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Thread: Truax?

  1. #1
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    Truax?

    Who's got one?
    Last edited by rockcrusher; 04-27-2012 at 03:33 PM. Reason: spelling

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    I'll bump this, I am looking at one as well.
    Leftys creep me out

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    Yeah, based on the specs-I'd say I'm interested. I've got a 2011 Range 3 that I love, but the specs on the Traux are very appealing for the form of riding I'm interested in pursuing more aggressively. I love the perkiness of the Range, so I don't think I could go all out by getting an Aurum, even with a CC A/S and a shorter fork. That seems like it would just be too burly. The wheelbase, head angle, seat tube angle, et cetera, on the traux is great looking.

    rider reviews appreciated

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    Is the Truax a new design for this year or has it been around a while? I honestly wasn't even looking at Norco until I started seeing some of the pics from Sea Otter. I was originally thinking a Transition Blindside or a Giant Faith (even though they are a little out of my price range.) I would love some feedback on the horst-link. I also like the spec sheet on the Truax 2, and 36.30lbs sounds perfect for me.
    Leftys creep me out

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    Leftys creep me out

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    Norco use to make a bike called the Shore. It was around from 2001-2011 and was a rather popular bike. The Truax just replaced it. Norco has been changing up their line of bikes lately.

    The way my Range feels while riding is great. I love the way the rear suspension on it flows with the trail. That's the reason I retain my interest in Norco and am considering a Truax. Norco says the two ride somewhat comparably, just that each is slightly more in another direction. Personally, I'd recommend getting the Truax LE framekit if you were to get one.

    I'm glad Norco has a Syntace rear axle on it too. That's important to me now.

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    What is the Syntace rear axle? The only thing about Norco is the nearest dealer here in NC is either Charleston or Greenville SC, both at least 6 hours away. And why do you recommend the Truax LE? I mean, I wish I could but I am biking on a budget.
    Leftys creep me out

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    The Syntace rear axle is different than the standard quick release axle. You can learn about it here:
    Why Syntace 142mm is here to stay?! - Pinkbike.com

    I'm not saying you should get the Truax LE, I'm saying you should get the Truax LE framekit. It is an option Norco provides: you buy the frame and it comes with a rear shock and you build it (or have it built up if you don't know how to) to the spec that you want. Personally, I don't necessarily agree with some of the components that are sold with the built up bikes that are available. I feel like you would ultimately feel compelled to upgrade a large number of them over a period of time. It would just be worth it more to get a frame and build from there.

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    Thanks for that link. I am curious, it only lists Norco bikes that use the Syntace, did they design the technology? And the more I look at the Truax the more I realize what a beautiful piece of machinery it is. As for the specs on the two, I think that those parts will suit me just fine. I have heard pretty good things about the totem as well, but switch it out for a Fox Vanilla R 180 on down the line. It would be a lot easier for me to have a complete bike and upgrade parts as I can than to buy a frame and buy parts as I could afford them. That's a lot of riding I would miss out on.
    Leftys creep me out

  10. #10
    Is that Bill rated?
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    Have ridden and it blows my older shore away in just about every way. It is certainly useable as a trail bike, while being ready for the big stuff.
    Well, it was a good try.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Teqtonik View Post
    Thanks for that link. I am curious, it only lists Norco bikes that use the Syntace, did they design the technology? And the more I look at the Truax the more I realize what a beautiful piece of machinery it is. As for the specs on the two, I think that those parts will suit me just fine. I have heard pretty good things about the totem as well, but switch it out for a Fox Vanilla R 180 on down the line. It would be a lot easier for me to have a complete bike and upgrade parts as I can than to buy a frame and buy parts as I could afford them. That's a lot of riding I would miss out on.
    No, I just got an article that was listed on the Norco page. I think they just listed bikes they make that have it. Norco is a great company. I don't see too many of their bikes here in California, but I saw a lot of them on Vancouver Island when I visited there. It certainly is a beautiful bike.

    My main concern is the brakes, drive-train, and the saddle. Those become easy to get picky on quick, but this is entirely your choice.


    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Humongous View Post
    Have ridden and it blows my older shore away in just about every way. It is certainly useable as a trail bike, while being ready for the big stuff.
    Thank you dude, how long were you on it?

  12. #12
    Chillaxin 'n Chilcotin!
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    Regarding the Syntace x-12, I'm a big fan. My Shinobi has this and the 12mm really makes for a stiff rear end that tracks really well. It is a little more involved than a QR when you need to change a tire, but it's easier than some other thru-axle systems I've seen. You just need a 5mm allen key and the axle screws right out.

    So far, I've taken a few hits to the derailluer and the break-away bolt hasn't wavered. It's good peice of mind to know that there is a replacement tucked away in the frame so if I ever need it in the back country, I won't be walking home.

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    Yeah I definitely enjoy the innovation involved

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    Dirt Rag had a review of the Truax in its last issue as I recall (#161) here is a quick link to a short review but the magazines review is quite comprehensive.

    First Impression: Norco Truax | Dirt Rag Magazine
    Try this: HTFU

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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher View Post
    Dirt Rag had a review of the Truax in its last issue as I recall (#161) here is a quick link to a short review but the magazines review is quite comprehensive.

    First Impression: Norco Truax | Dirt Rag Magazine

    This is a great article with some great detailed photos to see just how beautifully built and well thought out this frame is.
    Leftys creep me out

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    Hey,

    So I picked up a 2011.5 Truax 1 about a month ago, and have put some decent time on it both in the interior of BC (Okanagan), but a vast majority here in North Vancouver.

    In short... this bike is amazing. It's built incredibly well, ride's really well, and pedals alot better than it's "heft" might suggest. Immediately, I switched out the rear shock to a Rock Shox Vivid Air R2C, which I am glad I did, because the variety of trails here in North Van require me to change the pressure (a Ladies Only lap on Fromme needs a different set-up than a 7th-Crickum loop or a Neds/Pingu/Pangor ride, for example). I have run into a couple bottom out issues despite having 25% sag, but mine is a medium compression tune. I'd probably suggest a high compression tune on the shock.

    Anyways, I prefer to do pedalling to trailheads, and have taken this on some decent loops that might have been considered XC, and the bike rides surprisingly well. It would definitely benefit from an adjustable fork (which I am keeping my eyes open for), but it is not necessary if you know how to climb technically and are proficient at moving your weight and momentum around while climbing. A beginner-to-intermediate rider might find it challenging on steeper technical climbs, but then again, this is not a XC bike... it's built for abuse on the shore or in the park with the ability to pedal to your trails.

    Point this bike down though, and it's amazing. The geometry just sits so well, and bike is so easy to throw around under neath you. It rides like a slopestyle bike, but has the stability of a DH bike (at least in my opinion). Some people have brought up issues with top-tube length, but I am 5'9", ride a medium, and feel very comfortable on it.

    I've got a Joplin adjustable post on mine, which allows a lot more versatility for the bike, and contrary to what a lot of people are *****ing about (who have clearly never actually ridden or played with a Truax), you can get PLENTY of extension on the seatpost (in fact, I was able to get full extension for my leg length, but anyone taller would lose a bit of extension... my inseam is 32, but the dropper post has completely remedied that, so it's a non-issue for me). Plus, any decent rider doesn't slam the saddle down, and instead keeps it a little higher so that they can use it to maneuver the bike between their legs and have more control.

    The specs on the Truax 1 (well now Truax 2 for 2012) is great. It's all bomb-proof, problem free (which is what matters, right?), and well put-together. I have never had an issue with the Syntace drop out, and actually quite like it (my wife has a 2011 Norco Vixa with the same set-up and it's great).

    The frame is very stiff, yet very responsive, and forgiving. It's a very rideable bike (which I mean to say that it really can do everything). I have consolidated from two bikes (a 2010 Giant Anthem and a C-dale Judge DH build) down into just this one, because I am riding everything I did on both of those bikes, if not better on this. While I don't climb as fast as I did on my anthem... I am not really racing anywhere, and just want a fun ride.

    The totem, once broken in, is really smooth and plush. I really like it. I was initially debating swapping out to a TALAS, but have since decided not to because the Totem just rides so well (I am 170lbs kitted up, and the stock spring in the Totem suits me... seems RockShox has gotten it right with spring rates now).

    The bike does not NEED the VIvid Air over the Vanilla R (although I really recommend it), as I demo'd a Truax with the Vanilla before buying mine, and it actually rode really well still. There is bob, don't get me wrong, but that just forces me to be a smoother pedaler.

    Anyways, I really recommend the bike. There are definitely some cheaper options out there (Norco is almost boutique'ifying itself a little), as well as some better, more expensive options, but I've ridden alot of different bikes, from a lot of different companies, but this one really stacks up to the best of them, I really must say.

    For the record, I'd describe myself as an intermediate to advanced rider. I routinely ride ladies only, Oilcan, Empress, Pingu/Pangor, C-buster, Neds, and the usual XC loops etc etc, (and by "ride", I actually mean ride top to bottom, not walking most of the trails), so I think I put my bikes through the paces, and this is holding up really really well. No play anywhere (although, I'd recommend lock-tighting pivot bolts before taking the bike to the trails), and no concerns what so ever. At the end of the date, it's a Norco, and Norco's really are built very well.

    Good luck! It's a pretty rad ride.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Truax?-truax.jpg  


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    ps: yes, it has a bottle cage, but I'm doing 3-4 hour loops and it's nice to have a bottle...

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    pps: my rear shock settings are:

    PSI: 170
    End Stroke rebound: 1 click from fully open
    Beginning Stroke Rebound: 4 clicks from fully opened
    Compression: 3 clicks from fully open

    Works pretty well, although I think I have to add some air pressure to reduce the bottoming, but it's only on bigger hits.

  19. #19
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    Nice ride! I never hate on a water bottle cage, sometimes I ditch my camelbak.

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    That's great to hear a good review of the totem. I have heard it is a really well designed fork for all things freeride. Does the Fox DHX come with the propedal option? I know I have an RP2 on my all mountain BMC and had next to no pedal bob. I would imagine there are some rear shock options to cover that.
    Leftys creep me out

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    It actually feels pretty amazing. Better than my TALAS 180 I had on another bike last season, but not quite as good as the Vanilla or Float 180s.

    I had my shop rebuild the fork before I picked it up, topping up the oil bath, and making sure the bushings and seals were well lubed as Rock Shox tend to have underlubed bushings on the Lyriks and Totems out of the box. Once this was done, the fork was/is super plush.

    As I said, I was initially thinking of swapping the Totem out for a TALAS, but I think I am gonna hold on to them for now, and maybe even look for a 2012 Dual Position Totem (with the new dual position system), but we'll see. I'll put the summer on the totems since it will be a lot of park riding, and then when the winter rolls around, maybe find a TALAS as I'll be back to doing more climbing and stuff.

    -Mike

  22. #22
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    Shock

    What size rear shock does the Truax use?
    It's Better To Die On Your Feet Than To Live On Your Knees. (Emiliano Zapata)

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    Hey,

    It uses an 8.75x2.75 shock (222x70mm).

    I have heard and see some guys running an 8.5x2.5 in it, slackens it out a bit, lowers the BB, but you lose a tiny bit of travel...

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    New Truax for me

    Well just picked up what is a new bike for me. It is a used Truax 1 but it is in very nice shape. So far it is all stock, but I have some changes in mind.

    Handlebar was cut down will get a 720-740 (wide enough for my taste)
    Swap RS Vivid Air R2C from previous bike
    Swap Talas 180 RC2 from previous bike
    Swap X9 drivetrain from previous bike
    Swap 2ply Minion tire from previous bike

    I was quite surprised when I weighed the bike and it was 36.3lbs as claimed, that said, changing the rear shock from the coil Van-R to the Vivid air will drop weight and allow for more tuning options.

    I haven't used the Totem RC before and it does feel pretty good, but switching to the Talas 180 will drop some weight and allow for a better climbing position. The fork is also more adjustable on the compression setting.

    My current FR bike has a x-9 drive train that is in very good shape, so that is an easy swap. Might also consider swapping the Juicy-7s I have on the bike as well from the Elixer-5s that are stock on the Truax. Any comments on how the Elixer-5 would compare the Juicy-7s. I know the Juicy's are older but mine are in great shape and have always worked very well for me.

    Single ply Nevgals have to go, heard way too many complaints about these tires to give up my trusted 2-ply Minion DHF that I now run. I haven't have too much in terms of how the stock Inferno-29 rims and hubs are performing. I might be able to swap my wheels from my trail bike 20mm front with 135x10 Hope EVO hubs by changing the end caps? That way I could use the Truax if/when required with a lighter set of wheels (1.5 ply Schwalbes)

    I will also be able to use my KS dropper post from my trailbike as it also 30.9. I have an older i-900 post without the remote so it would be very easy to swap between frames.

    Last and certainly not the least, I am considering putting on an angleset headset. The stock HA on the bike is 65.5 which is already pretty slack. I would like to try the 1 degree cup and see what a 64.5 - 65 HA would feel like, especially for the really steep bits on the shore.

    Will post some pictures as the bike evolves from it's current state to the end state. Really looking forward to this little project and getting some trail time on this new ride.

    Cheers
    Last edited by rideitall; 09-27-2012 at 02:29 PM.

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    Truax questions

    I am hoping to start the rip down and build up of the Truax tonight and hope to be done this weekend, and have a couple of questions as to the equipment spec on the bike.

    Question 1 - Bottom bracket - Is it a 68/73 or 83mm bottom bracket?

    Question 2 - Stock RS Totem RC fork, does is have a straight 1 1/8 steered or is it tapered.

    That should do if for now. Thanks in advance.

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