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  1. #1
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    Big Creek question

    I was planning on riding Big Creek on Sat, but saw on my Fri road ride that it was signed as seasonal. This is different from the map - where can I find out about changes in the future?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    News to me. The FS pretty much does what they want when they want. I mean it is their land right?

    Stuff like this irks me. There is no reason for that trail to be closed in the summer. I have ridden that trail dozens of times and rarely encounter anyone hiking it.

  3. #3
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    It was signed as open to bikes and horses April 15 -Oct 15

  4. #4
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    wow. i rode it about a month ago and did not see such a sign. Not to say it wasn't there, though...

    that's ridiculous! I don't ride it a lot, but I have never seen a single hiker on it ever. and the other sucky part is with the # of creek crossings, that will serverely limit when a person would want to ride Big Creek.

    "Seasonal" has always struck me as a reasonable way to manage trails that the FS sees as potential for user conflicts. I applaud this use and am always careful to abide by the seasonal restrictions. But there should be some justification. If they are going to make more legal trails seasonal, how 'bout giving consideration to making some closed trails seasonal?

    And while I'm venting here, on Sat. some old dude informed us there were not supposed to be any bikes on Northslope . I gave him a big, fake smile and explained how seasonal works and wished him and his wife a nice hike. Hopefully he didn't harrass the next bikers he saw. What I don't understand is what makes a person be so f-ing hateful and cross with the world that they begrudge the trail to another user. We were both dismounted and spewing "good mornings" when he just had to try to be trail police. Most of the people I see hiking are having a great time, but there is a significant minority that look like they're chewing nails. I don't know if they think they have to do a certain number of mandatory hiking miles to keep their old hippie credentials or what.

  5. #5
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    Rode Big Creek Sunday a week ago. Never saw any sign out at the Parkway. Did see the old sign a little beyond the stair section at the top. The sign was broken off and stuck in a laurel on the left of the trail. That sign said open to bikes. Trail its self is in awesome shape. The leaf piles were so deep in spots I felt like I was boarding in some fresh powder. That trail does not see much traffic at all but is well worth the effort to get there and back.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by litespeedchick
    ...
    And while I'm venting here, on Sat. some old dude informed us there were not supposed to be any bikes on Northslope . I gave him a big, fake smile and explained how seasonal works and wished him and his wife a nice hike. Hopefully he didn't harrass the next bikers he saw. What I don't understand is what makes a person be so f-ing hateful and cross with the world that they begrudge the trail to another user. We were both dismounted and spewing "good mornings" when he just had to try to be trail police. Most of the people I see hiking are having a great time, but there is a significant minority that look like they're chewing nails. I don't know if they think they have to do a certain number of mandatory hiking miles to keep their old hippie credentials or what.
    I just got back from Colorado/Utah and rode some routes that were used primarily by dirt bikes. However, the moto guys would stop and wait for us to pass when we encountered them on the trail. A few times it seemed easier for us to pull over instead, and every single rider in the group would ride by SLOWLY to not kick up dust and said "thank you" as they passed. In fact, just about every person I encountered on the shared use roads and trails seemed much friendlier than over here. I don't understand it either. The difference in attitudes alone was almost enough to make me want to move!...but I think I still prefer our trails to the desert, sand, and rocks.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    However, the moto guys would stop and wait for us to pass when we encountered them on the trail. A few times it seemed easier for us to pull over instead, and every single rider in the group would ride by SLOWLY to not kick up dust and said "thank you" as they passed.
    Makes for a pleasant trail-sharing experience, doesn't it? There are more than a few mountain bikers (and equestrians, and hikers) who would do well to take lessons in this type of civility when they encounter other trail users, including fellow mountain bikers. A little bit of friendliness goes a long way toward breaking down barriers ... and make no mistake, we're in a war for trail access, and those barriers are getting bigger.

  8. #8
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    Me too!!

    Quote Originally Posted by FlavC
    I just got back from Colorado/Utah and rode some routes that were used primarily by dirt bikes. However, the moto guys would stop and wait for us to pass when we encountered them on the trail. A few times it seemed easier for us to pull over instead, and every single rider in the group would ride by SLOWLY to not kick up dust and said "thank you" as they passed. In fact, just about every person I encountered on the shared use roads and trails seemed much friendlier than over here. I don't understand it either. The difference in attitudes alone was almost enough to make me want to move!...but I think I still prefer our trails to the desert, sand, and rocks.
    I felt the same way last year after going to Colorado/Utah.....the part about moving.

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