Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 101 to 125 of 146

Thread: Norco Range

  1. #101
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    I haven't noticed any pedal bob whatsoever with my range when riding uphill. I'm actually quite surprised at how firm it feels. Before I bought my bike I did research to see if ART was worth it. Reviews said that the only time you would ever notice ART is when standing and climbing steep hills. When I stand and climb, I get massive pedal bob but with the type of riding I do, it's rare I ever have to do that. I overlooked the 142mm rear though, I assumed the range 3 came with that. But I'm happy with how it feels.

  2. #102
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    Yeah FSR is a great platform and a dialed shock really does make it. ART is a slight change in FSR, so I don't expect a huge difference. I'm interested in the pedal efficiency claim they made, but I already experience a minimal amount of bob with the sag setup properly. I suppose they really like the idea of their axle path. I've been told a rather controversial opinion of the lead designer at Santa Cruz bikes and it was that axle path doesn't matter these days as it is all relative vertical curves and that so long as you have a properly adjusted rear shock it becomes very hard to differentiate. What makes a lot of it, according to him, was high or low pivot for different styles of riding and again with the good rear shock. A little confusing for a company that ultimately boasts the S curve of the VPP. Although I don't entirely agree, I also find good points in it from a man who knows what's up in that realm.

    I ordered my DT Swiss hub kit and will do all the conversion as it shows up. I also don't expect a ton out of a 142mm rear end. I don't believe that QR 135mm is dead yet but the changing trend does have positive feedback from many. I do expect a stiffer feel and it will look a little cleaner.
    Last edited by ehigh; 09-18-2012 at 09:36 AM.

  3. #103
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    Waiting on the hub kit now



    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  4. #104
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    53
    Hi, ehigh

    Just wondering, sinse your frame is disassembled could you inform me of the bearing sizes? I don't want to pull my bike apart before I get new bearings. Thanks in advance.

  5. #105
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    I won't actually open up the bearings to measure them, sorry. It says KSK and 600IRS on the chainstay and then 608RS on the seat stay. You should contact a norco dealer and have them call for further information.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  6. #106
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    53
    Quote Originally Posted by ehigh View Post
    I won't actually open up the bearings to measure them, sorry. It says KSK and 600IRS on the chainstay and then 608RS on the seat stay. You should contact a norco dealer and have them call for further information.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2
    Thanks for the info, all i need were the numbers on the face of the seals.
    Is it a 608 at the bottom of seat stay by the rear axle as well. I'm looking for all bearing numbers in the rear suspension linkage system. I asked my lbs if they could get the info for me, but no luck yet.

  7. #107
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by cubb View Post
    Thanks for the info, all i need were the numbers on the face of the seals.
    Is it a 608 at the bottom of seat stay by the rear axle as well. I'm looking for all bearing numbers in the rear suspension linkage system. I asked my lbs if they could get the info for me, but no luck yet.
    I woul just call norco directly and ask them for the info. That's the quickest and most accurate route.

    ehigh, I like the finish on that rear end. Can't wait to see it when it's done. I did some technical ascending this weekend and I wish I had ART. As soon as I stood up, my back end would bob and the front end would lift off the ground. But on another note, the rest of my parts arrived. I ditched the azonic stem as it was slightly too twitchy at 45mm in length and went with spike spank bars and stem. Picked up a bash guard, chain guide, new grips, and 2.5 nevegal for the front.




  8. #108
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    Your bike is looking good. What size is it? Almost got the norco warranty # today but forgot at last minute. I don't think its actually posted though.

    I don't know about the stock rear wheel being convertible, so check into that before you get a new rear triangle.

    The only thing stock on my range is the fork.

    Enjoying the 2011 range 1 rear triangle. The chainstay came with no graphics and is just the ano. Got it all done and have only taken it around the block.



    Leaving for Santa Cruz within the next hour, so I'll enjoy it there and will let you know how it is.



    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  9. #109
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    Mine is a small. Not sure if the rear triangle would be different for my bike. As it sits right now, there's nothing I want to change. Maybe better brakes and the ART depending on how you like it.

    I like what you've done with the bike. Aside from the fork, I bet it rides just as nice as the range 1 now.

  10. #110
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    I started smashing my stock wheels, probably related with being 205 pounds with all my gear on when I do larger jumps. So I laced my own set of DT 240s hubs to FR600 rims with double butted spokes. I was also thrashing my stock cranks so I just upgraded to X0 with an MRP 2x. As I got faster, my brakes weren't meeting the demands of some of the long, technical, speedy runs. So I got XTR M985 trail brakes, they're killer.

    ART feels great so far. I'll write up detailed thoughts later. Just being a bike bum in Santa Cruz.
    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2


    edit:

    I immediately noticed the added support from the beefier rear axle. The firm feeling enables a little more confidence. It simply feels full bodied with ART. It's harder to blow through the mid stroke and I noticed that my bike resists bottoming-out the rear end more. I cased a few bigger jumps, but the impact wasn't as harsh feeling. It's a different feeling than FSR, even though it's just a slight variance in it, and it took a little to hone in on-but still I can only say good things about it. It feels controlled.
    Last edited by ehigh; 09-30-2012 at 03:59 PM.

  11. #111
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    Thanks for the detailed review. What type of riding do you mostly do? After reading the difference between ART and without, it's making me want it but I'm not sure if it would be worth it for me. Most of my riding is steep, rocky downhill with small jumps and drops. Only climbing I do is up fire roads to get to the trail head. I don't do any XC or flat trails.

  12. #112
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    I ride my Range aggressively.

    Out here, a lot of the trails are going to wreck your day if you fall at high speeds with all the rocks on them. It gets rough, but the Range sucks it up.

    I feel like a chum for saying so because these numbers can really be quite disambiguous as they were all done at a hodge-podge freeride/dirtjump park but uhhh:

    After sitting around with a measuring tape, my greatest claim to fame on the bike is a jump with 30 feet of clearance and 8 feet of lift. I've done some alright sized drops, ones that shoot you out 15-20 feet and drop 8 feet.

    In terms of technical riding, I've taken the bike from Sooke to Courtenay on Vancouver Island, British Columbia riding just about everything in between. The track out there is a lot different than out here. I experienced descents on massive granite faces, large drops out in the woods, lots of twisty tree-trails, and plenty of rocks and roots with some great wooden features built up.

    I really enjoyed meeting a group of Norco riders out on Forbidden Plateau that year. They were all with Norco and five of them sat atop a Range.

    I don't feel that ART will necessarily make you ride better right off the bat. It may serve to inspire confidence with the greater sense of control that it provides, but in the end: it's up to you.

    Consider this:
    $400 for the rear triangle, new derailleur hanger, and hanger bolt.

    MSRP for a hub conversion kit is usually about $100.

    If you don't have wheels that you can convert, then you're looking at a new rear wheel altogether.

    It's a bit of an investment, but I'm glad I made it. I'm about to head out and go ride the same trail I've ridden hundreds of times before. I'm yet to do it with the new rear triangle, so it will be fun to ride the same ol' trail kind of a thing with an upgrade. It's essentially my performance run.

  13. #113
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    Thanks again for the info. I guess it's time to save up for ART. I really don't mind the cost, my bike only cost me $1500 as it was on clearance for half price. So really, I could be riding a range 2 for a lot less money. You mentioned it helps with bottoming out, Im having issues with that now. I bottom out really easy, even on smoother trails although I don't notice it while riding.

    I actually live in BC and do all my riding on the north shore and whistler. It's good to know you huck your range like a freeride bike because I was a bit worried about having to upgrade to a bigger bike when I become better. Norco really hit the nail on the head with this bike. Thinking of getting my girlfriend on the new 650B version as she currently rides a hard tail 29er and likes the bigger wheel.

  14. #114
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    I actually have to go back on something I said earlier. I feel that I made it seem that bottom out resistance is greatly increased by ART. If you tune any rear shock, it should resist bottoming out. However, the intention is to have ideal small bump compliance while retaining a shock that doesn't wallow (have significant sag or terrible peddle bob).

    Also, you want to have a comfortable feeling midstroke. Medium sized hits should feel relative to how much your rear axle is moving (suspension travel).

    For example,
    say the rider considers medium sized drops, all with smooth transitional landings, to be anywhere from 2-5 feet. You want the midstroke to feel in compliance to the 2 foot drops, the 4 foot drops, and the 5 foot drops. You don't want a 2 foot drop to make your axle move just as much as a 5 foot drop would. Riders refer to this as "blowing through your midstroke"

    What I meant to say is that the shock feels like it is slightly more in tune with the rest of the suspension now. However, the Monarch R, which is on your Range, doesn't offer a whole lot of tuning options. In your case, a shock with more options might be the ideal solution if bottoming out is your major issue with the current setup on your bike. A number of riders have recommended a Monarch RC3 plus, but still I am enjoying the Monarch RT3 that Rock Shox sent me on warranty.

    bear with me here,

    I'm a big fan of the light approach to freeride that the Range takes on. It really does handle things like a brute. There isn't a trail that I've ridden where I feel that I'm limited by the bike. All the stunts that I've skipped were because of my own skill limitations and how my bike is setup on that given day. Putting a better fork and a coil on this bike would make it a bit of a monster and would inspire more confidence, but at the end of the day the Range is all over the place.

    However I do have some conflicting thoughts. DH and aggressive Freeride bikes are simply built to make it easier. Your Range can do everything you can't on the trails, but a bigger bike is a bigger bike.

    Since you live in BC, you should actually consider making a trip to a Norco bike demo.


    I did a lot of riding yesterday and paid thorough attention to the differences between ART and FSR in terms of how it affected my climbs and descents. I was especially winded yesterday and did not expect to make some of the technical climbs. The way the axle path traveled simply made it more comfortable.

    I was blown away on the descent. On some of the technical drops and rock sections the bike felt more stable. The 142mm rear end is built more aggressively and you can feel the support. The way the axle path traveled as a whole seemed to make braking more comfortable. I burned out on a few corners that I usually try to avoid ripping apart, but I only did so because I was enjoying tearing up all the other corners.

    I know I have stated a number of conflicting thoughts,

    in the end, ART is killer. I recommend it.

    However, adjusting your shock might be an actual culprit.

    Do you really want a bigger bike? Only time will tell. For $1,500 and then another $500 for the package of ART, you got a steal of a deal on that bike. I feel that it will make your bike feel better. Better is a funny word, but I mean it.

    Get your girl on the 650b version at Norco demo. You should try their Truax and Aurum while you're there.

    In the mean time, add a little bit more air to your Monarch R and adjust the dial clockwise and see if that helps resist bottoming out while you ponder all the incoherent and indecisive opinions I just filled your mind with.

  15. #115
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    703
    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket View Post
    50mm



    bike is working well



    though will change out the seat, don't like it... pinches my nuts

    also ordered this in from black spire to retain the chain

    Blackspire - STINGER | Blackspire
    Looks like a 40mm Ranger?

  16. #116
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802
    It's a 50mm, as stated

  17. #117
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    100
    Can you compare Range LE to different bikes/suspensions ?

    i'm thinking about Range (2012) (used in good price/condition)
    also i'm thinking about
    -Knolly Chilcotin
    -Carver ICB
    -Nicolai Ion16
    -Alutech Fanes 3.0 Enduro
    -Banshee Rune v2

    Now i'm riding on Pivot Mach 5.7 carbon - great bike, but i have L size and i feel that's a little too large (i'm 181cm - 5'11'' and half)
    It's size is good for trail riding, but i liked bikeparks, small jumps and enduro local contests in last season.

    so now, i'm looking something a little smaller (Range in M size should be fine?)
    and with a little more travel (~160mm)
    can you compare Range to these bikes/suspensions ?
    or maybe some comments on geometry?

    Norco Range 2012
    Norco Range-p4pb6871394.jpg
    Last edited by razorjack; 04-03-2013 at 08:03 AM.

  18. #118
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by razorjack View Post
    Can you compare Range LE to different bikes/suspensions ?

    i'm thinking about Range (2012) (used in good price/condition)
    also i'm thinking about
    -Knolly Chilcotin
    -Carver ICB
    -Nicolai Ion16
    -Alutech Fanes 3.0 Enduro
    -Banshee Rune v2

    Now i'm riding on Pivot Mach 5.7 carbon - great bike, but i have L size and i feel that's a little too large (i'm 181cm - 5'11'' and half)
    It's size is good for trail riding, but i liked bikeparks, small jumps and enduro local contests in last season.

    so now, i'm looking something a little smaller (Range in M size should be fine?)
    and with a little more travel (~160mm)
    can you compare Range to these bikes/suspensions ?
    or maybe some comments on geometry?

    Norco Range 2012
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	p4pb6871394.jpg 
Views:	320 
Size:	160.7 KB 
ID:	786955
    I have no experience with the other bikes but I use my 2011 range 3 for everything. Downhill, trail, XC, I even commute 20+ kms with it. It does great at everything. I'm surprised at how well it handles at whistler bike park. The suspension travel feels endless and it soaks up the larger jumps and drops. My only complaint is that it's a bit heavy, almost feels like a freeride bike. But the LE is a lot lighter. LE also has A.R.T suspension which would be awesome for uphill climbs.

  19. #119
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    100
    i'm getting only frame (3.2kg i think?) its .6kg (1.3lbs) heavier than my Mach 5.7 carbon frame.
    so still, bike will weight ~13.5kg (below 30lbs)

  20. #120
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802

    Re: Norco Range

    I love my Range, I've been riding it for 2 years this month.

    But having a Chilcotin would be pretty cool too. Hard one to call.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  21. #121
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    100
    I bought a frame
    But i have a little play on upper damper bushings
    Norco Range-tuleja1.jpg
    How to remove that axle? should i push it ?


    Do you have any torque specifications for that frame? I don't know how much force i should use during suspension check/service

  22. #122
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    100
    I have a little play between this axle
    Norco Range-tuleja21.jpg
    and a smaller one with threads.
    Is this play from the beginning ? it's impossible that one of axles was rubbed and play appeared (axles have ~4cm contact distance)

    Here, I have a play between these to axles
    Norco Range-tuleja41.jpg
    Last edited by razorjack; 04-14-2013 at 12:03 PM.

  23. #123
    inexperienced at large
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1,802

    Re: Norco Range

    In that case, you need to replace the DU bushings. It's fairly simple.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Tapatalk 2

  24. #124
    mtbr member
    Reputation: razorjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    100
    but DU bushings are on damper eyelets? as i wrote, the bigger axle seats firmly in an eyelet.
    the smaller one with threads (that one that comes into rocker) has a play between bigger one. Is it normal ? maybe normally you don't feel a play, bacause you have to squeeze axle with bolts ?

  25. #125
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    106
    Usually it is better to replace both at the same time, the reducer(the "middle axle" between DU bushing and "inner axle") and the DU bushing... For replacing the DU bushing you need a tool.

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •