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  1. #151
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    Just read "The easy way to quit smoking". I tend to agree with everything he said but one point. I don't think it is the nicotine that really is addictive, its some other chemicals/substances added to the tobacco. The e-cig or patch does not give the same satisfaction/buzz as a real cigarette.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    and now take a couple puffs off the e-cig every couple hours to keep me on the wagon.
    Dump the e-cigs if at all possible, they'll just keep you strung out. Once you truly break the habit, zero nicotine or e-cigs for a couple of weeks, I doubt you'll have any trouble hanging out with smokers. 1 & 1/2 years since my last one and I still like the smell of them, but have no desire whatsoever to inhale one.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    How does everyone deal with being around your old smoking buddies or going to a bar where everyone smokes? I am a musician so I can't just stop going to venues ya know?
    First off you REALLY gotta want to quit. I had a girlfriend who also smoked but I quit for a brief time, when I would kiss her it tasted horrible which opened my eyes, although I did start smoking again after a while. I then actually quit cold turkey because a new non smoking girlfriend at the time didn't smoke and I didn't want to put her through that horrible taste of cigarettes from my mouth.

    I also wanted to see how long I could go without a cigarette, 38 years now, and will never do it again, if I did I would have to go 38 years without having a cigarette. I hate the smell of it, dont like to be around it at all, and its a terrible addiction that will rob your money and your health as you get older. I have a 79 year old mother in law as a reference to that and continues to smoke even with all the health problems from it.

    I am sure the government likes taking your money from the taxes it generates and the health care system does to, smoking is BIG business. What a way to loose your money and your health! Do you want that for yourself? What do you really have if you don't have your health?

    I am also a musician and own my own live sound audio business working in bars all the time with people who drink and smoke. In 1 month it will be 9 years since I drank alcohol. I used the same method of cold turkey and see how long I could go without it. Though I would get a soda instead of alcohol to satisfy my need to go to the bar. It will soon be 8 years since I quit drinking soda. I now drink only water I take from home when I go to work, when I go out for dinner I have water (with lemon if they have it) when I am out, IT'S FREE, SAVES SO MUCH MONEY!

    One of the biggest things I see and have learned from drinking alcohol is that it wil make you do things you wouldnt normally do and that is what I tell people. if you want to quit smoking , DON'T DRINK as it will cloud your judgement and you will most likely smoke again.

    I look at all these people drinking and smoking and KNOW FOR SURE I am so much better off without it. I did chew tobacco for a few years but used the same cold turkey, see how long I can go without it method. It has worked for me.

    Now I am outside riding a bike everyday because I don't want to miss a day. A little reverse phycology. I do something everyday to better my life and heath, as opposed to not doing something everyday that would ruin my life and health. Some days I ride farther some days a very minimal ride but I can comfortably say I have ridden a bike, sometimes on the road for my commute, sometimes on my mountain bike in the woods, sometimes around the yard or to the mailbox only if my time is limited, but I still did it. Missed 1 day in 3 years and regretted doing that. I am in the best health I have been in my whole life!

    Allot of people do things because others do it, maybe they think they are cool, it helps them fit in. It takes a stonger person not to do something than it does to do let yourself be like everyone else. If you want to change your life and have better health good luck to you, I wish you the best, YOU CAN DO THIS, YOU CAN DO THIS, REPEAT, IF YOU REALLY WANT TO!

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bizman View Post
    First off you REALLY gotta want to quit. I had a girlfriend who also smoked but I quit for a brief time, when I would kiss her it tasted horrible which opened my eyes, although I did start smoking again after a while. I then actually quit cold turkey because a new non smoking girlfriend at the time didn't smoke and I didn't want to put her through that horrible taste of cigarettes from my mouth.

    I also wanted to see how long I could go without a cigarette, 38 years now, and will never do it again, if I did I would have to go 38 years without having a cigarette. I hate the smell of it, dont like to be around it at all, and its a terrible addiction that will rob your money and your health as you get older. I have a 79 year old mother in law as a reference to that and continues to smoke even with all the health problems from it.

    I am sure the government likes taking your money from the taxes it generates and the health care system does to, smoking is BIG business. What a way to loose your money and your health! Do you want that for yourself? What do you really have if you don't have your health?

    I am also a musician and own my own live sound audio business working in bars all the time with people who drink and smoke. In 1 month it will be 9 years since I drank alcohol. I used the same method of cold turkey and see how long I could go without it. Though I would get a soda instead of alcohol to satisfy my need to go to the bar. It will soon be 8 years since I quit drinking soda. I now drink only water I take from home when I go to work, when I go out for dinner I have water (with lemon if they have it) when I am out, IT'S FREE, SAVES SO MUCH MONEY!

    One of the biggest things I see and have learned from drinking alcohol is that it wil make you do things you wouldnt normally do and that is what I tell people. if you want to quit smoking , DON'T DRINK as it will cloud your judgement and you will most likely smoke again.

    I look at all these people drinking and smoking and KNOW FOR SURE I am so much better off without it. I did chew tobacco for a few years but used the same cold turkey, see how long I can go without it method. It has worked for me.

    Now I am outside riding a bike everyday because I don't want to miss a day. A little reverse phycology. I do something everyday to better my life and heath, as opposed to not doing something everyday that would ruin my life and health. Some days I ride farther some days a very minimal ride but I can comfortably say I have ridden a bike, sometimes on the road for my commute, sometimes on my mountain bike in the woods, sometimes around the yard or to the mailbox only if my time is limited, but I still did it. Missed 1 day in 3 years and regretted doing that. I am in the best health I have been in my whole life!

    Allot of people do things because others do it, maybe they think they are cool, it helps them fit in. It takes a stonger person not to do something than it does to do let yourself be like everyone else. If you want to change your life and have better health good luck to you, I wish you the best, YOU CAN DO THIS, YOU CAN DO THIS, REPEAT, IF YOU REALLY WANT TO!
    Great story thanks for sharing! I don't smoke but have enjoyed reading this thread and hearing all of the success stories. I am battling with something myself...noting like smoking.........it is late night snacking. I eat healthy all day long but at the end of the day I feel the need for junk! What you guys are going through inspires me to win my cheesy little battle

  5. #155
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    I did the same thing with chewing tobacco, used it for 32 years, and had "quit" once or twice during that time, but it was more of a I quit buying it, but could always find a buddy that had some. 2 years ago now, I woke up took chew, and said why? so I threw the can in the garbage spit it out, told my wife and kids that I was going to be an ass for a few days, and apologized in advance. I am now done, but I will admit that every once in awhile I will be doing something and it still triggers the thought of putting a chew in. It is a mental decision to not do it, and to not let it control you but to control your own future.

  6. #156
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    OK getting difficult here. I REALLY am restless and want to go for a ride/walk/ bout of sex, anything physical, but the botched root canal is keeping me in bed, even standing up or laying down causes an explosion of pain. Its times like this I wish I hadn't gotten rid of all the tvs in the house so I could play a video game or something.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    OK getting difficult here. I REALLY am restless and want to go for a ride/walk/ bout of sex, anything physical, but the botched root canal is keeping me in bed, even standing up or laying down causes an explosion of pain. Its times like this I wish I hadn't gotten rid of all the tvs in the house so I could play a video game or something.



    You can do this. Hang in there, hope you get that fixed soon.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ View Post
    You can do this. Hang in there, hope you get that fixed soon.
    Thanks for the well wishes and positive support!

    Going back to the dentist on Monday so they can go back in and finish the job, and if they can't get it right that time I'm having the damn thing yanked.

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    Thanks for the well wishes and positive support!

    Going back to the dentist on Monday so they can go back in and finish the job, and if they can't get it right that time I'm having the damn thing yanked.


    How you holding up? Still hangin in there I hope.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ View Post
    How you holding up? Still hangin in there I hope.
    Still hanging on, the severe nerve pain is diminishing on its own a bit, which is a good thing. Really in the thick of the poison detox though. Still on the wagon, thanks!

  11. #161
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    I was never a heavy smoker, but a smoker nonetheless. I woke up one day and said," I will never smoke another cigarette ever again." Its been 3 years now and I feel great! It was hard at first, especially when you drink and when you are around old smoking buddies, but now I very RARELY (if ever) crave a cigarette anymore.

    Cold turkey is definitely the way to go. Exceptions such as, "Just one cigarette in the morning", "Just one cigarette after a meal/sex", "I'll only smoke when I party/drink" are excuses that will simply keep you hooked. If you decide to quit, it should be for the rest of your life with no exceptions.

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    How does everyone deal with being around your old smoking buddies or going to a bar where everyone smokes? I am a musician so I can't just stop going to venues ya know?
    If your in a location where its prohibited to smoke indoors, don't join them outside.
    Last edited by whiplash4; 02-09-2014 at 03:16 AM.

  13. #163
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    I quit five and a half years ago on my thirtieth birthday. The motivation was that I wanted to be around to see my daughter turn thirty, guilt kept me off them and I now have two more kids.

    Cold turkey, no patches, no excuses. You have to WANT to quit or you'll never do it, it was my third attempt but the first time I had a tangible reason.

  14. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiplash4 View Post
    I was never a heavy smoker, but a smoker nonetheless. I woke up one day and said," I will never smoke another cigarette ever again." Its been 3 years now and I feel great! It was hard at first, especially when you drink and when you are around old smoking buddies, but now I very RARELY (if ever) crave a cigarette anymore.

    Cold turkey is definitely the way to go. Exceptions such as, "Just one cigarette in the morning", "Just one cigarette after a meal/sex", "I'll only smoke when I party/drink" are excuses that will simply keep you hooked. If you decide to quit, it should be for the rest of your life with no exceptions.
    Not sure I buy into this. I quit smoking 20 plus years ago. I can smoke a cigar or hand rolled without starting up again. Funny thing is they always sound better than they are. Maybe it's a personality thing but I don't buy into once an addict, always an addict.

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Not sure I buy into this. I quit smoking 20 plus years ago. I can smoke a cigar or hand rolled without starting up again. Funny thing is they always sound better than they are. Maybe it's a personality thing but I don't buy into once an addict, always an addict.
    I'd definitely say it's a personality thing. What works for some doesn't work for all. The main reason I say you should stop smoking for rest of your life is because it is considered one of the most unhealthy things you can do. It's a lifestyle thing - once you quit, it can help lead to a healthier lifestyle of eating better and exercising.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Not sure I buy into this. I quit smoking 20 plus years ago. I can smoke a cigar or hand rolled without starting up again. Funny thing is they always sound better than they are. Maybe it's a personality thing but I don't buy into once an addict, always an addict.

    I'm glad that works for you and frankly I'm a little jealous because I have always romanticised the notion of being able to light up just every once in a while, on a special occasion or under the right circumstance. Unfortunately I don't have that ability. After years of going without I smoked a few while enjoying a bit too much tequila one night with some old friends and the next day I'm buying a pack. That was the start of another 7 years of being chained to tobacco. Somehow my system is wired wrong and I would say that yes, I am easily addicted to nicotine, and I'm not the only one.

    18 months without any now and I honestly don't miss them, but I don't take my newfound freedom for granted anymore.

  17. #167
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    I quit smoking a year and a half ago after smoking a pack and half a day for 9 years. I was a very strange and atypical case I think. I had started riding a few months before for health reasons, and I loved it so I did it more and more until one day I lit a cigarette and it just tasted terrible and made me feel sick. It was my normal brand, and everything. I put it out and thought nothing of it until a few days later when I realized I hadn't picked up the pack I had pulled it out of for 3 days. It sat there on my dresser for another month before I threw it away. I haven't had a cigarette since.

    I was making a lot of lifestyle changes then, adding exercise, quit drinking, eating better, cutting toxic relationships out of my life, and forming a new social group of people with healthier habits. It's a big change to try to beat an addiction, so use the momentum to change all the things in your life that suck, all the bad habits and you'll find the whole process easier. The more you do to make your body and mind feel healthier, the easier of a time you will have with staying away from the cancer sticks.
    "...when I stand to climb I'm like the Hulk rowing the USS Badass up the Kickass River."
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  18. #168
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    I quit smoking about 5 years after I started in high school. I am a surfer, and I was already noticing the harmful effects of five years of smoking about a pack a day. I had a bad wipeout and long hold down at Sunset Beach on Oahu. I thought I wasn't going to make it. Almost blacked out. I decided to quit.
    I took a class in "self hypnosis" and actually practiced the techniques religeously for three months, until I had totally changed my self-image to that of a non-smoker. I also used cinnamon toothpicks as a crutch, going thru the smoking motions with them, but inhaling fresh, clean air instead of tobacco smoke.
    I hate tobacco smoke, and try to not hang out with smokers. I quit going to bars and taverns, and decided that I wasn't going to listen to any more George Thorogood singing about "drinkin alone." No sixers in my fridge now. No hard liquor in the house. Not even a bottle of wine.

    I'm thinking about quitting drinking altogether, but I can still see myself caving in for a micro-brew with some friends at the beach. I gotta ditch that image!

    These days, I like a clear head and quick reflexes. I don't eat candy, bakery goods (except for organic whole grain bread), fast food, most processed foods, and quit going to fast food restaurants years ago. There is no sugar or junk food in my house. I even quit eating at the local deli, since the deli meats have preservatives in them.
    I'm going to start growing many of my own veggies again, too. I eat fish that I catch, and am in the process of sourcing some grass-fed beef, and hope to find a local source of grass-fed buffalo. Etc. Etc. (Its never too late to cleanup one's act!)

    Now I'm cutting back on the coffee, too.

  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlutonicPlague View Post
    Now I'm cutting back on the coffee, too.
    I just picked up a coffee habit! But I cut out soda and energy drinks, so it's a step in the right direction I suppose.
    Back on topic, 3 years and 3+ months since I quit smoking.

  20. #170
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    Sorry about straying off topic there. I just recently decided to (more or less) quit the alcohol. Mainly to save $$, since I'm now retired and living on a fixed income. With WA state retail tax, sixers of micro brew were running me about $9 on the average. That adds up over time.
    Many of the locals here buy their cigs and tobacco on the nearby Indian Rez.

    It was 1974 when I finally quit smoking tobacco. 40 years ago, now!

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Not sure I buy into this. I quit smoking 20 plus years ago. I can smoke a cigar or hand rolled without starting up again. Funny thing is they always sound better than they are. Maybe it's a personality thing but I don't buy into once an addict, always an addict.
    With the greatest respect, if you still smoke then you haven't quit? You're either a smoker or you're not. Maybe I'm misinterpreting what you've said?

    I wouldn't smoke a single cigarette or cigar for fear of getting started all over again. That's just me though. I didn't want to sort of stop, or cut down, I wanted to quit.

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBNinja View Post
    With the greatest respect, if you still smoke then you haven't quit? You're either a smoker or you're not. Maybe I'm misinterpreting what you've said?

    I wouldn't smoke a single cigarette or cigar for fear of getting started all over again. That's just me though. I didn't want to sort of stop, or cut down, I wanted to quit.
    I don't smoke. I haven't had a smoke in over 2-3 years, unless you include canibus. I've probably only smoked 3 times in 22 years. But on a rare occasion, either at a social event, like playing golf in a charity event with friends, I'll partake in a cigar. On that golf event, I smoked part of one cigar, didn't find the attraction I used to, and didn't smoke again. Why? Because I'm no longer addicted to the drug.

    I get everyone is different. I'm sure some couldn't do that but I did. I didn't wake up jonesing for another smoke. It just didn't happen.

  23. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    I don't smoke. I haven't had a smoke in over 2-3 years, unless you include canibus. I've probably only smoked 3 times in 22 years. But on a rare occasion, either at a social event, like playing golf in a charity event with friends, I'll partake in a cigar. On that golf event, I smoked part of one cigar, didn't find the attraction I used to, and didn't smoke again. Why? Because I'm no longer addicted to the drug.

    I get everyone is different. I'm sure some couldn't do that but I did. I didn't wake up jonesing for another smoke. It just didn't happen.
    Unfortunately your experience is not the norm for most truly addicted smokers (like me). Like PBNinja and other long term smokers, I could not have a single cig because it kicks the dependency into full gear immediately and I would be back to 20 a day. I quit several times for 1+year and fell back to the habit each time because I fooled myself into believing that I was totally over tobacco and could have 'just one'.

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taranis View Post
    Unfortunately your experience is not the norm for most truly addicted smokers (like me). Like PBNinja and other long term smokers, I could not have a single cig because it kicks the dependency into full gear immediately and I would be back to 20 a day. I quit several times for 1+year and fell back to the habit each time because I fooled myself into believing that I was totally over tobacco and could have 'just one'.
    I get it. On the contrary, one year is a pretty small amount of time in comparison to a "long term" smoker. I didn't have a smoke for 10 plus years when I tried one. I had only been smoking for about 10 years. I also knew there was no way in hell I was going to have two. I also get that we are all different. The true takeaway to the story, is without the addiction, cigarettes and cigars taste like shiat.

    One thing is for sure, quitting smoking now is easier than it was in the recent past. The times I struggled to quit, my crew would smoke in the truck on the way to the job site. In a truck for 30 minutes with 2nd hand smoke is pretty hard to take when you are in the throes of withdrawal. Even bars in Oregon are now smoke free. Back in the day, if you wanted to quit you had to change your whole life to avoid exposure for at least a month or two, maybe more depending.

  25. #175
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    I have been tobacco free for just over 4 months now.
    I have smoked longer than (I imagine) most MTBR forum members have been alive.
    As such, I didn't ride as much as I like and did have a 20-odd year spot where I did NO cycling of any kind. Since I have joined this forum I have been riding off-on. Last year I transferred and moved to a MUCH more bike friendly area and MUCH more happy about it.

    That said I have tried:
    Cold Turkey (lacked the willpower strength)
    Nicorette (did nothing to stop the craving)
    Lozenges (gave me the hic-ups)
    Patches (nothing to stop craving)
    Chantix (suffered from paranoia, anxiety, and the worst horrible nightmares imaginable)

    Then I tried e-cigs. No craving, cheaper than smoking and all the above products, can slowly break away from the habits associated with smoking. Started at 18mg nicotine (same as reg cig) and now down to 12-6mg (I mix the juice). I plan on being done completely by June. I breath easier, more energy. still get winded but I have noticed an improvement there. It worked for me, may not do so for you.
    *edit*
    wanted to say last month I did drop to 6mg but cravings started. I immediately went to local vape shop and bought a 12mg juice, problem solved. The flavors are another reason why I am taking my time, I really like them.

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    Very cool Whaked. Good luck on your journey. Just think, once you kick it to the curb you will save about $1800/year, or more, if you were smoking one pack a day. After a year, go splurge on a new bike, a trip or something to celebrate.

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    Still no smokes for me since the new year. Everyone in the band still smokes, but it honestly doesn't bother me in the least. Smoke on their clothes and breath smells nasty, but when they are actually smoking it is very non-offensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    Still no smokes for me since the new year. Everyone in the band still smokes, but it honestly doesn't bother me in the least. Smoke on their clothes and breath smells nasty, but when they are actually smoking it is very non-offensive.
    I noticed that too. On poker nite duting breaks the cig smoke doesn't bother me. However when a coworker returns from smoke break he smells nasty.

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    Quitting Smoking

    I got on the e-cigs, and it worked great for about 6 months.....then all the guys at work would bum smokes on occasion started buying packs and taking it up full time now that I didn't have any, and of course, I slipped a bit. I'm back on the e-cigs now and determined to get in shape. The e-cigs work better if you can stay away from smokers for a while.

  30. #180
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    Quitting Smoking

    Quote Originally Posted by PatMc View Post
    I got on the e-cigs, and it worked great for about 6 months.....then all the guys at work would bum smokes on occasion started buying packs and taking it up full time now that I didn't have any, and of course, I slipped a bit. I'm back on the e-cigs now and determined to get in shape. The e-cigs work better if you can stay away from smokers for a while.
    Everything works better if you can stay away from smokers in general, IMO.

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    Wow didn't even know this thread was here great read this far. I've been up and down with fighting cigarettes for several months now. Problem I have is for some reason I turn into a prick without even realizing it after about 10-12 hrs of nothing. I have a wife and 2 boys, and my riding plus my health (well still good except lungs lacking obviously) as reasons to quit. But its a fight.

    Read earlier in this thread about a book, is it actually worth a crap? Still chewing through the thread, trying cold turkey again tomorrow. I know mindset isn't where it needs to be, will power lacking when stuck indoors all the time cause winter is extra harsh this year.

    Chantix not an option mind is not right as it is (childhood etc some things still come out of the dark in my head and mess with me once in a while). Possible side effects not worth risk.

    E cigs.do nothing, gum irritates throat, patches make me want to smoke more.

    So there's some background, need a way to help break the cycle of my attitude so I don't feel like crap and turn to a cig. Mainly a way to flush my body quickly so I can concentrate on the mental side of this.

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    Quitting Smoking

    I quit about 7years ago with the aid of Wellbutrin. This was the crazy pill version of a popular quit smoking drug at the time. Dr. Went this route to get it covered by insurance. Apparently quitting smoking is not covered but crazy is. Good stuff. I was able to quit and the family was able to tolerate me while doing so.


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  33. #183
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    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    So there's some background, need a way to help break the cycle of my attitude so I don't feel like crap and turn to a cig. Mainly a way to flush my body quickly so I can concentrate on the mental side of this.


    A week long solo backpack or mtb trip, sans tobacco, far enough into the sticks that hitting a Circle-K is not an option. You won't be a jerk to anyone but yourself and will emerge from the woods a clean, mean, fighting machine with no physical addiction. I did this many years ago and it worked perfectly, unfortunately I started smoking again 7 years later but thankfully now am off them again via cold turkey- almost 2 years now.

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    Read the book, The Easy Way to Quit Smoking by Alan Carr, it really helps. Both myself and drummer have had success after reading that book. Its short too, takes about 2-3 hours and its done.

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    Actually the hardest bit of quitting for me was the lack of support or understanding from my wife. I hid the smoking from my parents, ridiculous at 30 years of age.

    Whenever my wife was having a monthly visit and the inevitable row would break out her attitude was it was all my fault and "go have a smoke and calm yourself down" was the ignorance I had to contend with. The irony of it was it made me all the more determined to prove the b*tch wrong so she was actually doing me a favour

    Good luck to all of you on the quitting path, it's definitely the right way to go. I was that guy who ran to the smoke hut in the p*ssing rain and freezing weather to get my fix, I enjoyed a smoke as much as anyone but I do NOT miss them in the slightest. I've put weight on and feel much better.

    As someone else mentioned too, you don't realise how much you stink until you quit and smell other people coming back from a smoke break.

  36. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    Read the book, The Easy Way to Quit Smoking by Alan Carr.
    I might still have that book somewhere, completely useless IMNSHO.
    "Just follow my steps and you will be smoke free in no time. Just listen to what Phyllis D of nowheresville, USA has to say,..." rinse repeat ad naseum. couldn't get past chapter 2 as I kept expecting him to start talking about the steps.

    Last night I woke up completely ****** at myself. I went to the quickie mart and bought a pack of smokes. So I headed downstairs cursing myself, enough to make a sailor blush, and that is really saying something 'cause I was a sailor. I was determined to crumble every stick and toss them in the fireplace. As I stood in my living room still grumbling and calling myself names searching for the offensive product when it hit me.

    It was all a dream.

  37. #187
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    Keep after guys, it does get easier, albeit slowly. Just reminder yourself why you are doing it.

  38. #188
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    Updates from the quitters??

  39. #189
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    Still using the e-cig, haven't had a real one since 12/31/13. I can go hours and hours without even thinking of the e-cig, it's really not the nicotine that gets you, its the other crap they put in there.

    Still don't feel much different than before when I smoked, but I did notice I was not gasping as hard after a long fast climb on the trail the other day. I'm also sleeping better (well, at least falling asleep easier, of course I also quit drinking caffeine all day, just some coffee in the AM and an occasional glass or tea or coke at dinner as a treat.

  40. #190
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    Resurrecting this thread.

    Trying to quit.
    Again.
    Just crossed the 24 hour mark earlier today. Grumpy as hell. Kinda want to bash my head into a wall. Longest I've gone without smoking in the past 18 years or so is three months when I tried to quit a couple years ago. Three months ain't ****e to many people, but it was an accomplishment for me at the time. Before that, I had quit for a month at a time maybe 3 times. Getting back on the bike this spring after a long winter of inactivity made me realize how bad of shape my lungs are in. Going cold turkey. Might just go full-on straight-edge cuz drinking makes me want to smoke even worse.

  41. #191
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    Re: Quitting Smoking

    Time for my yearly check in. I haven't cheated once. I smoked for 19 years. Its been three years since I read Allen Carr's book http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/061548...;robot_redir=1.
    I'm in the best shape I've ever been in. I also started drinking green smoothies twice a day as well. Eating whole foods really does heal your body. I do know that if I ever smoked again that I would fall right into it again. Put them down and never look back.
    Cheers

  42. #192
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    Yeah I quit smoking 3 and half years ago and I am so glad I did. Cigarettes are terrible your basically paying to slowly kill yourself. Just think about all the money you spend in a year on cigs and how much bike stuff that money would get you.
    Hang in there for anyone trying to quit!

  43. #193
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    Checking in. I'd say im making slow progress but progress. Issues I end up with is trying to put my efforts into something else (bikes) and now lost that ability due to injury from work. Temporary issue but I got dumb and picked up a cigarette after not smoking much of anything for 2 weeks.

    So elbow getting better fast (now that im in control of "therapy" and found some natural things instead of pills) and instead of ending up with excuses im ordering this book I keep reading about here. Gotta kick these things and 2 packs cost more than the book so its worth a shot. Hopefully I have the same success as others. (crossing fingers a praying, damn things are the only thing in my life stronger than my mentality and will power)
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  44. #194
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    Quote Originally Posted by M320 View Post
    Hey guys just wanted to send out a quick thank you to everyone on this post/topic. And a very special thanks to who ever the hell 1st posted about Allen Carr's easy way to quit smoking book. I am 29years old. I have been a "full time" smoker since the age of 14. I quit two times in the past 4 years. Both times using Chantix. 1st time made it about 6 months and the last time I quit for about a year. Well getting back into mountain biking after 14years, I starting looking into quitting again..... Hopefully this time for good. So I spent the $150+ on my starter pack of Chantix and was waiting for the "right time" to start taking it. Fearing once again how it make me feel taking it and how it messed with my head it is still sitting in my med cabinet. About two weeks ago I was looking around on MTBR and saw a quitting smoking post. Shocked to see that on here I had to take a look. Well after reading through all the posts I went on to amazon the next day and ordered Allen Carr's book. I can not even tell you the last time I read a book. But it was $12.90. What did I have to loose. So after 3-4 days of reading after work, I finished the book on this past Monday Aug 5th at 9:45pm. At 9:46pm I became a non smoker again. And I must say it was very easy. There are a few times that can be rough for the first few days but I must say it is worth it. Anyway..... Sorry for the long story. Thanks again for everyone on this topic. If you are reading this, still smoking and want to quit . STOP reading this post and go buy the book already. You won't regret it. I am so looking forward to my first non smoker ride this weekend and hacking up all the **** from my lungs the entire time. Thanks again all.
    Today marks one year of being smoke free and I feel great. Its crazy to see this post from a year ago already. Anyway.... anyone out there that wants to quit and is just not sure how... Start with the book. (Allen Carr Easy way to quit) the best $12.90 I ever spent and just saved myself at least $2000.00 over the past year. (I spent a lot of that on my bike ...lol) Best wishes and best of luck to everyone.

  45. #195
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    Smoked from age 18 > 46 and one day I decided to stop. I picked up an e-cig and used it for about two months and got tired of "the burn." Those things are horrible! When I needed to buy more cartridges I didn't and that was that. That was a year ago and I rarely miss it. I'm riding stronger than I have in 20+ years, climbing things that were a tough push not too long ago and just generally performing at a higher level in all athletic endeavors.

  46. #196
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    Try an e-cig. I picked mine up for £20.00 and refills are about £5 each. Each refill lasts me a good month as well.

    No tar on the lungs, and a saving.

    If I'm entirely honest.. I still smoke, but the ecigs seem to work wonders for a lot of my friends who switched to them then gradually weined themselves off it.

    -sc00t

  47. #197
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    Congrats to all who have quit. I just finished reading this whole thread. Smoked for 29 gears, up to 2 packs a day. Tried quitting many times in the past. Patches didn't work for me. Chantix was a bad time. Makes a mess of your thoughts.

    Bikes hardly ever were ridden. Felt like utter crap when I turned 43.

    Decided to just stop cold turkey this past May 31st. I did use a disposable ecig a few times the first few days to soften the transition. Stupid things made my throat hurt and gave me headaches. After taking it apart, I discovered what looked exactly like the smoker out of my Lionel train.

    48 hours into withdrawal was the worst. I was an absolute wreck and I will never smoke another bleeping cigarette again.

    100 days now without one. Starting riding again on July 4th and feeling better every week that goes by. Actually thinking about racing now. Bought a fat bike with the money I've saved and rode it 100 miles the first few days that I owned it.

    I don't want one. I don't need one. It's a craving. It's an urge. Simple as that.

    Drink lots of water.

  48. #198
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    +1 on congrats to the quitters. 100 days and 1 year are both huge milestones.

    I quit cold turkey April 1 this year and went through some pretty tough times. The best thing for quitting was riding. I feel so much better now than I did when I started riding again this spring.

    Not smoking made riding easier and riding made not smoking easier.

    Not that it was easy. It still isn't. But it's totally worth it. Get through those first couple hours, days, weeks and it's like a long ride; before you know it there are a bunch of miles behind you and you feel pretty good about getting through all that struggle.

    Personally, I think e-cigs are BS. Same with Chantix, patches, gum, lozenges... just gotta tough it out and find a healthy alternative/distraction. I had to quit drinking for the whole first 30 days cuz drinking and smoking were so connected for me. Now I'm pretty much over it. I can have a couple beers without feeling like I need to smoke and I feel better the next day without having smoked a bunch.

    Like others have said, you can save a lot of money by quitting. I might have to reward myself with a new bike.

  49. #199
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    Turned 49 this May and quit after 30 years of smoking, four months ago today. Bought my first bike since I was a kid and have a new obsession. I suck at it, but I love it. My first ride was a cpl miles around the sub and I though I was going to die. Now I'm riding 30 miles a couple of times a week on rails to trails type things and the local single tracks when it's not raining. The weather has sucked here this year leaving the single tracks too muddy to ride. I'm nervous about winter coming and what I'm going to do when I can't ride, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it.
    We have met the enemy, and it is us. Pogo

  50. #200
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    Congratulations! I did the same 2 years ago after 18 years of smoking. I'm so happy I did it. I sorta wished I would have done it sooner, but better late than never.

    Personally, I'm looking forward to the snow so I can try out the fat bike on the groomed single track here in MN. Maybe you could find a place to rent a Fatty or if it fits your budget, one of your own, to ride this winter

    Again, congrats on taking that major first step, and I hope you stick with it. While it'll be difficult, the benefits far outweigh the costs (i.e. not having walking pneumonia twice a year, not getting a cold with an automatic free pass to the flu, etc breathing issues).



    Medicius

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