Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 34
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28

    Help a future "Niner" out, would ya?

    Greetings,

    This is my first post, so be gentle.

    I am going to give a short background cause I think it's relevant and I hope to be on here a lot.

    Was a road guy, gained a lot of weight over time (I mean, a lot). I am now 200lbs lighter and dropping. No surgery, no medication, just saying g'bye to carbs and swimming. ANYWAY, I am selling my road bike because I feel the trails and woods calling.

    Yes, I know there is a Newbie forum, and yes I know there is a Clydesdale forum; but i noticed very few Niner related questions or posts, hence the reason I am starting here.

    I have some questions.

    1) Despite having lost a lot of weight, I still have a "weighs" to go . I am just under 300 lbs. At first I was thinking hardtail but the more I read about whells and tires and people like me pinching tubes, maybe a full suspension is the way to go?

    Any thoughts? Despite still shrinking, can I dial in the rear on a JET for my size? Or is the SIR 9 the way to go and beef up the wheels, spokes/gauge, tires as much as I can?

    2) Everybody on here is so technically astute. I know cheap is not the way to go but I can't afford or should spend the $ for Sram XX should I? Any suggestions about companies that build out Niners would be great. I have noticed people mention Colorado Cyclist, Goat Cycles and Bitterbush (sp?). These bike shops are a tremendous help for me someone like me but are they a great deal? I wonder whether I should just get the parts and have my LBS put it together. I am in OH and I know there are three dealers in and around Pittsburgh.

    Finally, I thank everyone for their time, attention, and willingness to share their experience and expertise. This quest has saved my life, now I want to have some fun!

    Btw, I am in my mid-40s if that helps with deciding on FS or HT.

    MANY THANKS! You all inspire me!

  2. #2
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,109
    Thankfully quite easy questions to answer.

    Get a FS, The advantage of a HT is it is lighter...with the extra spare weight you are carrying it will be irrelevant.

    FS will last longer (if you buy smart) because the extra stress you put into the frame will go to the shock. It will give you more traction, more control and very importantly be more comfortable (so you fatigue slower and can ride further).

    The main mistake the new Clydes make is to buy light, you will have significantly more strength than a normal size rider this needs to be taken into account. I could ghost shift my old bike by pushing hard as I had the power to bend the frame by pushing on the cranks.


    So get a FS bike that is designed for much heavier duty riding than you do.
    Don't touch the JET, it may be one of the nicest bikes for a light weight racer, that is not you!

    The frame to start on would be the RIP, it will be a nice XC bike for you that could take small drops.
    The Fork is also Critial, you need a 20mm axle, this is probably the most important thing of all. 120/140 Reba (20mm) on a RIP would be a great bike.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  3. #3
    NMBP
    Reputation: gfs69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    So get a FS bike that is designed for much heavier duty riding than you do.
    Don't touch the JET, it may be one of the nicest bikes for a light weight racer, that is not you!

    The frame to start on would be the RIP, it will be a nice XC bike for you that could take small drops.
    The Fork is also Critial, you need a 20mm axle, this is probably the most important thing of all. 120/140 Reba (20mm) on a RIP would be a great bike.
    Great advice, I would say the RIP for sure, although you will most likely be needing a large air canister for the rear shock (no big deal, and pretty cheap). Good set of 36h Stans Flows/Hope Pro2 wheels, and you will be good to go. You do not need to drop the big bucks on the XX! I have found that Shimano XT/SRAM X9 are very tough and reliable at a MUCH better price point. Where in Ohio do you live? I am in CBus, and have an XL RIP if you want to give it a spin.

  4. #4
    Carbon & Ti rule
    Reputation: muzzanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    4,917
    ! choice IMHO Rip9 ( Strong fast & comfortable ) with stans flow rims 2.2 race king tyre on the back,2.4 Ardent on the front.

    I love my XX but dont go there untill you are under 200 lb if ever.

    The new 10 speed XT 11-36 rear, triple front with new xt 10 speed cranks 24/32/42 would be sweet.

    Just get bars,seat & brakes that you like but at 300lb go 185mm rotors.

    I hope this helps

  5. #5
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,109
    I might be overlooking something, but as a heavier rider, would he not be needing a more progressive stroke, and therefore a small air can?

    The best option would be to get push to tune it specifically for the additional weight and riding style. Getting my WFO can reduced and an increase in compression helped me a lot.


    for drive train, the tested clyde friendly kit is as follows
    Shifters - irelevant, but XT work for me.
    casette - very important for a clyde - must be XT, i destroy most others.
    Cranks - Shimano SLX is a great deal with proven performance - steel rings help a lot too.
    Chain - very important for a clyde - KMC X9 - silver or gold.

    This drivechain is mid priced, but exceptionally strong and long lasting.
    I have destroyed a lot of components before getting the above that work.

    Just restressing the Cassette (shimano XT) and chain (KMC X9) are very important.
    I snap SRAM cassettes and all their chains upto but not including the very good '991 XS, not regular 991 must be XS'
    The 991 Crossstep is a good chain, but not as good as the KMC, wears faster and costs more. however it is easier to find the sram.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,258
    Congratulations on your 200 pound loss so far. That is incredible!

    In Pittsburgh, check out Speedgoat. Those guys are awesome!

    Keep up the good work.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  7. #7
    NMBP
    Reputation: gfs69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by CaveGiant
    I might be overlooking something, but as a heavier rider, would he not be needing a more progressive stroke, and therefore a small air can?
    I am no shock expert for sure. My thoughts were that with the stock small canister, I was not able to get a plush ride at the correct sag. I was using around 145psi, and I "only" weigh 215 pounds. The sag was huge. I did get the PUSH treatment as well. At 300, I would talk with PUSH and see what they say. OP, that is PUSH Industries, they rebuild and rework suspension shocks and forks (www.pushindustries.com) with your specific riding needs and weight in mind.

  8. #8
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,308
    I'm no expert, but I think CaveGiant is right about the small can. That's what I have stuck in my head, anyway.

    If you go with a RIP, I strongly recommend getting a Maxle kit for the rear.

    When I made the jump to 29ers, I was ~250ish and accepted out front that I was going to spend money on my wheels. I wanted a solid set of hand-built wheels that would hold up, and Mikesee did me right. There are some great wheelbuilders out there, Larry at Mountain High Cyclery comes to mind as well, but I have no reason not to stick with Mike. His prices beat the pants off my LBS, too. I really recommend you talk to a wheelbuilder or 2 and get some specs and quotes.

    I'll be the odd man out here and give you a 'meh' on the Flows for your size. I strongly recommend you consider the Sun-Ringle MTX-33. Awesome rim.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

    Riding in Helena? Everything you need to know, right here.

  9. #9
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,709
    Quote Originally Posted by evasive
    I'm no expert, but I think CaveGiant is right about the small can. That's what I have stuck in my head, anyway.

    If you go with a RIP, I strongly recommend getting a Maxle kit for the rear.

    When I made the jump to 29ers, I was ~250ish and accepted out front that I was going to spend money on my wheels. I wanted a solid set of hand-built wheels that would hold up, and Mikesee did me right. There are some great wheelbuilders out there, Larry at Mountain High Cyclery comes to mind as well, but I have no reason not to stick with Mike. His prices beat the pants off my LBS, too. I really recommend you talk to a wheelbuilder or 2 and get some specs and quotes.

    I'll be the odd man out here and give you a 'meh' on the Flows for your size. I strongly recommend you consider the Sun-Ringle MTX-33. Awesome rim.
    I agree with the RIP suggestion. It really doesn't give up much to the JET in terms of weight and speed and is quite a bit more fun. Ride it and decide if you need/want to dump money into tuning the shock, it's hardly mandatory. It's extremely likely that you will enjoy it just fine in stock configuration. I think X9 is just about the best component group value out there, you can spend more but you won't see big performance gains. XT is also quite good for the same reasons.

    Flow rims depend on riding style and conditions. I find them mostly okay, but even at 175 lbs I can give them a beating. The MTX-33 or the Halo Freedom will be a bit heavier but more durable for you.

  10. #10
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,109
    If you are wanting bombproof wheels, the rims I use are Kris Holm Freeride.

    800g, 47mm wide and are so far indestructable.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28
    Dear All,

    THANK YOU SO MUCH! I was hoping to be welcomed, accepted, and supported here and you have exceeded my expectations by FAR.I so appreciate it.

    I also appreciate everybody taking into account my inexperience and being very clear about components and being quite specific. Because, just between us, i don't know **** but am learning fast.

    As usual, my journey continues just how it should, thanks to you guys.

    I am moved beyond words.

    Jack

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by gfs69
    Where in Ohio do you live? I am in CBus, and have an XL RIP if you want to give it a spin.

    I have a good friend in Columbus who has been trying to get me to visit so don't be surprised if I take you up on your offer.

    I just have to set my car on "auto-pilot" for it to drive past Katzinger's.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    729
    Regarding pinched tubes - you could go tubeless and not have to worry about that!

    I don't know if there are any issues w/ tubeless for big guys, but I know for many they work perfectly and pinch flats don't happen. I've been running them for a year without a single issue or a single flat. (Knock on wood so I don't jinx my next ride!)

    I had my AIR9 built by Speedgoat even though they are on the other side of the country. They did a great job, were very helpful, and had solid prices. Not the lowest prices, but I'm willing to give up some $ if the service and attention to detail are there.

    I noticed you said part of your loss was giving up carbs. You may need those again once you get going on the bike!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: edbraunbeck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    317
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGreek
    I have a good friend in Columbus who has been trying to get me to visit so don't be surprised if I take you up on your offer.

    I just have to set my car on "auto-pilot" for it to drive past Katzinger's.
    We have some great trails in the area and I'd be happy to give you the tour.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28

    Still confused, if not more so

    There are so many similar named, sized, and numbered components and I don't want to waste all the great info and generosity of spirit passed on to me the other day.

    Will those of you who have responded and know my size and durability issues PLEASE comment on which group might serve me well and if there is a group that works with 1 or 2 components that must be changed, I am sure that won't be an issue.

    Thanks

    http://www.coloradocyclist.com/product/display/20121/

    http://www.coloradocyclist.com/product/display/20118

    http://www.coloradocyclist.com/product/display/20120

    For whatever it's worth, I am not foregoing info that was passed onto me the other day, but when I went to a buildout sight, say, speedgoat, there were SO MANY choices of what seemed to me to be similar products.

    I know this is asking a lot but we are talking about someone pretty green here.

    Durability is much more important than price or name.

    And if you think this is a bad way to go, please offer another build-out site or recommend a specific list of components.

    With great appreciation and respect for everyone's time and attention.

  16. #16
    Carbon & Ti rule
    Reputation: muzzanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    4,917
    Hi I will sit down later to day & work out how I would build a bike if I was building it for you.

    I have your weight but what is your height ?

    For what it is worth the speed of a bike is more about a good fit for the rider & reliable so you can get out & get miles under your belt.

    The rider confidence is still the big thing fitness will come

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28

    Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by muzzanic
    Hi I will sit down later to day & work out how I would build a bike if I was building it for you.

    I have your weight but what is your height ?

    For what it is worth the speed of a bike is more about a good fit for the rider & reliable so you can get out & get miles under your belt.

    The rider confidence is still the big thing fitness will come
    THANKS!

    I'm 5'10 with a 31-32 inseam. That inseam might grow as my weight goes down.

    I THINK that puts me squarely in Medium land as far as frame is concerned. Cranksets, I have no idea.

  18. #18
    Carbon & Ti rule
    Reputation: muzzanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    4,917
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGreek
    THANKS!

    I'm 5'10 with a 31-32 inseam. That inseam might grow as my weight goes down.

    I THINK that puts me squarely in Medium land as far as frame is concerned. Cranksets, I have no idea.
    Yes Med frame for sure & 175 mm cranks.

    I'm also thinking that at approx 300lb & down from approx 500 that there should be quite alot of power in your legs & still quite a bit of weight for standing up pedaling not that you will be doing alot but maybe GFifteen cranks as they have a 30mm spindal shaft & not 24mm like most cranks.

    I have not run the Gfifteen cranks but I really like the look of them.

    Shimano XT drive train is good but take note with what ever crankset you go for you will need to swap out the 44 tooth large chain ring to 40 or 42 max so you don't end up getting the chain stuck between the chainring & rear triangle at any point.

    As for wheels I'm still on 36 spoke Notubes Flow rims on Hope pro 2 hubs.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MI-29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    463
    Congrats on getting a RIP. I have had my RIP for a couple of months and haven't been happier. Here is my build list and a pic or two. Thomson stem and set back set post, sram x-9 trigger shifters and rear derailer, xt front derailer (came with bike), xt 770 crank, sram 990 rear cassette, easton ea 70 mid rise bars, ergon grips, hope pro x2 hydraulic disc brakes, 185 front & 160 rear (rotor size that is),stans flow wheels with hope pro II hubs (32 spoke), wtb rocket saddle, salsa qr seat post clamps, 15 mm thru axle front, dt swiss 10mm axle rear.

    I personally like the scram components. You can get a good set for very cheap if you shop around. No reason at all to go with the xx group.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Help a future "Niner" out, would ya?-rip00.jpg  

    Help a future "Niner" out, would ya?-rip-resized-7.jpg  

    Help a future "Niner" out, would ya?-rip-resized-3.jpg  

    2009 GF Cobia
    2010 RIP 9 SOLD
    2011 EMD
    Soon to add Giant 27.5

    SAVE GAS RIDE A MTB BIKE

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGreek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    28
    I haven't gotten the RIP yet, I am waiting on whether to have a Niner shop do the build out or have a LBS do it. The good news is that I am in Cleveland, and speedgoat is in Pittsburgh, and they have built a ton of bikes! Thanks for posting a sweet ride!

  21. #21
    Daniel the Dog
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,473

    Nice

    I would jump on a RIP 9 or WFO depending on your riding style. I might call Niner and talk to them about what they would recommend for a strong build. HT's suck the big one if you have any bumps at all. Speedgoat will set you up! They are brilliant bike geeks.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MI-29er's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGreek
    I haven't gotten the RIP yet, I am waiting on whether to have a Niner shop do the build out or have a LBS do it. The good news is that I am in Cleveland, and speedgoat is in Pittsburgh, and they have built a ton of bikes! Thanks for posting a sweet ride!

    Not a problem. The big thing is you are getting other peoples input on what to get and not. We are all just here to help out a fellow rider!!!!
    2009 GF Cobia
    2010 RIP 9 SOLD
    2011 EMD
    Soon to add Giant 27.5

    SAVE GAS RIDE A MTB BIKE

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2
    Greek,

    I just took delivery last month from Speedgoat of an awesome M.C.R. (steel frame hard tail) . Been riding the hell of it, and love it!

    I'm 6' 5' and riding weight is 205 (XL frame/SRAM X9 components, Reba Race, Elixir 5)

    Just to throw in my 2 cents, don't rule out a hardtail...been awhile since I've ridden around Cleveburg (transplanted Akronite...Lebron sucks), but if you're planning on spending any time on the Towpath or other trails around the Emerald Necklace, full suspension on a Niner may be overkill.

    Definitely focus on a Niner, but maybe broaden your considerations to a good strong steel frame, like the MCR or SIR...just a thought. You can beef up your components, and still be lighter (slightly) and under budget from a comparable FS build.

    I know there are places in the world where FS is the only answer, but for the rest of us, we need to be honest in our assessments of our riding style, skills, and local trails we'll be riding, before deciding on the style of bike that best suits us...it's become a big purchase!

    I'm the first to throw money at gear, since I lack any natural skills ;-), but I'm not a believer that the right answer is always to drop 3k or more on FS.

    There's nothing sadder to see someone with a bike that is better than they'll ever be, or with capabilities they'll never utilize.
    Last edited by Sonoken; 07-31-2010 at 07:10 PM.

  24. #24
    Carbon & Ti rule
    Reputation: muzzanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    4,917
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonoken
    Greek,

    I just took delivery last month from Speedgoat of an awesome M.C.R. (steel frame hard tail) . Been riding the hell of it, and love it!

    I'm 6' 5' and riding weight is 205 (XL frame/SRAM X9 components, Reba Race, Elixir 5)

    Just to throw in my 2 cents, don't rule out a hardtail...been awhile since I've ridden around Cleveburg (transplanted Akronite...Lebron sucks), but if you're planning on spending any time on the Towpath or other trails around the Emerald Necklace, full suspension on a Niner may be overkill.

    Definitely focus on a Niner, but maybe broaden your considerations to a good strong steel frame, like the MCR or SIR...just a thought. You can beef up your components, and still be lighter (slightly) and under budget from a comparable FS build.

    I know there are places in the world where FS is the only answer, but for the rest of us, we need to be honest in our assessments of our riding style, skills, and local trails we'll be riding, before deciding on the style of bike that best suits us...it's become a big purchase!

    I'm the first to throw money at gear, since I lack any natural skills ;-), but I'm not a believer that the right answer is always to drop 3k or more on FS.

    There's nothing sadder to see someone with a bike that is better than they'll ever be, or with capabilities they'll never utilize.
    Yes or he could stick with a Rip9 that would suit better.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    729
    Since you're on the green side as far as component selection, call a shop like Speedgoat and talk it through with them instead of using the website to figure it out on your own. Shops like that have built tons of bikes for many different people riding all kinds of terrain. They have the knowledge and are happy to share it because it means someone that buys from them isn't going to report an unhappy experience to other possible customers.

    In my book, it's hard to go wrong with XT for the drive train.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •