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  1. #1
    Drinkin' the RIP9 Koolaid
    Reputation: Kaizmuth's Avatar
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    Jun 2011
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    RIP9 bearing service interval?

    My 2010 RIP9 is 2 1/2 years old and has only about 1300 miles on it. I'm not feeling any problems from the back end at all (other than a rear shock problem). I pulled the shock and rear wheel, fully articulated the swing arm and don't feel anything notchy or anything. I thought I felt a 'slow' or very slightly sticky spot a few times, but it wasn't strong enough to easily duplicate. There's no slack or 'looseness' that I can feel in the rear end. No lateral slop at all when checked by hand, doesn't feel loose at all when riding.

    Given the mileage and age, would it be a good maintenance time to replace the bearings, or is it better to wait until they do start feeling like they need to be replaced?

  2. #2
    Drinkin' the 29er KoolAid
    Reputation: kwarwick's Avatar
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    Jun 2004
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    Sounds like you did exactly what i do to check out the bearings... detach the shock and rotate the suspension through its full movement and if nothing feels notchy (or sounds crunchy) you're generally good to leave them alone. If on the other hand you feel or hear anything questionable its best to unbolt the suspension links to isolate individual bearings. You mentioned some stickiness, so I'd probably want to unbolt the links and rotate each bearing individually just to make sure.

    Suspension bearings don't rotate very much so its pretty hard to wear them out, usually the races get pitted from the repeated impacts or water gets in and rusts them but otherwise they should last a long time.

  3. #3
    Drinkin' the RIP9 Koolaid
    Reputation: Kaizmuth's Avatar
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    Given that I couldn't readily reproduce the 'sticky' spot, it's not much an issue. I'm not sure if it was the brake cable rubbing on the front derailleur as it passed by, or just the cables flexing in their races where they are attached to the frame. Move the cables a bit by hand while I move the suspension changed the way it felt, so I'm confident that was the problem rather than the bearings.

    I've been pretty bad about maintenance. Give that that attitude has cost me a full rebuild on my rear shock, I'm pretty sure I'll get a lot better about it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: herothedog's Avatar
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    Aug 2009
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    Worse case is you don't do anything and eventually damage the bearings, in which case replacement cost shouldn't be that much different then servicing. I think servicing might be more in labor cost than replacing.

    If you've stayed out of water and mud and you are okay with what you've described you should be fine. I ride my bearings until the make grinding noises then I replace them, which I've only had to once due to a couple of long weekend riding in the wet.

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