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  1. #1
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    Green Coffee Bean Extract for performance?

    Someone sent me information about green coffee bean extract. It is marketed primarily for weight loss. Dr. Oz is really big on the stuff.

    Apparently it also enhances metabolism of fat. So I am wondering if it could be a performance enhancer.

    I read somewhere that caffiene facilitates conversion of fat to glycogen. So I have been taking 100 mg of caffiene before rides. It definitely helps. However, I am wondering if the green coffee bean extract would work better.

    Green coffee bean extract is virtually caffiene-free. I would rather not take a drug as a performance enhancer. I don't like the effect the caffiene has on me. I drink coffee about once a week and it has no effect on me. But if I take the caffiene pill then don't ride for some reason I get jittery.

    I experimented with Svetol with 45% clorogenic acid. First 200mg, then 400mg. It had no side effects. I then took 400mg before a ride, and in spite of a hellish day at work and eating junk all day and not drinking enough, I felt quite good and posted a good time (for me anyway ). Most importantly I wasn't ravenously hungry with low blood sugar after the ride.

    I'll experiment more, and try it in combination with caffiene.

    I could stand to lose another 5# or more. It will be interesting to see how it affects my weight. I'll be happy just to not gain weight over the winter.

    I would appreciate your input.

    Fact Sheet: Green Coffee Bean | The Dr. Oz Show
    Miracle Pill to Burn Fat, Pt 1 | The Dr. Oz Show
    Green Coffee Bean Extract: Fat-Burner or Fraud? Pt 1 | The Dr. Oz Show

  2. #2
    DLd
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    Why would you consider caffeine a drug but not the green coffee bean extract? Obviously it has some chemical in it responsible for the effect. I doubt it works through magic. Relative to caffeine it's just a less tested drug that we don't really know much about.

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    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  3. #3
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    Well, what I meant by "drug" as something that affects the mind or is potentially addictive.
    Drug - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition 3. Svetol is sold as a "dietary suppliment".

    Sorry I wasn't clearer.

    I doubt it works through magic.
    Chemicals and electricity ARE magic

  4. #4
    gran jefe
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    i'm going to stick with the brown coffee bean extract.

  5. #5
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    It sure tastes better!

  6. #6
    gran jefe
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    ooo, i didn't even think about that part...

  7. #7
    DLd
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisF View Post
    Well, what I meant by "drug" as something that affects the mind or is potentially addictive.
    Drug - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition 3. Svetol is sold as a "dietary suppliment".

    Sorry I wasn't clearer.


    Chemicals and electricity ARE magic
    Well, not all drugs are addictive... The green coffee bean extract could be though. I doubt it's been researched. That's the problem with so many of these "natural" supplements. No real research, no control of dose, blah blah blah. Just a pet peeve, don't mind me. Pay good money to be the guinea pig...

    Anyway, I too will vote for the brown coffee bean extract. A proven performance enhancer, and it tastes great!

    Oh, and the definition you linked to backed up my explanation more than yours 3) : a substance other than food intended to affect the structure or function of the body.

    Just saying...
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  8. #8
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    Oh, and the definition you linked to backed up my explanation more than yours 1 c 3 : a substance other than food intended to affect the structure or function of the body.
    Ok, but there is no point of debating the definition of "drug". No one is questioning whether there are other definitions of "drug", nor am I claiming my definition is the "best". I indicated the meaning I intended, and I haven't changed my mind about what I meant. If you want to make the case that I am a lousy writer, then point taken

    I agree with your comments about "natural" and lack of dose control. I drink coffee because it tastes and smells good. When I want the effects of caffiene, I take caffiene pills. WIth coffee, you never know how much you're getting. It depends on the variety of beans, where it is grown, the particular crop of beans, and how it is roasted and prepared.

    The first link I posted explains that you shouldn't buy just plain natural green coffee bean extract. Svetol and GCA are sufficiently unnatural to assure accurate doses chlorogenic acids etc. I have green coffee beans that I roast myself -- I could just chew on those if I were into "natural".

    It isn't totally unresearched. HOPEFULLY, if it were addictive, we would know by now. Regardless, there is risk involved no matter what you do.

    Anyway, I'm glad that hundreds of years ago, someone experimented with coffee beans
    Last edited by DennisF; 11-24-2012 at 12:32 PM.

  9. #9
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    This bean extract seems to show up every so often. Give it a whirl and report back.

  10. #10
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    Ok, I took a 22 mile ride but forgot to take it :-(

    But I took a 14 mi ride, taking 400mg Svetol about 15 minutes before starting. I didn't notice any difference. At about 5 miles in, before starting the "monster mile", I took another 400mg, and awas feeling super near the end of the ride.

    So I don't know -- it's hard to test something like this. I get a second wind sometimes anyway. Plus the weather was super nice and I was feeling pretty good anyway. I wasn't too hungry.

    Again, no side effects. I don't think there is any danger of ODing on the stuff I will try taking more of it sooner before I start riding.

    Worst case I might lose some weight, which would be good. I weighed myself and recorded it so I can keep track of that.

  11. #11
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    Followup: I have experimented with it for performance, and have concluded that caffeine works better. I did recently take 800 mg with 200 mg of caffeine, and had a bad reaction. I felt sorta dizzy -- hard to describe. My performance was about normal. It wasn't just the caffeine -- normally I have no side effects from caffeine unless I take it then don't ride for some reason, and then just the normal effects that you would expect from caffeine.

    I tried 400 mg Svetol with 200 mg caffeine and had a great ride, no side effects at all. I'll try that again and if it works may use it for a race.

    I haven't been taking it regularly for weight loss -- no real problems there. Still a little belly I am slowly getting rid of, but it was 20 years getting there, so can't expect it to disappear overnight I guess.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisF View Post
    Drug - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition 3. Svetol is sold as a "dietary suppliment".
    Drugs and supplements are terms of art. Not, terms defined with normal dictionary definitions. Under the Food drug and cosmetic act, a drug is something intended to cure, prevent, or mitigate disease.

    Hence the disclaimer on supplements that they are not intended to cure, prevent, or mitigate disease.

    Since supplements are not drugs (foods or food additives), they are not regulated by the FDA. Sometimes, when claims get too ridiculous, the FTC gets involved for false advertising.

    Also realize that simply because something is not considered a drug (in the legal FDA sense), does not mean it lacks pharmacological effect.

    I have an issue with the FDA here. The supplement market is big money. However, they are not involved in items that can potentially cause signiciant harm to people.

    Just noticed this thread is old. . .

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