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  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    The first places you pack on the weight is the last place it comes off. It's not like doing sit ups will make you loose your gut or drinking beer will give you one. Although if you don't eat often enough you're more likely to burn muscle as energy, and store more as fat when you do eat/drink.
    For most people, a sure way to get scrawny with a big gut is to starve yourself all day and binge at night. Which as a person who drinks who starts to gain weight might do
    This is certainly not a scientific study at all, but after having moved a lot and formed new friends in a lot of places, I can honestly say, right now, that every guy that I know that has been consistently overweight over the years, drinks quite a bit. Every one without exception. That doesn't mean this is the case with everyone, but with the 25 or so guys I've known over a decade that are always overweight, every one of them drinks a lot and usually drinks a lot of beer.
    Are you really sure about that?

  2. #77
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    Yep, of coarse there are exceptions to the rule, and alcohol does make it harder for your body to burn anything else as energy. As well as to get the same buz from beer as compared to harder drink takes more calories but it's about calories, and timing of them that makes a person fat, scrawny or both at the same time.
    Round and round we go

  3. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    Yep, of coarse there are exceptions to the rule but
    To get the same buz from beer as compared to harder drink takes more calories but it's about calories, and timing of them that makes a person fat, scrawny or both at the same time.
    The simple truth is that guys that drink a lot almost always make bad food choices because that's what alcohol does to you. It also gets you off to a slower start in the morning and makes you more likely to blow off a ride or workout. Take a walk around a really cranking brew pub and take a look at the food that's being washed down with all that beer. Add to that the reality that alcohol and beer in particular has a very strong inflammatory effect on the entire body which makes joints hurt more, injuries more painful, lungs and heart less efficient and healing slower. In other words, drinking makes you hurt more which, once again, contributes to blowing off workouts and heading out for a few beers to deal with the aches and pains.

    It's a spiral that's hard to get out of.
    Are you really sure about that?

  4. #79
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    No argument there
    Round and round we go

  5. #80
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    No mater what type of food choices you make you need consistency!! Yes you need to cut back on the amount of processed high sugar added foods, high omega 6 fat added foods.

    One thing that every nutrition expert or want to be expert knows for sure is that Protein, Fat, Carbohydrates are all MACRO nutrients, as in your body needs these things in LARGE amounts, so I don't understand cutting out one or the other. The other thing that is agreed on is there is a balance of energy intake and expenditure. These things are fact!!

    Yes Beer and other high calorie drinks are to me one of the poorest choices out there, yet I still drink 1 or 2 beers a night and never feel bad about it. I am 5'11" usually range from 68kg to 71kg and sit right around 10 to 12% Body Fat. If you make good choices and are consistent with the rest of your diet you can definitely enjoy the things you like.

    I am currently a personal trainer (about 4 months now) and have been helping clients loose weight and meet their goals, and am starting to be quite successful at it. I have never once told somebody to cut something out of their diet, only to control portion sizes or make slightly different choice of the foods they eat.

    Small steps one at a time, if you were to teach somebody how to ride a MTB would you get them to go down a super technical trail then at the end tell them every little detail about what they did wrong and expect them to remember every one and fix them all for the next run. I don't think so. you would let them know that they need to get their but off the seat, after they get that then you may get them to bend the elbows a little more. It's all about progression, as it is with any skill and yes living a healthy lifestyle is a skill.
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  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaboo View Post
    I really am interested in hearing about the miracles performed on vegetarian or raw diets.
    The results often do seem to be of the vague and not really quantifiable type.
    Durianrider lists a half marathon time that is nothing remarkable when you consider how he goes on about how light and energetic he is.
    I don't know what a "good" time is but IMO, a sub 3 hour full marathon is pretty impressive (Durianrider). But that's coming from someone that runs a 10 minute mile.

  7. #82
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    I don't have any tips really. I just know what works for me. I started a Paleo-ish diet last January. By September last year I was down from 320 to 238. I'm hovering in the 250's now after letting my eating slip some plus I did CrossFit all winter and added some muscle mass. I'm trying to get things straightened back out again and shooting for 40-50 pounds weight loss this year. Hoping to end the year below 220. Anything less is just a bonus.

  8. #83
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    Cycling tips for weight loss.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    I don't have any tips really. I just know what works for me. I started a Paleo-ish diet last January. By September last year I was down from 320 to 238. I'm hovering in the 250's now after letting my eating slip some plus I did CrossFit all winter and added some muscle mass. I'm trying to get things straightened back out again and shooting for 40-50 pounds weight loss this year. Hoping to end the year below 220. Anything less is just a bonus.
    Go get it, man. Congrats on losing all of that weight. And good luck hitting your goal.

    I was 250. Now 200. I just cut out sugar. Not crabs just sugar.
    Except when I get ready for a ride I eat a luna bar and mix a bottle with 50/50 water and Gatorade for in/post ride. It's helped a lot.

    I hope I never get sick of eating broccoli.

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-Bone View Post
    I hope I never get sick of eating broccoli.
    Thanks and I'd be screwed if that ever happened to me...lol

  10. #85
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    Good stuff JRA. Not only do small steps make things easier to keep permanent, as a lifestyle, but more effective for long term progress since your body adjusts and figures out more/better ways to store.
    So many people dive in with the best intentions, and make so many improvements that it's too hard to stick with, and then when their progress slows, which it will, they have no where to turn to step it up a notch.
    Ride each wave of progress, then step it up for the best long term gains.
    Round and round we go

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