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  1. #1
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    Need of advice on where to get advice!

    Iím looking for nutritional/training advice (preferably in book form) that I can follow to keep a balanced cycling program going, as I get older. Iím 46 now and I want to continue to enjoy and advance in my riding abilities.

    Iím always being told that Iím not eating correctly while cycling. Iíve been told that Iím not replenishing my sodium properly, getting enough calories, carbs, electrolytes, etc. I was just told (on the endurance XC racing section) that Iím eating foods that are too heavy and canít be absorbed quickly enough during the ride. These guys are probably correct but I want to know for sure!

    Iíve recently built up to extended XC endurance rides. In addition to my regular weekly rides, I take a few 6+ hour rides per month. I recently entered my first 12-hour single-track solo race and finished pretty well.

    Your thinking whatís the problem right? Well, Iíll tell you. Itís a 6-hour wall that gets me at times. During the 12hr race it was more like a 10-hour wall that killed me. I was swimming in glue at the end! I also found myself in a cold sweat about to throw-up the next morning and felt drained for two days after the race. It doesnít have to be this hard!

    Now I admit that during the rides Iím taking stabs at nutrition but off the bike Iím eating lean and healthy. Iím going for seriously pure vegetables, plenty of fruits, nuts, and organics all week. Iím taking my old dude multi vitamins along with my cardiologist approved fish oil supplement. Other than the occasional (veggie) pizza/beer celebratory splurge Iím doing okay!

    I am, however, ready to follow proven guidance and quit this self-guided redneck-training curriculum. Please give advice on good books to study for improved cycling nutrition and training that has worked for you.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    https://www.coursera.org/ -- free college level courses. Even though it's free and there is no real penalty for skipping class, the more you put into the course the more you will get out of it. So do all the background readings, assignments and exams.

    Hint -- bone up on your organic chemistry. Go to https://www.khanacademy.org/ for a chemistry/physiology refresher. Again -- free, but this is geared towards the high school crowd (it may help you remember all the stuff you have forgotten since college).

    While waiting for the nutrition courses to open again, check out your local community college. Many offer basic nutrition/health courses either correspondence or web based.

    Get a handle on the basics before tackling sports nutrition. There is a lot of contradictory research findings and a lot of junk science on the internet. Understanding the basics will help you separate the crap from the good stuff. There really is no magic food that will turn you into a professional level racer overnight. You are looking at a lifelong commitment to a lifestyle change.
    Last edited by dave54; 10-08-2013 at 09:25 PM. Reason: update
    So many trails... so little time...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trophy View Post
    I also found myself in a cold sweat about to throw-up the next morning and felt drained for two days after the race. It doesnít have to be this hard!
    Exactly, there are little or no health benefits to be expected from ultra-endurance races and that's why I don't bother with them. But I'm not telling anybody what to do and for those who enjoy this sort of thing, this might help:

    Are Endurance Sports Unhealthy?

  4. #4
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    Out of the dozens of nutrition books I've read some are more shocking, or eye opening than others or try to be, and some are more boring and repetitive then they need to be. None that I've read jump out as the best for me but you start to see some common points and methods that are successful for many in what IMO is a useful for most book. A couple that are popular and IMO good are Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition, and Monique Ryan's Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes but there's many more.
    A few personal observations and what I've found to be trues for me are....
    There's alot of variables. So to dial in and find what works best for you, you should make small changes every few weeks to see. If you make too may changes you just don't know how effective or substantial for you any one thing is, maybe making things harder than they need to be. Plus making lots of changes is more times than not much harder to do and stick with long term. And fitness and diet progress happen in waves, so ride each wave until it ebbs and that leaves you room to adjust, and to make improvements to ride the next wave of progress. If you do everything or too much from the beginning you don't leave as much wiggle room for improvements when you plateau.
    I look to success and would much rather pick the brains of people regularly at the proverbial front of the pack even if they haven't read alot or gone to college, then from one of the last guys in the race who did, and it's more often much more practical, doable, and inspirational advice.
    Last edited by theMeat; 10-09-2013 at 10:47 AM.
    Round and round we go

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    Exactly, there are little or no health benefits to be expected from ultra-endurance races and that's why I don't bother with them. But I'm not telling anybody what to do and for those who enjoy this sort of thing, this might help:

    Are Endurance Sports Unhealthy?
    Wow, I'm gonna have to point this out to the 79 and 82 yo couple down the block who do the nyc marathon and others every year. Who jog to the supermarket and walk home carrying as some training.
    Round and round we go

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Wow, I'm gonna have to point this out to the 79 and 82 yo couple down the block who do the nyc marathon and others every year. Who jog to the supermarket and walk home carrying as some training.
    Did you even read the link I provided? It points to a book that is being written that intends to help people who do endurance sport to stay healthy. I'm sorry if my comment hit a nerve with you, that was not my intention.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fatsinglespeeder View Post
    I'm sorry if my comment hit a nerve with you, that was not my intention.
    No need to be sorry and you didn't hit a nerve. As the first line of the article/link says, "I'm just sayin", and pointing out some other "examples". "Want some more examples?", and absolutely, don't have to look too far to find a longtime runner, mtbr, whatever with wear n tear or adverse effects.
    Round and round we go

  8. #8
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    Wow, quite a range of recommendations.

    Dave54, I appreciate your thoroughness in offering links for free college classes. Thereís no doubt that it would be the most beneficial method. I just have way too much going on in my life to enroll in a class right now.

    Fatsinglespee I read the article. Very interesting! Actually, Iíve been thinking about it all day. I am, however, a tad skeptical though. The article is structured to prove that I should be fearful of endurance riding. Maybe I should? He continually offers examples of athletes who have died from or developed hart problems while conducting extended distance running/cycling events. While this upcoming book may very well be worth reading. I honestly feel that this author is focusing on scare tactics to create a demand for the book prior to its release. Some of the pros that he pointed out probably spend most days training and are probably more likely to die on a bike anyway. Itís like a guy that sits on the couch watching tv all of his life. Heís more likely to have a hart attack on the couch right? Even though Iím skeptical, the article did get me concerned. Today, instead of my normal lengthy ride in the woods I took a shorter ride but at much higher intensity. I had a great time but ultimately wrecked toward the end. No biggie, I just cut my leg and banged my arm. I was pretty fast on the short run and therefore found myself maneuvering more rapidly on the tight single-track course. This got me to thinking about the article again. Cyclists who ride longer distances tend to set a slower, safer pace than the sprinters. Ultra-endurance riders may be less likely to get ejected from the firkin bike like I did today! Endurance riding could actually be saving lives right? Man, I donít mean anything by using the silly logic. Iím just skeptical of the intent of the article. Thanks for sharing itÖIíll take a look at the book when it comes out anyway. Maybe itíll save my life!

    Themeat, nice take on the subject. You seem to be opting for proven methods while continually picking the brains of the front-runners. Thatís just good advice! Iíll have a look at those books for sure. Thanks!

  9. #9
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    I'm glad you found it interesting. I don't think he's fear mongering just to sell his book. There are dangers in any sport and ultra-endurance is no different. When one is aware of the dangers one can take steps to avoid them and I think that's what he is trying to do. Take a look at the related posts at the end of the article. He knows what he's talking about and he's worth listening to.

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