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  1. #1
    fc
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    Niner bikes One 9 - mtbr.com review

    <html><body><center><font face="arial,helv"> <h1>Niner Bikes One 9</h1><h3>A quick preview - It just rolls baby!</h3> <i>By Francis Cebedo<br>Date: April 21, 2005</i>
    <img width="640" height="480" vspace="5" src="http://gallery.mtbr.com/data/mtbr/624/medium/78849IMG_1770.jpg">
    <div align="right"><font color="#000000" size="-2">Photo &copy;: mtbr.com</font></div></center>
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    <caption class="small" align="bottom"> <font size="1">View from the front</font> <br></caption><tr><td>
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    <caption class="small" align="bottom"> <font size="1">Head Tube Badge and Welds</font> <br></caption><tr><td>
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    <caption class="small" align="bottom"> <font size="1">EBB Close-up</font> <br></caption><tr><td>
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    <caption class="small" align="bottom"> <font size="1">Seatsays </font> <br></caption><tr><td>
    <a href="http://gallery.mtbr.com/showphoto.php?photo=11583&size=big&password=&sort= 1&cat=624"><img src="http:/gallery.mtbr.com/data/mtbr624/78849/IMG_1776-thumb.jpg" border="0" vspace="5" hspace="5" alt="Click for larger image"></a>
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    <caption class="small" align="bottom"> <font size="1">Chris from Niner bikes (2nd from left)</font> <br></caption><tr><td>
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    <b>Overview:</b>
    29-inch bikes have been around a few years now and are clearly gaining momentum. Manufacturer support and the fanaticism 29er enthusiasts have fueled the 29er fever this year. Having never tried one before, I've heard advantages of: better fit for larger riders, smoother ride and it goes over obstacles better. I've also heard of disadvantages such as tougher fit for smaller riders, slower acceleration and handling and limited choices on components.

    <b>Disclaimer: </b>
    Niner bikes is an advertiser of the 29er forum with our company, mtbr.com. I do not allow our advertiser relationships to affect any positive or negative comments I have about a product. Also, I rode the bike for only two hours. A more in-depth review is pending.

    <p><b>My background:</b>
    I am 5'8", 140 lbs. I ride a Turner 5-spot and a couple of steel singlespeed bikes. I mainly ride cross-country and occasionally race and try to do an 24-hour team race every year. I prefer steel hardtail bikes since aluminum hardtails I've tried are too harsh for my aging body. I've been curious about 29-inch bikes but have been concerned about fit issues for my small stature and I've never had the opportunity to test-ride one.

    <b>Testing Grounds:</b>
    The test ride was a 12-mile loop at the Sea Otter cross-country race course. This course features rolling hills, steep and gradual climbs, twisty singletrack, sandy spots. Another notable feature of the course are the famous Sea Otter stutter bumps. Over the years, small bumps and holes have developed on the singletrack and have hardened.
    <p> Through the last few years, I've ridden this course dozens of times. I've ridden it both for the Sea Otter race and for the 24 hours of Adrenalin series. I've used full-suspension bikes, geared hardtails and singlespeed bikes. Suspension is nice here but then you really feel it on the steep and short Hurl Hill and the long Grind home.

    <b>Bike Setup:</b>
    The bike I tested belonged to Chris Sugai, co-founder of Niner Bikes. Chris started the company along with Steve Domahidy. He happened to be my size so minimal adjustment was necessary. My old concerns that I was too short to fit a 29-inch bike were quickly put to rest when I hopped on the bike. I didn't feel high off the ground and I had plenty of top tube clearance.

    Some notable components on the bike were:

    White Brothers Big Wheel 1.0 100mm fork with 20mm thru-axle - Chris said this was a smooth fork with a nice lockout feature. He chose the 20mm axle to provide a stiff and accurate steering front end. He says fork flex can be an issue with 29-inch forks because of the longer fork legs.

    Syntace Adjustable bar stem combo - This is a wide, straight handlebar attached to a stem that can pivot around to provide some height and length adjustability. Chris was trying it out and used the lower position to 'level' the bars with the seat.

    Kenda Klaw 29er tires - These tires were big and meaty. These tires featured big knobs specially on the sides.

    <b>Performance and Observations:</b>
    This bike weighs in at about 22 lbs. Wow! However, it is made of scandium. That had me concerned since all aluminum bikes and the one scandium bike I rode before were a bit harsher than the steel bikes that I'm now used to.

    The bike fit great and it felt right. I didn't feel high off the ground. My position seemed perfectly normal and no different that what I was used to. Just after five minutes of putting around I felt like I've been riding this bike for months.

    On the first long downhill, I quickly saw this bike's strength. It would smooth out the stutter bumps and trail ruts. Descending at Sea Otter was never so easy. The front fork was definitely plush. I was really impressed with the rear end though as if felt so smooth. Chris from Ninerbikes says that scandium is not as harsh as aluminum. I think the 29-inch rear wheel was really helping smooth out the ride on this bike.

    The Avid Juicy Sevens on this bike and the Kenda tires performed flawlessly. The brakes were powerful and easy to modulate and the tires were extemely predictable. They were confidence-inspiring as it felt like I didn't come close to reaching their limits.

    On the twisty singletrack, the bike steered quickly and was very easy to control. The bike cornered well through the sandy singletrack and held its line very well. It seemed like it maintained momentum nicely as it muffled the stutter bumps and rolled right though the ruts along the way.

    Finally on climbs, the bike performed perfectly again. It seemed really easy to pedal and felt fast. Traction was great at Hurl Hill and on the loose gravel at the end of the Grind.

    The bike just felt right on this trail. At the end of the ride, I tried to recall if there I had any problems with slow acceleration or slow handling on the singletrack but those flaws really were not evident on this ride. So I really feel a little bit guilty having nothing bad to say about this bike at the moment. But in a few weeks, I will have this bike for an extended review. I will test it in many trails in Norcal to expose some of its weaknesses and discover some more of its strengths. For now though, I'm craving that nice fast and smooth ride.

    <b>Strengths:</b>
    - smooth ride over stutter bumps
    - fast climber on steep and gradual terrain
    - good traction on gravel climbs
    - stable and easy to control in sand, ruts and obstacles

    <b>Weaknesses: </b>
    - none yet. extended review coming this summer

    <b>Summary:</b>
    The ride was perfect! In one lap at Sea Otter I was able to understand the many benefits of 29-inch bikes. The biggest bonus for me was how smooth the ride was over stutter bumps both on front and the rear end. The bike seemed faster too and really easy to pedal on the gradual climbs, specially the 3 mile grind home. I will need more time with this bike on varying terrain to expose its weaknesses. But for now, I will look forward to my extended test of this bike. I will also go out on the limb and say that this bike is the ideal bike for the Sea Otter course. It's smoothness over rough terrain, stability in sand and climbing ability gives it an unfair advantage.

    The frame retails for $749 and is available for order now at their website. It is available as singlespeed only. First delivery is scheduled for June 15.

    <b>Frame Specs:</b><br>
    - Price: $749 frame only or $1549 with Rockshox Reba fork, American Classic Wheels and Avid Juicy 7 brakes
    - 3.3 lb. Niner SingleSpeedSpecific, disc only frame with custom drawn and butted Easton™ Scandium GX2 tubing *weight is for medium frame with EBB
    - Super light 110 gram Eccentric Bottom Bracket with Titanium set screws
    - Niner specific geometry
    - Custom Single speed only drop outs
    - Stainless Steel Head Badge
    - Internally butted head tube and EBB shell
    - S-Bend Seat Stays and Chain Stays for add heel clearance and mud clearance. Frame will accept 2.3” tire
    - Requires a 31.6mm post, 400mm length recommended

    <b>Related Links:</b><br>
    http://www.ninerbikes.com

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  2. #2
    fc
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    please comment and help me proofread before I publish site-wide.

    francois

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    please comment and help me proofread before I publish site-wide.
    Wrong form of the word 'heel' in heel clearance.

    Something wrong with this sentence: 'The felt very stable through the sandy singletrack.'

    Technically this sentence could use a comma or two around 'however', or be reworded: 'I do not allow our advertiser relationships however affect any positive or negative comments I have about a product.'

    I was going to say a carriage return after 'Disclaimer:', but a single space would work too

    'I will test it in many trails of Norcal' - on many trails in Norcal ?

    ----------------------------------------------------

    And not an edit but a comment, the 29er faithful will have noticed since we've had the conversation here, but I wonder if those with no exposure will note that 'heard... disadvantages are...slower...handling' in the Overview, became 'stable and easy to control in sand, ruts and obstacles' in Strengths.
    Last edited by jpre; 04-21-2005 at 06:28 PM.

  4. #4
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    Reads well until you repeat yourself at the end of the p&o and the summary. Glad you had some fun.
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigwheel
    Reads well until you repeat yourself at the end of the p&o and the summary.
    Disagree. The P&O was trying to cover how it felt in different kinds of terrain, and just because it feels similar (good) in more than one kind of terrain doesn't mean the text was repeating.

    ---edit: Bigwheel, I see that stutter bumps and ruts are referred to very similarly in both the dh and single track descriptions. Some editing attention could potentially be paid there. It didn't strike me negatively on my reading through.---

    However, a summary is supposed to repeat the highlights of the above text.

    I've got a negative for you vs a fs bike. I agree the big wheels are amazing in the stutter bumps, really changes their nature. But on the first downhill singletrack descent, I wouldn't really call those stutter bumps, more like potholes. I would think you could point a fs bike down that hill and just ride it out with no brakes more easily than a hardtail, yes?
    Last edited by jpre; 04-21-2005 at 06:13 PM.

  6. #6
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    "Performance and Observation:
    I will test it in many trails of Norcal to expose some of it's weaknesses.


    Weaknesses:
    - none yet. extended review coming this summer

    Summary:
    I will need more time with this bike on varying terrain to expose it's weaknesses."

    Although he may find a weak point or two in his trials, it seems like stating it at least one less time would maybe be enough. It just read wrong to me.

    Also, "I will test it in (on) many trails"
    A bike by any other name is still a bike.

  7. #7
    The Duuude, man...
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    Best damn review I've ever read. Period.

    Quote Originally Posted by francois
    I've heard advantages of: better fit for larger riders, smoother ride and it goes over obstacles better. Disadvantages are tougher fit for smaller riders, slower acceleration and handling and limited choices on components.
    Only thing I took issue with was the above passage. You talk about what you've heard - which is good, you call out the "rumors"...but the wording, and the PERIOD after the "advantages" section, followed the sentence beginning "Disadvantages" --- reads like you're talking about the rumored advantages, but then you flatly STATE what the straight up disadvantages are (I think you mean to say those are "what you've heard" the disadvantages are).

    I think what you mean to say above is this:

    I've heard advantages of: better fit for larger riders, smoother ride and it goes over obstacles better, while I've also heard the disadvantages are tougher fit for smaller riders, slower acceleration and handling and limited choices on components.


    Nit picking? Maybe. But again, damn good review.

    Please teach me how to put the little pictures off to the side like that....html in Frontpage, then copy/paste? How can I create a clickable small image if I only have my regular size image in VillagePhoto or the like?
    FS: Everything

  8. #8
    fc
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    All edits to this point DONE! All good feedback.

    fc

  9. #9
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    Totally made me want that bike, oh that's right, I forgot, I don't care for single speed bikes.

  10. #10
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    The front fork was definitely plush. I was really impressed with the rear end though as if felt so smooth.
    if=it?
    Only thing I found.

  11. #11
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    Put a speedhub on it ...

    Quote Originally Posted by artnshel
    Totally made me want that bike, oh that's right, I forgot, I don't care for single speed bikes.
    Looks like a perfect frame for a Speedhub with the eccentric bottom bracket.

  12. #12
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    How about adding Vulture, Walt, Wily, On-One, yadda, and yadda to your online reviews. They buy adds too. (some of them)

    -M
    Mike Henderson, Dirty Hippy Mountain Biker and part owner of Jet Lites.

  13. #13
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    Excellent review!

    Only typo would be in the Summary section. You need to use "Its" rather than "It's" in the sentence, "It's smoothness over rough terrain ..."
    "People like GloyBoy are deaf. They are partisan, intellectually lazy & usually very angry." -Jaybo

  14. #14
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    [/QUOTE]
    It's smoothness over rough terrain, stability in sand and climbing ability gives it an unfair advantage.

    [/QUOTE]

    While we are on the subject of promoting a truely superior wheel size, can you remove the word "unfair". That's like people with second or third hand experience complaining about toe overlap and tall cockpits. Nothing unfair about a technology that's just waiting to be bought by the masses...once MBA gets done pushing 7" travel 32 pound trail bikes on everyone.

  15. #15
    fc
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    It's smoothness over rough terrain, stability in sand and climbing ability gives it an unfair advantage.

    [/QUOTE]

    While we are on the subject of promoting a truely superior wheel size, can you remove the word "unfair". That's like people with second or third hand experience complaining about toe overlap and tall cockpits. Nothing unfair about a technology that's just waiting to be bought by the masses...once MBA gets done pushing 7" travel 32 pound trail bikes on everyone.[/QUOTE]



    Interesting. I'll think of another way of saying it. It's kind of an over-the-top expression I picked as a form of extreme praise for new technology. I got it from the video 'Audi - the unfair advantage'. Audi joined the American touring car series and the rally car championships in the 80s with turbos and unproven 4WD technology. Let's just say school was in session that year... taught by Audi.

    fc

  16. #16
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    All I can say is that the more I see it the more I keep thinking I shoulda talked more seriously to Chris about pricing/sizing and a longer test ride. My little exploration ride around the venue was too short.
    Very nice bike.
    I need an unexpected bonus for a new toy.
    Don't harsh my mello

  17. #17
    ewl
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    What size frame were you testing?

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    Interesting. I'll think of another way of saying it. It's kind of an over-the-top expression I picked as a form of extreme praise for new technology. I got it from the video 'Audi - the unfair advantage'. Audi joined the American touring car series and the rally car championships in the 80s with turbos and unproven 4WD technology. Let's just say school was in session that year... taught by Audi.

    fc
    I was more or less worried about the fact that some races supposedly don't allow or recognize the wheelsize due to "unfair advantage"...even though 29"ers are allowed by UCI and NORBA. I agree with keeping some kind of superlative expression, but I'd pick one not already used by folks who attempting to stunt the growth of the larger wheel size.

  19. #19
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    It was a medium so too small for me.
    Don't harsh my mello

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    What was the gearing?

    For those that rode the course on a SS, it would be nice to know what gearing YOU rode it with in the evaluation.

  21. #21
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    Gearing

    Quote Originally Posted by SSlowTwitch
    For those that rode the course on a SS, it would be nice to know what gearing YOU rode it with in the evaluation.
    The bike was geared at 34 - 20.
    .........

    Peace,
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    strength of 29" wheels

    I don't know if this is a legitimate issue but aren't larger wheels not as strong? I didn't see it mentioned, anybody know the answer to this? weren't 26" wheels originally adopted for MTBikes because of superior strength over the 700c standard?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplain
    Weren't 26" wheels originally adopted for MTBikes because of superior strength over the 700c standard?
    Nope, they were originally adopted because big fat balloon tires from 50's type bikes were available in that size and it took off from there. Now that big fat tires are becoming available for 700c rims, they can be just as viable.


    Quote Originally Posted by jplain
    I don't know if this is a legitimate issue but aren't larger wheels not as strong? I didn't see it mentioned, anybody know the answer to this?
    That is a more complex question. With build quality being equal, I bet you could build a super light 26" wheel that was not as strong as a buff 700c wheel. But if the question is that if the weight and build quality is equal, then, yes, the 26" wheel would be a bit stronger, but probably not by much. Of course the 29" products on the market at the moment aren't up to the same strength standards as what are found on DH/Freeride bikes. It's probably not because it couldn't be done, but that no one has (and there'd likely be some serious weight involved)(which I'm sure would be fine by some and definitely not by others).

    As for not seeing it mentioned, from the FAQ sticky:

    Q: Are big wheels weaker?

    Big wheels may be weaker than small wheels, especially if the number of spokes and overall construction is the same. For that reason, one would perhaps want to use 32 spokes instead of 28, 36 spokes instead of 32, and so on. However, big wheels take less hard hits due to their smaller angle of attack to obstacles, reducing the need for more spokes. In reality, many riders seem to use about the same number of spokes on their 29 inch wheels as would have been normal on a 26 inch wheel, and it has not seemed to be an issue.
    Last edited by jpre; 04-25-2005 at 01:31 AM.

  24. #24
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    Other topic. But no, 26" wheels were designed for kids up to 12yo, and only got first line into mtb'ing because in the 70's they came with fat cruiser tires. All 28" tires were skinny and either pinch flatted or washed out.
    Back to Niners now!

  25. #25
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    How strong do you need them ...

    Quote Originally Posted by jplain
    I don't know if this is a legitimate issue but aren't larger wheels not as strong? I didn't see it mentioned, anybody know the answer to this? weren't 26" wheels originally adopted for MTBikes because of superior strength over the 700c standard?
    Well, let me ask you how strong you need your wheel????

    And if your answer is stronger, than there are other things you can do. You can increase the diameter of the hub. You can increased the width and depth of the rim. You can increase the spoke count.

    Look, using the same materials and a larger wheel will produce a wheel that flexes more because the spokes are longer. But if people are so concerned about strength, why not use 26" wheels. Why not 20" wheels?????

    More than likely the #1 reason is because the Mountain Bike is descended from fat tire cruisers. You use what's available. Creating new standards takes time and siginificant amount of public and business buy in.

    The 29er exists for a REASON. The reason is that bigger wheels roll over things better. Bigger wheels have a larger gyroscopic effect and keep the bike upright better.

    If the 29er didn't have advantages, the early adopters would have dropped them like a rock. Their cost is a premium, so there must be value associated.

    Finally, it's 100% feasible to make 29er wheels fit for downhill. The key is using beefier rims, larger hubs and more spokes.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplain
    I don't know if this is a legitimate issue but aren't larger wheels not as strong? I didn't see it mentioned, anybody know the answer to this? weren't 26" wheels originally adopted for MTBikes because of superior strength over the 700c standard?
    Nope, not a legitimate issue.
    I was 250lbs for the last 2 years....I have 32 hole Rhynolites on my 29er SS, and the wheels have barely needed truing in that time period. I'd say that some pretty solid wheels.

    Can you imagine how long that same wheelset would last under someone who weighed 165?

  27. #27
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    I'm #160 and have been using the same wheels since I built my bike up in 2000. They have ridden all over Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Utah...i've trued the rear once I think.

    Wheel strength has not been an issue at all, at least for me. My old roommate built up a front wheel using a 36 hole DT tandem wheel (super high flanges) and a T520 rim and even he said it was overkill. If you are a big guy (like Padre) this might be worth checking out for peace of mind...but I think it's overkill.

    Brett
    Front Range Forum Moderator

  28. #28
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    Well, sorry for not getting this in before the published version, but the sentence "Manufacturer support and the fanaticism 29er enthusiasts have fueled the 29er fever this year" should read either 'the fanatacism of 29er enthusiasts' or 'the fanatical 29er enthusiasts'.

    Personally, I prefer the word "evangelists"

    Otherwise, nice review, though I agree with Wolfy about trying to get Brad to line you up a Wily for a test ride - if only for the sake of fairness. How bout it Brad?

    Sam

  29. #29
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    I see a lot of people hyped up on the review and the bike, but no one mentioning buying one. Am I the only person on "the list"?

    After having my KM powder coated and putting the rigid fork back on, I can't say I love it anymore. I need something new, light, flashy, and racey. The One9 might just be what I need.

    Anyone?

  30. #30
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    I'll gladly do the Wily tst. I can send Brad my measurements, no problem. :-D

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewdog
    I see a lot of people hyped up on the review and the bike, but no one mentioning buying one. Am I the only person on "the list"?
    First, I'm not really in buying mode. Second, I've never been a singlespeeder.

    However, I've just begun my first experiences with ss. I bought a little wheel rigid Kona ss for $250 or so a while back and have been enjoying the ss concept on the first several rides. One of the things I'm digging about the situation is how cheap the bike was. I don't find it to handle like a 29er, but it's fun trying to make it up hills and such, like ss'ers well know.

    At this point I think I'd really like the Niner and am thinking about it (and very curious about the rigid fork they intend to release), but don't think I could commit the kind of $ it would take to get one at the moment, either mentally or realistically. I'm pretty sure I like 29" wheels better for everything offroad except for N* (and Pacifica) (I'm not particularly skilled), but ssing for me, being so new to it, is more about the struggle of the newness of the concept, rather than being further along and knowing I actually want a blinglespeed.

    Edit to say ---->
    I think the answer to this question would be more important on the ss board. I would think the release of a cool ss 29er isn't going to turn most 29er gearies away from their typical rides.
    Last edited by jpre; 04-26-2005 at 04:07 PM.

  32. #32
    mtbr member
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    I'm in.

    Quote Originally Posted by brewdog
    I see a lot of people hyped up on the review and the bike, but no one mentioning buying one. Am I the only person on "the list"? Anyone?
    I'm on the list. Getting the wheels as well.

  33. #33
    ogarajef@luther.edu
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    Small Godzilla Green for me

    I am also on the list, getting the whole package. At those prices you can sell what you don't want and make some extra cash, to offset the price of a pair of Magura Marta SL's.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 1strongone1; 04-26-2005 at 07:33 PM.
    "RIDE IT LIKE YOU HATE IT"

  34. #34
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    XL Tang & Reba for me. I'd go for the wheels, but I'm not confident with that close-flange theory. It's a combo that's hard to beat $975.

  35. #35
    Pedal Damnit
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    I'm on it.

    Got the full kit in tang. Gonna be my first 29er and my first SS. Killing two birds with one stone, I guess. I for one can't wait, the mail order parts should be arriving this week. The frame should arrive in time for a belated B-day gift.
    Lost in Texaslation

  36. #36
    mtbr member
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    American Classic Wheel Set

    "I'd go for the wheels, but I'm not confident with that close-flange theory"

    Thanks to those who have pre-orders.

    I have fielded a number of questions about the wheel flange issue and would like to address it here as well. I agree the narrow spacing on the 9 speed hubs does look suspect, BUT the hubs (wheelset) we are offering have the Single Speed Hubs. If you look at our link on our website http://www.blockergroup.com/niner/hub.html
    you will see that the flange spacing (33.45/33.36) is quite generous and similar to King (32.0/34.2) and DT Swiss (32.5/34.3) single speed hubs. Although I am no wheel builder, this should make for a much stronger wheel.


    Chris
    Niner Bikes
    .........

    Peace,
    Niner Bikes

    Follow all things Niner Bikes on Facebook!www.ninerbikes.com

  37. #37
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    I'm New and I'M IN & on the LIST

    Quote Originally Posted by brewdog
    I see a lot of people hyped up on the review and the bike, but no one mentioning buying one. Am I the only person on "the list"?

    After having my KM powder coated and putting the rigid fork back on, I can't say I love it anymore. I need something new, light, flashy, and racey. The One9 might just be what I need.

    Anyone?
    This is my first post, though I have read others for a while.

    I just put down my deposit on a large Niner, in orange.

    I had a Cannondale 1FG, just sold it to start saving for the Niner. Going with the complete set up; fork, brakes, wheels. May sell the wheels and build up something with Chris Kings ISO if I can save enough. I loved the 1FG but prefer the 29 inch wheels obviously. Thought hard about a GF Rig, but they are rare at the shops in Portland OR. Nothing in my size until who-knows-when

    This is my second 29'er, I have a Curtlo that is stripped and getting repainted soon. LOVE that bike. It was the bike that made me realize that rear suspension was for p...ies. I still can't beleive the stuff I can go down on that bike.

    While that bike is down I am suffering on my Curtlo Softail which is still pretty sweet--just it has 26 inchers.

    I am hoping that this bike will ride a little softer than the 1FG, I had to put fatties on it and a carbon post to take the edge off the lovely aluminum.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
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    Niner Update and Pictures

    First of all, we would like to thank everybody for the incredible response we've had to the launch of Niner. It's been overwhelmingly positive and I know many of you are waiting with baited breath for your frames. Everybody who's pre-ordered with us, thank you. Thank
    you for trusting a new company, thank you for being excited about a new frame, and thank you for your understanding about the recent delay.

    Small and Medium frames have been produced and are waiting for the Large and Extra Large frames to be finished. Unfortunatly, for cost reasons, it doesn't make sense for us to ship the small and medium frames without the large and extra large frames. We have air shipped a couple of the production frames over for photo shoots and will be giving these out to various magazines for testing. (By the way this Hot Tamale frame is going to Francis for a long term test.)

    All sizes of frames will be in on July 20. For those of you still interested in pre-ordering, we will extend our current pricing through that date, but the free shipping will not be offfered. However we will extend the offer for a free t-shirt and hat for anybody interested in purchasing a frame before July 20th.

    Prices on the parts packages will go up after July 20th.

    Thank you again for your support.

    Steve Domahidy
    Niner Bikes
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    Niner Bikes

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  39. #39
    Motobecane Pilot
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    New question here.

    Looks veery noice! Love the depth of that red.
    Is there any chance that one could get a paint code to have a matching fork built up from say, Walt or Wily. Much more convienient than sending the frame to the powder coater. Also, will the frame come with a seat collar?
    Thanks
    john

  40. #40
    Pedal Damnit
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    Nope

    Quote Originally Posted by merk
    Looks veery noice! Love the depth of that red.
    Is there any chance that one could get a paint code to have a matching fork built up from say, Walt or Wily. Much more convienient than sending the frame to the powder coater. Also, will the frame come with a seat collar?
    Thanks
    john
    I asked the same thing. here's their response.

    You need a 35mm seat clamp. I don't know in inches what that works out to
    be. We reccomend the DK brand if you can find it.

    Chris
    Niner Bikes
    Lost in Texaslation

  41. #41
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    Very Nice Indeed

    I am waiting for an XL in Tang with Reba & Wheels. Again, it will be a lot of fun to see the builds folks decide on with the new frames.

    July 20th can't get here soon enough

    Russ
    There are three kinds of people: those of us that are good at math and those that are not.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
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    Paint Codes

    We are trying to get paint codes so you can build a matching fork. We will take the frames to some local painters to see what they can do about matching.

    Chris
    Niner Bikes
    .........

    Peace,
    Niner Bikes

    Follow all things Niner Bikes on Facebook!www.ninerbikes.com

  43. #43
    Reviewer/Tester
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    How about international orders? Could you send one 'down under' to Australia for me?

    What sort of $$'s for shipping?

    Full kit, small frame ?

    The Niner could prove to be the key to my search for the SS passion I have lost.

    I wonder how my On One Mary bars would look on a "Tang" frame?


    R.
    It is inevitable ...

  44. #44
    Waiting to exhale.
    Reputation: SMOKEY's Avatar
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    for the big uns

    Just to clear something up right quick...
    The entire frame is made of scandium right? Not just the stays?
    Is there any potential problems for riders over 200lbs as far as ride quality, BB flex and frame longevity? Thanks dudes.
    Quite possibly the slowest single speeder on earth.
    Now skating 'cause its cheaper.

  45. #45
    17.5" pistons of love
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    Then there was a bridge...

    Anyone notice the addition of the chainstay bridge in the recent pics?

    I have to admit not seeing a chainstay OR a seatstay bridge(the short piece of tubing that links the stays together right behind the bb and tt/st junction on most frames) on the Niner site, that it scared me a little.

    But not enough to keep me from ordering one.

    I realise frame builders sometimes toss the bridge to gain tire breathing room and to be able to shorten the chainstays a little. I've been told the importance of this seemingly worthless little tube is highly under-rated, also that the chainstay bridge is the more needed of the two.

    Very happy to see it.

  46. #46
    Recovering Weight Weenie
    Reputation: Padre's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMOKEY
    Just to clear something up right quick...
    The entire frame is made of scandium right? Not just the stays?
    Is there any potential problems for riders over 200lbs as far as ride quality, BB flex and frame longevity? Thanks dudes.
    Smokey....I personally have ridden a medium for a short time up an extremely steep grade.
    I could sense no flex AT ALL in the frame.

    The L and XL sizes use larger/stronger tubing also. I'd be very confident in them.

  47. #47
    Waiting to exhale.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    Smokey....I personally have ridden a medium for a short time up an extremely steep grade.
    I could sense no flex AT ALL in the frame.

    The L and XL sizes use larger/stronger tubing also. I'd be very confident in them.
    Thanks dude!
    Quite possibly the slowest single speeder on earth.
    Now skating 'cause its cheaper.

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