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  1. #1
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    What is the WFO capable of?

    Hi,

    There is quite a lot of discussion on an earlier thread about what people expect a trail/am bike to be capable of.

    Made me think,

    What is the WFO designed for in the sence of drops?

    I must confess I am a bit of a coward when it comes to drops, so will not have had a chance to push this bike to maximum capability, yet. I wan't to know what to aspire too though.

    What is the biggest drop I can do to flat on this bike before I should think about getting a DH bike?

    This could make a good photo thread.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  2. #2
    Delirious Tuck
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    That's a very subjective question. Short answer depends on rider/style and bike set up.

    I'd look to your wheel set, rather than your frame to answer the question. Once you're dropping to flat and getting flat spots on your rim, you're probably going too far for the component's drop to flat. Also, I'd imagine if you had an avalanche or a shox tuned for the big hits that some of the impact and frame stress could be mitigated with damping and progression.

    Also, if you're sailing a drop to flat at speed and landing smoothly you'll also further mitigate some of the stress vs. a wheelie drop to flat.

  3. #3
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    Asking what a bike is capable of is kind of like asking what the human body is capable of. If you are a couch-sitting, uncoordinated person, maybe you won't be able to do what David Bell does with the same standard equipment.
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  4. #4
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    I believe the OP was asking specifically what the frame can handle, not the parts build, or the mind can handle ;-) . I think its a valid question since its we've seen niner built one up w/ the manitou dorado fork to test the limits. Put a coil rear shock on one, and the frame weight will hover around 8.5lbs; a weight traditionally reserved for frames that can take some abuse. I do realize weight is not the end all spec to judge a frame by, but that heft counts for something.

    -Sp

    Quote Originally Posted by chuky
    Asking what a bike is capable of is kind of like asking what the human body is capable of. If you are a couch-sitting, uncoordinated person, maybe you won't be able to do what David Bell does with the same standard equipment.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SinglePivot
    I believe the OP was asking specifically what the frame can handle, not the parts build, or the mind can handle ;-) .
    -Sp
    Spot on.

    I specifically did not mention the rest of the build as I am classifying the frame as the weak point,

    For those that are curious Dorado/Kris Holm Freeride wheels.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  6. #6
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    It is capable of murder, I can tell you that.......

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by edgerat
    It is capable of murder, I can tell you that.......
    Yes if I drop it off something too big and it exploded it might kill me, that is the point of this thread ;-)
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  8. #8
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    There are too many variables to accurately answer the question.
    Rider weight, horizontal speed, body english (bending knees and arms to take some of force), position of bike when landing, tire pressure, component choice, suspension settings, terrain (eg. sand, asphalt, rocks)...

  9. #9
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    why does everyone have to overcomplicate the question? The simple answer would be something like:

    "I've done 4 foot drops on mine..."

    "My friend took his to _____________ and did ____________"

    Cave Giant, what have you done on yours so far? I think that would be a decent starting point...

  10. #10
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    no frame failers that tells you it can handle alot, she good!!! dont worry about that too much.... just ride it hard and dont think about it!!!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by larsbaby
    why does everyone have to overcomplicate the question? The simple answer would be something like:

    "I've done 4 foot drops on mine..."

    "My friend took his to _____________ and did ____________"

    Cave Giant, what have you done on yours so far? I think that would be a decent starting point...
    I am glad there is someone with sense here.

    I am not good with big drops, so don't laugh.
    Probably the biggest drops I have done on this were on DH course, 2-3' landing either to flat or to steep bumpy rocks.

    I have managed to blow a seal on the RP23 doing that, but the frame is more than solid.


    Do we have any serious riders on this bike yet?


    I could rephrase the question too:

    What is the biggest drop you have seen done on a WFO, was it yours?
    tell us about it and any feedback!


    I want a target to aspire too =-)
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  12. #12
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    i dont if anyone ran across this yet, but if the wfo can do downhill and win that means alot...

    http://rollbikes.blogspot.com/2010/0...niner-wfo.html

  13. #13
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    The WFO is capable of going really fast through/over almost anything that is on the trail. My friends hate to ride behind me because they can't follow the same lines. Funny thing is with the WFO you really don't need to have a "line". Just go straight through it, the faster you go the smoother it feels, so wierd but so true. BTW the Dorado does help just a little!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolan17
    The WFO is capable of going really fast through/over almost anything that is on the trail. My friends hate to ride behind me because they can't follow the same lines. Funny thing is with the WFO you really don't need to have a "line". Just go straight through it, the faster you go the smoother it feels, so wierd but so true. BTW the Dorado does help just a little!

    helps a little or alot?!?

  15. #15
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    David 8613: I feel it helps a lot. My friend has the same bike only smaller and a Marz 44 on it and he looses ground on the really techy stuff. He is getting a Dorado soon and will let you know is he keeps up or not.

  16. #16
    JMH
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    The WFO with a Dorado is an odd duck. As a Park Bike (talking about Whistler-style trails like A-Line and Dirt Merchant) it's as good as I've ridden. It jumps with confidence and predictability, and it eats the 4-6ft drops with smooth transitions that you typically encounter. It holds speed through sections I would typically pedal, and I find myself holding the bike back to avoid over-jumping. The bike puts you on the back side of huge jumps as smooth as you like.

    When I ride it on really steep techy trails (what you might encounter on a tough DH track) the rear suspension feels outgunned and the head angle feels a bit steeper than what I would like. This is neither a criticism or a surprise since I basically put a World Cup DH fork on a trail bike. While the WFO is not intended to be a DH contender, it's still plenty fast enough to win DH races as Michael Darter (in SoCal) and a few other skilled dudes have shown. I certainly have blown by guys on Flavor of the Month World Cup DH bikes a few times. It's 10% more satisfying than making a pass on 26" tires!

    What is the bike capable of? Well, more than I am in most cases. I am still a ways off from hitting road gaps on a regular basis, so I feel like I have room to progress on the WFO.

  17. #17
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    Thanks, that helps alot.

    I have something to aim for!
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

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