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  1. #51
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    I stumbled upon this 2 days ago on Saturday night. I bought Allen Carr's book, Easy way to quit smoking, started reading it Saturday night. I finished reading it Sunday. I quit just like that. Amazing. No B.S., the book makes it so clear. No panic attacks, jitters, fears etc. A chain smoker to a non smoker for life. Thank you. PS my first ride as a non smoker was out of this world incredible.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddmeyers View Post
    I stumbled upon this 2 days ago on Saturday night. I bought Allen Carr's book, Easy way to quit smoking, started reading it Saturday night. I finished reading it Sunday. I quit just like that. Amazing. No B.S., the book makes it so clear. No panic attacks, jitters, fears etc. A chain smoker to a non smoker for life. Thank you. PS my first ride as a non smoker was out of this world incredible.
    Congrats. I smoked for 21 years before the book. Everyday that passes that little monster inside gets a little weaker. Soon he will be dead and so will the thought of ever doing it again.
    Btw. You will heal no matter how long you smoked for. I can ride circles around people that have never smoked a day in their lives.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2

  3. #53
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    I'm already healing. I felt it instantly on my first ride. I have an 8 mile loop that i'm used to. My best time was an hour and 15 minutes. I did that same loop in 45 minutes for my first ride. I felt the benefits as soon as I hopped on my bike for my first ride. This is going to get better. I can't imagine what I'll be able to do in a few months time.

  4. #54
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    I quit again last week and watching these posts help me get through the day. Thanks

  5. #55
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    Well done OP and stay strong! I stopped smoking cold turkey over 6 months ago. Personally I found it really very easy - no cravings, absolutely no desire to smoke again.

    I found this forum very useful:

    http://forum.nosmokingday.org.uk/

    And if you are slipping, just check this for a serious dose of reality:

    http://whyquit.com/

    And particularly the timeline of benefits:

    http://whyquit.com/whyquit/a_benefits_time_table.html

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  6. #56
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    I smoked 25 years before I read that book. I just celebrated my 2 year anniversary of being off of cigs. Good job and enjoy how incredible your life is about to be!

  7. #57
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    You cannot quit smoking at a very short span of time.It needs time and a lot of effort especially when you think of discouraging yourself of how hard it would take for you.Remember mark off each successful day on a calendar. Look at it when you feel tempted to smoke, and tell yourself that you don't want to start all over again.Always be positive and always keep in mind how things would go better after you succeed.

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    Sedona Arizona l West Fork Trail

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by toddmeyers View Post
    I'm already healing. I felt it instantly on my first ride. I have an 8 mile loop that i'm used to. My best time was an hour and 15 minutes. I did that same loop in 45 minutes for my first ride. I felt the benefits as soon as I hopped on my bike for my first ride. This is going to get better. I can't imagine what I'll be able to do in a few months time.
    So what is the latest? Still doing good? Let us know.

  9. #59
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    It's been over a week and i feel phenomenal. I can't believe how easy it was to quit.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by redfox1939 View Post
    You cannot quit smoking at a very short span of time.It needs time and a lot of effort especially when you think of discouraging yourself of how hard it would take for you.............
    I had a different experience. When I quit in 1998 after 15 years it happened quickly....now I'm figuring smoking is 90% mental. I had made up my mind enough was enough. I used the patch for 2 weeks.....then one night I had an attack and wanted a cigarette.....I couldn't leave my house because of the kids and the wife was at work. I tore my truck apart looking for a butt. I couldn't find one.

    I went back in the house and sat on the couch. Five minutes later the urge was gone. I told myself if I can get through that I can get through anything. I never wanted one again. Not even a single temptation after that. No more patch either. I could go in bars and have a drink and still not feel that urge after that one episode. I'm glad I didn't find one that night...... It was a most disgusting habit.

  11. #61
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    My experience, I couldn't wrap my mind around the idea of NEVER smoking again, after 20 years, it had become part of my identity. I told myself that I'll go get some smokes in an hour, and kept doing that till I HAD to get gas, then it was next time I get to the store, I'll get some then. After about a month of that, I no longer thought about buying them. It's been 5 years now, and I don't miss them at all. To anyone trying to quit, it's not as hard as it seems right now. Take it one day at a time, don't worry about tomorrow, just focus on getting through today. Don't expect instant increased lung capacity, it's going to take time. The coughing spell, it won't last long, just seems that way, I remember blowing stuff out that looked like it had been there for 15 years. Finally, hang in there, it's worth it!

  12. #62
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    Lots of great advice, i second the site whyquit.com it has a lot of information
    that will prepare you for the cravings , the physical reactions of your body and mind.
    And all the things you will face while your body starts healing and returning to its nicotine free state.

    Watching some videos on youtube from joel spitzer was very helpful for moral support , and getting past the 3 days is very important, after that it gets easier.

    8 days free from the addiction, and my rides feel better and better everytime.
    You can do it!

  13. #63
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    Easy, I spent on my bike what id spend on cigs in a year, so now I cant afford cigs. They are over $10/pack here in ny. Been almost 3 weeks and I feel great.

  14. #64
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    I wish everyone well. I've quit and re-started so many times now. It's hard every time, but I'm sick of that cycle, so I've quit for the final time a while back. I just don't like being around it anymore.

    I've gotten back into running and mountain biking and that helps me stay away. Never fool yourself into thinking you can just have one, which will lead to two...etc...

    I've quit just about every way short of hypnosis...cold turkey, patches, gum, wellbutrin, chantix....they all work but you need will power with any of them. Best bet is to save your money and just go cold turkey, fight it out for a few days then move on with life.

  15. #65
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    To everyone who has quit, great job. As for me, It's been an easy 4 weeks. My personal observations. I love the fact that I've got a bit of extra cash now. I sleep better and I have a lot easier time getting up in the morning. I'm generally in a better mood. My mountain biking skills have gone through the roof. When I push myself riding now, it only takes me 10 seconds to catch my breath instead of 2 minutes. Oh, I haven't gained a single pound. LIfe is good!

  16. #66
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    Hi, I searched for a recent thread on bikeforums.net but couldn't come up with anything - so I created an account here. I do love mountain biking, and I recently got a new Surly Troll :-)

    I'm 27 years old and I've been smoking since I was 19. In the last 5 years it has been between 15-20 cigarettes a day.

    I had my last cigarette this evening.

    I read Allen Carr's "Easyway to stop smoking", which I HIGHLY recommend!

    This might be against the rules on the forum, but I suggest looking for the book on torrents. The author is dead (from lung cancer) so he isn't getting anything from it anyway. It's of my opinion that information that can save a life should be free...

    Anyway, best of luck to everyone quitting! I will be posting here often :-)

  17. #67
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    I'd like to add that I've tried Chantix twice over the past three years. The first time I used Chantix I was smoke-free for ~8 months before starting up again. I tried Chantix a second time and had the worst 2 months of my life: I was extrememly suicidal, angry, depressed, and had terrible nightmares almost every night. I was smoke free for about 2 months 2 weeks before I picked up a pack again.

    I've also tried nicotine patches and gum. Never made it past a week using those methods.

    This time I'm quitting cold turkey, thanks to the help and inspiration of Allen carr's book.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by BustedBearing View Post
    Pretty simple. If you want it, just quit.

    Prepare to feel bad for a couple of days but provided you have been and will keep exercising that time may be reduced. Two to three weeks and you'll be able to notice differences, for the best!

    It's all in your head. Mind beats body.

    I have to agree with this statement. If you REALLY wanted to quit, Just boot stomp whatever cigs you have left in your pack. Then walk away.

  19. #69
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    Hey Mike,

    Good on you for quitting! I've been quit for 12 years now after smoking for nearly 20 before that. The Big Tobacco companies want you to believe that quitting is impossible, but that's just another one of their lies.

    Nicotine is powerfully addictive. Your body has special neurological receptor sites that are specifically designed for nicotine. Nicotine is totally evil. It is toxic; it is a very powerful insecticide and a tiny amount of pure nicotine will kill a 200 lb. person very quickly and horribly.

    The good news is that you can quit. It's just difficult. I quit cold turkey. I had 10 days of misery. After that, I'd get these urges at regular intervals for the first three years or so. You absolutely have to remember that once your nicotine receptors have been activated, the drug (nicotine) will always have a powerful effect on you. You will forever be a recovering nicotine addict. Consequently, if you ever ingest any nicotine after you stop, you will be addicted again—as if you never quit in the first place.

    But you can quit. Remember that. Quitting smoking will not kill you, but not quitting certainly will. Certainly.

    There were two things that helped me finally decide to quit:

    1.) a very young co-worker of mine had developed chronic emphysema after a couple of decades of smoking (she started as a teenager). Her cubicle was next to mine. Sometimes the emphysema would get so bad that she would start gurgling like she was drowning in phlegm, and then she'd spasm into a 15-minute coughing fit that was a hellacious sounding watery death rattle. Frequently after that, she'd sneak outside for a smoke—even though she had told her family and her doctor that she didn't smoke any more. Her circulation finally got so bad that her nose turned blue and she had to go on oxygen. She wasn't even 40 years old. The last coughing fit I heard her have was terrible. So bad in fact that the secretary called 911. She went on permanent disability after that.

    2.) Shortly after that episode, my wife told me she was leaving at the end of the week if I didn't quit smoking. This was Monday. She said she was out by Friday. I didn't believe her. A friend of mine called and told me that my wife already had moved things over to their house and that she was going to move in at the end of the week. For the next two days, every time I went out to smoke (once an hour—I was a pack-and-a-half-a-day smoker), I really focused on just how awful the cigarettes really tasted and how much different smoking as an addict was compared to how "enjoyable" smoking had been when I was first stupid enough to start. After really focusing on the grotesque flavor of the smoke, I could actually feel how toxic each cigarette was. After two days I developed an involuntary gag reflex to each cigarette. I had my last cigarette that Thursday. I've been quit ever since.

    Just remember that you can quit smoking if you choose to. If you do not quit, you are guaranteed to die a slow, lingering, painful death. That's a much worse scenario than 10 days of discomfort.

    Good luck! You are the man!

    P.S. It is not hyperbole when I say that every single aspect of my life has gotten better since I quit smoking. Seriously. I have no regrets at all.
    Last edited by Blister Butt; 11-09-2012 at 08:54 AM.
    "You'll thank me when it's all said and done"

  20. #70
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    Congratulations. It really take a lot of determination to do it. I'm glad that you did it

  21. #71
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    As a smoker of 20+ years and ex-smoker of about 3 years, I can say the best way to quit is just to do it.

    Don't try and figure out an acceptable amount of cigarettes or think it is ok to smoke occasionally, or only when you drink, or only after sex, or blah blah blah because you can't do it.

    You need to quit and swear you will never go back or pick one up ever again.
    Anything else and you will be right back where you are now.

    I had been there before and quit one other time for a couple years thinking I could control it if I picked one up. Unfortunately, it just does not work that way.

    That being said, it will suck at first but after a while the cravings will be fewer and lighter.
    It took well over a year before I stopped completely having them.

    Just stick with it and eventually you will know it was the best choice you ever made.

  22. #72
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    Australian Tea Tree sticks. Basically toothpicks with tea tree oil in them. Handles the oral fixation on the times I have tried to quit. You can get them at nutrition stores.

    I still smoke, and I want to quit. But right now, I haven't picked up a bike yet, and I am the type of person that needs to do something to get away from the cravings, something to get addicted to. Plus, when I have quit before, the weight gain has killed me. And I am the type of person that hates to work out, just boring to me. I use to run a lot, Marine Corp got me in to that, but I have bad knees from skiing all my life, and I am only 31, so the impact on the knees after about half a mile causes me to stop running.

    I know it is all mind over matter, but replacing it with something has always helped me, like biking did when I was back in MN.

    Now to just do it again.

  23. #73
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    Don't take this the wrong way but you are a guy who has admittedly never quit successfully and are giving advice on quitting.

    Seriously, you are coming up with excuses on why you can't quit and until you stop doing that, you never will be able to quit.

    You just have to decide to do it then stick with it.

    I gained weight afterwards too.
    So then I had to stop making excuses for the weight gain and decide to get off my ass and do something about that too.

  24. #74
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    I used to smoke. One day I said 'wtf am I being a nicotine addict for? lol! I'm funding big tabacco by slowly killing myself!!'.

    I was only 13 at the time. NEVER smoked a puff of tabacco since. Quit dope a few years later.

    Some people wake up early than others. Most important thing is that we wake up at all...

    ITS JUST A CHOICE IN THE MOMENT TO DECIDE BETWEEN MAGIC AND TRAGIC..

  25. #75
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    Almost 2 years now since my last cigarette. Took me 5 months to completely get over the habit after quitting. I used the nicotine patch plan and it seemed to take the edge off most of the time. Alot of willpower helps though. If I could do it, ANYONE can. I smoked for 16 years and already notice a big difference.

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