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Thread: All day riding?

  1. #1
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    All day riding?

    I had a big day of riding past Saturday, I rode 2 hours at one mountain and then 4 hours at another and was completely depleted before I got back to the parking lot. I mean to the point where I could barely hold a straight line on the bike.

    For breakfast I has a cosmic omelete (pulled pork, onions, cheddar) with 4 pieces of toast, homefries, and some blueberry pancakes and OJ. Then fueled up with a bunch of gatorade, water, one powerbar energy gel thing packet (disgusting btw) and a couple protein bars throughout the ride, that's all I had from 9am-7pm.

    Is it unrealistic to make it through the day with only what I fit in my saddlepack and a frame mount water bottle? I did refill the water bottle between locations, but didn't really have time to get any real food throughout the lunchtime break so I just pounded a whole bottle of gatorade before the second ride.

    The type of riding was fast where possible, and technical where fast isn't an option.

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    IMO, 6 hours of riding with no real food is a bonk waiting to happen...well, it did happen. At the least, smash a PB sammich on whole wheat into your saddlepack. Two if you can fit them. Better yet, invest in a hydration pack. That way you have plenty of water and room enough for food to keep you fueled for your all day ride. Riding all day is awesome but it sucks big time when you don't have the energy to enjoy it. Been there, done that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

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    Try shooting for ~200 calories an hour. Ideally in liquid carbohydrate form. Stuff over 2 hours, a little (~10%) protein helps, too.
    idiom - raleigh hard rock
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richtacular View Post
    I had a big day of riding past Saturday, I rode 2 hours at one mountain and then 4 hours at another and was completely depleted before I got back to the parking lot. I mean to the point where I could barely hold a straight line on the bike.

    For breakfast I has a cosmic omelete (pulled pork, onions, cheddar) with 4 pieces of toast, homefries, and some blueberry pancakes and OJ. Then fueled up with a bunch of gatorade, water, one powerbar energy gel thing packet (disgusting btw) and a couple protein bars throughout the ride, that's all I had from 9am-7pm.

    Is it unrealistic to make it through the day with only what I fit in my saddlepack and a frame mount water bottle? I did refill the water bottle between locations, but didn't really have time to get any real food throughout the lunchtime break so I just pounded a whole bottle of gatorade before the second ride.

    The type of riding was fast where possible, and technical where fast isn't an option.
    My understanding is "bonking out" results from depleted glycogen stores, which take days/weeks to build in body. Protein is ideal for recovery, the body uses energy to process protein, so the quick get-me-up is not really there. I'd eat pasta and starchy food (potatoes, bread, breadsticks) days before a long (3hr+) ride. I eat a cereal breakfast with whole wheat muffins w/pb, and 2 bananas. And drink water or milk(I prefer almond), sugary drinks just make you pee more. On the trail I pack a 3L water camelback, muffins w/ pb, protein drink, oatmeal CLIFF powerbar, dried fruit, and a kiwi/apple type snack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by XCProphet View Post
    My understanding is "bonking out" results from depleted glycogen stores, which take days/weeks to build in body. Protein is ideal for recovery, the body uses energy to process protein, so the quick get-me-up is not really there. I'd eat pasta and starchy food (potatoes, bread, breadsticks) days before a long (3hr+) ride. I eat a cereal breakfast with whole wheat muffins w/pb, and 2 bananas. And drink water or milk(I prefer almond), sugary drinks just make you pee more. On the trail I pack a 3L water camelback, muffins w/ pb, protein drink, oatmeal CLIFF powerbar, dried fruit, and a kiwi/apple type snack.
    The best time to replenish glycogen stores is in the first hour after a workout, where you want fast acting sugar. Chocolate milk is the best thing to have due to its balance of protein/carbs. Carb-loading the night before is kind of a wives-tale.
    idiom - raleigh hard rock
    http://www.idiomband.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by stevehollx View Post
    The best time to replenish glycogen stores is in the first hour after a workout, where you want fast acting sugar. Chocolate milk is the best thing to have due to its balance of protein/carbs. Carb-loading the night before is kind of a wives-tale.
    It's certainly debatable, but IMO the sugar in milk is not the correct type. You need glucose for the fastest absorption, not lactose or corn syrup. Plus, fat is bad for absorption so unless you are drinking fat free chocolate milk, you are pretty much negating the whole point of the post-workout protein consumption.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

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