Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azmtbkr81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    137

    Nutrition for training and weight loss?

    Hi, I'm a 36 year old guy, just a hair under 6' tall and my weight has steadily crept up to 215 lbs. I have the dual goal of losing 25 lbs and also training for longer endurance/marathon races this summer.

    Over the last few weeks I've started tracking my food intake and have been limiting my calories to about 2000 per day. I'm not a fan of crazy, restrictive diets, so I've been making an effort to clean up my eating habits by sticking to healthy, balanced meals with almost no processed foods or sugar. I've also drastically cut my beer/alcohol intake.

    I have plenty of energy to get through the day, but I feel gassed quickly on longer or more intense training rides. I'm not hitting the wall, but I definitely feel weaker and it also seems to take longer to recover.

    Are there any tweaks I can make to my nutrition strategy to continue training hard and still lose weight or is this something I have to push through to give my body time to adjust?

  2. #2
    Oh, So Interesting!
    Reputation: davec113's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,555
    Me too... Well, I was 208 and have dropped 10 lbs by limiting caloric intake, carbs and processed foods as well as not eating after dinner. I think the last point is key, especially if you normally have a late evening or midnight snack. I'm not always successful but I have limited it to a large degree.

    I have noticed less consistency on rides since cutting cals and doing an evening fast, and I do think you need to adapt by eating more before and during rides. On rides I'd look at 150 cal/hr or so of sugars, I use Skratch drink mix + Kirkland organic fruit snacks. One 21 oz bottle of drink mix + 1 pkg of fruit snack per hr does help and makes me feel less hungry after rides so I'm less likely to overcompensate.

    Before the ride probably depends more on genetics, but I do best with some amount of fats and proteins others might not. I've been working on a pre-ride or workout shake consisting of a dose of Vega One, a banana, a cup of Califa cold-brew coffee in almond milk, a couple tbsp cacao powder, and a spoonful of pb and honey. As I said this might not sit well with some, as there's "too much" fat and protein, but for me it's been great for consistency. I'm also a bigger guy and at 6' 197 I don't have a ton more weight I can lose without losing muscle but for me, I think 190 is a reasonable goal.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    2,091
    Sounds like maybe you just need more calories during your ride.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Formerly of Kent
    Reputation: Le Duke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    9,251
    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Sounds like maybe you just need more calories during your ride.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    This. If youíre only eating 2,000 calories a day, youíre going to have a very hard time putting in hard miles on the bike.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Death from Below.

  5. #5
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,355
    There are a lot of variables that can be factored into the OPs question.

    Individual variability is a big one.

    The majority of responses I see when these sort of "what should I eat?" question come up focus on some sort of special mix of eating this or that.


    When I ride with others, the guys I see _not_ petering out are the lean guys with low body fat.

    When I ride by myself, I do best with less in my belly. Unless the ride is over 3 hours I typically take in no calories during the ride, while others are munching then getting sleepy. Generally I eat breakfast and supper only and can go all day with nothing else, but it took some time for my body to get there, and now I feel better.

    Most riders I'm seeing are carting around a very large amount of stored calories.

    The amount of stored energy we keep on hand, even with an empty belly, is a lot.

    Add to that, most riders could go a lot longer and faster if they dropped 10 to 15 pounds of dead weight from their chassis.


    Take 2 average riders and over a 6 month period have one focus on "fueling up" pre and post ride, and one who overall ate a lot less, and trained their body to use pre-existing stores. I'd wager at the end the one who focused on eating less would be faster. He'd weigh less, and would allow his body to re-learn what millions of years of mammalian physiology has programmed into us. This presumes the "average rider" is hauling around at least 10 pounds of dead weight.


    I see guys, several pounds overweight, talking about what to eat, while consistently getting smoked on rides by lean guys who are taking in a lot less calories overall.


    We have a pandemic of excessive caloric intake, even among relatively intense weekend warriors.

    I'd also wager that if most posters on this site simply ate less they end up being far faster.


    I'd say not "bonking" has more to do with training more, rather than eating more.


    These thoughts of mine may not be correct, or best for everyone. They are meant to present theories that fall on the other side of the "advice spectrum" so that we might keep an open mind.


    Good luck OP, and let us know how it works out.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtnbkrmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1,599
    Everybody is different. I am 6', 192 lbs. Long, lanky and lean. I try to consume 3500 calories a day. I also try to eat at least 2 eggs or drink a protein shake before bed (with at least some portion being casein or a slower digesting protein). If I don't eat often daily, including a nice bedtime snack, I feel weak on my bike. I have been down to 180 in recent times and while I could climb for a while like a billy goat, overall I am MUCH stronger at 190. Especially for longer rides.

    It has taken me a while to figure out what works. So far, this works for me. For some of my friends, they would be larger than a VW bug if they ate like I do, and there is no doubt they would suffer on the trail.

  7. #7
    Oh, So Interesting!
    Reputation: davec113's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,555
    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    There are a lot of variables that can be factored into the OPs question.

    Individual variability is a big one.

    The majority of responses I see when these sort of "what should I eat?" question come up focus on some sort of special mix of eating this or that.


    When I ride with others, the guys I see _not_ petering out are the lean guys with low body fat.

    When I ride by myself, I do best with less in my belly. Unless the ride is over 3 hours I typically take in no calories during the ride, while others are munching then getting sleepy. Generally I eat breakfast and supper only and can go all day with nothing else, but it took some time for my body to get there, and now I feel better.

    Most riders I'm seeing are carting around a very large amount of stored calories.

    The amount of stored energy we keep on hand, even with an empty belly, is a lot.

    Add to that, most riders could go a lot longer and faster if they dropped 10 to 15 pounds of dead weight from their chassis.


    Take 2 average riders and over a 6 month period have one focus on "fueling up" pre and post ride, and one who overall ate a lot less, and trained their body to use pre-existing stores. I'd wager at the end the one who focused on eating less would be faster. He'd weigh less, and would allow his body to re-learn what millions of years of mammalian physiology has programmed into us. This presumes the "average rider" is hauling around at least 10 pounds of dead weight.


    I see guys, several pounds overweight, talking about what to eat, while consistently getting smoked on rides by lean guys who are taking in a lot less calories overall.


    We have a pandemic of excessive caloric intake, even among relatively intense weekend warriors.

    I'd also wager that if most posters on this site simply ate less they end up being far faster.


    I'd say not "bonking" has more to do with training more, rather than eating more.


    These thoughts of mine may not be correct, or best for everyone. They are meant to present theories that fall on the other side of the "advice spectrum" so that we might keep an open mind.


    Good luck OP, and let us know how it works out.
    I agree with much of what you're saying... but we can't change genetics and some folks are never going to be skinny people. Skinny people don't peter out because lower weight means doing less work, less exertion and it's easier for them to maintain moderate heart rates and clear obstacles without overexertion.

    As far as using preexisting stores imo it's important to train your body to switch power sources smoothly, but for maximum performance I'm not sure it's ideal, and it can leave you hungry after a ride and more likely to overeat.

    With your 2 avg riders example I'm absolutely sure I'm faster learning how to best fuel myself before and during rides. I do know some top athletes and they eat before and during rides. If you're doing some sort of keto type diet than you need a different plan I guess. But for everyone else I'm quite sure fueling during rides over an hour or two is a really good idea.

  8. #8
    Oh, So Interesting!
    Reputation: davec113's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,555
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Everybody is different. I am 6', 192 lbs. Long, lanky and lean. I try to consume 3500 calories a day. I also try to eat at least 2 eggs or drink a protein shake before bed (with at least some portion being casein or a slower digesting protein). If I don't eat often daily, including a nice bedtime snack, I feel weak on my bike. I have been down to 180 in recent times and while I could climb for a while like a billy goat, overall I am MUCH stronger at 190. Especially for longer rides.

    It has taken me a while to figure out what works. So far, this works for me. For some of my friends, they would be larger than a VW bug if they ate like I do, and there is no doubt they would suffer on the trail.
    I'd be obese for sure. Reminds me of my friend who is ~5'3" and 100 lbs, she has to eat more often than she wants to maintain that weight.

    Before I was ~32 it didn't matter what I ate, then I had to adjust after gaining a little weight. Now at 43 I have to adjust further. It sucks, but what can you do...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azmtbkr81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    137
    Thanks for the advice everyone, especially davec113, sounds like you have your pre-ride nutrition pretty dialed! This week I'm going to try fueling up a bit more prior to riding and see how that goes, maybe start a log of what I'm eating prior to the ride and how I'm feeling during/after the ride.

  10. #10
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    I am 53, weigh 181-182, and am rather muscular and lean, certainly more than most riders. I have used the app LoseIt (similar to MyFitnessPal, but better, IMO) for four years to track and manage my calories, and I swear by it. I had recently crept up to 190-ish, and set a calorie limit to lose 1/2 pound per week, to get down to 185 and lean out a bit. I lost it in a couple weeks, and am now adding calories to get back to 185. Again, I swear by it and track my calories meticulously.

    I also did Dry January, cutting out alcohol for the first time in my adult life, and have stayed dry because I feel so good. I mean, sleep, soreness, energy are all better than ever, and the only difference is no alcohol. Iíll be back at some point, but I donít miss it, and I feel it has made a huge difference in trimming down and leaning out.

    I am an endurance XC SSíer, and do 12/24-hour solo races, and long loop/P2P events. So I ride a lot. I also lift hard in then gym 3x per week, as maintaining my physique and muscle mass is important to me. As you can imagine, at 53, and with the amount of cardio I do, along with trying to trim down a bit, I have to work to maintain muscle. I also try to run every so often; sometimes 1x per week, sometime a bit less.

    To net it all out, for me, it is ALL about counting calories, and generally being thoughtful about the macros and makeup of those calories, along with consistent, and relatively hard, exercise. Yes, you need to make sure you get enough calories and proper nutrition in order to train and compete effectively, but in the end, itís a math exercise. If youíre not taking in less than you burn, on a net basis, you wonít lose any weight. Period.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Ride more; post less...

  11. #11
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    Iíll add, on rides of up to 2-3 hours, you donít need to eat anything beforehand. Youíll do just fine on stored energy (glycogen), and youíll more effectively ďburn fatĒ. As rides get longer than that, you start to add in snacks. I always feel best, on the bike, running or at the gym, when I feel somewhat hungry, and am on a relatively empty stomach.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Ride more; post less...

  12. #12
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,355
    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz View Post
    Iíll add, on rides of up to 2-3 hours, you donít need to eat anything beforehand. Youíll do just fine on stored energy (glycogen), and youíll more effectively ďburn fatĒ. As rides get longer than that, you start to add in snacks. I always feel best, on the bike, running or at the gym, when I feel somewhat hungry, and am on a relatively empty stomach.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk


    Less is better, with calories, is my slant.

    Azbiker, I'd agree with you for high end athletes at peak performance. But for most of us, getting lean by eating less, will get us faster, faster.

  13. #13
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    But for most of us, getting lean by eating less, will get us faster, faster.
    ^^This

    I weighed 189.6 on Jan. 1, and 178.8 this morning. At the same strength (basically), that's like taking 10 pounds off my bike.
    Ride more; post less...

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankout's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,647
    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonlui View Post
    Sounds like maybe you just need more calories during your ride.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    This again...

    Do a search with key words 'weight management loss cycling' and you'll find some good information out there to help you out. Stick with cycling specific sources, such as Active, FastCat Coaching, Cycling Weekly, etc.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz View Post
    Iíll add, on rides of up to 2-3 hours, you donít need to eat anything beforehand. Youíll do just fine on stored energy (glycogen), and youíll more effectively ďburn fatĒ. As rides get longer than that, you start to add in snacks. I always feel best, on the bike, running or at the gym, when I feel somewhat hungry, and am on a relatively empty stomach.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    I was reading this thread this morning before my ride so I decided to try out your advice on the whole riding on an empty stomach thing. I gotta say things went damn well. I did 12 miles with 1800 ft of climbing which for me is a moderately difficult ride. The first 15-20 minutes, which coincides with a long climb right from the parking lot, was resulting in some stomach cramps. I powered through and had no issues after that. I did have my cheat meal for the week last night which included some pizza and bread sticks so I guess I was carbed up. I'm normally pretty low carb.

    The timing of your post was really good. I was seriously considering starting this week to do my weight workouts in the mornings before work and then get a ride in after work. I just wasn't sure how I was going to eat before going to the gym. I guess I'll try lifting fasted. That might be tough during heavy squats and deadlifts though. Any advice?
    Get out and go ride.

  16. #16
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    Quote Originally Posted by felix1776 View Post
    I was reading this thread this morning before my ride so I decided to try out your advice on the whole riding on an empty stomach thing. I gotta say things went damn well. I did 12 miles with 1800 ft of climbing which for me is a moderately difficult ride. The first 15-20 minutes, which coincides with a long climb right from the parking lot, was resulting in some stomach cramps. I powered through and had no issues after that. I did have my cheat meal for the week last night which included some pizza and bread sticks so I guess I was carbed up. I'm normally pretty low carb.

    The timing of your post was really good. I was seriously considering starting this week to do my weight workouts in the mornings before work and then get a ride in after work. I just wasn't sure how I was going to eat before going to the gym. I guess I'll try lifting fasted. That might be tough during heavy squats and deadlifts though. Any advice?
    For a ride that short, even with the hard climbing, you really donít need anything. Your stored glycogen was more than enough.

    For lifting, you definitely donít need anything before the gym...it wouldnít even impact the lifting workout. Fasting will be just fine. Iíll bet you feel great.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Ride more; post less...

  17. #17
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,355
    Quote Originally Posted by felix1776 View Post
    I was reading this thread this morning before my ride so I decided to try out your advice on the whole riding on an empty stomach thing. I gotta say things went damn well. I did 12 miles with 1800 ft of climbing which for me is a moderately difficult ride. The first 15-20 minutes, which coincides with a long climb right from the parking lot, was resulting in some stomach cramps. I powered through and had no issues after that. I did have my cheat meal for the week last night which included some pizza and bread sticks so I guess I was carbed up. I'm normally pretty low carb.

    The timing of your post was really good. I was seriously considering starting this week to do my weight workouts in the mornings before work and then get a ride in after work. I just wasn't sure how I was going to eat before going to the gym. I guess I'll try lifting fasted. That might be tough during heavy squats and deadlifts though. Any advice?
    Anecdotally of course....


    Depends how much lifting you do and how dialed your lifting regime is.

    Something that has left me keep lifting during riding season, and not need a lot of extra calories is backing off on the reps.

    During the riding season I do something like a modified "strong lifts 5x5" but after warm up I won't do a full 5 sets. Rather 3 sets with 5 reps of each exercise.

    Works on a lower calorie diet. Does not totally fatigue the muscles so riding the same day or next day is possible, and most importantly, it still keeps me strong.

    I had grown up in the day when weight training was all about pushing every set until exhaustion, then doing "negatives". After a day like that I couldn't walk a flight of stairs let alone ride a mt bike. I then learned you don't have to overly fatigue the muscle with weights to make it get stronger.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Anecdotally of course....


    Depends how much lifting you do and how dialed your lifting regime is.

    Something that has left me keep lifting during riding season, and not need a lot of extra calories is backing off on the reps.

    During the riding season I do something like a modified "strong lifts 5x5" but after warm up I won't do a full 5 sets. Rather 3 sets with 5 reps of each exercise.

    Works on a lower calorie diet. Does not totally fatigue the muscles so riding the same day or next day is possible, and most importantly, it still keeps me strong.

    I had grown up in the day when weight training was all about pushing every set until exhaustion, then doing "negatives". After a day like that I couldn't walk a flight of stairs let alone ride a mt bike. I then learned you don't have to overly fatigue the muscle with weights to make it get stronger.
    I've been lifting about 4 days a week here recently. Chest/Tris, Legs, Shoulders, Back/Bis. I tend to do more bro-style, bodybuilding workouts for my upper body which includes 3-4 sets of 3-5 rep deadlifts on back day for strength. On legs day, I only do about 3 set of 3-5 reps on squats and then maybe 3 set of 10-20 lunges (fairly easy). With all the biking, I know I don't need any extra volume for legs. I just do the heavy squats to maintain my strength. I've been in a cutting phase for quite a while. I'm sitting at 217 down from about 260 with a goal weight of some where between 185 and 195 (6'1"). I love biking but I want to maintain as much strength as I can without losing all of my muscle mass.

    I've never been one for early morning lifting but now that the weather is getting nicer, I still want to maximize my time on the bike. I think weights in the AM and riding in the PM is the way to go. I'll just have to get my nutrition dialed in to make it work.
    Get out and go ride.

  19. #19
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,302
    I am maniacal about my lifting regimen, and work hard to keep my muscle mass and definition, with all the riding I do.

    I do Push 2x per week (chest/shoulders/triís) and Pull 1x per week (Back/Biís). Iím not doing legs right now, with all the riding I do, but will be picking up one day per week.

    For Push, I generally do 3 exercises per muscle group, going 4x4-5, then 3x8, then 3x10-12 (super-setted). For Pull, I generally do about 5-6 exercises for my back, doing 3x10ís, and 3 exercises for my biís, doing 3x10 for a main set, then superset a couple others at 3x10. This all works really well for me. I also time myself in between sets, with a minute rest. Gets me in and out in 65-75 minutes, and keeps the muscles pumped.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Ride more; post less...

  20. #20
    9 lives
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12,637
    Re diet... An interesting article about diet and weight loss

    Low-Carb Vs Low-Fat Diets: The Final Answer
    If you want to lose weight, is it better to cut out bread, pasta, and fruit? Or should you toss the avocadoes, nuts, and cheese? Results from a year-long study of more than 600 people has a surprising answer!

    When weight loss is the goal, is low-fat or low-carb better? This is a question that's had dieters scratching their heads for years, and which has plenty of die-hard believers on both sides. But, it turns out that the differences may not matter that much after all.

    A recently concluded year-long Stanford University study gave the best effort yet at giving a definitive answer. It closely followed a full year of weight-loss attempts by 609 men and women, all of whom were in good health, with an average BMI of 33 (class 1 obesity) and an average age of 40 years.[1] In other words, there were a lot of people in the study, they were tracked for a long time, and they were tracked carefully. As studies go, it was a huge effort and a well-designed approach.

    Twelve months later, the two groups had lost a total of more than 6,500 poundsóthough some people lost as much as 60 pounds, while others gained as much as 20 pounds. So, on average, which group lost more?

    Hold on to your bacon, keto believers. The answer might surprise you.

    Finding A Sustainable Level Of Consumption

    At the start of the study, members of each group were instructed to follow a specific diet for the first two months. People in the low-carb group were told to consume only 20 grams of carbs a dayówhich is low enough to meet the standard for most interpretations of ketogenic dieting. The low-fat group, on the other hand, consumed only 20 grams of fat per day. After the two months, people in the low-carb group were told to add more carbs back into their diet until they felt they could maintain the diet at that level. The low-fat group was instructed to do the same thing with their fat intake.

    Crucially, the researchers never told the participants how many calories they could have every day. They just told them to "maximize vegetable intake...minimize intake of added sugars, refined flours, and trans fats; and...focus on whole foods that were minimally processed, nutrient-dense, and prepared at home whenever possible."

    By the end of the third month, researchers found that fat consumption in the low-fat group had doubled to an average of 42 grams of fat per day, up from the original 20 grams. Meanwhile, carb consumption in the low-carb group shot up from an average of 20 grams of carbs per day to 96 grams per day.

    And The Winner IsÖ
    Despite this difference in consumption levels, at the end of the 12 months, results showed that it didn't matter at all whether people were focusing on their fat intake or their carb intake. On average, both groups consumed about the same number of calories each day and, even though some individuals gained or lost more weight than others, both groups lost about the same amount of weight.

    No matter which group they were in, participants saw about the same improvements in measurements like:

    BMI numbers
    Body-fat percentage
    Waistline measurement
    Blood pressure
    Fasting insulin
    Blood glucose levels
    There were some differences, though. For instance, the low-fat group saw a bigger drop in "bad" cholesterol (LDL). And while LDL levels rose more in the low-carb group, so did levels of "good" cholesterol (HDL).

    The low-fat group lowered the amount of saturated fats they consumed while increasing the amount of fiber in their diets. The low-carb group consumed slightly less fiber, but saw an overall lower glycemic index of their diets. Both groups lowered their overall glycemic load, but the low-carb group lowered it more than the low-fat group.

    As Kamal Patel points out in Examine.com's excellent in-depth analysis of the study, the difference (or lack thereof) in calories and protein intake may be the key determinant. Both groups ended up with nearly identical numbers in terms of caloric intake, and the low-carb group consumed only slightly more protein on average, to the tune of 12 grams per day more.

    "The results of this study contribute to a large body of evidence indicating that, for weight loss, neither low-fat nor low-carb is superior (as long as there's no difference in caloric intake or protein intake)," Patel writes.

    How To Explain The Results?
    The researchers suggested that a key to the results may have been when, after the initial two months, they gave all the participants specific goals for their dietary behaviors, not specific daily caloric limits. Rather than saying "eat this much of that," they had them personally determine the lowest level of either fats or carbs they needed to not feel hungry, and crucially, to prioritize healthy, nutrient-rich foods when they did it.

    The takeaway for you? Calories may still matteróalthough counting them exactly may not. Protein still matters. Food quality matters. But carbs and fats? Perhaps not so much. Many people find they simply prefer more of one or the otherói.e., they crave more carbs or more fat. As long as you have those first three priorities lined up, feel free to design your personal diet based on your preferences, and what you can sustain for the long haul.


    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post

    With your 2 avg riders example I'm absolutely sure I'm faster learning how to best fuel myself before and during rides. I do know some top athletes and they eat before and during rides. If you're doing some sort of keto type diet than you need a different plan I guess. But for everyone else I'm quite sure fueling during rides over an hour or two is a really good idea.
    I agree with you. I think people who ride in fasted states or try to get into "fat burning mode" during long rides for the sake of losing weight are self sabotaging in the long run because their metabolism will also downgrade. Signal to your body that it is starving or food is in short supply and it will respond accordingly. After the metabolism craters, then you have to double down and the cycle repeats.

    The best way to lose weight over the long term is to signal to your body that it is living in an environment of abundance. Lots of sleep, reduce stress, eat when hungry (but don't overeat or eat junk food). And take recovery foods and drinks after the ride.

  22. #22
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,038
    Grain of salt since we are all different, but your body is also going to have to adapt to the longer rides. I can comfortably ride for 5 hours or more without eating (obviously I'm hungry, but energy isn't a factor). But my body has adapted over the years to long hard miles, originally from running. I started at 200 pounds, 5'8". I'm substantially smaller now.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewalk View Post
    Grain of salt since we are all different, but your body is also going to have to adapt to the longer rides. I can comfortably ride for 5 hours or more without eating (obviously I'm hungry, but energy isn't a factor). But my body has adapted over the years to long hard miles, originally from running. I started at 200 pounds, 5'8". I'm substantially smaller now.
    True, but judging from your posts in the XC forum, you are a cat 1 guy who is pretty serious about training. In other words, you are an athlete through and through. You are not doing 5 hour rides to lose weight, you are doing it for performance.

    But most people aren't that way. They resort to gimmicky ways of cutting calories or trying to trick their body into losing weight, performance be damned. That's the mindset of a chronic dieter bordering on a eating disorder, not an athlete. And it rarely works for the majority who try it.

  24. #24
    Rides all the bikes!
    Reputation: Sidewalk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    2,038
    Quote Originally Posted by midwestmtb View Post
    True, but judging from your posts in the XC forum, you are a cat 1 guy who is pretty serious about training. In other words, you are an athlete through and through. You are not doing 5 hour rides to lose weight, you are doing it for performance.

    But most people aren't that way. They resort to gimmicky ways of cutting calories or trying to trick their body into losing weight, performance be damned. That's the mindset of a chronic dieter bordering on a eating disorder. And it rarely works for the majority who try it.
    When I was 200 pounds, I was struggling to "shuffle" (not even jog) a mile, I was in BAD shape.

    I'm just saying don't get discouraged by feeling weak and tired at the end, we all do. For some the end is an hour ride, for others it is 6.

    And no gimmicks, just patience.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    256
    I agree that patience is the key. And he will need to push himself hard enough to feel weak and tired to see progress in his training.

    But that's different from feeling weak and tired because he is improperly fueled. I can't imagine that 2000 calories for a 6' guy training for a marathon is proper fueling.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    98
    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Re diet... An interesting article about diet and weight loss




    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    So basically Stanford spent millions to "prove" what any decent nutritionist has known for years.

    Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk
    Get out and go ride.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: azmtbkr81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    137
    Wow, seems like this thread has generated a lot of interest, lots of good information here. I know it has only been a week but I thought I'd share a few thoughts/observations based on experimentation I've been doing.

    -My general hunger level has dropped somewhat, seems like my body is starting to adapt to the 2000 calorie diet. I've realized that 2000 calories is a good baseline but not an absolute rule, with this in mind I am trying to achieve a 5-750 calorie deficit per day with the goal of losing 1-1.5 lbs per week.

    -On days when I am doing 1-1.5 hour harder training rides or intervals a 200 calorie snack immediately before the ride gives me enough fuel to get through. On these days the extra calories are more than burned by the training effort.

    -On less intense riding days and gym days no additional fuel is needed.

    -I did a 4.5 hour ride this weekend and felt fast and strong, I ate approximately 500 additional calories (mostly carbs) the day before and ate what I wanted (within reason) the day of the ride. I still managed a 1000 calorie deficit that day without feeling starved.

    -My weight has stayed the same but I noticed this morning that I'm down a notch on my favorite belt...I'll count that as minor progress.

    -I spent about 9 hours on the bike last week and 2 in the gym, going to start increasing this by riding before work, may need to tweak my nutrition strategy further.

  28. #28
    viva la v-brakes!
    Reputation: FishMan473's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    2,065

    Nutrition for training and weight loss?

    Quote Originally Posted by midwestmtb View Post
    The best way to lose weight over the long term is to signal to your body that it is living in an environment of abundance. Lots of sleep, reduce stress, eat when hungry (but don't overeat or eat junk food). And take recovery foods and drinks after the ride.
    This is great advice. I have certainly read and experience that lack of sleep and stress can incur weight gain. And Iíve heard that we should try to make your body feel like itís ďliving in an environment of abundanceĒ and not starving yourself. But somehow I never put those two together.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
    I have a car. I made a choice. I ride my bike.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    256
    Yeah weight loss is tricky. Actually, the *right* kind of weight loss is tricky. The body always prioritizes survival which means that excess stress or huge calorie deficits will ramp up fat retention over muscle retention. So one can certainly lose weight from big calorie deficits but the rate of lean mass loss will be greater than fat loss. Metabolism also slows. Over a long enough period, the thyroid starts to downgrade too and then the person is screwed.

    A buddy of mine who was 30lb overweight set a goal to lose it all in 3 months. Massive calorie deficit and a Type A personality helped him achieve it. Everybody was impressed in the short run......3 years later, he is fatter than ever. A new PR in weight gain because he screwed up his body.

  30. #30
    Oh, So Interesting!
    Reputation: davec113's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,555
    Quote Originally Posted by midwestmtb View Post
    Yeah weight loss is tricky. Actually, the *right* kind of weight loss is tricky. The body always prioritizes survival which means that excess stress or huge calorie deficits will ramp up fat retention over muscle retention. So one can certainly lose weight from big calorie deficits but the rate of lean mass loss will be greater than fat loss. Metabolism also slows. Over a long enough period, the thyroid starts to downgrade too and then the person is screwed.

    A buddy of mine who was 30lb overweight set a goal to lose it all in 3 months. Massive calorie deficit and a Type A personality helped him achieve it. Everybody was impressed in the short run......3 years later, he is fatter than ever. A new PR in weight gain because he screwed up his body.
    It is interesting... I'm working out a few times a week and riding a few times a week, so it's a balancing act. Like most things in life finding the balance is key to success. I just wish the goalposts would stop moving as I get older!

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    1
    That's great that you consume up to 2000 calories a day, but don't forget that you need to eat at least 5 times a day and with no hurry. As for the exercises, I used that program for burning fat. I've got the same problem: during 5 or 6 weeks I didn't lost weight at all!! And that's combining sport and diet. Then my trainer explained that it was inside weight lose, and I need to continue. As a result, I lost about 30% of my weight in 6 month. Believe in yourself and consult a doctor for consultation to be sure you do everything right.

Similar Threads

  1. Help with pre and post ride nutrition during weight loss plan!
    By krazymatt in forum Nutrition and Hydration
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-30-2015, 05:21 PM
  2. 3x10 to 1x10 - weight loss to low range loss formula
    By flipsidem in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 10-15-2013, 08:57 PM
  3. Help with weight loss? And a dual weight loss stratgy.
    By hedonistic in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-09-2013, 01:32 PM
  4. Weight loss equals power loss?
    By HelmutHerr in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-16-2013, 07:12 PM
  5. Nutrition Canteen - Carrying Nutrition on Long Events
    By mtnfiend in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-20-2011, 06:35 PM

Members who have read this thread: 104

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.