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  1. #1
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    Need a hydropack

    OK running into an issue. Searching for a Hydropack thats not to expensive (around $75 preferably) but fits what I want/need the best.

    Priority 1: Water flow. I have a Hydropack I was given for free (new just never used) that works kinda. 2.0L capacity I believe. But its small looking, IM a 6'1 260 Clyde, and water flow is crap. Gotta suck kinda hard to get about same as drinking through a straw.... Forces me to carry a water bottle if I need a drink while catching my breath from a long climb or whatever. Gets frustrating but I have water at least.

    Link Amazon.com : Bag Sunlite Hydration Hs-1 2.0L : Cycling Hydration Packs And Bladders : Sports & Outdoors

    So big priority is minimal resistance and good flow (larger tube). Thankfully any decent pack has the hose/nipple set up where you dont have to use your hand to take a drink all the time.

    Second, and less of a problem but want something that doesnt look tiny on me but not some huge backpack looking thing. A pocket for keys and wallet is plenty (which current pack can hold wallet and my car key), my little seat pouch carries the rest. And if it has a hip belt gotta be long enough to fit around my refusing to come off as of yet, gut. But this isnt that important at all compared to price and water flow.

    Capacity is fine for anything ive ridden. 2L/70oz
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  2. #2
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    Can't go wrong with an Osprey. A little more expensive then $75, and I know thats a main factor of yours, but if you're getting a life-time warranty and a comfortable, durable pack I think its worth ponying up the extra bucks.

    I would go with either a syncro or a manta series pack. They have a magnet on the mouth piece that attaches to the chest strap so you can bite it and drink while riding, a lid-lock for your helmet when you're rolling on long climbs and a suspension system that allows for great airflow on your back.

    Most importantly the mouthpiece allows for good flow and I've never had problems with the bladder. I have an osprey raptor and the suspension isnt as nice as the syncro or manta but it has been a solid pack. I've had it for about three years with zero issues.

    Im a total gear nerd and I research the hell out of my purchases so I can justify buying it in my head (and to my girlfriend). A good place to look at comparisons is outdoorgearlab.com/ for side by side comparisons of outdoor gear. Pretty solid website. They show you their editors choices, top picks and best buy awards for gear that they put through the ringer. It's definitely helped me with some purchase decisions.

    Happy hunting

  3. #3
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    +1 on Osprey, but I would also look at a Raptor. I have one and love it. One other thing to mention is that you seem to have somewhat contradictory criteria. You want something that doesn't look small on you, but you also want something to just hold 70oz of water, a wallet and a key. That's going to be a pretty small pack.

    A pack that is small on you can be a great thing, less of your back is covered so you get better sweat evaporation, and you aren't carrying around a bunch of extra material (although at 260 I get that you're probably not a weight weenie).

    But if you like the bigger packs, you'll always have room for a jacket, a larger pump, a lunch, etc.

  4. #4
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    Thnx for that ya I didn't realize I kinda contradicted myself there. I guess looking a bit odd isn't all bad, especially as much as I sweat lol.

    Yet to have a need for a pack I can carry extra stuff, dont have access to anything more than a 1-1.5 hour ride before being back at trailhead.

    So basically good flow and trying to stay at budget or as close as possible.

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  5. #5
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    Hey Tigris,
    I recently needed a hydra-pack as well. My needs are very similar to yours. I needed 2+ liters water, room for extras + tools + spare parts. I wanted a waist belt that wasn't just a simple strap, and in general a bag that was made for biking.

    I did a lot of research into all the different packs available. I was between a camelbak an osprey and a vaude. I decided to go with the Vaude Tracer 28 because of its utility and build quality.

    Been biking with it a few times now and am super happy. It has enough room for the extra stuff I bring with me at times whilst being totally compress-able when it aint full. It's got a real clean, professional look without jazz and pomp. Everything is super accessible and rugged. I especially love the hip belt pocket on the right side. It perfectly fits an iphone 4 or in my case a samsung galaxy s4 mini, so you can get to it without taking off the pack. I took it for an 18 mile hike yesterday and it handled very well. I have to suggest it. However, it may be a bit over 75 bucks with the hydration pack.

    About the water flow: I would think a bladder/hose with an open/close by hand valve would give you the best flow. Bite valves are more restrictive. The Vaude that I have has a bite valve. It works decently enough. It aint a gush of water when you need it. You more need to take a few long pulls. Not for chugging. I think however that it is plenty sufficient and it definitely not "too little" flow.

    I got mine on sale from HiBike but I'm in europe so... perhaps state side you can find it cheaper.

    ps: i agree, the osprey looks odd indeed.
    Last edited by pressed001; 06-08-2014 at 12:32 PM. Reason: correcting html link, and moar info!!

  6. #6
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    Well back to that, thnx for the info. I actually am still looking had an emergency expense delay that. Expect to get one next week sometime hopefully. Waist belts are a problem in some cases, I have a gut(trying to loose) so im hoping the lbs' etc that are hr away have options to try on.
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  7. #7
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    The Vaude Tracer 28 has a removable waist belt. Seems plenty big to me but I'm on the small size for waists. Ehh, I would guess it to be a max of...38?

  8. #8
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    Like the previous posts if your looking for hydration, try a go with something on your waist. Fanny pack status! The weight rides better on your hips. Last month Kurt Gensheimer wrote some inspiring words on the subject right here on mtbr. I loved the article and am sure you'll find it informative and entertaining.

    The Angry Singlespeeder: Dear Europe | Mountain Bike Review

    4. Fanny Packs.

    Because wearing a hydration pack is like having a sweaty midget on your back trying to strangle you all day long, thatís why.

  9. #9
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    That's one I haven't read but love his rants their hilarious.
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