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Thread: Dog training

  1. #1
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    Dog training

    I'm not sure if having dogs on the trails in a controversial topic, if it is I apologize and I hope this won't start a long debate. I've seen well trained dogs while biking and just wanted to know if anyone could suggest a good place to go for dog training. Or any suggestion in general. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    fyi if your dog is off leash and gets in my way I will kick it... so this training better be fing amazing

  3. #3
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    All I have to is say "off trail" and my dogs hop off. It is basic, basic training. You can do this on your own with positive reinforcement within a couple of training sessions.

    But, if you kick my dog and it is not attacking you, I will attack you. Got it big boy? If you have a problem, it should be with the slack ass owner not the dog. Try a better approach. And shouldn't you be yielding to the hiking party anyway?
    He/she who works the trails does so in their own image.

    Speed just slows me down...

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    like I said ...your training sounds amazing if they jump of the trail that well, great. I love dogs and have 2 myself. sadly your dogs sound like they are trained better than most dogs I come accross on the trails. Usually they dart out in front of me from out of nowhere I have actually had to jump a dog before on one of the local clt trails. And yeilding to hikers doesnt mean I have to stop and get of my bike and let them by that is insane.

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    I've heard of and had problems with dogs on trail. This dog is new to me and I have no plans on taking him on the trails until he is trained. I just wanted advice on how to get him there.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by supercusty View Post
    fyi if your dog is off leash and gets in my way I will kick it... so this training better be fing amazing
    Great! Another azz hat on the trails to contend with. Kick my dog, for any reason, and we will have a problem. And mysterious dogs jumping out of the forest? Please! I call bs To the op, spend time with your dog on the trail and be sure you both understand some basic commands that will keep you both safe and happy.

  7. #7
    drunken pirate
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    Positive reinforcement is the best training method for any desired behavior.

    I would start by taking him to a dog training school that uses positive reinforcement and teach him basic commands before taking him off leash on the trail.
    More Trails, Not Less

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    I will shut up after this ... It is not like I said I kick dogs for fun... But If they jump out in front of my bike or they act unfriendly to me they get the boot. If you can't control your dog and have a problem with it I will boot the owner too. I am an equal opportunity ass kicker.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbmb65 View Post
    And mysterious dogs jumping out of the forest? Please! I call bs
    While I completely disagree with the abusive tone this thread has taken already, and the threats made, I will point out that on numerous and regular occasions I encounter:

    * Dogs who leave their owners side and follow me up the trail/road for as much as a quarter of a mile, sometimes getting under my feet or othewise putting both of us in danger.
    * Owners of dogs that are ON leash, but the owners don't have control of them. They are jumping and pulling at their leashes and I can't get past, either on a bike or while running.
    * Dogs running around on the trails with no owner within sight
    * Owners of dogs calling or whistling for dogs that are up to a quarter mile away.
    * Owners of dogs either wandering around or driving, stopping me to ask, "Have you seen a dog that looks like..."?


    It's not BS. There are quite often "mysterious dogs jumping out of the forest".

    I have no problem whatsoever sharing the trails with dog owners and dogs who are off leash but well trained and/or under control. However, in my experience the number of well behaved dogs are in the minority.

    So, thank you to the OP for at least taking the time to ask for advice and accepting the responsibility for training their dog.

    And for what it's worth, this same issue could be raised for those with small children running around out of control.
    "Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go."
    T.S. Eliot

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    This is the point I was getting at just stated with more eloquence. And without my Monday morning rainy week attitude.

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    Thanks for some of the comments and sorry to start the debate (i had a feeling it would be unavoidable). Has anyone taken there dogs to a local training class that can comment? I'm going to a free orientation tonight and would like to know if anyone has had a positive experience with any of the local trainers.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by supercusty View Post
    This is the point I was getting at just stated with more eloquence. And without my Monday morning rainy week attitude.
    LOL.. at least it finally stopped raining. For the moment anyway.
    "Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go."
    T.S. Eliot

  13. #13
    drunken pirate
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustinM View Post
    Thanks for some of the comments and sorry to start the debate (i had a feeling it would be unavoidable). Has anyone taken there dogs to a local training class that can comment? I'm going to a free orientation tonight and would like to know if anyone has had a positive experience with any of the local trainers.
    I took my dog to A Good Dog's Life and was very pleased with the experience
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  14. #14
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    The only mystery dog I have ever seen in the forest belonged to a bear hunter. He followed us for about 6 miles until we got back to the road and found somebody who said they thought they knew who he belonged to. Those guys are real db's to just take their dogs out in the woods and leave them.

    As far as training, I am probably a bad example. The trails here in Sparkleburg are so uncrowded that I have never had a problem taking my boys to Southside and just letting them run. One stays pretty close to me and the other stays somewhere within earshot and eventually gets back to wherever I stop to wait on him. Unfortunately, he has a bum leg at the moment and won't be running off-leash for a while.
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  15. #15
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    My dog goes to Pisgah quite often with me. She's rarely on a leash and does just fine. I'll preface this by saying I honestly didn't have to "train" my dog to be a trail dog. Lots of dogs take to it really naturally. A few pointers:

    Do standard obedience training first. My dog was pretty easy and I never even considered paying someone to help me train her. The key is to make the dog understand that you are the boss, after that, desired behaviors should be relatively easy to obtain. Plenty of resources online for training your dog.

    Training the dog to return to your call and stay (somewhat) close to you is the first step to going off-leash. It's easier in my opinion if you can start them young without the leash restriction, but some dogs are escape artists, so be careful. Mine was off-leash in the woods at 12 weeks old so I didn't have to work too hard at this one.

    Once you can take the dog in the woods without a leash without worrying, you just have to introduce the bike into the situation. More often then not, the dog will chase you as soon as you take off. You'll probably have to teach them to stay behind you and out of the way. A few gentle tire buzzes made my dog VERY respectful about staying the F out of my way.

    To the above posters, lighten up. If a dog is not agressive towards you, you have no reason to kick it. Ever. My dog would never "dart out of the woods" in front of a fast moving bike but she has gotten in a few people's way on the trails (she's very friendly and loves bikes). Nobody has ever acted upset. I fully encourage anyone riding with me to hit her rather than crashing, which has taught her to stay out of the way.

    I've also had dog's leave their owners and follow me on several occasions. They usually figure out they're going the wrong way and turn back...what's the big deal? Dog owners know the risks of taking their pups in the woods, it's not on you. Sometimes you lose track of your dog for awhile and have to ask friendly people if they have seen it...again, what's the big deal? Does it ruin your ride to see a lost dog or have to talk to an owner looking for their dog?

    Also, I board my dog at Perfect Paws in Pisgah Forest and they also do training. They have a great facility and seem very knowledgeable. It really comes down to training owners as much as it does training dogs though.

  16. #16
    drunken pirate
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    Here's a quick dog story:

    My good friend, The Extreme Tomato, always used to convince me to take my dog riding with us on Wednsedays (WNDC FTW!). We would hike together with our dogs regularly and riding just seemed natural, right?

    Well, one Wednesday I finally relented and brought the freaking dog. We start from Fawn Lake and head down Reasonover. I'm in the back because I'm slow but my dog is in the front because he is fast. My dog gets concerned about my pace and decides to turn around to check on me. The extrmtao was on the trail in front of me and when my faithful companion was headed his way he turned abruptly. Perhaps too abruptly.

    No humans or dogs were injured but tomato did suffer a tacoed wheel one hundred yards into the ride.

    That is the last time my dog went riding with me. He is a great dog but bicycles are just not his thing (sucks for him!).
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  17. #17
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    To reiterate what others have said, start with a good training school and basic commands. I've had pretty good success with my Weimaraner in training her to be a good trail dog. I started off young getting her to follow when on the trail be teaching her, first not to pull on the leash, then later to stay behind when trail running. Once you can get the dog well-disciplined hiking/trail running, it's a very easy transition to getting them to follow on the mountain bike. My dog follows at about this distance whenever on the flats and climbs, but lags behind obviously on the downhills.




    It's a very rewarding experience to have a trail dog, always a good riding companion. Good luck!

  18. #18
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    I'd talk to this guy, since his dog is effing awesome:

  19. #19
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    Cool Vid!

  20. #20
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    I have been riding Pisgah with dogs for well over 20 years. 95% of the rides I've done in those years have all been with a dog. And that's no joke. My dogs have ridden with me all over the country. And in all those years I've had exactly 2 negative encounters. One time a fuggin jack azz Texan tried to kick my dog for running beside him. She bit him. He called the sheriff who visited me at my home and when I explained what happened, he looked at me, laughed and walked away shaking his head. That was at Bent Creek a long time ago. The next time was on Butter Gap. This moron tried to kick the dog because she was trying to pass his slow azz. I wanted to get around as well, so I was right behind him. He said he was just trying to keep her out of his spokes. Uh, riiiiiight.That was maybe 6 years ago. The most important thing to consider when teaching a dog to do stuff is respect. You gotta respect the dog and the dogs gotta respect you. Or else it ain't gonna work. I dog that wont listen has an owner that has failed it. And a dog that wont listen is good fer nuthin. Nice to see some pro dog responses with good info. Never mind the two trolls. They're part of the uptight crowd that is all too common around here.

  21. #21
    Big Mac
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobovedo View Post
    While I completely disagree with the abusive tone this thread has taken already, and the threats made, I will point out that on numerous and regular occasions I encounter:

    * Dogs who leave their owners side and follow me up the trail/road for as much as a quarter of a mile, sometimes getting under my feet or othewise putting both of us in danger.
    * Owners of dogs that are ON leash, but the owners don't have control of them. They are jumping and pulling at their leashes and I can't get past, either on a bike or while running.
    * Dogs running around on the trails with no owner within sight
    * Owners of dogs calling or whistling for dogs that are up to a quarter mile away.
    * Owners of dogs either wandering around or driving, stopping me to ask, "Have you seen a dog that looks like..."?


    It's not BS. There are quite often "mysterious dogs jumping out of the forest".

    I have no problem whatsoever sharing the trails with dog owners and dogs who are off leash but well trained and/or under control. However, in my experience the number of well behaved dogs are in the minority.

    So, thank you to the OP for at least taking the time to ask for advice and accepting the responsibility for training their dog.

    And for what it's worth, this same issue could be raised for those with small children running around out of control.
    You should build your own private little haven that you and your high strung, flag waving friends can have all to yourselves. It will be perfect and you will not have to share. No pesky animals or little humans. Just ya'll. With no one to blame but yourselves. I can help with the build.

  22. #22
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    The hardest issue I had training my dog in the trail was not to pass me and not allow her to approach other people and dogs. Different breeds of dogs do better than others. Mine is a pit mix which loves to hunt and run. On two occasion I have gone over the bars due to chasing squirrels. Once learning to stay behind me at all times over a 1-2 year period I have not had an issue. Most of my training was done prior to ever taking on a bike ride. I also trained my dog to always run on the right side of my bike to avoid oncoming hiker and biker conflict. I use several different commands in the trail to do this.

    In regards to other people and other dogs on leashes and off leash. Some people are afraid of dogs and being a responsible dog owner you need to prevent your dog from running up to everyone. In addition to that other dogs may not be as friendly as your dog, and when leashed I have noticed them to be more aggressive and cause dog fights. I have also come across hunting dogs and they to sometimes can be aggressive causing a fight. So just because your dog is friendly does not mean others are. Being a responsible dog owner off leash means having your dog under control at all times, and only allowing the dog to approach people and other dogs when given permission.

    Other thoughts of owning my dog.

    Dog training class will show you how to do all this and making up your own command words before going to the class defiantly helps.

    This past year I have not taken my dog out much because of not being able to keep up on longer rides. So keep in mind some dogs can get injury from longer rides. I usually try to keep it under 10 miles when the dog is in shape and when first starting out 2-3 miles. Also if you get a puppy it should not run on the trail I think for at least 1-2 years till the bones and muscles develop I beleive.

    Also, In the summer at times it is almost too hot for some dogs and you will need to plan more stream stops for water breaks. Teach the dog how to drink out of a water bottle and camel back.

    If your dog is food motivated a lot of this training will come easy. My dog also was not food motivated at all.

    Also on a side note. Once the dog knows you are going for a bike ride by touching anything bike related the dog will go bonkers to get in the car.. Work on commands to get dog in and out of the car. This will help in the parking lot to reduce conflict with others. I also use in and out of the house commands and release commands.

    On a side note this training takes a lot of work and persistence but will provide many years of having a good dog.
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  23. #23
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    Uptight haahahahahahahahah

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Mueller- View Post
    Once you can take the dog in the woods without a leash without worrying, you just have to introduce the bike into the situation. More often then not, the dog will chase you as soon as you take off. You'll probably have to teach them to stay behind you and out of the way. A few gentle tire buzzes made my dog VERY respectful about staying the F out of my way.

    .
    That's EXACTLY how we trained our late Doberman and Golden Retriever to be good trail dogs. They were allowed to run a little ways ahead, but if they heard us coming, they both would immediately move to the side of the trail and wait for us to pass before falling in. A knobby up the rear end apparently gets a dogs attention.

    Unfortunately, after we started riding longer distances, we had to leave them at home. How far do you guys ride with your dogs? They started looking kinda tired after 15 miles or so. Even more unfortunately, my current Doberman has proven himself untrainable. He's more dangerous to ride near than a Donaldson C group. He stays home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedchick View Post
    That's EXACTLY how we trained our late Doberman and Golden Retriever to be good trail dogs. They were allowed to run a little ways ahead, but if they heard us coming, they both would immediately move to the side of the trail and wait for us to pass before falling in. A knobby up the rear end apparently gets a dogs attention.

    Unfortunately, after we started riding longer distances, we had to leave them at home. How far do you guys ride with your dogs? They started looking kinda tired after 15 miles or so. Even more unfortunately, my current Doberman has proven himself untrainable. He's more dangerous to ride near than a Donaldson C group. He stays home.
    In good weather with plenty of water my pup can go 20+ miles. In heat she stays home. Lots of gravel and she's likely to split a pad. She's a 50 lb pit/hound mix.

    Turkeypen is my favorite place to take my dog because there's tons of water and you don't have to share any roads with cars.

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