry made with lentils or chickpeas and cauliflower, served with your favorite type of rice? Or oatmeal plus hemp seeds, non-dairy milk, berries, and a scoop of nutty-tasting vegan protein powder?

    Vegan meals lend themselves really well to batch cooking in a crock pot or slow cooker, and can be served up with rice, potato, or in a wrap for round #2!

    You’ll probably already have a good idea of your macros. As a guide, make sure you are getting 0.7g-1.0g protein per pound of lean mass. 20-30% of your calories from healthy fats. Vegan diets tend to naturally from saturated fats. We do need some saturated fat in our diet, so get yours from coconut products including coconut oil, coconut milk, or coconut meat. Good vegan fat sources include flaxseed, coconut oil, olive oil, almonds and other nuts, nut and seed butters, avocados.

    The Surprising Benefits of A Vegan Diet

    Vegan athletes report staying leaner in their off-seasons than before they turned vegan, partly because their choice of junk food is limited, and partly because their vegan diet contains more volume of whole foods. Many vegans say that they have fewer digestive issues from vegan protein powders, avoiding the bloating some experience from whey.

    These days, there is a vegan substitute for almost every food you could think of. Veganism isn’t boring, repetitive, or restrictive. Your only limit is your imagination!


    Sauce:
    Building Muscle On A Vegan Diet - Lift Big Eat Big
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Those with nut allergies have been warned


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    I went to a restaurant tonight and ordered the portobello burger. The waitress informed me "that's vegetarian". I told her That's ok, I'm a vegetarian (I'm actually a pescatarian). She said some guy ordered it before and then made such a scene about it not having any meat that they are now required to notify anyone that orders it that it is vegetarian. It was as described in the menu.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  44. #1044
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Can recommend How To Not Die by Dr. Michael Greger


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    I was researching Rich Roll the other day and found this book "How Not to Die" and ordered it. Should be here today. Can't wait to read it and I'm glad you recommend it Has lots of great reviews!

    Also, if you haven't checked out Rich Roll you should. One of the fittest men in the world according to Men's Fitness Magazine. He's now 51 but looks 30 and turned Vegan at 40 after a health scare. I had never heard of him until this week. Has lots of good info on his website, his books, his PODCASTS and his Youtube channel.
    Rich Roll - Profile | Rich Roll


  45. #1045
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    Thank you for sharing the link about Rich Roll! What an inspiring transformation! Incredible athlete!
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  46. #1046
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    Happy Hump day!!!


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17021610_1908100689421768_1799206007271509583_n.jpg

    6 Libido-Enhancing Vegan Foods


    1. Arugula
    A delightfully spicy leafy green that’s part of the cruciferous vegetable family, arugula contains beneficial antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that support overall health by combating free-radical damage and nourishing our bodies. From the culinary perspective, arugula is delicious and easy to use in vegan recipes. With its delicately peppery flavor, arugula can be eaten in a salad, blended into sauces, and added to green juices. And great news in the love-life department: arugula has been hailed as a powerful aphrodisiac since the first century!


    2. Walnuts
    Rich in flavor and healthy fats, heart-healthy walnuts can help keep arteries flexible, which means better blood flow to certain parts of our bodies … and better blood flow is something we definitely want when it comes to getting in the mood. In addition, with more antioxidants than any other nuts, walnuts support the body’s overall health and vitality, which are all great things when it comes to maintaining and promoting a healthy sex drive!


    3. Garlic
    While it might not leave you with the freshest breath, there’s an old expression that goes something like this: “if your lover doesn’t like the smell of garlic, it’s time to find a new lover.” Or maybe that’s just what you hear growing up in an Italian family. At any rate, garlic is another raw plant-based ingredient that supports sexual health. Similar to walnuts, garlic is high in antioxidants but is also heart-healthy and serves as a natural antifungal. Furthermore, garlic is packed with allicin, which increases blood flow and dilates blood vessels.

    4. Avocado
    High in monounsaturated fats that can help lower cholesterol, avocados are another power player when it comes to getting your blood pumping. They’re also high in vitamin B-6, vitamin E, and folic acid, all of which are known to boost libido, which is fantastic news for fans of this popular ingredient.

    5. Cacao
    Who doesn’t love chocolate, especially for romantic occasions? The great news is that chocolate not only boosts your mood and sex drive but it can also be served in ways that are both healthy and delicious. Cacao has more antioxidants than green tea or wine and is packed with a chemical called Phenylethylamine (PEA), which is something our bodies release when we’re, um, excited. In addition, cacao makes for a natural mood-enhancer that can come in handy when you’re looking to get into a romantic state of mind, making it a deliciously convenient plant-based ingredient for desserts.

    6. Maca
    This ancient starchy Peruvian root is most often found in powdered form and makes for a tasty addition to many vegan recipes, but especially in desserts. Maca’s earthy sweet taste pairs well with raw cacao, which enhances everything from puddings to ice creams. The root is well-studied in terms of its ability to increase sexual desire and is considered a nutritionally robust plant due to its fiber, calcium, magnesium, iron, and selenium. Maca can also help balance hormones in women, alleviating symptoms of menopause while giving sex drive a boost.


    Sauce: 6 Libido-Enhancing Vegan Foods
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  47. #1047
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Thank you for sharing the link about Rich Roll! What an inspiring transformation! Incredible athlete!
    Yes, I've heard several endurance athletes are going vegan because of the performance boost and overall health and recovery. When I first became vegan about seven years ago I was still eating a lot of junk food and drinking sodas and alcohol so I was surprised when my cholesterol numbers weren't as low as I expected them to be. Then I got the Thrive book by Brendan Braziar and got healthier in my 40s than I was in my 20s and I was really healthy in my 20s. But I had more endurance and stamina on the Thrive diet.
    https://www.amazon.com/Thrive-Nutrit.../dp/0738212547
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-brendan-brazier-book.jpg

    Here is Rich and his wife making a cheese sauce. I haven't tried it because I have my own recipe that is the best cheese/nacho dip/sauce I've ever had but I don't have a YT of mine

  48. #1048
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    I can't believe tomatoes aren't on the sexy food list. Even oranges.
    Communist Party Member Since 1917.

  49. #1049
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jem7sk View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Can recommend How To Not Die by Dr. Michael Greger
    Both of these were really good. Before I took the V plunge, I had met a lot junk-food vegetarians who really didn't seem all that healthy. As RR nicely puts it - "eating plants as close to natural state as possible" is IMHO a great guideline for keeping the compass pointed towards maximium health. Thanks for sharing.

  50. #1050
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    Chia Seeds

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-chia-seeds-770x402.jpg

    The tiny chia seed is a superfood which can help with weight loss, diabetes, and hypercholesteremia. Each serving gives you a healthy dose of fiber, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. Unfortunately, it may bring on constipation, flatulence, diarrhea, and an allergic reaction. Chia seeds can also cause thinning of your blood. They could even be a choking hazard if you don't prep the seeds correctly


    Chia seeds, a superfood dating back to Aztec times, is now enjoying a rebirth of sorts. It features in every nutritional A-list as a rich source of fiber, omega-3 fats, protein, vitamins, and minerals. Granted, chia seeds are a great source of nutrition as part of a balanced diet. They are also constantly marketed as a weight-loss aid and scoffed down in large quantities by weight watchers. But you can have too much of a good thing, and this superfood is no exception. Here are some side effects you need to watch out for.

    5 Downsides Of Chia Seeds

    1. Tummy Troubles

    Chia seeds are very high in fiber content – at nearly 11 gm per ounce serving, it takes care of a sizeable chunk of the American Dietetic Association’s recommended fiber intake of 38 g for men and 25 g for women for the day.1But a high-fiber diet doesn’t work for every body type. Too much fiber in one go can lead to flatulence, constipation, and diarrhea. It’s a good idea to eat chia seeds with a lot of water or soak them first. Soaking makes it easier to digest them. It also offers the added benefit of releasing all the nutrients stored inside.2

    2. Blood Thinning Effect

    Chia seeds can act as natural blood thinners, helping prevent your blood from clotting. If you are already taking blood-thinning medication like warfarin, steer clear of chia. For the same reasons, avoid chia seeds right after a surgery to avoid excessive bleeding.3

    3. Allergy Alert

    Chia seeds have a lot of protein in them and that’s bad news if you are allergic to the protein in chia. A 100 gm serving has about 16.54 gm of protein.4For those with a nut or seed allergy, chia seeds may be off the table. Get tested to check anyway. Reactions can range from skin rashes and hives to watery eyes, vomiting, and diarrhea. Also watch out for repetitive coughing, wheezing, difficulty swallowing, and a hoarse throat. You may also feel dizzy. As inflammation flares up in the larynx, tongue, and mouth, you could find it difficult to talk and even breathe. If your allergy is more severe, you may go into shock, your pulse may weaken, and your skin may turn pale or blue.5

    4. Choking Hazard


    Chia seeds have gained notoriety as a choking hazard. As one Time magazine report highlighted, incorrect consumption can lead to complications.6When you don’t pre-soak your chia seeds or eat them without roasting, you run the risk of gagging or choking on them. You may even end up in the ER as a result. Why? Because the seed when dry and unroasted absorbs as much as 27 times its dry weight in water. When this happens it turns gelatinous and expands hugely, plump with water. This sticky mass can get stuck in your esophagus, making you choke.7

    5. Prostate Problems

    The case for and against chia when it comes to prostate cancer isn’t closed just yet. While some research indicates it could decrease the risk of prostate tumor growth, other research contradicts this. For instance, one study indicated that consuming foods high in omega-3 fatty acids, like chia seeds, could trigger prostate tumorigenesis in men. This could imply an increased incidence of prostate cancer.8Previous research had a contradictory view. Researchers claimed that the omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid did not increase prostate cancer risk and believed it even marginally decreased the risk.9The jury is still out on this one, but you may want to hold off on binging on chia.

    How Much, How Often?

    On the whole, the chia seed is a powerhouse of goodness. No wonder every nutritionist loves it. Ayurveda also recommends adding chia to your regular diet, conscious of its high fiber effects. But since the superfood is still not fully understood, additional studies will be needed before it can be declared safe for consumption by those with certain conditions like high triglycerides and low blood pressure, and even pregnant women.

    Just ensure you don’t rely only on chia for your daily fiber intake. If you are aiming to lose weight, having more of it won’t lose you much. After all, you will have added on extra calories from the seeds as well. Typically, 1–1.5 tablespoon taken up to twice a day should be fine for most people. That’s the equivalent of a 20 gm serving that has 139 calories each time.10


    Sauce: What Are The Side Effects Of Chia Seeds?
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    Eat your veggies

  51. #1051
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    Maybe there's a corn shortage in Jamaica?

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  52. #1052
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    I was in Turkey a few years back and had a million Turkish Lira in my pocket, it still wasn't enough to rent a car for a week. Now they're about a quarter a piece. Wonder if the stuff I have laying around is still redeemable.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  53. #1053
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    today? or next /Monday?

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  54. #1054
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    Doesn't matter. Monday is ALWAYS a bad day.

  55. #1055
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    Beware the Ides of March

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  56. #1056
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    So I'm on a show site in Vegas and the last couple of days we've had crew meal lunches. Went in today and a coworker/vegetarian pointed out the sign next to the salad listed the ingredients which included "bacon" and then concluded with "vegetarian". And the salad obviously had bacon on it. How stupid is the person that typed that up not to notice? And why wouldn't they put the bacon in a bowl next to the salad so that you can have it if you want it but those of us that don't want it still have something to eat?

    Last year on the same show we were ordering out for a runner to go pick up. The same coworker order a vegetarian "turkey" sandwich, actually him and another guy. When the runner placed the order, he was told they were out of the faux turkey so he went ahead and ordered real turkey. Fortunately, I had ordered something different and got something I could eat. And that runner was not hired back this year.
    "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." -Douglas Adams.

  57. #1057
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-dairy-free_milks_05-675x250.jpg

    Guide to Dairy-Free Eating
    Why Go Dairy-Free?

    Dairy products are deeply problematic on both health and ethical grounds. On the health side, countless people who’ve quit dairy found that their chronic congestion, digestive problems, ear infections, or acne vanished within a few weeks. You might therefore consider going dairy-free for a month to see if doing so significantly improves your quality of life. Having said that, it’s important for everyone—meat eaters, ovo-lacto vegetarians, and vegans alike—to read up on nutrition to ensure the diet they follow isn’t deficient in any nutrients.

    Nutritionally speaking, dairy is bad news everywhere you look. Almost half of the calories in whole milk come from fat, and nearly all of its carbohydrates come from sugar—all of it in the form of lactose, which many people can’t properly digest. Worse yet, the fat in dairy products is every bit as saturated as the fat in beef. Dairy also has absolutely no fiber or iron. And if all that were not enough, you might contemplate why the FDA refuses to answer the question about whether there is pus in milk products.

    On the ethical side, many dairy cows are never allowed to graze outdoors; they are confined to cramped stalls on factory farms. Although a cow can live twenty years, practically all dairy cows are slaughtered before before they turn five, as the milk production of aging cows can’t match that of younger animals. Modern dairy cows are impregnated each year in order to maximize their milk yields, and their calves are often sold to the veal industry. So if you oppose veal crates and the killing of young calves for food, you should know that buying dairy products helps to keep the veal industry afloat. For detailed information about the dairy industry’s cruel farming practices, see Jonathan Safran Foer’s superb book Eating Animals.

    How to Go Dairy-Free

    If the idea of rapidly removing all dairy products from your diet seems daunting, you can ease into it. Think about the dairy products you currently consume: chances are that there are one or two such foods you love, but a dozen others you eat regularly that you’re not crazy about. If, for example, you regularly consume whole milk, yogurt, ice cream, American cheese slices, butter, and cheese pizza, it might be that yogurt and pizza are the only foods from this list that you’re especially fond of. So get rid of the others, and you’re immediately more than halfway to being dairy-free! But the real key to success in eliminating dairy foods involves not cutting them out, but rather crowding them out with superior non-dairy alternatives. And luckily, there are all sorts of non-dairy products on the market that are truly wonderful:

    Butter: Earth Balance and Soy Garden are delicious vegan margarines, and both are free of dangerous trans fats.

    Yogurt: Silk’s Peach & Mango soy yogurt is sensational, and may be the best vegan yogurt on the market. Other brands of soy or coconut-based yogurts include So Delicious, Trader Joe’s and Nancy’s.

    Milk: Soy, rice, almond, coconut, and even hemp seed milks are widely available, not just at natural food stores but also at most supermarkets. They’re sold both in aseptic juice boxes stored at room temperature, and in conventional milk cartons in the refrigerated dairy case. Note that “coconut milk” may refer to a pour-it-on-your-cereal milk alternative that’s similar to soy milk, or it may refer to canned coconut milk which is a much thicker and fattier product that’s perfect for Thai curries.

    Cheese: The number of vegan cheeses on the market has soared in recent years,and we list all the top brands on our vegan cheese page. If the product doesn’t label itself as vegan, always check the ingredients for casein or sodium caseinate—these are proteins extracted from milk that are used in some soy cheeses.

    Ice Cream: There are a number of excellent brands: Turtle Mountain’s “Purely Decadent” pints are outstanding, and conventional ice cream producer Double Rainbow makes several excellent varieties from soy milk. Ben & Jerry’s has even gotten into the act with four “Non-Dairy” flavors that are certified vegan. Also, both So Delicious and Tofutti make vegan versions of those junky but delicious ice cream sandwiches you ate as a kid—you won’t even be able to tell the difference! Plus don’t forget about sorbets, which tend to be vegan and are lighter and often more flavorful than ice cream. If you love the flavor of coconuts, you owe it to yourself to try Luna and Larry’s Coconut Bliss.

    Cream Cheese, Sour Cream, and Mayo: Once again, you’re in luck. Follow Your Heart, Daiya and Tofutti make superb vegan versions of cream cheese, which are available at Whole Foods Market and Trader Joe’s, as well as many natural food stores. Follow Your Heart and Tofutti also make vegan sour cream. There are also several vegan brands of mayonnaise, the most popular of which is Just Mayo by Hampton Creek, which is carried by Walmart, Costco, and natural food groceries nationwide.

    Coffee Creamer: There’s no need to put cream in your coffee: both So Delicious and Silk make vegan creamers that blend perfectly into coffee.

    Pudding. Bestselling cookbook author Mark Bittman concocted perhaps the best chocolate pudding recipe you’ll ever try, and it doesn’t contain a drop of milk. ZenSoy makes refrigerated vegan pudding cups made from soy milk and almond milk.

    Dairy-Free Cookbooks

    The easiest way to find a dairy-free cookbook is to choose one with vegan in its title. There are hundreds of vegan cookbooks available, and since a vegan diet excludes all animal products every vegan cookbook is by definition dairy-free.

    Start with a cookbook offering a diverse assortment of easy recipes that can be prepared in minutes. Two excellent choices are Robin Robertson’s Quick-Fix Vegan or Mary Mattern’s Nom Yourself. If you want to make meals and desserts that are a little more upscale, check out titles like Happy Healthy Vegan Kitchen or Eaternity.

    There are entire books devoted solely to vegan baking. Two comprehensive titles are The 100 Best Vegan Baking Recipes and Whole Grain Vegan Baking. If sweets are your thing, be sure to check out Chloe’s Vegan Desserts. Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, and Vegan Cookies Invade Your Cookie Jar.

    Whether you want to reduce your dairy consumption or cut it out entirely, you’ll probably be surprised by how easy it is. So why not make a commitment to try out a dairy-free lifestyle for a month?

    Guide to Dairy-Free Eating
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    Eat your veggies

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    F*ck Cancer

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  59. #1059
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    I found this article a good reference.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-iron-2.jpg

    Iron Deficiency and Women
    While iron might not be as hot a topic as protein or carbohydrates, it’s actually the most common nutrition deficiency in the world (including in the USA).

    Only two percent of adult men are iron deficient, but it increases to 9-12 percent of Caucasian women and nearly 20% of black and Hispanic women. Even in the general, non-runner, non-vegan population, there are a lot of people who are iron deficient, and female athletes may be at an even higher risk.

    A 2011 study of female collegiate rowers in New York found that 30% of the athletes tested had low iron stores. Yup, nearly a third of all women in the study.

    All that’s to say that iron deficiency is common among all women of childbearing age, and it’s probably even more common for athletes.

    Why Female Athletes are at Risk for Anemia

    You run, practice yoga, and eat plants. There’s nothing to worry about, right? Like it or not, there are a few situations when your healthy exercise habits may actually increase your risk of certain issues, and this is one of those times.

    Female athletes are at a greater risk for iron deficiency because along with losing iron in blood monthly through menstruation, we also lose iron through sweat, and our iron absorption is reduced through exercise-induced acute inflammation.

    There are other factors which could be of particular concern to runners, such as hemolysis (the rupturing of blood cells from a repeated foot strike), but there’s some controversy on the research so let’s skip it for now.

    Then there’s the whole cycle of diminishing returns, which is far too common in runners and other athletes. When you’re no longer seeing the results you want, your instinct is usually to push harder, leading to even more fatigue and depletion of iron stores, instead of stepping back to give yourself the chance to fully recover between workouts.

    And that’s a cycle nobody wants to get stuck in.

    How to Know if You’re Deficient in Iron


    If you’ve made it this far into a No Meat Athlete article, I’m willing to bet you already agree eating a whole foods plant-based diet is healthy and ideal. And that for the most part, all the hoopla around whether or not we get enough nutrients through plants is not of concern.

    But research shows that while omnivores can also develop anemia, vegetarians or vegans may be at a slightly increased risk.

    Now don’t panic — there’s nothing to freak out about. As a vegan, simply be on the lookout for the symptoms, like:

    Tiredness or weakness
    Pale skin
    Headaches or lightheadedness
    Declining athletic performance
    Cold hands and feet
    Hair loss
    Loss of appetite
    Cravings for ice, dirt, or clay
    If you’re thinking any one of those (except for maybe the dirt cravings …) could be the sign of a dozen other things, then you’d be right. But that doesn’t mean you can ignore them.

    Iron deficiency occurs when your stores of iron decline below normal levels, and anemia refers to low hemoglobin, the measure of iron circulating in the blood. When either of those take place, it will likely trigger one or more of the symptoms above.

    And if that happens, do yourself a favor and talk to a doctor.

    Side note: If you have very heavy periods, that’s also something to report. Large blood losses may make it difficult to avoid anemia.

    A doctor will assess your iron levels by testing your hemoglobin — whether or not you have enough red blood cells (low levels make you anemic) — and your ferritin. Low ferritin levels indicate a deficiency in iron stores. The good news is, if your ferritin levels are low, your body will automatically start absorbing more iron from the foods you eat.

    Doctors measure your levels through a simple blood test.

    Your doctor can then determine if an iron deficiency is a sign of something more serious, like chronic infections, cancer, celiac disease, or uterine polyps (do I sound like a drug commercial yet?). But most likely it’s just a simple absorption problem.

    Let’s take a step back to break down how iron absorption works, and how to prevent a deficiency from developing in the first place.

    Understanding Iron Absorption

    There are two types of iron: heme and non-heme iron.

    Heme iron comes exclusively from animal source foods, and it’s more easily absorbed by our bodies than non-heme iron. Interestingly, however, only about 40% of the iron from animal-sourced foods is heme iron. The rest is non-heme, which comes from both animal sources and plants.

    For the typical omnivore, only about 10% their iron is heme iron, because the majority of iron they consume actually comes from grains and veggies. All iron found in plant foods is non-heme, and while non-heme iron isn’t as easily absorbed, our bodies don’t need both non-heme and heme sources to thrive.

    Bored yet? I bet this will get your attention:

    Our absorption of non-heme iron can be further reduced by calcium intake and by compounds in soy, coffee, and tea.

    In fact, a cup of coffee may reduce the iron we absorb by up to 39%, and a cup of tea by 64%. So after eating an iron-rich meal or taking an iron supplement, I recommend to wait two hours before enjoying coffee or tea.

    That sounds worse than it is. You can avoid this issue altogether by keeping coffee and tea to break time instead of during a meal.

    How to Increase Iron Intake and Prevent Iron Deficiency

    Like any nutrition-related issue, the focus should first be on prevention — or in this case, increasing iron consumption and absorption before there’s a problem.

    I like to start in the kitchen, since there are a ton of iron-rich plant-based foods we can easily consume on a daily basis, including:

    Legumes — lentils, kidney beans, soybeans (tofu, tempeh), lima beans
    Grains — barley, quinoa, buckwheat, fortified cereals, brown rice, oatmeal
    Dried fruit — apricots, flaked coconut, dried prunes, dried pears, and sun-dried tomatoes
    Nuts and seeds — cashews, almonds, macadamias, pumpkin, squash, pine, pistachio, sunflower
    Vegetables — dark leafy greens like Swiss chard and collard greens, tomato sauce
    Other — cocoa powder, blackstrap molasses, prune juice
    Find recipes that incorporate several of these ingredients, like this Chickpea Tagine or Lentil Soup, or (and this is my favorite) simply combine many of the foods above into one giant iron-rich stir-fry with greens, legumes, and other veggies on top of a bed of quinoa.

    Top it off with raw nuts and seeds for an extra punch (and crunch).

    When it comes to absorption, it’s not just about what you eat, but how you eat it. As you prepare your food:

    Pair iron-rich meals with a food source of vitamin C, which will increase the absorption of non-heme iron. It’s super easy to do, as many iron-rich and vitamin C-rich foods go together (think hummus made with lemon juice or black beans with lime and red peppers).
    Cook in cast-iron cookware, especially if you’re making an acidic food like tomato sauce. A small amount of iron will always leach from the pan into your food, but acidic foods enhance this process — that is a good thing!
    But, of course, there are times when iron levels drop below normal, no matter what sort of prevention measures you’ve taken in the kitchen.

    Iron Supplements

    If you become iron deficient, increasing iron intake through food might not be enough to get you back on track, and a supplement may be needed.

    If you do take an iron supplement:

    Take it with food so you don’t upset your stomach.
    Consider taking a vitamin C supplement along with it to increase absorption.
    Don’t take a calcium supplement at the same time (spread them out throughout the day).
    Avoid taking it directly after a hard workout, when absorption may be reduced.
    Avoid coffee and tea within two hours of taking the supplement, or better, avoid them all together.
    There’s absolutely nothing wrong with taking supplements when you need them, but when you do, take them in a way that allows for the best absorption rate.

    Iron is Your Friend, Don’t Neglect It

    Looking after our iron stores is an important part of maintaining our health and performance as plant-based female athletes. Since anemia is such a widespread issue, it’s one area of nutrition that I always recommend you attack preemptively, before it becomes a problem.

    Many of us can do that on a whole foods, plant-based diet and a well-planned training regimen. But for some, extra care through supplementation is needed.

    Whether that’s you or not, all female athletes should take iron seriously, and if a symptom or issue is to ever arise, don’t hesitate to get it checked out.

    Maintaining proper iron levels is one of the best ways to ensure that you get the most out of your training.


    Iron: a Primer for the Vegan Female Athlete | No Meat Athlete
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    Eat your veggies

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    After the gym and prior to our evening ride, we did a big walk .... some random pics along the way

    Mid day treat... vegan supersonic cookie for me and a double double cupcake vegan for Chris

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17265105_1897606980483744_4116151531759894321_n.jpg

    jackfruit... medieval weapon on the outside... bubblegum on the inside
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17352160_1897610500483392_3560958382438400435_n.jpg


    ginseng... looks like people
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  62. #1062
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    Building muscle mass as a vegan is easy if you take the time to monitor your macronutrients

    Has anyone ever told you that getting all your macronutrients from a vegan diet is impossible? If so, you should ask that person where her or she got that information because that belief is wrong. The truth is that as long as you eat the right kinds of calories, fill yourself with protein, train hard, and rest even harder, almost anyone can build muscle mass without relying on any animal products. In fact, a plant-based diet is better for your muscle-gaining efforts, which is one reason vegans have advantages at the gym. Still, many bodybuilders are leery of adopting a plant-based lifestyle for fear that removing steak from their diets will turn them skinny. This also isn’t true, as a plant-based diet is a stellar way to put on muscle, so long as you go about it correctly. To understand what kinds of foods you should eat to supplement your bodybuilding, it's important to look closely at the kinds of nutrients that are in your meals.

    The role of calories
    Understanding the science of weight gain comes down to the role of macronutrients (proteins, carbohydrates, and fats), which are the main energy providers in our bodies. Eating the correct ratio is essential for bodybuilding success, and while it's important to experiment with daily calorie levels to learn what works best for you, a 2010 study found that male bodybuilders increased their muscle mass best at 18 to 23 calories per pound per day. Because vegan food is naturally lower in calories than meat-based meals, building muscle mass with vegan macronutrients requires extra attention to your calorie levels. If you don't eat more calories than you burn in your workouts, weight gain is almost certain not to happen.

    Looking at protein
    No bodybuilder will last long without protein, a nutrient responsible for supporting the growth of body tissues, building antibodies, synthesizing enzymes and hormones, and repairing exercise-induced muscle damage. Contrary to popular belief, vegan dieters aren't hindered when it comes to protein—instead of meat, they can rely on plant-based sources such as soy and pea protein. The key to building solid muscle mass is a well-balanced, protein-rich diet. This means eliminating the foods your body isn't equipped to handle (such as junk food and sugary snacks). These food-like products damage our bodies and raise our body fat percentage with unhealthy levels of carbs and fats. Increased body fat hurts more than our competitive edge—it actually slows muscle growth due to an increase in insulin resistance. Because insulin is needed for muscle growth, this is bad news for bulking up. On the other hand, the opposite problem can also occur. Eating too much fresh produce and not enough high caloric foods might make you short on macronutrients and your weight gaining goals. Building muscle on a vegan diet requires mixing healthy fats and proteins into every meal. For best success, aim to eat at least six meals a day, combining carbohydrates with protein-rich sources like beans and tofu to get plenty of protein. A sprinkling of high-fat nuts will also make a difference for your health, especially when it comes to recovering after intense workouts.

    Beyond macros
    Monitoring your macronutrient and vitamin intake is important for general health, regardless of a person’s health goals. For this reason, pay attention to your daily iron intake and add some dark leafy greens, beans, and dried fruits to your plate for some non-heme iron. If you are a menstruating female, an iron supplement is also a smart idea. Calcium is another mineral our bodies require. Because it helps with bone maintenance and muscle contractions, calcium is imperative—not getting enough will have us keeling over at the gym from muscle cramps. Vegans can get more than enough calcium if they fill their plates with almonds, collard greens, spinach, and other dark green vegetables. When all else fails, a calcium supplement can help increase calcium levels. If you feel like your appetite isn't where it should be and your testosterone levels seem low, a lack of zinc might be to blame. It's best to aim for 40 milligrams of zinc everyday to enhance your muscle-building efforts, so be sure to eat plenty of zinc-rich foods such as almonds, fortified oatmeal, and pumpkin and sesame seeds.
    Sauce: How to Get All the Nutrients You Need on a Vegan Diet
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  63. #1063
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    Let’s separate food facts from fiction


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-lemon-water-810x425.jpg

    Are nuts good for you?
    Get the facts:
    Nuts are packed with protein, fibre and essential fats. The type of fat in nuts is largely unsaturated fats. Nuts also provide some calcium, vitamin E, B vitamins, potassium, magnesium and are a source of antioxidants.

    A small handful of nuts (30 grams) eaten each day may reduce your risk of developing heart disease and has been linked with lower body weight and lower risk of obesity. Use a handful of nuts as a substitute for unhealthy snack options such as muffins, cookies, chips and chocolate. A 30 gram serving is about the size of a golf ball. Each type of nut contains its own unique nutrients, eat a variety.

    Is honey better for you than sugar?
    Get the facts:
    Honey is another form of sugar. In fact, your body handles naturally occurring sugar in food, and processed sugars and syrups in the same way. While some people consider honey to be more natural, it is still a type of carbohydrate or sugar and a concentrated source of calories with very few other nutrients. Excess sugar in any form gives extra calories and raises your blood sugar. Whether you choose to use honey, brown sugar, agave syrup or white sugar, the advice would be to use small amounts.

    Can drinking lemon water help with weight loss or detoxification?
    Get the facts:
    Lemon water is often promoted to help burn fat, lose weight, or detox, but there is no evidence to support that it works. Unfortunately, lemon water does not work to burn fat in the body. Adding lemon juice to your food or drink may add a refreshing light taste, but it will not reduce the fat absorption from your meal. There is also no evidence to show that it can significantly increase your metabolism to lose weight.

    Lemon water also does not serve to detoxify the body. There are many complex systems already built into the human body to help with detoxification. The best way to keep your body’s organs healthy is to limit the intake of alcohol, and processed high fat and sugary foods. Overall, lemon water is a healthy beverage. It is free of sugars and calories, and works well to quench your thirst. Drinking lemon water to replace sugary beverages like soda, fruit juice, or sweetened caffeinated beverages would be a healthy change. So, if drinking lemon water helps you drink more water and stay hydrated, then by all means drink up!


    sauce: Happy Nutrition Month! Let's separate food facts from fiction
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  64. #1064
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    Judy...
    The staff should give you your own vegan nutrition column.

    "Judy's Vegan Facts"
    They could sticky it here at the top of the Nutrition forum.
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    I sure hope there isn't a downside to eating nuts, especially peanuts as I buy them by the 3lb can and eat about a pound a week at work. I don't have a weight problem btw so the fat content is not a concern for me.

    Though honey is pretty much another form of sugar, the fact that it never spoils makes it pretty amazing stuff. I remember reading recently a lady was asking how to keep bees away from her pool. Her neighbor had a hive and I think she was allergic and the bees were always at her pool. The reply was that the bees needed a water source to be able to make honey. The guy said to go ahead and kill the first ones that appeared and when they didn't return, the hive would get the message that that was not a good water source. Someone then mentioned that when they were a kid, there were always bees in the outhouse from their beehives. She also mentioned that she never ate the honey for that reason.

    I imagine the lemon water for weight loss and detox is as mentioned, as a substitute for other drinks, especially soft drinks. The lemon mostly just provides some taste for someone not used to plain water.
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  66. #1066
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    The downside to eating nuts, is you can become what you eat...
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  67. #1067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ericmopar View Post
    The downside to eating nuts, is you can become what you eat...
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  68. #1068
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    I should also mention, that I do crossfit

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17353170_1287169934705430_4193101686790039049_n.jpg
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  69. #1069
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    I think I may be a Realist, Utopist, Vegan

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17352098_1957430250951228_3394478590733868242_n.jpg
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  70. #1070
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    Pics from our visit to the market on caturday Part 1

    Taro Root

    (we were both laughing when this pic was taken... hubbba hubba )
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17458068_1900974690146973_3532053556949526143_n.jpg


    Taro is a root vegetable that is eaten in many different cultures around the world. The leaves of the taro plant are also used as a vegetable. Taro root is easily digestible and the leaves are a good source of vitamins A and C.

    Taro root is inedible raw and must be cooked thoroughly to leach out the calcium oxalate (associated with gout and kidney stones), preferably with a pinch of baking soda. Taro leaves should also be cooked before eating. Taro root is used in curries, prepared in similar ways to potatoes, cooked with lentils, used in baking, and even used in dessert recipes. Taro chips, also known as vegetable chips, are available in many health food stores. Taro has a mild, nutty flavor.

    Taro root is often used in a similar fashion to a potato, but in fact has better nutritional qualities than a potato. It has almost three times the dietary fiber, which is important for proper digestive health and regularity. Fiber can also fill you up and make you feel less hungry with fewer calories. Taro root has a low Glycemic Index, as opposed to potato which has a high Glycemic Index. A low GI means that taro effects blood sugar levels slowly, without the peaks and crashes of a high GI, which lead to increased hunger later on. Eating a diet of low GI foods can also help prevent diabetes.

    Taro is nutritious, and is an excellent source of potassium, which is an essential mineral for many bodily functions. Taro also contains some calcium, vitamin C, vitamin E and B vitamins, as well as magnesium, manganese and copper. Taro leaves contain good amounts of vitamins A and C, fiber and a relatively high amount of protein

    Eating taro can lead to kidney stones and gout as well as other health complications if it is not prepared properly by boiling for the recommended amount of time. It can also be steeped in water overnight before cooking to further reduce the amount of oxalates. To absolutely minimize risk, milk or other calcium rich foods should be eaten with taro in order to block oxalate absorption. However, taro is a staple food for many people around the world and should not be considered a high risk food after it is cooked.

    Taro has many benefits over potatoes but does actually contain more calories, gram for gram, with 142 calories per 100 grams to the 93 calories per 100 grams of a potato. However, with the additional benefits of fiber and a low Glycemic Index, taro is still a good choice as a starch vegetable.


    Sauce: The Nutrition of Taro / Nutrition / Healthy Eating
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  71. #1071
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    Pics from our visit to the market on caturday Part 2

    White Radish (Daikon)

    (We were laughing again when this pic was taken.... )

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17458356_1900974623480313_6805340323346626727_n.jpg

    Also known simply as White Radish, and in Japan as Daikon or Daikon radish, this popular Asian vegetable bears little resemblance to small, round red radishes found in tossed green salads. Instead, Chinese white radish, or Raphanus Sativus to use its scientific name, resembles a large white carrot. While Japanese cooks rely on Daikon's sharp bite to add flavor to relishes and salads, in China it is used more in cooking.


    I had white radish in my bowl for lunch... also brown rice, tofu, guacamole, carrots mmmm)
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17426288_1900974006813708_2186124164108371218_n.jpg

    We discovered a new vegan restaurant in Toronto (anyone visiting , I highly recommend checking it out!)

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17458209_1900973913480384_6256790065454054460_n.jpg

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17457973_1900974123480363_4116463225970870011_n.jpg

    Kupfert & Kim
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  72. #1072
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    Found a new vegan Youtuber I really like. She has lots of great recipe videos on her channel. Here is one linked below. I believe she lives in Toronto too cyclelicious.

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    My wife cooks daikon a lot. It can really stink up the house but somehow tastes a lot better than it smells. She puts it in miso soup pretty often.
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  74. #1074
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    ^^ Good find Jem7sk and thanks for posting. Vegan desserts have come a long way

    ^ Good stuff chazpat . I'll bet your wife is an awesome cook
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  75. #1075
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    I could have used an umbrella today

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17155668_1653757211597675_8820140021329656345_n.jpg
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  76. #1076
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    You think carrots and bananas have always looked the way we know them? Sorry to say but you're wrong! Take a look at how fruits and veggies looked like before humans domesticated them:

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  77. #1077
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    You think carrots and bananas have always looked the way we know them? Sorry to say but you're wrong! Take a look at how fruits and veggies looked like before humans domesticated them:

    Having worked for a plant breeder/university professor, when people say "I won't eat GMOs" I always shake my head and give a wry smile.

    Unless people are heading out into the blackberry bramble to go harvest wild berries in Alaska, good luck not eating GMO fruits or vegetables in the US.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
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  78. #1078
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-14721763_1143156692416364_7342821667300338622_n.jpg
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  79. #1079
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    Happy Hump Day decision support!

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17554078_398252827203626_8822064571843181067_n.jpg
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  80. #1080
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    Hmmmm...
    Could this be a Freudian slip?
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  81. #1081
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    Now this cross breeding makes mouthwatering sense


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  82. #1082
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    The Hippies Have Won


    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-05hippies-slide-yy6q-videosixteenbyninejumbo1600.jpg

    Miso, tahini, kimchi, quinoa, seaweed, dates, turmeric and ginger are some of the popular health food ingredients of the 1970s that have made recent appearances at some of the most innovative restaurants in the country. Here, the Power Bowl at Dimes in Manhattan, which features black beans, rice, kale, avocado, pumpkin seeds and alfalfa, among the ingredients.


    sauce: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/04/d...egetarian.html
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  83. #1083
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    Happy Hump Day

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17759649_1340501749374177_3865571356010455266_n.jpg
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  84. #1084
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Happy Hump Day

    Click image for larger version. 

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    'Licious are you alright? I think all of your posts this week have been off by a day. Yesterday was hump day.

  85. #1085
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    Yes I fell behind ... our modem at home cacked and I had much to catch up on the interwebs
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    Vegan cheese renamed 'Gary' at Sainsbury's after a dairy-lover's Facebook rant goes viral

    Vegan cheese has been universally renamed ‘Gary’ after Sainsbury’s turned one cheese-lover’s furious tirade into a viral joke.

    The supermarket was the subject of a tremendous Facebook rant after a woman kicked off at the branding of dairy-free vegan products as ‘cheese’.

    Instead, she said: "Call it Gary or something just don't call it cheese because it's not cheese!"

    But the vegan community responded in style, and within hours social media was flooded with jokes and memes, particularly on the new 'It's not Vegan Cheese, it's Gary' Facebook page.

    Then the supermarket itself got in on the act, posting an altered image of its dairy-free cheese with the name changed to “Gary”.

    It added the caption: "Thanks to customer feedback, we’re excited to introduce our new range of #Gary." The post has been shared over 4,000 times and sparked a flurry of similar efforts.

    It comes after the supermarket released its new range of seven £2.25 coconut oil-based cheeses last week, which include alternatives to cheddar and wensleydale with cranberries.

    The firm behind the products – Bute Island Foods – also saw the funny side, posting a photo of member of staff called Gary holding up a pack of the dairy-free cheese with a ‘Gary’ label.




    sauce : Vegan cheese renamed 'Gary' at Sainsbury's after a dairy-lover's Facebook rant goes viral | London Evening Standard
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  87. #1087
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    Vegan Mozzarella Gary

  88. #1088
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Vegan cheese renamed 'Gary' at Sainsbury's after a dairy-lover's Facebook rant goes viral







    sauce : Vegan cheese renamed 'Gary' at Sainsbury's after a dairy-lover's Facebook rant goes viral | London Evening Standard
    I don't know, a Grilled Gary Sandwich doesn't sound very vegan.
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  89. #1089
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  90. #1090
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    Vitamin B 12

    I've been taking a B12 supplement for quite a number of years

    Of all the nutrients that vegans must pay attention to, Vitamin B12 is at the very top of the list. It is essential for nervous system health, so every vegan needs to take this nutrient seriously. People with B12 deficiency risk nerve damage, neurological problems, and elevated homocysteine levels that can cause inflammation that may lead to heart attacks or stroke.

    Vitamin B12 is found exclusively in foods of animal origin, and the amount of this nutrient present in an unfortified vegan diet is essentially zero. It can, however, take several years for a deficiency to arise, since B12 is stored in the liver. It’s dangerous to be complacent about finding a reliable source of B12 because deficiency can creep up over time, silently doing damage before symptoms arise.

    One of the great annoyances of being vegan is that you will sometimes encounter other vegans who insist that there’s no need to take a B12 supplement. Generally speaking these people will say something like, “I’ve been vegan for eight years, never take B12 supplements, and I’m in perfect health,” but meanwhile they’re all twitchy and something just isn’t right. In many cases these people will experience a health crisis, return to eating meat, and then tell the world that a vegan diet leads to failed health. Unfortunately, having a productive dialog with these folks is generally futile, just like there’s no reasoning with the Vegan Police.

    Why are there so many vegans who take pride in spurning B12 supplements? It’s because back in the 1980s and 1990s several prominent vegan advocacy books came out that dismissed the need for vegans to take B12. Because these books were published at a time when there weren’t many reliable vegan books available, B12 misinformation got a big head start on the truth. There are all sorts of ludicrous arguments asserting that vegans don’t need B12, ranging from the idea that it’s produced in your intestines (it isn’t, at least in a way that you can absorb), that it’s found in algae or seaweed (no, it’s not), or that you can get enough B12 by not washing your vegetables (that’s just silly.)

    In at least a couple cases, the vegan authors contributing to B12 complacency went back to eating animal products. But the damage these books have done have produced ripple effects continuing to today.

    Meeting Your B-12 Needs
    The B12 needs of vegans can easily be met through supplements or by regularly eating B12 fortified foods. Some B12 supplements contain non-vegan ingredients, but the supplements featured on this page are all vegan.

    B-12 isn’t absorbed especially well when it’s swallowed in a tablet. You’ll get better absorption if you purchase B12 lozenges or ‘sublingual tablets’, which are different words for the same thing. You let these tablets dissolve under your tongue, and the B12 is absorbed through the capillaries in your mouth. A sensible dosage is a 1000 to 2000 microgram tablet taken a few times a week. Note that many brands of B12 contain methylcobalamin, but cyanocobalamin is currently considered the better choice by nutritionists who’ve carefully studied the topic.

    Foods commonly fortified with B12 include non-dairy milks, cereals, meat substitutes, energy bars, and nutritional yeast. You have to check the nutrition label for B12, since many of these foods aren’t supplemented, or are supplemented in tiny amounts. Note that B12 fortified foods are dosed with the very same B12 that gets put into tablets, so obtaining your B12 through fortified vegan foods is in no way more “natural” than getting it through tablets. Additionally, it may be difficult to meet your B12 needs through fortified foods, since comparatively few products are fortified, and B12 fortification of foods is often at low levels.

    For most vegans, it’s therefore much easier and more reliable to simply buy a bottle of vegan B12 lozenges. Sublingual B12 supplements are easy to find online or at any natural foods store. Of the dozens of B12 supplements Amazon stocks, probably the best buy is Now Foods’ 2000 microgram cyanocobalamin lozenges. A 250-lozenge bottle comes in at around $10 and will last more than a year if taken three times a week.

    Unless you like burning money, avoid sprays or other high-priced alternative ways to get B12. While sprays may perhaps be more absorbable than lozenges, they also cost vastly more. There are thing you should care about when choosing a vegan B12 brand is bang for the buck. You want to get the most micrograms of cyanocobalamin in the bottle at the lowest cost, while choosing lozenges instead of pills intended to be swallowed. If you pay a premium price for your B12, you’re just being victimized by slick marketing.

    Ability to absorb vitamin B12 decreases with age, and some people cannot absorb sufficient B12 orally. Luckily, determining your B12 levels is one of the cheapest bloodwork tests available, and it’s standard on every basic nutrient panel. If your levels are low despite regular use of sublinguals, injections may be warranted. Since injections go straight into the muscle, they guarantee that high levels of B12 will be absorbed. These injections require a prescription in the United States, but hypodermic needles pre-loaded with B12 are sold over the counter in Mexico and many other countries. Obviously, injections should only be done by someone with proper qualifications.






    Sauce: Vitamin B-12
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    14 Genius Tricks to Keep Fresh Food From Spoiling Fast

    1. PUT PAPER TOWELS IN THE SALAD DRAWER.
    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544787-syn-hbu-1443451869-paper-towel-salad.jpg

    Lining your crisper with a few sheets of paper towels absorbs the condensation that the veggies generate as they chill. Excess moisture can make your fresh foods wilt and much faster, so the paper keeps them fresher for longer. AND it keeps your fridge cleaner without any extra effort, because no one deserves to spend their hard-earned Sunday wiping up cucumber gunk.

    2. DON'T SEPARATE BANANAS BEFORE EATING.

    You may think you're being super productive packaging your bananas into day-to-day portions, but actually the trick to stop them going brown is to keep them together as long as possible. Wrap the stems of the bananas in plastic wrap when you first buy them, and only snap one off when you're ready to eat it. This should give you three to five extra days of perfectly ripe banana joy.

    3. PUT AN APPLE IN YOUR BAG OF POTATOES.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544789-syn-hbu-1443452165-potato-bag-apples.jpg

    Sprouted potatoes are at the top of nobody's to-eat list. It turns out the best way to prevent them turning into a reject is to keep an apple in the bag – apples produce ethylene gas, which keeps potatoes fresher and firmer, and ready for mashed potato duties for a few more weeks.

    4. BUT KEEP APPLES AWAY FROM OTHER FRUITS AND VEGGIES.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544790-syn-hbu-1443452346-apples-plastic-bag.jpg

    Ethylene gas may be good for potatoes, but it's bad for almost everything else. Keep apples out of the fruit bowl (and in a plastic bag in the fridge) and you should suddenly find that your other purchases keep much better.

    5. WASH BERRIES IN VINEGAR.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-gallery-1443545675-gallery-1443542172-gettyimages-475164592.jpg

    Because fate is cruel, berries are both a) pretty much the most expensive fruit and b) the quickest to go moldy without fail. You can extend their life by giving them a bath in 1 cup of vinegar and 3 cups of water before you put them in the fridge – this kills the mold spores and bacteria that turn them fuzzy. Just be sure to dry them thoroughly before storing.

    6. DON'T REFRIGERATE YOUR TOMATOES.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544792-syn-hbu-1441191112-screen-shot-2015-09-02-115105.jpg

    Seriously. You'll kill their flavor, and their juicy texture doesn't survive so well in the cold either. To make the most of your tomatoes, keep them on a counter to allow them to ripen them to their full potential. FYI, other veggies that shouldn't live in the fridge include potatoes and onions, although they should be stored in a cool dark place rather than within the sun's reach.

    7. WRAP CELERY IN FOIL.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544793-syn-hbu-1443452837-screen-shot-2015-09-28-160652.jpg

    In the plastic wrapper you get from the supermarket, celery will last a week or two at most – annoying if you only use a couple of stalks at a time. Swap the original packaging for a sheet of aluminium foil – it lets the gas that spoils your celery escape, rather than trapping it like plastic, so the celery stays crisp long enough for plenty more hummus-dipping adventures.

    8. TREAT HERBS LIKE A BOUQUET.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544794-syn-hbu-1443452950-herbs-water.jpg

    Buying fresh herbs in a bag and keeping them in there is a surefire route to grassy mush town. Instead, use what you need on the day, and then store the rest of the bunch in a glass of water on the windowsill. You could even put a couple of different varieties of them on the table in place of flowers and let everyone garnish their meals themselves. You fancy hostess, you.

    9. AND WHEN THEY'RE ON THE TURN, FREEZE THEM IN OLIVE OIL.

    Did you know you can preserve #basil, #parsley and other #herbs by freezing them in ice cube trays with a little olive oil? Then, when a recipe calls for fresh herbs, just pop a couple cubes in!

    When the method above has run its course, you can finely chop the herbs, add them to an empty ice cube tray, and then pour olive oil over the top. Freeze until set, and they'll last for months – to use, just add to a hot pan until the oil cooks down

    10. KEEP MUSHROOMS IN A PAPER BAG.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544795-syn-hbu-1443453165-gettyimages-166262945.jpg

    Proper markets use these bad boys for a reason – paper bags keep mushrooms much more efficiently than the usual plastic or styrofoam containers. Moisture is a slime sentence for mushrooms, so storing them this way keeps them clean and dry (and if you leave them too long and find they get too dry, you can give them a quick rinse in the sink and they'll plump right back up).

    11. LET AVOCADO RIPEN AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544808-syn-hbu-1434991204-screen-shot-2015-06-22-173928.jpg

    There are few things in life sadder than going to make avocado toast and finding a sad, rock-hard excuse for a fruit. Protect your brunch-making emotions by keeping avocados out til they're ripe (you know they're there when they give a little when pressed), then put them in the fridge to halt the process and keep them ready to eat. Once you've cut them, keep the stone in the remaining half squeeze on a little lemon juice to preserve them even further.

    12. PUT YOUR ONIONS IN TIGHTS.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544809-syn-hbu-1443453416-184bmhseac3u.jpg

    Not your finest, obviously, but if you've got an old pair that have seen better days lying around, you could find a worse storage receptacle for your onions. Put them in one at a time, knot between each bulb and keep them in a dark, dry place until you need them.

    13. KEEP RAISINS AIRTIGHT.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544812-syn-hbu-1441190898-screen-shot-2015-09-02-114716.jpg

    Raisin take years to spoil properly, but going dry and rubbery takes them just a few weeks if you don't store them right. Putting your raisins into an airtight jar or tub will keep them fat, moist and perfect for sprinkling over porridge. If they do shrivel up, soaking them in hot water for an hour or two will help, but as always, prevention is better than cure.

    14. ICE YOUR GREENS.

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-1443544814-syn-hbu-1443453715-iced-lettuce.jpg

    You're too good for limp lettuce and you know it. Rehydrate and refresh your leaves by separating them and tossing them into a sinkful of iced water for anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes, depending on how sad they're looking. Voila!












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  92. #1092
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    Meatless Monday !


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    Love both but I'm a hummus fan
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    B-12 isn’t absorbed especially well when it’s swallowed in a tablet. You’ll get better absorption if you purchase B12 lozenges or ‘sublingual tablets’, which are different words for the same thing. You let these tablets dissolve under your tongue, and the B12 is absorbed through the capillaries in your mouth. A sensible dosage is a 1000 to 2000 microgram tablet taken a few times a week. Note that many brands of B12 contain methylcobalamin, but cyanocobalamin is currently considered the better choice by nutritionists who’ve carefully studied the topic.
    This is interesting in that I've always heard that methylcobalamin was the better form.

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  94. #1094
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    Happy Hump Day


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  95. #1095
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    "Mad honey" has been documented as a poison, aphrodisiac, powerful medicine, and hallucinogenic drug.

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  96. #1096
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    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-17903855_1450793158304771_7013810827726355522_n.jpg
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  97. #1097
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    This image answers a question we get asked frequently.

    Following a vegan diet can provide many health benefits. Vegans typically have a much lower risk of type-2 diabetes than do meat-eaters – in fact, it's not even close. Research has also shown that vegans have a slightly lower risk of cancer by virtue of our diets. Vegans also have, on average, lower cholesterol levels, blood pressure, and body fat.

    Even though there are numerous health benefits, there are also some important nutrition issues vegans should be aware of in order to thrive.
    For instance, it is important to consume enough calories so you feel satisfied and maintain proper energy levels.
    Just removing animal products from a typical American diet leaving mostly low-calorie foods such as salads, vegetables, and fruit could quickly leave you feeling hungry and weak and unsatisfied.

    While a protein deficiency is highly, highly unlikely, not eating some high-protein plant foods could leave you craving animal products. Legumes (beans, peanuts, peas, lentils, soy), seitan, and quinoa are some of the best sources of protein for vegans. Include a few servings of these foods each day – perhaps even each meal.

    Avocados, nuts and nut butters (e.g. peanut, cashew, almond) pasta, rice and potatoes are great sources of calories that are also packed with nutrients.

    A very low-fat diet might improve someone's health in the short term, especially if they have high cholesterol or heart disease, but it might not be ideal for longer periods. If you are avoiding all added fats and you start to crave animal products, it might be time to increase the plant fats. People tend to think of animal products, and especially meat, as "protein," but many are 50% fat.

    If you prefer to eat low-carb, that's still possible on a plant-based diet. For such people, an 'eco-Atkins' diet (Google it), high in plant proteins such as tofu, legumes, and seitan and with fats from sources such as seeds, nuts, avocados and olives.
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    Happy Easter

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  99. #1099
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    Open the windows!


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  100. #1100
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    The story about marmite ie vegemite... I've never tried it, curious if anyone else has tried this "superfood"?

    Vegetarian and Vegan Passion-marmite_2321022b.jpg


    Perhaps you first heard about Vegemite in the early 1980s from the Men at Work song, "Down Under."

    The Australian sandwich spread, described by the Telegraph as a sticky, gloopy, salty spread made from yeast extract, may be the flavor that embodies the entire continent, as 23 million jars are purchased in Australia every year.1

    Vegemite's first cousin, Marmite, is the British version of the controversial condiment. Both are considered an acquired taste, but it's the latter that's been scrutinized in scientific circles and found to contain some very impressive properties for the human body.

    In fact, several studies show it contains vital nutrients, including 40 percent of the reference daily intake (RDI) for vitamin B12, 50 percent for folic acid and 36 percent for niacin, helps to protect against antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as MRSA and boosts gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels to restore optimal brain balance.2

    Invented in the late 1800s, Marmite came first, followed by Vegemite, invented in the 1920s. In fact, Marmite was included in the ration packs English soldiers carried during World War I. The high level of different B vitamins is also attributed to its effectiveness as a mosquito repellent.

    The Daily Meal describes the dark, rich sauce as"full of umami and, at first blush, one of the most disgusting things most Americans have ever tried."3

    The British are serious about their Marmite. Owned by Unilever, the company's spoof Ministry of Marmite exists "to enrich the existence of all Marmite lovers, whether resident in the U.K. or overseas, through the comprehensive application of Marmite in every facet of their domestic, professional, cultural and social lives."4

    Brits and Aussies are wild about their respective yeast extracts like many Americans are about jam on their morning toast, but Marmite isn't sweet like jelly and marmalade; it's umami, the newest flavor among the basic tastes of sweet, sour, salty and bitter. Umami is the Japanese word for "delicious," which in English means "savory."

    Popular as a meat flavor for vegetarians, this yeast-based paste can be stored at room temperature and, although it might dry out, remains edible for years, according to the International Business Times (IBT).5 One must ask what's in it to give it such a remarkable calling card.

    Sweden Not a Fan: Marmite's Controversial Components

    The main ingredients in Marmite are yeast extract, vegetable extract and salt augmented with thiamin, folate, riboflavin, niacin, iron and vitamin B12. It's flavored with things like celery extract, although the exact ingredients and the amounts are a carefully guarded and undisclosed recipe.

    The Marmite website reports that a jar contains 100 grams (just over 3.5 ounces) with 34 grams of protein, 30 carbs, 1.2 grams of sugar and 10.8 grams of salt.6 In spite of its strong flavor, some consider Marmite to be a bona fide superfood. According to Daily Mail:

    "Both products are made via a complex method in which salt is added to a suspension of yeast and then heated, resulting in a rich paste loaded with free glutamic acids, also known as umami (it's the primary component of MSG).

    The exact recipe is a secret, but various vegetable extracts and vitamins are also added."7

    The glutamic acid in MSG, or monosodium glutamate, is an excitotoxin, which means it overexcites your cells to the point of damage or death. But the glutamic acid found in nutritional yeast binds to and is absorbed by other amino acids or proteins, while what is found in MSG is not. In essence, your body controls the glutamic levels.

    While Marmite isn't exactly banned in Sweden, the government requires retailers to obtain special permission from the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration to place it on their shelves. IBT explains it this way:

    "The paste is made by adding salt to the yeast by-product from breweries, heating the solution until the cell walls of the yeast are softened, then straining the solution to make it smooth.

    The result is naturally rich in vitamins, especially the Vitamin B complex, but additional vitamins and minerals are added to Marmite — and that is what the Danish government dislikes."8

    While in the U.S. Marmite barely shows up on the radar in terms of nutrition, it's been lab tested and declared better than peanut butter in terms of its ability as a brain booster. Recent studies have determined that the savory substance may increase your brain's neurotransmitters, the function involving messaging.

    Marmite May Boost Your Brain's GABA Levels

    Of course, it was a study based in the U.K., kicked off when researchers found that a single teaspoon of Marmite, taken daily by study participants, prompted a decrease in neural response to visual stimuli.

    Scientists at the University of York said that's an indicator of increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels.9 According to Medical News Today:

    "GABA is a neurotransmitter responsible for inhibiting the excitability of brain cells, helping to restore the optimal balance of neuronal activity required for healthy brain functioning. Put simply, GABA 'calms' the brain.

    Previous studies have associated low GABA levels with an increased risk of numerous neurological and mental health disorders, including anxiety, depression, autism and epilepsy. As a result, researchers have been investigating ways to boost GABA levels in the brain."10

    Study author Daniel Baker, Ph.D., used data from 26 adults, divided into two groups. One group was directed to eat a teaspoon of Marmite every day for a month, while the others ate the same amount of peanut butter.

    Thirty days later, the study subjects underwent electroencephalography to measure brain activity in response to visual stimuli in the form of flickering lights.

    The latter group had a 30 percent decrease in neural response to visual stimuli in comparison to the Marmite group but, even better, those responses were ongoing for another eight weeks.

    The result was similar to that resulting from an animal study in which there was a 300 percent decrease in neural response to visual stimuli. The study concluded:

    "This 'response gain' effect should provide a clear index of GABA availability in cortex, in that increasing GABA concentration should reduce the neural response evoked by visual stimuli to below normal levels."11

    Baker said the main reason for the significantly reduced responsiveness to visual stimuli in the participants was most likely the high concentration of vitamin B12 in the Marmite.

    Interestingly, while the scientists stressed that therapeutic recommendations couldn't yet be made, they touted the study as the "first example of how dietary interventions can alter cortical processes."12

    B Vitamins: 'Super' Compounds in Marmite

    According to the Journal of Clinical Investigation,13 niacin, or vitamin B3, one of the main ingredients in Marmite, helps protect your body against staphylococcus bacteria. The Telegraph reports that in tests, niacin:

    " … [P]roduces neutrophils, a white blood cell that fights bacteria — [and] increased our immune system's ability to kill different strains of the bugs by up to 1,000 times.

    This could mark a turning point in the battle against antibiotic-resistant superbugs, such as MRSA, the deadly strain that poses a threat in hospitals."14

    Folate, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 are essential for converting what could become a damaging molecule, called homocysteine, into the amino acid cysteine in a process called the methylation cycle.

    Without this suppression mechanism, studies show heart disease and Alzheimer's to be an increased risk, as homocysteine can lead to brain and blood vessel deterioration. According to the George Mateljan Foundation:

    "Homocysteine promotes atherosclerosis by directly damaging blood vessel walls and by interfering with the formation of collagen (the main protein in connective tissue).

    Elevations in homocysteine are found in approximately 20 [to] 40 percent of patients with heart disease, and it is estimated that daily consumption of 400 mcg of folate alone would reduce the number of heart attacks suffered by Americans each year by 10 percent."15

    Further, high levels of homocysteine not only are linked to blood vessel damage, but are often found in Alzheimer's patients, suggesting that many people all over the world may be suffering from a "Marmite" (or B vitamin) deficiency.

    Other brain and mental capacities positively influenced by vitamin B3, or niacin, found liberally in Marmite, include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety, depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. And B12 deficiency can trigger different types of psychoses and paranoia. Unfortunately, this deficiency is common.

    How an Early Scientist Discovered One of Marmite's Most Important Benefits

    In the 1930s, English scientist Lucy Wills discovered that the folic acid content in Marmite could successfully treat anemia. In studying whether a vitamin deficiency might contribute to what was at the time called pernicious anemia of pregnancy, one review noted her research on the effects of Marmite, a "cheap yeast extract," on monkeys:

    "One particular monkey did especially poorly, and for reasons which are not recorded — perhaps in desperation — she tried the cheap yeast extract, Marmite. It had a dramatic effect. Thus, after all the intensive examination of diets and exhaustive testing on rats, it was a chance intervention with a single animal that led to the breakthrough. Wills had taken the first step to the discovery of folic acid."16

    According to nutritionist Melanie Brown, who specializes in pre-conception and pregnancy nutrition, Marmite can help pregnant women through morning sickness, as well as help elderly individuals who have lost their sense of taste.

    High Salt Content Leads to Marmite Bans, but —

    Denmark, which hasn't sold Marmite since May 2011, isn't the only country to look unfavorably on the savory condiment that a large portion of the known world swears it can't live without. The powers-that-be in Ceredigion, Wales, banned Marmite in elementary schools in 2008.

    Oregon State University jumped on the bandwagon and began warning people not to take high "doses" of the stuff without medical supervision due to its high salt content. However, salt is not the ogre it's been made out to be. In fact, not enough salt in your diet isn't good for your heart. The more important question is whether or not your salt quotient is properly balanced with that of your potassium intake.





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