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  1. #1
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    Who knows their tree roots?

    Being a durn yankee carpetbagger, I'm always amazed at seeing so many fallen trees, root ball and all here in NC. Thats obviously the sandy soil.

    Whats more amazing, tho', are the large areas of exposed roots that make trails so interesting. I hiked Wolf Branch today in deference to the rain and was struck by the large pattern of exposed roots on the lower stretch before the first bridge. On the bike they're just an obstacle; on foot, fascinating.

    Hows came they ain't down below where they belong?
    IT'S CRACKERS TO SLIP A ROZZER THE DROPSY IN SNIDE

  2. #2
    Official Cooler Inspector
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    "Tree roots extend radially in every direction to a distance equal to at least the height of the tree (assuming no physical barriers) and grow predominantly near the soil surface. Typically 90% of all roots, and virtually all the large structural supporting roots, are in the upper 60cm of the soil."

    Not the quote I was looking for from my horticulture days, but close enough. The decision of an ornamental tree equals how soon your driveway and sewer line will need to be replaced.

    Most of those big roots you see along the trails are erosion exposed.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Who knows their tree roots?-root.jpg  

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  3. #3
    pronounced may-duh
    Reputation: Maida7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 450VoltsDC
    Being a durn yankee carpetbagger, I'm always amazed at seeing so many fallen trees, root ball and all here in NC. Thats obviously the sandy soil.

    Whats more amazing, tho', are the large areas of exposed roots that make trails so interesting. I hiked Wolf Branch today in deference to the rain and was struck by the large pattern of exposed roots on the lower stretch before the first bridge. On the bike they're just an obstacle; on foot, fascinating.

    Hows came they ain't down below where they belong?
    Actually we have a clay soil here in western NC. Sandy soil would encourage tree roots to go deeper.

    Roots need air just as much as they need water. Like mum pointed out 90% of the roots are very close to the surface. Why? Because this is where the air and water is. Deeper down the soil is much too compacted for proper root aeration.

    How does that translate to trails? If you take a clay soil and compact it with trail traffic (feet tires hoofs), you remove all the spaces between the soil particles where air and water could be stored. This forces the roots to come out of the ground and sit on the surface where the air and water is.

  4. #4
    Jamin, Applesause, No?
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    I like a rooty trail.

    Thanks for the insight. Is that why everyone is aeraiting their lawns right now?

  5. #5
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Senor StrongBad
    I like a rooty trail.

    Thanks for the insight. Is that why everyone is aeraiting their lawns right now?
    yeah, lawns have major problems with aeration. Especially in clay soils. Some of it is from compaction from people walking, siting, driving, parking on the grass. Even pounding rain can compact soil. But it can also comes from using chemical fertilizers. Lawns are very wasteful and require tons of fertilizer. High use of chemical fertilizer will breakdown the "structure" of the soil. When a soil looses it's granular structure the pores in the soil are destroyed and there is no place for water and air. Roots will move to the surface. On a lawn this condition is represented by thatch.

  6. #6
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    I'm supposed to use fertilizer on my lawn?

  7. #7
    Just Wanna Ride!
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    I may be crazy, but wouldn't fertilizer just make my grass grow faster?

    That sounds like something that could limit my weekend ride time...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by sthrnfat
    I may be crazy, but wouldn't fertilizer just make my grass grow faster?

    That sounds like something that could limit my weekend ride time...
    That's so right. When I see people picking up bags of Scotts at my store I suggest they'd be better off with a bag of rock salt.
    IT'S CRACKERS TO SLIP A ROZZER THE DROPSY IN SNIDE

  9. #9
    Third Degree Hater-Fu
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    I haven't fertilized my lawn ever. It's 4 years old. My lawn is shrouded by massive trees and I just hit the leaves with the lawn mower a few times a year.

    Unfortunately, I think my lawn has figured me out and wants more nutrients this year. That part over the septic...well, I blame the wife.
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  10. #10
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    My neighbor had someone come and fertilize his lawn one Fall and he was out there mowing by February. No thanks.
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