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  1. #1
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    Some Friday pics...Colorado green has peaked.

    Hi Guys,

    I got out for a ride on Fathers Day for three hours on my favorite local ride which I'm fortunate enough to get out on 2-3 times a week. I happened to bring my camera and I am glad I did.

    We have had a huge amount of rain this year in Northern Colorado (well, all of CO really) and took my camera with me last Sunday. Typical N. Colorado late June is brown and dry due to little rain and 90+ degree weather. Our terrain on the edge of the mountains here is "high desert plains" and gets pretty cooked once the heat sets in. Very little relief from the sun - and 310 days of sun on average a year - so our rides happen early or late in the summer typically. With us having maybe only 10 days of 80+ degree weather it's awesome right now still.

    I normally don't get all artsy-fartsy with the camera, but thought I'd share some of my local loop. It's beautiful out here. All pics taken from Indian Summer loop just west of Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Happily on my JET9 1x9 tearing it up this day.

    Happy Friday!

    Brett
    Niner Bikes
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  2. #2
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    Quick question - all you guys (OP included) who carry a camera on rides... what do you bring and how do you keep it safe? I've never found a good solution for this...

  3. #3
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    nikon coolpix in a lowe case placed in the hydration pack or thru the strap across my chest.

  4. #4
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    Pentax W60, it's waterproof 10mp and HD video if needed.

  5. #5
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    Come on Brett, we all know those pics are from earlier this year when the snow was melting, sometime around spring nice stuff, Indian Summer sure looks nice like that

    I roll with a Panasonic LUMIX 7.2 MP that was given to me and works quite well, has a lot of actual manual control over settings which I really like. Does decent video, but no audio with it I either keep it in a soft pouch on the chest strap of my Cb or in a little TOPEAK case that has a QR system that can mount to your stem, TT, ST etc - works quite well, rode the entire of the Laramie Enduro and Leadville with it there with no problems or it falling off.

    Quote Originally Posted by rollmonkey
    Quick question - all you guys (OP included) who carry a camera on rides... what do you bring and how do you keep it safe? I've never found a good solution for this...
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Come on Brett, we all know those pics are from earlier this year when the snow was melting, sometime around spring nice stuff, Indian Summer sure looks nice like that
    Make : Canon
    Camera Model Name : Canon PowerShot A560
    Exif Version : 0220
    Date/Time Original : 2009:06:21 00:20:12
    Create Date : 2009:06:21 00:20:12
    Shooting Mode : Manual
    Shutter Speed : 1/160
    Focal Length : 23.2mm (35mm equivalent: 137.2mm)
    Lens : 5.8 - 23.2mm (35mm equivalent: 34.3 - 137.2mm)
    Light Value : 12.6


    Well if it's a fake, he faked the EXIF creation time. Though given that the clock is off... pretty funny to find someone else who actually shoots manual mode with a point-and-shoot. A560 one of the few cameras that lets you do that.

    Re: cameras sounds like you guys answered my questtion, which is, you carry your cameras around in ways that would get mine shattered to pieces, which is to say, I crash too much because I suck at riding. Figures.

    Nice pics
    -RM

  7. #7
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    You did see the "Winky" smily right? I was joking

    As to manual, I wish, but I can set exposure compensation up to 2 stops, usual force flash on/off and then there's always the meter where you want the exposure and hold down the shutter button 1/2 way to keep it. I don't push myself really that much to crash regularly, but I don't tend to, just have learnt not to "chest plant"

    Quote Originally Posted by rollmonkey
    Make : Canon
    Camera Model Name : Canon PowerShot A560
    Exif Version : 0220
    Date/Time Original : 2009:06:21 00:20:12
    Create Date : 2009:06:21 00:20:12
    Shooting Mode : Manual
    Shutter Speed : 1/160
    Focal Length : 23.2mm (35mm equivalent: 137.2mm)
    Lens : 5.8 - 23.2mm (35mm equivalent: 34.3 - 137.2mm)
    Light Value : 12.6


    Well if it's a fake, he faked the EXIF creation time. Though given that the clock is off... pretty funny to find someone else who actually shoots manual mode with a point-and-shoot. A560 one of the few cameras that lets you do that.

    Re: cameras sounds like you guys answered my questtion, which is, you carry your cameras around in ways that would get mine shattered to pieces, which is to say, I crash too much because I suck at riding. Figures.

    Nice pics
    -RM
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  8. #8
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    I need a different camera for rides. Right now, when I bring it, I carry my Canon EOS 20D w/ 18-55 and 70-300 lenses plus several filters and extra batteries. It all fits in a Lowe pack that wears over one shoulder/around the waist kind of like a messenger bag.

    Very heavy and the pack twists around a bit and I keep having to shove it onto my back, but I'd rather deal with that than miss the photos.

    Now that I have a bike, what I need is perhaps this:

    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...elTechSpecsAct

  9. #9
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    I can't imagine I'd ride too "comfortably" if I had that package strapped to me, would sure make me hesitate and miss loads of stuff. Let's not even talk ab out the one shoulder thing if it's putting the weight mostly on that shoulder - have a fugged hip from my days lugging around my 1 strap bag w/ 2 bodies, 3-5 lenses, a flash or 2 and all the other crap I could fit in there. I took my D70s on a couple rides, but the weight and thought of damaging it kept me from really enjloying the ride. Now different story if I'm just using the bike to get me to the areas to take photos then you ride different.

    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    I need a different camera for rides. Right now, when I bring it, I carry my Canon EOS 20D w/ 18-55 and 70-300 lenses plus several filters and extra batteries. It all fits in a Lowe pack that wears over one shoulder/around the waist kind of like a messenger bag.

    Very heavy and the pack twists around a bit and I keep having to shove it onto my back, but I'd rather deal with that than miss the photos.

    Now that I have a bike, what I need is perhaps this:

    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/co...elTechSpecsAct
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  10. #10
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    Great photos. You're fortunate to live in such a beautiful area. I visited Ft. Colins for a day last year and regret not getting out on the trails there!
    "The most persistent principles of the universe are accident and error." -Frank Herbert

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    I need a different camera for rides. Right now, when I bring it, I carry my Canon EOS 20D w/ 18-55 and 70-300 lenses plus several filters and extra batteries. It all fits in a Lowe pack that wears over one shoulder/around the waist kind of like a messenger bag.

    Very heavy and the pack twists around a bit and I keep having to shove it onto my back, but I'd rather deal with that than miss the photos.
    My wife has a 20D with a bunch of lenses too....no way I'd lug that backpack around.

    Steve here at Niner has a Canon Powershot G10 and it is an amazing camera. It's the perfect in between camera slightly higher end point/shoot, check it out if you haven't before.

    http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/d...+powershot+g10

    The A560 is a $150 camera I got my wife for her purse (so she didn't have to worry about the big 20D backpack toting 2 kids ) on sale a few years back that is pretty amazing for the price. That was a few years ago...
    Front Range Forum Moderator

  12. #12
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    Ok, I got it wrong, it's actually a Tamrac Velocity 7:

    http://www.tamrac.com/frame_velocity.htm

    Shoulder sling w/ a waist belt. It's about as comfy as a Camelbak. The only time I notice it is if I'm on a longer downhill, it will gradually migrate around from my back to side to front. I have to slow once in awhile to shove it onto my back.

    Really not that bad. I do want to go w/ something small though so I can also have the Camelbak on.

    It is pretty fun to have access to the good lenses, filters, etc. when I come across some great scenery.

  13. #13
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    Well as a compromise then I'd suggest looking for something made using Carl Ziess optics, like maybe a Sony or some such. It'll cost more than your avg P&S, but you'll have the optical superiority. If you want to carry about your DSLR consider one of the packs made as a dual pack, both hydration and camera bag in one. Photo John has reviewed a couple and if I was still serious about it I'd have one - they look very well made. For the life of me can't remember who makes them.

    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    Ok, I got it wrong, it's actually a Tamrac Velocity 7:

    http://www.tamrac.com/frame_velocity.htm

    Shoulder sling w/ a waist belt. It's about as comfy as a Camelbak. The only time I notice it is if I'm on a longer downhill, it will gradually migrate around from my back to side to front. I have to slow once in awhile to shove it onto my back.

    Really not that bad. I do want to go w/ something small though so I can also have the Camelbak on.

    It is pretty fun to have access to the good lenses, filters, etc. when I come across some great scenery
    .
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2melow
    My wife has a 20D with a bunch of lenses too....no way I'd lug that backpack around.
    To answer the question of 'what's the "pro" point-and-shoot', for people who can't carry a DSLR... the answer (by miles) right now is the Lumix LX3. The glass is made by Leica and is optically competitive with the Zeiss branded stuff being shipped by Sony - it is extremely good. The camera is set up to work like a pro camera, and in addition to video and the normal automatic-everything nonsense, it operates quite well in full manual mode - manual iso, manual focus, manual shutter speed (yes you can do 20 minute exposures), manual aperture (limited to f8 max), and RAW file mode for post-processed white balance. I took both of these on an LX2 in manual:
    http://k41.pbase.com/o3/20/601820/1/...ndDuneNP37.jpg
    http://k53.pbase.com/o3/20/601820/1/...ngToTaos02.jpg
    And I'm a terrible photographer.

    Of course I'm still too chicken to take it on rides because I crash all the time.
    Disclaimer: I'm not a professional photographer, but I'm married to one.
    http://gizmodo.com/5027211/panasonic...stay-sensitive

    edit: random pictures taken using this camera by competent photographers:
    http://www.pbase.com/cameras/panasonic/lumix_dmc_lx3
    http://www.pbase.com/antonmuller/image/107201045

  15. #15
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    Good job!

    I'll say that it's the one big thing I think Panasonic have done right in this line, which is why I love my cheapie little Lumix, so much control over everything except manaual shutter speed. Never knew they made one using Leica glass, could be very interesting

    Quote Originally Posted by rollmonkey
    To answer the question of 'what's the "pro" point-and-shoot', for people who can't carry a DSLR... the answer (by miles) right now is the Lumix LX3. The glass is made by Leica and is optically competitive with the Zeiss branded stuff being shipped by Sony - it is extremely good. The camera is set up to work like a pro camera, and in addition to video and the normal automatic-everything nonsense, it operates quite well in full manual mode - manual iso, manual focus, manual shutter speed (yes you can do 20 minute exposures), manual aperture (limited to f8 max), and RAW file mode for post-processed white balance. I took both of these on an LX2 in manual.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

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