Who Makes Niner Frames?

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  • 12-21-2012
    hanky_spanky
    American components, Russian components all are Made in Taiwan.

    - A scene from the movie Armageddon
  • 12-21-2012
    jboyd122
    Since this thread has risen back from the dead (12-21-12 zombie apocalypse?). I was wondering if anyone knows who does the work on the Niner carbon frames? Are those USA made or also an overseas job. It doesn't really matter I'm still curious since I've committed to throwing down $$$ for one this spring.
  • 12-21-2012
    jboyd122
    So I did a search and according to another thread in the 29er forum their carbon frames are also mande in Taiwan.
  • 12-21-2012
    thehaus
    Duh. Now I may be new to this forum but I think almost everyone knows that unless you are doing custom, ther are basically three plants in China that make frames. There are no plants to my knowledge in Taiwan, just middle men/woman. The main layup and assembly is still in China! Time weaves their own carbon as an exception. There are a few brands that do assembly of the carbon materials here in the USA or Canada or a few other places in Europe. 95-99% are most likely from China.

    I can elaborate more and give you references of my sources on this but they are from China also.

    Peace.

    Enjoy whatever frame you get till the next one!
  • 12-21-2012
    muzzanic
    Oh no is it not NASA building them.
  • 12-21-2012
    thehaus
    Well...many do look identical, like the shuttles, but with different makes. Think about how much a mold costs and how many bike companies can afford to have their own propriety closed molds. Many people use open molds and have their own unique paint schemes and names. Look around at European frames and US frames. Many look identical!

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2
  • 12-21-2012
    gtrdmg
    My 2013 Jet 9 RDO green has a label near BB , it says "handmade in Vietnam". Awhile back I saw a 2012 model marked "Made in Taiwan". It doesn't really matter where is it made, what matter is how Niner manage their vendor and QC.
  • 12-22-2012
    thehaus
    Very true. I guess Vietnam is becoming the new China?

    Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk 2
  • 12-23-2012
    bikeindustrydude
    The crap that comes out of your mouths - interesting, and mostly false.

    Niner formerly worked with a company called Pacific, but not the same one that makes Wal-mart bikes, they are a small facility in Taiwan that makes higher-end frames.

    Now, Niner works with Astro, a small, high-end facility in Taiwan that also makes some other nice high-end equipment. Astro owns a carbon factory in Vietnam, and the carbon is made there.

    To answer some other things in this thread - there are many carbon factories in Taiwan, and many more than 3 in China. I have visited almost every single one in both countries, and I can count 10 at least in Taiwan that are doing the entire process, including 1 that even makes their own fabric. Vietnam is becoming the new China, because typically the higher end stuff is made in Taiwan, and lower end in China, But the EU has high anti-dumping duties on China, so many companies are moving to India, Vietnam, Indonesia to avoid those duties to the EU market, which dwarfs the US market by a factor of 10.
  • 12-23-2012
    thehaus
    BID,
    Thanks for the update. I am not sure what you think is false. Some people though often have more information than others and that is just life. I guess my info is about 3 years old now and things are rapidly changing there (China, Taiwan, etc.). Great to know that there are so many more options for manufacturing. From what I understand, it doesn't really matter where the frame is made but QC is what we should all focus more on.
    Haus
  • 12-23-2012
    PeopleForScience
    Haus, we should focus on geometry and technology and customer service. You should not ever need to worry about QC. That is the bike companies job.
  • 12-23-2012
    thehaus
    True. What I was trying to say is that some companies do a better job at setting up and supervising their QC. Sometimes manufacturers try to get away with shoddy work by doing weird things on the inside of the frame, like putting more carbon and epoxy in areas than required. This adds to weight and can make installation of forks and bottom brackets more difficult to name a few. Sometimes things are also not to spec and the tolerances are to far off for proper installation of components. Most of the time these things are caught before they get to the consumer. I just hate to be the one that gets the frame that has the problem.
  • 12-23-2012
    Kaizmuth
    Funny thing is, the OP has probably gone through two or three bikes by now. What's the point of reviving a 4 year old dead thread to shill for Intense?
  • 12-23-2012
    thehaus
    Very true indeed. I was sort of respectfully hijacking the thread to talk about something a bit more interesting...at least to me anyway :)