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  1. #1
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    Jet RDO cable routing -- shift kit failure...

    This weekend I had an interesting mechanical breakdown in a 100km marathon race on my Jet 9 RDO. The plastic ferrule thingee that sticks in to the RDO chainstay at the derailleur appears to have either broken and fallen off or been sucked into the chainstay. Either way the housing has been pulled into the chainstay and is no longer anchored for tension... With next to no tension on the cable I was only able to access the first four cogs on my cassette. Not ideal on the big climbs.

    Anyone had this happens?

    I'm considering running a continuos housing from the bottom bracket to the r. der. Zip tied to the outside of the chainstay. Anyone doing this? I haven't looked at it too closely to see if this is feasible.

    Also, I have not really ridden the bike much with the original routing system before the shift kit "upgrade." How bad is the ghost shifting? Going back to this is an option.

    I don't know how much I trust the shift kit. I have a three day race coming up and I wan't the bike to be as reliable as possible.

    So far I have to say that the cable routing on this bike has been nothing but an eye-pleasing headache.

  2. #2
    COMBO - President
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    I would simply get another shift kit. My RDO was terrible without it but works great.
    Hope to meet you on the trails!

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  3. #3
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    Yeah I was okay with the shift kit once I accepted the increased cable drag... it's just that it pretty much completely failed in the middle of a big race last weekend and I don't want a repeat scenario. Hopefully this was a one-off?

  4. #4
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    This weekend a friends RDO with shift kit was continuously ghost shifting when hitting bumps then by the last ride it would not maintain a gear.

    Mine shifted ok, with the standard through the chainstay routing but I'm sure it is eating a hole in my swingarm from the cable moving with the suspension.

    Seems like a pretty horrible design, and shouldn't have to re-route the cables outside the chainstay on a nearly $3k frame.

  5. #5
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    I have alway run continuous housing from the cable chuck to the rear derailleur. I'm pretty sure this was the original intention as the shift kit wasn't out when I got my RDO. Be sure to get the rubber grommets needed for the cable routing into the chain stay, the one near the bottom bracket is essential otherwise the cable housing will wear on the carbon.

  6. #6
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    Installed another shift kit last night. What a nightmare. My girlfriend came by while I was doing so and was amazed to see that I had to remove my handlebars, fork, crankset, wheels and rear shock to change a derailleur cable... "Race Day Optimized"??? Hardly. Wouldn't be so bad if it was the once-a-season job I'd hoped it would be but it's been anything but. I just replaced everything two weeks ago.

    As I mentioned, the shift kit plastic ferrule at the rear derailleur had somehow slipped into my chainstay, completely screwing up my shifting in the middle of a big race. Yesterday I pulled everything apart and replaced all housing, cables and installed another shift kit. The messed up ferrule is now lost somewhere in my chainstay as it proved impossible to remove. I also noticed that many of the plastic ferrules -- including the other end of the shift kit were bent and/or cracked. I used Dura Ace housing/metal ferrules this time. We'll see. Hopefully the plastic shift kit bits hold up this time. My confidence is low. I'll keep an eye on it but I think I'll end up running full-length housing eventually.

    A buddy of mine is considering this bike. He's excited about the new pricing and he wants my opinion. At this point I'm having a hard time recommending it. If he had asked last night while I was dealing with this cable routing I would have no doubt told him to get a Specialized or something...

  7. #7
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    I installed a shift kit for a friend a week ago. I think it was super easy, you just need to have an internal routing "toolset". Its not really tools per say but methods that come in handy on internal frames. I got mine from working in a tri shop for a few years. Trust me guys, this frame is super easy compared to tri frames. What I did was thread an old piece of housing ovet he cable before removing it from the frame. That way when you get ready to put in the new cable all you need to do is run the cable through the old housing. I was able to install the kit in less than 30 minutes and I didnt need to remove the cranks, fork, handlebars, or anything else. I did undo the upper shock bolt to get more access to the bb though. Also, I think the shifting was way better with the kit installed. I know i sound a bit like a billboard but I hate to see people struggling on here when its really not hard once you have the method down.
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  8. #8
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    Oh I had the "tool kit" and followed the usual procedures. It wasn't exactly difficult -- more annoying -- but it was way more work than a cable/housing change should be. It's a mountain bike. This is standard stuff. Especially on a "race" bike. Cable change in the middle of a stage race? Yeah... My Cervelo time trial rig is much easier to work on and rarely needs housing replacement.

    I'm actually getting pretty good at it now... I find the fork removal a hassle but nowhere near as frustrating as trying to line up a piece of housing through the downtube to the head badge with the fork in the way. If the routing actually worked well I wouldn't mind doing all this. But... my experience has been that it's a lot of work, the shifting still kind of sucks and now the shifting "fix" broke.

  9. #9
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    If you use thinner more flexible cable housing it should help with the cracked/bent ferrel issues. I've found the Jagwire housing is working the best so far.

    I've been having to recable about every 30-60 days (except for when I broke my collarbone last fall). So, all in all I've recabled about eight times since July 2011. I agree that it is quite high maintenance... but as far as riding goes when everything is right it is a great race bike.

    I will have to figure out what to do for the Breck Epic next year though as I won't want to have to spend the time and effort to recable should an issue crop up. I'll have my hardtail for a backup, but if I have to resort to using it the discomfort level will likely exceed the fun level of six days of hard racing.

  10. #10
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    For a race like the Epic, I'd just do a temporary full length housing and zip tie/tape it to the frame. It won't win a beauty contest, but it won't screw up, either.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138 View Post
    For a race like the Epic, I'd just do a temporary full length housing and zip tie/tape it to the frame. It won't win a beauty contest, but it won't screw up, either.
    Ah yeah... good idea. It may end up that way before then!

  12. #12
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    I currently have a Jet 9 and have really been thinking of upgrading to the Jet RDO, but you guys are scaring me. I don't want to re-cable my bike every other month. If you run a full length cable won't this be good for 6 months or so???? Right now I probably install new housing/cables every 8 months or so. I ride about 5 to 6 hours a week on the MTB. I really don't have any experience or knowledge regarding the Jet RDO other than online gawking. Am I missing something?

  13. #13
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    I have had my Jet9 RDO ( Tang ) for just over a year now & built it up with black cables because the orange one's i ordered had not turned up, A year on & I haven't got around to fitting the orange cables yet as there has been no reason to change them.

    I haven't felt the need yet to even go to the new shift kit.

    So they can be set up with no problems & last.
    I have a 6 Berth Motorhome that I rent out . It is based in Tauranga, New Zealand

  14. #14
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    Did you run full length housings as some people have mentioned?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by epiphreddy View Post
    Did you run full length housings as some people have mentioned?
    I have housing from the shifter to the head tube, then housing from the Bottom bracket through the chain stay & upto the rear derailieur, The trick is in the length between the BB & chain stay & using an end cap that won't let the cable kink at that point.

    I have built up 4 RDO's & not had a problem with any of them.

    I have not done it, but have thought that putting about a 2 inch long bit of teflon hose over the outside of the outer cable at the bottom end will mke the cable bend in a more uniform way as well if one thought they needed it.
    I have a 6 Berth Motorhome that I rent out . It is based in Tauranga, New Zealand

  16. #16
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    It's not a deal breaker but it really is a bad design. It is silly complicated and increases drag just for aesthetics. Other manufacturers do it better and I would be surprised if Niner doesn't make improvements with future generations.

    I was okay with a complicated cable change every few months but the recent issue I had with the shift kit ferrules was a real problem. I hope it was a one-off. If it happens again I will run a full length of housing from the bb to the r.der.

    So I don't think you should avoid the bike because of the routing as the issues are manageable and not universal to all owners. It just sucks to have to deal with issues at all with something that should/could be so simple.

  17. #17
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    My Jet 9 RDO doesn't shift as snappy as my Jet 9 alloy did. The internal cable routing is another solution looking for a problem. I hate it!!! It is a pain to install and I can't find a reason for it except it looks cleaner. BB30 is in the same boat.

  18. #18
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    Guess I am lucky, no problems with RDO and BB30 or the shifting. Using SRAM X0 components.

    I don't use the shift kit, using full housing through the chain stay.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dry Side View Post
    Guess I am lucky, no problems with RDO and BB30 or the shifting. Using SRAM X0 components.

    I don't use the shift kit, using full housing through the chain stay.
    Does the housing slide right through the chainstay from end to end without modification?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by epiphreddy View Post
    Does the housing slide right through the chainstay from end to end without modification?
    It does but shifting is not always as precise as with the shift kit because the full housing can migrate towards the derailleur end, leaving a loop at the BB that is too short to handle bottom-out. We have also seen instances of very muddy cable housing damaging the opening of the housing hole near the BB. The shift kit was developed to protect against both of these potential troubles and is the only recommended/approved routing so definitely take advantage of it to protect your frame from damage.

    Give us a call at 877-NINERXC if you have questions about getting your shifting set up!
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  21. #21
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    Love Niner stuff, and my RIP is a great bike, but to hear how Niner continues to have issue with something as simple as cable routing and their EBBs really makes me scratch my head.

    When I look at and work on my Stumpy FSR, with it's full length, under the downtube cable routing, I cannot see a reason to do it any other way. Super neat, easy to work on, and the housing protects the frame just a bit from rocks.

    I'd like to get an RDO, but as someone who loves to wrench, quirky issues on a frame costing this much is hard to take.

    Clean this up Niner, please.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138 View Post
    For a race like the Epic, I'd just do a temporary full length housing and zip tie/tape it to the frame. It won't win a beauty contest, but it won't screw up, either.
    Just curious if anyone has tried this, and how they navigated to the RD. After numerous recabling attempts, both with and without the shifting "fix" kit, I am convinced the RDO will never shift well, or will ghost shift, on trails that stress the rear suspension. Huge design flaw.

    Needs routing similar to RIP 9, but I am unsure how to do this other than complete ghetto.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by eleventhcog View Post
    Just curious if anyone has tried this, and how they navigated to the RD. After numerous recabling attempts, both with and without the shifting "fix" kit, I am convinced the RDO will never shift well, or will ghost shift, on trails that stress the rear suspension. Huge design flaw.

    Needs routing similar to RIP 9, but I am unsure how to do this other than complete ghetto.
    You can get the cabling right. Mine shifts great running the cable housing the original way through the chainstay. The trick is once it's right, the next time it needs cabling is to do it exactly the same. Right now it seems the best setup for me uses Jagwire housing and nylon ferrels. So far everything is holding up quite well, better than before.

  24. #24
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    My Jet 9 RDO tore three of my toes off before I realized the damage had been done. This was done on one ride.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    My Jet 9 RDO tore three of my toes off before I realized the damage had been done. This was done on one ride.
    Jaybo,
    You are in a mischievous mood today!
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    My Jet 9 RDO tore three of my toes off before I realized the damage had been done. This was done on one ride.
    So that now leaves you with 12 ???
    I have a 6 Berth Motorhome that I rent out . It is based in Tauranga, New Zealand

  27. #27
    Daniel the Dog
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    I have 12 fingers Get ir right!

  28. #28
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    Posted this in "Woes" thread also, wasn't sure which thread is better - sorry for duplication: Someone asked this earlier but didn't see an answer. Is the "kit" just a 110mm piece of housing and 2 more of the angled ferrules that come with the frame, or are the kit ferrules "special" to better stay in place in the chainstay where the housing enters near the BB and exits near the RD?

  29. #29
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    The shift kit ferrules are different. They are more like cable stops as they allow you to run an exposed cable through the chainstay. They have a sort of "head" on them that fits somewhat tightly in the two holes in the chainstay.

    I'm currently running continuous housing on the outside of the chainstay from the BB to the r. der. and it's probably the best-feeling shifting I've had on this bike yet. The shift kit ferrules have failed me twice now so until version two is released I'll stick with the external run of housing.

  30. #30
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    So how do you re-cable this bike using the recommended shift kit? I need to put new housing and a cable for the rear derailleur. My rear derailleur cable is frayed and I need to replace it and I figured while I was at it I would change the color of my housing.

    I have some liner. Do you remove the rear most derailleur housing between the derailleur and chainstay and then push the liner over the cable through the chainstay until it comes out next to the BB and then cut the cable, remove the short piece of housing between the chainstay and BB, slide the liner over the cable going from the BB to the headtube? So you will need two liners? One through the chainstay and one from the BB through the headtube? I have not done this yet and will need to do it soon. The Niner video shows installation only and unless you have a new bike with housing installed it is of no use.

  31. #31
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    Its pretty easy to recable, just make sure that you always have either a cable or housing in the frame. IE, before removing the cable from the chainstay make sure you use the cable as a guide to put the housing in. When you go to put new cables back in the frame you can just push it through the housing and its super easy
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  32. #32
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    internal cable routing is a pain and always was.
    Last edited by davthedude; 10-01-2012 at 04:29 PM.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeopleForScience View Post
    Its pretty easy to recable, just make sure that you always have either a cable or housing in the frame. IE, before removing the cable from the chainstay make sure you use the cable as a guide to put the housing in. When you go to put new cables back in the frame you can just push it through the housing and its super easy
    So as long as you have a cable or housing in the frame there is no need to remove the crank or fork I take it?

  34. #34
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    I just cabled my Jet 9 RDO (not a re-cable). As far as there is housing or liner pushed over the existing cable so you have a guide for new cables for the internal routing, there is no need to remove the cranks or fork. However, I could not install the "shift kit" piece of cable housing with the chainrings in place, so I removed the drive-side crank arm and chainrings and it was much easier to get under the bottom bracket. I believe you do have to remove the "shift kit" piece of housing under the bottom bracket to recable to the rear derailleur.

  35. #35
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    Would removing the shock bolt allowed better access to the shift kit piece?

  36. #36
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    Would removing the shock bolt allowed better access to the shift kit piece?
    Mandatory - at least it was for me. Be careful when you push the rear triangle down, the upper rocker arm will knock into your seat tube. Not noticing this right away, I now have a nice little paint scuff on my seat tube which aggravates me tremendously. Do it softly or, if I had it to do over again, I would put a thin rag around my seat tube and guide the upper rocker arm to sit on the rag as padding for the seat tube. I still had to remove the chainrings, and then it was do-able. As a disclaimer, I did the shift kit with jagwire and 110mm and it ghost shifted. I re-did it with shimano 4mm (much stiffer) and 120mm and now it appears to be remedied based on neighborhood curb hopping outing. Weather has delayed a trail test.

  37. #37
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    Good comments. Let us know how it works under real trail riding experience.
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  38. #38
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    The shift kit comes with "special" ferrules doesn't it? If I understand it correctly at the headtube you push a little of the housing into the headtube? i.e. There is no cable stop? Same at the rear of the bike where there are two of these ferrules..........the housing goes into the frame an inch or so with no cable/housing stop? Is this correct?

  39. #39
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    Yes re: "special" ferrules. I believe there are 2 different versions of the headbadge, one without cable housing stops, so you use the special shaped ferrules which insert into the headbadge and serve as both ferrule and housing stop, and one with cable stops built-in which I presume means use std ferrules. Mine is the version that requires the shaped ferrules so no personal experience with the other kind. Take a look at page 37 of the Sept. 2012 Niner Encyclopedia which shows both versions. On the chainstay, the special ferrules are the cable housing stops.

  40. #40
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    Shame we have to zip tie cable on a high dollar frame

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanB View Post
    The shift kit ferrules are different. They are more like cable stops as they allow you to run an exposed cable through the chainstay. They have a sort of "head" on them that fits somewhat tightly in the two holes in the chainstay.

    I'm currently running continuous housing on the outside of the chainstay from the BB to the r. der. and it's probably the best-feeling shifting I've had on this bike yet. The shift kit ferrules have failed me twice now so until version two is released I'll stick with the external run of housing.

    Plan B, I am curious if this is still working for you. The ghost shifting and constant tweaking of the RD is ruining the ride of my RDO. Agree that the shift kit is not a major improvement, as the real problem here are the tight housing bends in that 110mm section that is constantly moving with the rear suspension.

    Could you post a picture of your fix?, I am curious how you routed the cable to stay clear from chain rings and tires, and not end up tight cable bends or short, fixed sections of housing from BB to chain stay.

  41. #41
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    I finally got a good real trails test ride after installing a "shift kit" with 2 ferrules plus 120mm of 4mm shimano housing from the BB chuck to the rear chainstay. I was careful to do my best not to kink the derailleur cable which may have been a problem with my previous shift kit attempts. The good news is it worked fine, no more ghost shifting. FYI I finally took a look at my friend's Jet 9 RDO on the same ride and saw that he has continuous housing from the BB chuck, through the chainstay, all the way to the rear derailleur. He has never had rear shifting problems with his set-up

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeopleForScience View Post
    Its pretty easy to recable, just make sure that you always have either a cable or housing in the frame. IE, before removing the cable from the chainstay make sure you use the cable as a guide to put the housing in. When you go to put new cables back in the frame you can just push it through the housing and its super easy
    I appreciate the tip and it was definitely helpful but I must say that you must be a superb mechanic/wrench to say this is "super easy". I re-cabled mine about a week ago, and it was a complete pain in the ass. Yes, as long as you have housing over the existing cable you can slide a new cable in, no problem. BUT you have to remove the special ferrules and the cable guide at the bottom bracket before you can push the liner/housing through. To get at it you have to remove the crank and shock bolt and then pivot the rear triangle just to the right angle to get a hex wrence on the cable guide nut. And you have to install the 110mm shift kit piece with the cable installed through it. Of course you have to have all pieces in the correct order. Installing the 110mm shift kit piece is not easy to do without messing up a ferrule or the cable due to the tight bends that must be made in a tight space. I now see where the second person helping suggestion comes in handy. You screw up one part of this process and unknowingly damage a ferrule or the cable and all is lost or worse yet, you discover it later while you are out on the trail or in a race and it comes back to haunt you.

    Now that I have done it once I am sure the next time will be much easier. But to say it is super easy and can be done in less than 30 minutes, I am calling BS.

    My bike shifted like complete garbage for several rides and it was built brand new from a well known respectable bikeshop. I finally decided to take matters into my own hands and as usual give up on a bikeshop getting MY bike to work properly. If you want something done right you have to do it yourself. I used the shift kit specifications but I used Jagwire L3 housing and Jagwire slick cables. Based on this thread I started out using 120mm for the BB to chainstay length and it seemed to be impossible to get it installed. It was too tight. I cut it down eventually to 110mm and it was still a tight fit but I got it to go. Seems to me this distance (as Niner points out) is absolutely critical. It has to be tight enough to stay in place, but not so tight that it messes up the ferrules.

    I am happy to report that my bike shifts perfectly now using the shift kit specifications. It shifts as good as my old Jet 9 and there is no noticeable cable drag. I hope that the ferrules hold up and I don't have to come back and report a failure as some in this thread have. I am convinced now that it is easy to unknowingly screw it up and have poor shifting, but if done correctly it seems to be fine, for now at least. With the internal routing there should not be too much contamination and hopefully the cables/housings will last much longer than externally. I know on my old Jet 9 I needed to recable probably minimally every 6 months due to contamination/cable drag.

    I will say that had Niner installed some internal guides (like my much less expensive Sette Razzo Carbon HT) it would have made things WAAAY easier. You just push the cable through and it pops out the other end.

  43. #43
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    Weird. I built mine up following the Niner video and I'm not having any issues. And I'm a complete hack.

    Do the problems evolve over time - or are they present from the get-go? I only have 75 miles on it so far.

    I'm using SRAM 10 spd cassette, X0 2x10 cranks and an XT rear der.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by eleventhcog View Post
    Plan B, I am curious if this is still working for you. The ghost shifting and constant tweaking of the RD is ruining the ride of my RDO. Agree that the shift kit is not a major improvement, as the real problem here are the tight housing bends in that 110mm section that is constantly moving with the rear suspension.

    Could you post a picture of your fix?, I am curious how you routed the cable to stay clear from chain rings and tires, and not end up tight cable bends or short, fixed sections of housing from BB to chain stay.
    To be clear: the shift kit was working fine for me (no real ghost shifting). Until it wasn't. The special ferrules ended up slipping right into the chainstay. This made shifting beyond, say, the first four cogs impossible. The ferrules failed on two occasions.

    So I gave up on the shift kit for now. I routed a continuous piece of 4mm shimano housing from the BB chuck to the rear der. (Sram XX). The housing runs along the top of the chainstay under a neoprene guard. I secured it with about six small zip ties. I made sure there was about 110mm of housing between the BB and the chainstay and then securely zip tied it down. It's important that the 110mm length between the BB and chainstay doesn't change. It is this movement that can cause ghost shifting with the original pre-shiftkit set up. The zip tie has kept it from moving so far. The same way the shift kit ferrule secured the housing.

    So it's been good for about 10 rides or so. Shifting is fine and no ghost shifting. I'm confident in it. My only gripe is that it is a hack job on a really expensive and pretty frame. I'm not sure what to do long term. I'd like to use some kind of modified shift kit ferrules but it's ruined two important races for me this summer. I don't trust it. I'm considering contacting Niner regarding a warranty claim as I'm thinking the holes in my chainstay must be too large or worn from the original (and since corrected) internal continuous routing (though I hardly used it in this configuration.) Either way, the bike's not functioning as advertised... My hack job is functional but it king of bothers me.

  45. #45
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    I had the front derailleur housing pull through the special ferrule at the headtube last night during a ride. Lost my big ring shifting capability. Time to mess with a re-cable now.

  46. #46
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    I Ihave a good friend in a lbs who has dealt with several Niner Jet9 RDO's and he highly recommended routing the cables exactly as Niner said, paying close attention to make sure there is enough of a loop at the rear derailleur for the cable housing to not get pulled to tight or kink under full extension causing any ghost shifting, and you will not have any issues. From what my buddy said they have seen, 99% of the shifting issues are coming from this section not the bottom bracket to rear chain stay section. (if it was done correctly in the first place) If the bottom bracket to chainstay piece of housing is set up properly with 110mm of housing and the correct ferrules they have not seen any issues with it. He said even two of the guys in the shop race that bike and use it as their daily trail bikes and have never had issues with shifting in over a year of racing and riding on the same cables. I can't report on mine yet because I just got it and I'm still in the process of building it up.
    but my take on the internal cable routing is... If you don't like then don't buy it. Man up and stop complaining about the internal cable routing or simply run full cables down the outside!!!
    furthermore to the guy saying the specialized full cable routing under the downtube is the best set up ever... I say bullsh*t! I have seen the cable get smashed by rocks kicked up, destroyed by high centering on rocks, logs, ect. On my friends Specialized. Exposed cable in potential bad areas (like under a bottom bracket) is always a bad idea!

  47. #47
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    mdcrisp............I ran mine just as Niner suggested and it worked perfectly up until the housing pulled through the special ferrule. Apparently there are new ferrules out that are made of harder plastic according to a post on this forum. You said you are in the process of building yours up. Are you doing it or is your friend at the local bikeshop? How do you suggest "simply running full cables down the outside?" How do you suggest attaching them? Would you zip tie around the frame? That is not a viable solution. There are no cable stops available on the outside. A $2,600 frame should have better execution. I am sure many of the complaints are legitimate, particularly in the case of mine and others where it was done properly, it worked properly, and then the ferrule broke.

    That should not be happening on a frame this expensive. I have a much lessor expensive Sette Carbon Hardtail and its internal cable routing is much better than the Jet RDO's. No question if done properly it does work perfectly, mine did up until it failed. I got just over 2 months out of mine. My Sette is over a year now and shifts perfectly. Why can't a frame that costs 4 times as much do the same?

  48. #48
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    Niner - Please for the love of god just put tabs on the outside of the frame for full run housing. You already have them on the non drive side for the rear brake!

  49. #49
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    I checked with him today, and you are right it looks like they are now shipping with different ferrules, although mine is a 2012 model (couldn't pass up the $1100 off on frame from outside outfitters right now.) I am building mine up myself, I enjoy building up a new bike almost as much as riding it. You can buy frame tabs and use a very small amount of Shoe Goo to adhere them to the frame. After the shoe goo dries in about 24 hours, you are good to use the new cable guides(its just a strong rubber, and its yes it comes off if you really want it to). I have been using shoe goo for over 20 years its great durable stuff and it won't harm paint. Also the Racers tape is what I use, it is fantastic clear urethane tape. I use 12mil thick on downtube and use 4mil thick everywhere else I might find I need it. Clear shoe goo dries clear and will last for years, I have it on my WFO at the start of the chainstay where my chain would rub due to the small size of my hammerschmidt 22 ring, and it takes a beating and is still holding strong after a year with only slight wear from chain smack/rub.
    to the guy asking where you can find it... Google search, I got mine on ebay.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdcrisp View Post
    I Ihave a good friend in a lbs who has dealt with several Niner Jet9 RDO's and he highly recommended routing the cables exactly as Niner said, paying close attention to make sure there is enough of a loop at the rear derailleur for the cable housing to not get pulled to tight or kink under full extension causing any ghost shifting, and you will not have any issues. From what my buddy said they have seen, 99% of the shifting issues are coming from this section not the bottom bracket to rear chain stay section. (if it was done correctly in the first place) If the bottom bracket to chainstay piece of housing is set up properly with 110mm of housing and the correct ferrules they have not seen any issues with it. He said even two of the guys in the shop race that bike and use it as their daily trail bikes and have never had issues with shifting in over a year of racing and riding on the same cables. I can't report on mine yet because I just got it and I'm still in the process of building it up.
    but my take on the internal cable routing is... If you don't like then don't buy it. Man up and stop complaining about the internal cable routing or simply run full cables down the outside!!!
    furthermore to the guy saying the specialized full cable routing under the downtube is the best set up ever... I say bullsh*t! I have seen the cable get smashed by rocks kicked up, destroyed by high centering on rocks, logs, ect. On my friends Specialized. Exposed cable in potential bad areas (like under a bottom bracket) is always a bad idea!
    Well thanks for the lecture.

    For the record (again) my bike was assembled correctly and was shifting fine until the special ferrules failed. I'm hoping the harder new ferrules last longer. This is basically Niner's third version of the Jet 9 RDO shift housing set up. As I said before, it's not a deal breaker but it's a nuisance on a high dollar frame. The revised routing on the new carbon RIP looks like it addresses the Jet's issues somewhat.

    Best of luck with your build. If you have any problems be sure to keep them to yourself. You know, "man up" about it...

  51. #51
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    Plan B, +1 and LMFAO....mdcrisp, shoe goo on a new frame? Have you no shame? Where do you buy glue-on frame tabs anyways? Even at $1,500 no one should have to jerry rig a brand new frame.
    I can only hope that the new ferrules will work properly. I took a lot of extra time to make damn sure mine was done correctly and then to have the GD ferrule break is unacceptable.

  52. #52
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    Give us a call at 877-NINERXC, or send us an email to service@ninerbikes.com if you are having trouble with the ferrules or setup on the bike. We love talking with riders and sharing any piece of knowledge we have. The guys in rider support are the experts on setting these bikes up and all things Niner and are happy to take calls and emails to help our fellow Niner riders out.
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  53. #53
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    No need to secure it with zip ties

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanB View Post
    To be clear: the shift kit was working fine for me (no real ghost shifting). Until it wasn't. The special ferrules ended up slipping right into the chainstay. This made shifting beyond, say, the first four cogs impossible. The ferrules failed on two occasions.

    So I gave up on the shift kit for now. I routed a continuous piece of 4mm shimano housing from the BB chuck to the rear der. (Sram XX). The housing runs along the top of the chainstay under a neoprene guard. I secured it with about six small zip ties. I made sure there was about 110mm of housing between the BB and the chainstay and then securely zip tied it down. It's important that the 110mm length between the BB and chainstay doesn't change. It is this movement that can cause ghost shifting with the original pre-shiftkit set up. The zip tie has kept it from moving so far. The same way the shift kit ferrule secured the housing.
    So it's been good for about 10 rides or so. Shifting is fine and no ghost shifting. I'm confident in it.
    Like you, I'm running continuous housing along the top of the chainstay. But instead of anchoring it down with zip ties, it's held in place loosely under a neoprene chainstay protector. The housing slides fore and aft under the protector as the suspension cycles through its travel. This setup eliminates the need for the extra 110mm housing corkscrew between the BB chuck and the chainstay. Works perfectly.

    It appears that there might be interference between the housing and the chain rings but fortunately it never happens.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  54. #54
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    Interesting. Letting it move about freely seems counter-intuitive to me but, hey, sounds like it works for you. Just make sure the housing isn't sawing into any carbon when it moves.

  55. #55
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    Sho nuff

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanB View Post
    Interesting. Letting it move about freely seems counter-intuitive to me but, hey, sounds like it works for you. Just make sure the housing isn't sawing into any carbon when it moves.
    I'm keeping a close eye on it. Most of the area is already protected by the built-in chainstay protection gizmos.

    The movement along the top of the chainstay is in place of corkscrew. The advantage is that it eliminates the sharp bends and is way easier to install. It's a pretty straight run from the chuck to the derailleur loop. It's so easy and effective that I'm waiting for the other shoe to drop.
    I dreamed I ate a 10 lb marshmallow. When I awoke, my pillow was gone.

  56. #56
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    In the last week I have tried a few different setups, or to be more precise, several different measurements of the housing under the bottom bracket. Everything always seems perfect until I get to the trails and the suspension becomes active. Shifting is not horrible, but I have to admit that after paying what I did expect perfection. I don't want to do the full housing from bottom bracket to derailleur after reading it could start wearing out the carbon. If the tweaks I have done today don't work at the trails tomorrow I will be just doing it externally on the chain stay. It sucks and it's not what I expected out of this frame....It also sucks I see people with lower end bikes than this with internal routing and have no problems whatsoever...... but what can you do.

  57. #57
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    Or....

    run full length internally. This is what I did with my RDO. Drilled out the plastic piece next to the BB and ran the cable housing all the way from the shifter to the rear derailleur. One little adjustment on the barrel adjuster on its first ride and no further issues.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlanB View Post
    Well thanks for the lecture.

    For the record (again) my bike was assembled correctly and was shifting fine until the special ferrules failed. I'm hoping the harder new ferrules last longer. This is basically Niner's third version of the Jet 9 RDO shift housing set up. As I said before, it's not a deal breaker but it's a nuisance on a high dollar frame. The revised routing on the new carbon RIP looks like it addresses the Jet's issues somewhat.

    Best of luck with your build. If you have any problems be sure to keep them to yourself. You know, "man up" about it...
    sorry, if I came off a bit rude, I was a bit intoxicated the other night, as you can see I never post on here because I usually don't have anything of any real value to contribute.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler View Post
    run full length internally. This is what I did with my RDO. Drilled out the plastic piece next to the BB and ran the cable housing all the way from the shifter to the rear derailleur. One little adjustment on the barrel adjuster on its first ride and no further issues.
    +1

    I've done the exact same thing for a customer's bike and all seems well so far.

  60. #60
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    So all the way from the shifter, through the bottom bracket and back into the chainstay, out the chainstay to the rear derailleur? And this works good?

  61. #61
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    yes.....

    Quote Originally Posted by epiphreddy View Post
    So all the way from the shifter, through the bottom bracket and back into the chainstay, out the chainstay to the rear derailleur? And this works good?
    exactly like you described it.. Works like a champ and the housing fits inside the chainstay easily.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZmtncycler View Post
    run full length internally. This is what I did with my RDO. Drilled out the plastic piece next to the BB and ran the cable housing all the way from the shifter to the rear derailleur. One little adjustment on the barrel adjuster on its first ride and no further issues.
    I might do this as well and not even mess with correct routing at all.

  63. #63
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    What about the special ferrules? Do you use them and then drill them out to allow the housing through?

  64. #64
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    no.....

    Quote Originally Posted by epiphreddy View Post
    What about the special ferrules? Do you use them and then drill them out to allow the housing through?
    I didn't use those ferrules at all. I'll keep an eye on the chainstay for any wear at the entrance and exit. If any develops, I'll figure something out to protect it.

  65. #65
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    Guys, pictures of these set ups please?

  66. #66
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    here are some photos...

    since I'm waiting for my new XTR crankset... Thought it would be a good time to snap some photos..
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Jet RDO cable routing -- shift kit failure...-img_1632.jpg  

    Jet RDO cable routing -- shift kit failure...-img_1633.jpg  

    Jet RDO cable routing -- shift kit failure...-img_1634.jpg  


  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by epiphreddy View Post
    What about the special ferrules? Do you use them and then drill them out to allow the housing through?
    Funny I was just talking with a friend about doing that as well. We both thought it would be a good idea.

  68. #68
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    I would like niner to come out with some type of metal insert ( epoxy in) that would allow full length cable from head tube to end of chain stay. The insert ID could be larger than the cable guide letting it move freely as suspension moves. Just a thought.

  69. #69
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    Please do keep us informed of your experience with this. I've often considered doing this and will probably go for it this spring. My one concern would be that the housing would move around as the suspension cycled; causing the section at the BB to "tighten." I think this is why the original continuous run through the chainstay often led to ghostshifting.

    I hope I'm wrong. Looking forward to your reports.

  70. #70
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    Ok so I tested mine real good with 114mm housing on the BB. It worked flawlessly. I am curious to see if the ferrules will hold or get sucked in like it has happened to others. If it does happen I will be going full housing.

  71. #71
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    Hey guys, not sure if anyone has suggested this yet, but I ran a full length housing zip tied to my brake line on the non-drive side. Then under the bottom bracket between the linkage, and finally through the chainstay. LBS left some slack under the bottom bracket so the suspension can cycle. Full housing from shifter to derailleur. If you didn't know this bike had internal housing you probably wouldn't notice how this is routed. It's very clean.

    And the most important thing of all....It shifts great with very light action. Hope this helps if people are looking for suggestions. Hadn't read about this one yet but the owner of my LBS recommended it and I went for it. Digging it so far.

  72. #72
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    I had a fun ride yesterday. First I noticed that I had lost my tallest and smallest sprockets, then I lost everything. Had to ride back to the car in my highest gear. I got home expecting a snapped cable and this is what I got instead



    Had to re-cable the bike yet again, and I've only had the bike since August. 4th time's a charm, right?


    For those of you running full-length housing, are you drilling out the hole in the BB chuck?
    Last edited by llamma; 01-21-2013 at 07:36 PM. Reason: apprently vBulletin has some bugs

  73. #73
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    Mis post on my part. Wrong thread.

  74. #74
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    yes

    Quote Originally Posted by llamma View Post
    I had a fun ride yesterday. First I noticed that I had lost my tallest and smallest sprockets, then I lost everything. Had to ride back to the car in my highest gear. I got home expecting a snapped cable and this is what I got instead



    Had to re-cable the bike yet again, and I've only had the bike since August. 4th time's a charm, right?


    For those of you running full-length housing, are you drilling out the hole in the BB chuck?
    remove the plastic BB chuck and drill out the spot where the rear derailleur cable went through to where full housing slides through.

  75. #75
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    I had the exact same thing happen on the front derailleur side. I re-cabled mine and it works perfectly again. There is a thread that talks about the "new" special ferrules being harder plastic. I could not tell for certain if what I used were harder or not (they could have been) but anyways this is my second re-cabling and it was waaaaay easier this time around. Hopefully it will hold properly for 6 months or better.

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